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Worcester daily press. [volume] (Worcester, Mass.) 1873-1878, April 04, 1873, Image 1

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EVERY MORS I.MI, RI’S HAY EXCEITKO,
—AT—
per iinnum; 7 5 ch, per month.
Siltthls press,
EVE It Y HATI'R II A V MORNING,
Al WJ .> per annum.
EDWARD R. FISKE & CO., Proprietors.
E. H. UNKE. J. A. «FAU>O«I.
New Advertisements.
e it 1 N (l T it A D K
Carpets!
R. B. HENCHMAN,
Has now in store a full assortment of every grade
of
BRI MKELS,
TAPESTRY,
INGRAINS, AC.,
WINDOW SHADES,
KI GS,
MATS.
LOOK AT MY
EXTRA BARGAINS!
from #1.75 to #1.90 per yard.
English Tapestry
at #1.25 per yard.
50 ROLLS
Strair Matting,
at 25c. per yard.
THE LARGEST ASSORTMENT OF
Oil Cloths
in this market, at the LOWEST PRICES, can be
found at
R. B. HENCHMAN'S,
.Vo, / Foster St., cor. Main.
al-tf _
[JINEA R T S I
LOVERS OF THE FINE ARTS
will find at my store one of the best collections of
Fine Steel Engravings; English, French,
German ami American Chromos,
in Oil and Water Colors, to be found in New
England outside of Boston.
Stereoscopic Views,
Prangs’ Beautiful Productions
IPliotographs,
BRACKETS AND WOOD CARVINGS,
PIC TUR E ERA ME S
MADE TO ORDER
from latest patterns of mouldings.
GOLD FRAMES, BLACK WALNUT, &C„
of all desirable kinds. Picture Knobs, Cords and
like fixtun s.
Particular attention given to re-gilding old
frames.
A. E. PECK, Art Dealer,
at ts Lincoln House Block.
J»ICE, WHITING & BULLOCK,
BANK E R S ,
Corner Main and Pearl Streets, Worcester,
Huy and sell Railroad, City and County Bonds.
Special attention given to orders for the pur
chase and sale of Stocks at NEW
YORK ami BOSTON
* BO ABDS.
Agents for the Various Lines of
European Steamships.
Persons contemplating going abroad will find
nt our office Cabin Plans of the Steamers of the
several Lines, thus enabling them to select ami
secure rooms without the delay and expense of
applying at the principal offices in New York or
Boston. Letters of Credit furnished available in
all the principal cities of Europe.
Drafts Drawn Payable in any City in Euroiw.
C^l’nited States Passports procured without
charge. ts al
$T R ONG & ROG E R Xu,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
DEALERS IN COAL,
Fire Brick, Clay and Kaolin.
Ollice, No. 410 Main St.,
al <ltf WORCESTER, Mum.
JOSEPH CHASE & CO ~
373 MAIN STREET.
F. E. Smith’s & Co.’s Crushed Wheat, delicious
ami nourishing.
The best Canada, Scotch and Irish Oat Meal.
Baltimore pun* Hominy and Meal.
S. G. Bowdlear’s Maize Meal. Try it.
PURE SPICES.
The best Teas and Coffee to be found in the city.
Pullna and Seltzer Waters, warranted genuine,
al 3in
OLD GOV’T. JAVA COFFEE,
.7 rounds SI.OO.
»t.- t Black Oolong Tea per lb., - -90 c.
Best Uncolored Japan Tea per lb., - #1 OO
Other goods in proportion.
Enterprise Tea Co.,
al lit No. 546 Main Street.
H . J O U R D A N,
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
ANTHRACITE AND BITUMINOUS
C O 1 L .
'OFFICE; ’ I YARD:
'2 Lincoln Bhu k, I Green Street.
WORCESTER, MASS.
alts
At FI LLER'S Coal Yard,
Buy Coal black and hard,
wBQ? To'keep the tin* bright
Bv day ami by night.
< WtilV 9 ‘ , is better than gold
To keep out the cold.
1 Softer coal for the cook
Will do like a book.
rmiE CENTRAL STREET COAL
A YARD, is in a central location, easy of ac
ccss, near Main street,and there is kept constant
ly on hand and for sale
Franklin and Chestnut Coal!
Lehigh Coal, Four Different Sizes, for
Stoves and Furnaces!
KUFUS FULLER.
alts
A R T IN KELL E Y ,
FASHIONABLE
. Boot and Shoe Maker.
Repairing Neatly Done.
398 Main Street, - - Worcester Mass.
a2dtl
Winmtrr -Oil Baily Press.
VOL. I, NO. 4.
New Advertisements.
j us T o p EN E D I
OVK SPKINO ASMOKTMENT OF
CIA >TIIH
Foil ot II
CUSTOM DEPARTMENT,
lii the choicest varieties of Foreign ami Domestic
manufacture.
Tin- reputation of our house for flm* garments
Im well known, ami all desiring to leave their or
ders will do well to rail early before the rush com
mences,
D. H. EAMES & CO.,
One Price Clothiers.
CORNER MAIN AND FRONT NTREETH,
at WORCK9TBR, MASS. (Hy
P R I N G
OVER COATS,
NOW READY,
A good assortment of the most approved styles.
Prices from W 7 to #2O.
Spring Suits
FOR
(}ENTS AND BOYS
In all varieties and pliers, now in ^tock, at
D. H. EAMES & CO.’S
One Price Clothing House,
CORNER MAIN AND FRONT STREETS,
al WORCESTER, MASS. <lly
W E OFF E R TO-D AY ,
465
PAIRS ALL WOOL CASSIMERE PANTS
AT ONLY
$5.00
A PAIR, FORMER PRICES FROM SIX TO
EIGHT DOLLARS. THIS IS LESS THAN
THE ( LOTH IS WORTH. WE 801 (HIT
THESE IN A JOB LOT, AND GIVE OCR
CUSTOMERS THE ADVANTAGE OF IT.
WE ALSO OFFER TWO H CNDR ED ( OATS
ANDONE HI NDRED AND FIFTY VESTS,
AT EQI ALLY LOW PRICES.
D. H. EAMES & CO.
at dly
J^NOWLTOH BKOTII Elt S,
NO. 282 MAIN STREET,
WK AKE RECEIVING
Spi iiifi luijioiiatioHx of
CROCKERY,
FRENCH CHINA,
FINE CRYSTALGOODS,
BRONZES, CLOCKS, &c.,
direct from Manufacturers, thereby enabling us
to sell <»ur Goods as low as any house in the
country. Our stock of
SOLID SILVER AND PLATED
WARES, CI’TLERY,
Lamp Goods and Gas Fixtures
IS COMPLETE IN EACH DEPARTMENT,
And will Bear Close Inspect ion.
Orders from country trade promptly attended
to.
Knowlton Brothers,
252 MAIN STREET,
al ff Opposite Bay State House.
EWENG L A N D
Concrete and Roofing Co.
CONCRETE
Walks, driveways, ground floors, &c., l.y a com
bination of the important features of the most
approved methods. Scrimshaw’s. Ford X Moor's,
Snow X Davis’ and the Latham patents have been
purchased by this company, and no expense or
pains have! been spared to‘qualify them to pro
duce the .most .perfect bituminous concrete {that
can be made. ‘
GRAVEL ROOFING,
Of best material, and applied with superior skill.
Ready Roofing, Widely and Favorably Known.
SHINGLE PAINT.
Shingle paint is great economy. If taken in time
no money for repairs is so judiciously expended.
ROOF PAINTING IN OIL OF ANY COLOR,
Ornamental or plain. Painting confined exclu
sively to roofs. By making roof painting a speci
alty we can do it 20 per cent, cheaper than any
other parties.
Shingle Paint for Tin has no rival. Concrete
and Roofing Mat<*rials for sale,
In quantities not less than 40 gallons at manu
facturers’prices. Raw and Distilled Tar, Black
Varnish, Asphalt, Pitch, Dead Oils, Napthas, and
every form of Bitumen.
OFFICES—36O Southbridgc St., 26 Pleasant
St., at Knowlton X Bacon’s Paper Store.
P. O. BOX 285, WORCESTER, MASS.
T. C. Rice. - - Lorin Foskit.
Concrete.
Having disposed of mv interest in the Concrete
Bussiness to Messrs RIC'E X FOSKIT, of this
city, 1 take pleasure in recommending them to
tli.i patronage of myoid customersand the public
generally.
al dim* J. J. RANDALL.
r; G. II ILDR ET II
"A* Would respectfully inform the citizens of
Worcester and vicinity' that he is still engaged
in the business of undertaking, as heretofore,
although entirely disconnected from Mr. H.
Willson, his former partner. His present place of
business is at No. 15 Waldo street, first door
north of Waldo House. Orders left at No. 7
Waldo street. Residence No. 32 Oread street.
al d3m
(JHICKERING & SONS’
CELEBRATED PIANOS,
FROM *423 UPWARDS.
The Best- in the Market.
— AT —
S. It. LELAND * CO.’S.
JTALLETT, DAVIS & CO.,
HAYNES BROS., HALLETT* CUMSTON,
And Other Noted Pianos,
at prices that defy competition, at
S. R. LELAND * CO.’S.
VEW ROSEWOOD 7-OCTAVE
PIANOS,
From #3OO I'pwards,
8. R. LELAND * CO.’S.
Mason & hamlin, burdett
ORGAN CO.,
Smith American < )ry;an.
And Other Organs, from #75.00 I'pwards
S. R. LELAND * CO.’S.
TMANOS AND ORGANS SOLD ON
A EASY MONTHLY PAYMENTS,
S. It. LELAND & CO.’S.
•pi AN O S TI NE D, REPAIRED,
-I POLISHED AND MOVED.
Work Guaranteed.
— AT —
al y 8. It. LEI.AND & CO.’S.
WORCESTER, MASS., FRIDAY MORNING, APRIL 4, 1873.
New Advertisements.
J 11. OLA It K * CO.
would invite the attention of their customers and
the public to their large stock of
NEW DRY GOODS
— FOR THE—
— tiiaiye.
ATTENTION is SPECIALLY INVITED to our
Superior Stock of Black Silks.
We have all grades from S 1.25 for the cheapest
silk in this city > ami upwards, that for real value
cannot be surpassed in this city, Boston or New
' York.
STRIPE SILKS
I are much cheaper this spring. We havo a large
stock in
WHITE GROUNDS,
with hair lines and fancy stripes.
Black Grounds,
with white utripes,
GREY GROUNDS,
with black stripes, and many other styles and
colors, at from 12> S to 25 cents a yard le»s than
last season’s prices’.
Black Brillantines,
Black Mohairs,
Black Alpacas.
We have the same superior makes in these
goods that have given perfect satiMfartion to
our customers for two years. Selling at satis
factory prices.
10 Ps. Black Cashmere and Hen
rietta Cloths,
JUST RECEIVED.
Xetc Goods Opening
Daily.
OUR STOCK OF WOOLLENS, LINEN GOODS
AND DOMESTICS LARGE AND FULL,
AND PRICES WILL BE
FOUND LOW.
J. H. CLAHKE & CO.,
al St 3SB Main St.
4 T C HA M PION’S KI TCH E N
STORE,
No. 13 Pl<*asant Street, (North Side,)
You can find a great variety of the most useful
goods, consisting in part of
Clothes ami Reels, Wringers, Baskets,
Lilies, Wash Tubs, Clothes Frames, Wash
Benches, Rolling Pins and Molding Boards,
Chopping Trays, Pails, Tin Wan*, Ac., &c.
Call and sec for yourselves. Goods at low
R. CHAMPION.
al eodlw
ESTABLISHED A. D. 1850.
R. McALEEE
Successor to D. Brown,
Manufacturer of
Fine Harness
AND DEALEB IN FIRST CLASS
Stable and Carriage Goods,
228 Main St.
aldtf
W A T U II E SI!
Mv life work has been the manufacture, sale
and' repair of Watches. If this experience, to
gether with a large ami carefully selected
STOCK OF WATCHES
Bought, not on Credit, but for Cash, my intimate
connection with the largest Manufacturing and
Importing Houses in tin- country, and my ven
small store expenses, are of any advantage to
me, I am abunuautly able to make it so to my
patrons.
M\ unexpected success in my new enterprise
has encouraged me to All my store with a com
plete stock of
Genuine Waltham Watches,
And to resume the sale of
Celebrated Chas. E. Jacot (Swiss) Watches,
(Having introduced them Into Worcester when at
the old stand), and a tine stock of LADIES AND
GEN TS' GOLD CHAINS, RINGS. STUDS, BUT
TONS, SETS, LOCKETS, Xc., Xe. This stock
will bear inspection as to price and quality.
I solicit tine and diflicult Watch M ork. and shall
take no more than 1 find time to ^o with my own
hands.
IBA G. BLAKE,
Formerly Superintendent of Watchmakers’ De
partment at Waltham Factory, and Manager of
the Watch Department in the late firm of Blake
X Robinson.
480 MAIN STREET, opposite the Common,
ally
E O R G E K. SPURR,
DEALER IX
DRUGS, MEDICINES, CHEMICALS,
PEinTMEitr,
Soaps. Brushes, Patent Medicines, Pure
Wines and Liquors for Medicinal Pur
poses. Agents for the Great United
States Tea Company.
337 Main St., Worcester, Mass.
Physicians Prescriptions Carefully Compounded
ait'f at all hours.
£< () M S T (> (' K & E VER E T T,
Wholesale Dealers in
Pork, Lard ami Hams, Poultry, Sausages and
Dressed Hogs. Prices as low as any house in
New England.
No. 21 Soutlibriffiro Street.
JAMES K. COMSTOCK,
EDWARD S. EVERETT.
Worcester, April I.IMS. al d&wlw
VCII.S! BUY THE BEST!
The best Eggs to hatch arc from
Healthy Thoroughbred.
FOWLS.
whether they are awarded first premiums or not.
1 claim to have the largest and best collection of
Thoroughbred Brown Leghorn Fowls of any man
in the world; legs free from disease, and the
fowls pefectly healthy. Circulars on application.
FRANK J. KINNEY,
No. 3 Olean st., Worcester, Mass,
al dTuTSlm£w4t |Tatnii<k. j
4 V E n Y DAVIS,
* 413 Main street. Worcester.
Tin* public are invited to my spring opening of
piece goods for
CUSTOM GARMENTS,
Fine Furnishing Goods and Ready Made Cloth
ing, which is complete in all the latest styles and
novelties.
FINE SHIRTS
mand to measure and warranted. Patterns cut.
Cloths sold bv the yard and cut to measure if
desired. ts al
j?oR8 A L E ,
Clothing, Hats. Taps, Furnishing Goods, Boots
and Shoes. Xe.. Xe.
The subscriber wishes to sell his entire stock at
once. Terms reasonable. A goo-1 chance. Rent
low, K. MONTAGUE,
Northboro’, March 25,1873. 6t-al
DH. WHITTEMORE’S MEAT
• CUTTER will cul two pounds of Pie Meat in
one minute and Hash for the Family in one half a
minute. Works extremely easy. Sells for 83.
May be taken on trial at &70 Main st. al 3m
faila gress.
MORNING, APRIL l.
UNDER THE KNOW.
It is pleasant to think, just under the snow,
That stretches HO bleak and blank and cold,
Are Iwaitty and warmth that we cannot know,
Green fields and leaves, and blossoniN of gold.
Yes, under the frozen ami dumb expanse,
I'ngladdened by bee or bird or flower,
A world when* the leaping fountains glance,
And the buds expand, is waiting its hour.
It is hidden now; not a glimmer breaks
Through the hard blue ire and the sparkling
drift;
Tin* world shrinks back ftoin tin* downy flakes
Which out of the folds of the night cloud sift.
But as fair and real a world it is
As any that rolls in the upper blue;
If you wait you will hear its melodies,
And see the sparkle of fount and dew.
Ami often now, when the skies are wild,
And hoarse and sullen the night winds blow,
And lanes and hollows with drifts are piled,
1 think of the violet, under tin* snow.
I look in the wild fiower’s tremulous eye,
1 hear the chirp of the ground bird brown,
A breath from the budding grove steals by,
And the swallows are dipping above the to\,n.
So there, from the out<*r sense concealed,
It lies shut in by a^eil of snow,
But there to the inward eye revealed,
Are boughs that blossom, anti flowers that glow.
The lily shines on its budding stem;
The crocus opens its April gold;
And the rose uptosses its diadem
Against the floor of the winter cold.
And that other world, to my soul I say.
That veiled anti mystic world of the dead,
Is no further away on any day
Than the lilies just nmler the snow we tread.
—Ti'tsbyterltiH.
NO ADMITTANCE.
BV JOHN GODFUKY SAXE.
A wealthy Syrian—Abdallah by name—
Fell ill anti died; and when his spirit came
Before the gait* of heaven, the angel there
(Who stands with awful and majestic air
To guard the elysian portal) softly said:
•• U hence contest thou?” The Syrian bowed his
head,
Ami answered, “ From Aleppo.” “ Very well;
What want thou?” asked the heavenly sentinel.
“ A merchant.” •• True; but tell me all the rest,”
Replied the angel; “all—the worst ami best;
From me—reflect—no act can be concealed.”
Whereat the merchant all his life revealed,
And nothing hid of aught that he had done:
H<iw he had sailed beneath the Indian sun,
In quest of diamonds, and for yellow gold
To northern Asyi; how he bought and sold
By the Red Sea, and on the wondrous Nile;
And stormy Persian gulf; and all the while
Had bravely striven to keep his conscience clear,
Though always buying cheap and selling dear,
As merchants use. “ And so I throve amain,” •
He said, “ for many a year—nor all in vain
For public benefaction, sfhee I gave
Freely for charity—content to save
Enough for me and mine—a handsome store—
And that is all.” “ Nay, there is something more,”
Tht* angel said: “Of thy domestic life
Thou hast not spoken—hadst thou not a wife?”
•• Yes!” said the Syrian, with a sigh that spoke
Of many a groan beneath the marriage yoke.
Whereat the angel said : “ By God’s rich grace.
Come in!—poor suffering soul, and take thy place
Among the martyrs—and give heaven thanks!”
Now, as he entered the celestial ranks,
Another soul approached the golden door,
Who, having heard all that he who came before
Had spoken, and observed him entering in
The open portal, thought himself to win
U«, w y u.ln.ittnnee • <«•*■ »vli^n 1m» »•* < ."la
His history, like the other, he made bold
To add: “ All this, good angel, is most true;
Ami, as for wives, I’ve had no less than two!”
•• Twice married!” said the angel, with a face
Of wrath and scorn: “ Unfortunates have place
In heaven’s blest mansion—but, by Reason’s
rules,
(So get thee hence!) there is no room for fools!”
MISCELLANY.
GEORGE ROGERS CLARKE.
BY JAMES PARTON.
To Genoral George Rogers Clarke, of Vir
ginia, the country was indebted for its ex
emption from Indian ravage and massacre
during the greater part of the revolutionary
war. The Indians had increased the terrors
of all previous wars in America a hundred
fold; for a band of Indians on the frontier,
though they might not destroy much pro
perty, nor kill many persons, could keep the
borders of two or three States in alarm, and
scare from their homes the population of a
dozen counties. But during most of the
revolutionary war the frontiers were at peace,
the Indians being held In check by the vigi
lance, audacity and fortitude of this one
man.
It was no magnanimity on the part of the
enemy that spared the borders. Every
boy remembers something of the celebrated
debate in the House of lairds, in 1777, when
Lord Chatham denounced the employment
of Indians in America with so much elo
quence.
“Who is the man,” he exclaimed, “that
has dared to authorize and associate to our
arms the tomahawk and scalping-knife of the
savage? To call into civilized life the wild
and inhuman savage of the woods, to dele
gate to the merciless Indian the defence of
disputed rights, and to rage the horrbrs of
his barbarous war against our brethren ?”
In the course of this debate, Lord Suffolk,
Secretary of State, defended the employ
ment of Indians: first, as politic; secondly,
as necessary; thirdly, as right.
“It is perfectly justifiable,” said he, “to
me all the means that God and nature have
put into our hands.”
Then it was that the great soul of Lord
Chatham was stirred to its depths. He be
gan to speak even before he had quite risen
to his feet.
“I am astonished,” he cried, “shocked, to
hear such principles confessed, to hear them
avowed in th s house or in this country’—
principles equally unconstitutional, inhu
man and unchristian. * * * What! to
attribute the sacred sanction of God and
nature to the massacres of the Indian scalp
ing knife—to the cannibal savage torturing,
murdering, roasting and eating! * * *
Spain armed herself with blood-hounds to
extirpate the wietched natives of America;
and we improve upon the inhuman example
even of Spanish cruelty; we turn loose these
savage hell hounds against our brethren and
countrymen in America of the same lan
guage. laws, liberties and religion, endeared
to us by every tie that should sanctify hu
manity.”
But most readers remember, and have pro
bably spoken from the school rostrum, the
rest of this fine passage, in which he called
upon The “Right Reverend Bench” —almost
to a man supporters of the war ami all its
hellish enormities —to vindicate the honor of
religion, and upon the learned bench of law
yers, to show the illegality of the scheme.
His generous words were fruitless. They
were spoken on the 18th of NovembiT, 1777;
and on the 30th of June, 1778, occurred the
massacre of Wyoming. Four hundred Brit
ish troops and seven hundred Indians fell
upon this lovely and secluded valley in Penn
sylvania, Killed in battle two-thirds of all the
men capable of bearing arms, and massacred
the rest of the inhabitants, men, women,
amt children, except the few who found safe
ty in flight. Three hundred was the num
ber of the slain. Not a human being re
mained in the valley alive. One of the In-
dimi women, a sort of queen among them,
tomahawked foiirtiMUi prisoner* with her own
hand, and a large number of others were
bin ned and tortured in the Indian manner.
When tin* tidings of this bloody business
reached Virginia, Patrick Henry commis
sioned Colonel (Jeorge Rogem Clarke to lead
an es|H*dition into the far West and give the
Indian* occupation in their own counlr)’.
Never was a piece of work done mord thor
oughly. With a small body of men—not
more titan a hundred and fifty in number—
he tioated in bargea down the Monongahela
to the Ohio, and down the Ohio to a jmint
not far from its mouth, when he struck across
the praries for a British post at Kaskaskia*,
on the Mississippi river, in what was then
called tin* “county of Illinois.” On the
march the party consumed their little store
of provisions, and lived for two days upon
roots dug from the ground. He approached
the |>ost. a mere palisadoed enclosure, with
all the stealthy caution of an Indian. So se
cret was he, anil with such skill did he invest
the place, that lie captured every creature in
it without tlie loss of a man. He found a
good many horses in the place, upon which
he mounted some of his men, and Itefore the
alarm could spread, raptured three other
river posts higher up. and sent the command
er of the whole a prisoner to Virginia.
Holding these |MMts on the Mississippi,
which he strengthened in all haste, he was
master of the situation in the western coun
try, for between the Mississippi and the Al
leghanies he was the only white man ^ho
commanded a company of troops. The wi!-
derness was unbroken. All the teeming val
ley of the Ohio was inhabited only by wild
beasts and savage men. He proceeded at
once to summon the chiefs from far and
near, witli whom lie held solemn talks, ex
changed wampum, and smoked the pipe of
peace* Himself a natural chief of men, he
was uot long in obtaining over the tribes the
ascendency due both to his character and to
his position. As the winter came on, and
the frontiers were protected by snow and
cold, he gave himself up to rest and tran
quillity.
But about Christmas some friendly Indi
ans brought news which changed the whole
asp(*ct of affairs. One Colonel Hamilton,
who had been for many years commandant
of the British post of Detroit, a man thor
oughly conversant with Indians, and skill
ful in managing them, brave, resolute, and
unscrupulous, had marched from Detroit
into the western wilderness, and taken
post at what we now call Vincen
nes, on the Wabash—right between
Colonel Clarke and the settlements.
There he was fortifying himself, collecting
supplies, and making treaties with the
lindian tribes; intending, as soon as the
spring opened, first to crush Clarke at Kas
kaskias, and then to sweep on to the fron
tiers with a mighty host of British and In
dians, and lay waste the borders from New’
York to the Carolinas. Colonel Clarke soon
perceived that a hostile influence was at work
among his own Indians; and, before long,
detached parties of the enemy were heard of
in the neighborhood, sowing disaffection.
Destruction, as Clarke himself said, seemed
to threaten from every quarter, and he saw’
no hope of doing anything except to call in
j.:.. ; UH ] se ]j ] M i s life and the lives of
his men as dearly as he coma.
Amid the bustle and hurry of preparation,
he obtained certain intelligence that Hamil
ton luul so weakened his post by sending out
parties, that he had not more than eighty
men left in garrison. Colonel Clarke’s reso
lution was instantly taken to attack him.
Th<* distance was about one hundred and
fifty miles. *After he had garrisoned his
post, and sent round by river a barge with
his artillery and stores, he could mustd’ only
one hundred and thirty men for the expedi
tion.
Starting from Kakaskias on he 7th of
February, he met in a few days the early
spring thaw, which so flooded the country
that on most days he could only march two
or three miles. It required eleven days’
march to reach a point near the Wabash
river, nine miles from the post. The river
overflowed, and the whole country round
about under water. This last nine miles
was one sheet of water, from two to live
feet deep.
“It took us,” says Clarke in bls report,
“five days to cross the drowned lands of the
Wabash river, having to wade often, and
upward of two leagues, to our breasts in
water. Hail not the weather been warm we
must have perished.”
They reached dry land, in full sight of the
fort, about an hour after dark, and began
the attack immediately, all dripping as they
were. The French settlement outside the
post joyfully surrendered, and assisted in
the siege. Clarke posted his men with the
utmost caution, as he had none to spare, plac
ing them behind the trees, and forbidding any
man to expose himself needlessly. When
he began the attack, a brilliant moon both
aided and retarded his operations; but at
one in the morning, when the moon set and
darkness covered the scene, he caused bis men
to throw up in silence an embankment within
easy rifle shot of the enemy’s best artillery.
That done, to use the language of the com
mander, “we poured such showers of well
directed balls into their ports, that we
silenced two pieces of cannon in fifteen
minutes without getting a man hurt.”
All that night the battle continued, and
till late in the afternoon of the next day,
when the fort surrendered. Col. Clarke was
again undisputed master of the western coun
try. lle captured seventy-nine prisoners and
sent Hamilton under an escort to the Gov
ernor of Virginia, who put them into a dun
geon, shackled, for their cruelty while in
command. A few days after the victory,
Col. Clarke made an easy capture of a great
convoy of goods and provisions, worth £lO,-
000, coining down the Wabash to supply the
fort.
The Indians never again made bead
against the wliites during the Revolutionary
war. The spell of the British name was
broken in all that region, and the families of
the frontier slept in tranquillity. Col.
Clarke longed tq strike a blow at Detroit,
and Gov. Jefferson did all that was possible
to spare him the men requisite for the ex
pedition. But Virginia was then hanl
pressed by the enemy, and required all her
men and menus of self-defence. Col. Clarke,
promoted to be brigadier-gunui*a|, gallantly
assisted to drive back the execrable Arnold
during his invasion of Virginia; and when
the war was over in 1782, it was he who led
a thousand mounted riflemen against the In
dian tribes of Kentucky, and gave them such
a lesson that no formidable band of Indians
ever again ravaged that province.
In retirement, this hero, who had assisted
to make his country free. Iwcame himself a
s ] aV e—a slave to his appetite, to whisky.
This unhappy servitude clouded the evening
of .his life, and dimmed the lustre of his
fame. He died in 1818, near Louisville, in
Kentucky. Immense as his services were
to his country, they met with no particular
reward, except the gratitude and esteem of
his countrymen. He died in poverty, and,
by the great majority of the jwople forgot
ten : but the country which he had assisted
to create, he lived to see prosperous, power
ful and famous.
If any of the revolutionary heroes should
Im* honored by some public memorial in eter
nal bronze, he should be, who held buck the
Indians of the Great West, while the white
men fought out their tight on the other side
of the mountains—the man who set free the
hardy men of the w*estem settlements by
putting their minds at rest concerning the
safety of their families, and thus enabled
them to join the armies under Washington
and Greene.
THE WRECK OF THE ATLANTIC-.MORE
PARTICULARS.
STATEMENT OF THE CHIEF OFFICEIt.
My watch ended at 12 o’clock on Monday
night. The second and fourth officers took
charge and I went to my berth. I was
aroused by the shock of the vessel striking.
The second officer came down to my room
and said that the ship was ashore, and he
was afraid that she was gone. I put on a
f<*w articles of clothing, got an axe and
went on deck to clear the boats. The ship
had careened over before I reached the deck.
I cleared the two starboard boats. Just then
a heavy sea swept the boats away. I was
bidding fast to the mizzen-mast and rigging,
and now’ climbed higher for safety. The
night was dark and the spray flew so thickly
that we could not see well what was going
on around us. 1 saw men on the rock, but
did not know how they got there. All who
were alive on board were in the rigging when
daylight came. 1 counted thirty-two persons
in the mizzen-mast rigging with me, includ
ing one woman. When these saw that there
were lines between the ship and the shore
many of them attempted to go forward to
the lines, and in doing so were washed
overboard and drowned. Many reached
the shore by aid of the lines, and
the fisherman's boats rescued many more.
At last all had either been washed off or res
cued, except me, the woman and a boy. The
sea had become so rough that the boats
could not venture near us. Soon the boy
was washed off, but he swam gallantly and
reached one of the boats in safely. I got a
firm hold of the woman and secured her in
the rigging. 1 could see the people on
shore and in the boats and hailed them, but
they were unable to help us. At 2 o'clock
in the afternoon, after we had been in the
rigging ten hours, the Rev. Mr. Ancient, a
Church of England clergyman, whose noble
conduct I can never forget while I live, got
ft crew of four men to row him out to the
wreck. He got into the main rigging, and
procured a line, then advanced as far as lie
could toward me, and threw it to me. 1
caught it, made it fast around my body, and
then jumiMHl clear. A sea swept me off the
wreck, but Mr. Ancient held fast to the
line, pulled me back, and got me safely in
the boat. I was then so exhausted and be
numlied that I was hardly able to do any
thing for myself, and but for the clergy
man’s gallant conduct I must have perished
soon. The woman after bearing up with re
markable strength under her great trials, had
died two hours liefore Mr. Ancient arrived.
Her half-nude body was still fast to the rig
ging, her eyes protruding, her mouth foam
ing. a terribly ghastly spectacle, rendered
more ghastly by the contrast with the nu-
j-.. -i. ...r: 1. .... i, />M
We had to leave her body there, and it is
probably there yet. The scene at the wreck
was an awful one, such as I had never be
fore witnessed, am], hope never to witness
again. Comparatively few bodies drifted
ashore. Most of them, witjj such articles as
came out of the ship, while I was on her
were carried to sea.
A CABIN PASSENGEB’s STATEMENT.
Freeman Markland of New York, a cabin
passenger, was interviewed by a reporter of
the Halifax Chronicle, and made the follow
ing statement:
I turned into my berth at 9 o’clock on
Monday night and was aroused by the shock
of the ship striking. All the men in the
cabin rushed on deck to see what was wrong.
I went into the saloon on deck. Observed
by a clock that the time was twenty minutes
past 3. Rockets were being fired. Within
fifteen minutes from the time the ship struck
she careened oyer. The captain, who with
h|s officers behaved bravely, cried out. “Take
to the rigging: it is your last chance.” At
daybreak the fisherman’s boat came out and
rescued several of us and landed us on Mary
Island. The handful of jieople on the island
warmly welcomed us, gave us food and
clothing, and did all for us that they could
do. Edmund Ryan, a magistrate, Dennis
Ryan and their wives were esixcially active
in ministering to our wants. There were
three boab*’ crews, whose names deserve a
high place on the roll of honor. The first
boat was manned by Dennis Ryan. James
Coolen, Frank Ryan, John Blackburn and
Benjamin Blackburn: the second by James
O’Brien, Michael O’Brien, Patrick Dollard,
William Rairy and T. J. Coorg. I regret
that I have not the names of the other crew.
To these men chiefly belong the credit of
having at the risk of their own lives rescued
from death over four hundred souls. They,
as well as several others of whose bravery I
have heard, should certainly receive some
reward for their noble conduct and gallantry.
HOW THE CAPTAIN APPEAKED.
“Captain Williams,” said the reporter,
“to what cause do you ascribe the disaster?”
“I can hardly say,” replied the captain, “un
less it was because we had overrun our dis
tance. I thought we were going about eleven
knots, but the speed must have been greater
than that or we could never have got so far
out of our course.” The captain was seri
ous and composed, yet at intervals, when
some particularly harrowing incident was
mentioned, he broke down and seemed over
whelmed with sorrow. He said: “To think
while hundreds of men were saved every
woman should perish. If I had been able to
save even one woman. I could bear the dis
aster; but to lose all, it’s terrible, terrible.”
He seemed to realize fully that he would be
held to strict account for the disaster, and
that whether he was blameless or culpable
he would by many be held resjMmsible.
Captain Williams is a stout-built English
man of about 45 years of age, who has fol
lowed the sea for many years. He met with
an accident a short time ago which partially
disabled him. and recently he has been com-
IMdlwl to use a stick and abstain from great
exertion. Notwithstanding this ho so con
ducted himself at the trying time as to win
the highest commendations from the pas
sengers.
INCIDENTS.
A little felow, the only child saved from
the wreck, rushed upon deck with the stream
of passengers, when the first alarm was
given. His parents and other members of
his family were still below and evidently
perished when the ship filled and fell over
on her side. Hustled about among that
struggling mass of excited humanity, the
piteous screams of the poor little fellow went
to the hardest heart. He leaped upon the
back of one of the men. in the hope* of
saving himself, but in that fearful crisis,
•where everylM»dy was intent on saving them
selves, few paid attention to the wails of the
the boy, and the man upon whose back he
PRICE 3 CENTS.
was clinging, as If fordear life, made several
ineffctual attempts to shake the boy off.
The cries of the boy at last attracted the
attention of the captain, who perceiving the
• tenacious manner in which he was strug
gling for life calh*d out to the men who were
surrounding the lines that led to the rock, to
endeavor if possible to save the boy, and the
little fellow was immediately passed over the
heads of the struggling mass and placed in
the boat. Mm who were exerting them
selves to save their own and ethers’ lives
almost wept for joy as they saw the lad
safely landed onshore.
All the passengers speak in the highest
terms of the gallant conduct of the thin!
officer and the first engineer in particular,
who remained on the wreck for hours, assist
ing the passengers to reach the rock. Two
lady cabin passengers came on deck in the
excitement, and were standing near the
wheelhouse. They hesitated a moment, as
if panic-stricken and returned into the com
panion-way, as if looking for something.
Presently they came out and endeavored to
reach the forward part of the ship, where the
passengers were sent ashore on the lines.
At this moment a huge wave swept over the
ship’s quarter, the men clinging to the rigging
heard two heart-rending shrieks, and when
they looked again the women had dis
appeared. These are only a few of the inci
dents of that terrible wreck. Young men as
well as old becalm* paralyzed, and as they
clung to the rigging ami to the sides of the
vessel they seemed bereft of all reason.
When spoken to by the others to make some
effort to reach the boat and save themselves,
they ^would roll their eyes in their head,
stare vacantly at the speakers and ask them
in a whining tone. “What boat?” Many
again who were roused out of their berths
had scarcely time to put their clothes on and
rush on deck to iM.*rish. One cabin passen
ger, a young man, came up with only a vest
on. He clung to the ship’s side as long as
he was able, and finally rolled off into the
sea, frozen to death.
“I suppose it is not necessary,” said one
of the crew, “to give you the minute particu
lars of how each life was lost. Every suc
ceeding minute the waves washed off one,
two or three, sometimes six and thru a dozen
were swept away and went out, side by side.
There is no language that can describe the
feelings of a man holding on for dear life tv
a bit of rigging and watching his friends and
companions struggling, clutching, sinking,
dying. The weakest, of course, went first.
One poor fellow had managed to get himself
in a position where he was hemmed in by
pieces of timber, which could not very well
be affected by the action of the waves. His
body was nearly entirely protected. From
my position in the rigging I could see the
expression of his countenance, as from time
to time he took his hands from his face,
gazed alxmt as if not daring to lift his Lead,
and then again hid his sight. In an unlucky
moment, when a lull came, he lifted up a
l>ortion of his body to make himself more
comfortable, when the biggest wave I had
yet seen caught and swept him in a moment
out of sight.”
APPEARANCE OF THE RESCUED PASSEN
GERS.
The business of the vessel was to get on
board the passengers and others who had
1 • ’ ••• n»»J on sLrira
where, with such a large number and such a
small place, not even the large-hearted gene
rosity and kindness of the fishermen could
be expected to make them comfortable. The
Delta and Lady Head, being unable to ven
ture near the shore, came to anchor, and the
Goliah, with a life-boat, went in to embark
the shipwrecked people. No time was lost,
and the Goliah and the boats soon returned
filled with men, who proceeded to get on
board the Delta. And such a motley party.
FalstafFs men were well attired and resect
able looking compared to these English.
Irish, Scotch, Welch, German, Dutch, Nor
wegian, Swedes, Swiss—indeed representa
tives of every country in Europe and of the
United States of America were huddled to
gether, talking, laughing, crying, praying
and thanksgiving, producing a veritable con
fusion of tongues. Scarcely one-half had a
complete and respectable looking suit of
clothes. The wealthy merchant of London
and New Y’ork, the high-toned professional
gentleman and the lowest of the foreign
emigrants appeared in strange clothing, much
of which had been given to them by the good
people of Prosjiect. Some were without
coats, many without hats, others without
boots, and all had to mourn the absence of
some comfort in the clothing line. Eximhi
sive broadcloth blended with the rough
Guernsey jacket on the one jierson. Here
was an arisUM’ratic looking man striving to
make himself at home under a dilapidated
looking overcoat that had probably done
duty in days of yore on the back of more
than one hardy fisherman of the place, while
at the same time he made d<*sperate efforts
to get on his benumbed hands a pair of
lavender kid gloves. He had a preference
for kid as a rule, no doubt, but at that par
ticular moment he was gazing enviously on
a half-frightened-t Q-death Dutchman, who
sported a prodigious pair of wool mits, which
did great credit to the skill and sense of the
fisherman’s pretty daughter who had given
them to him. All were warmly welcomed
on board the Delta by Capt. Shaw and his
officers, who spared no pains to make them
as comfortable as possible. The Goliah re
turned to the shore and was soon back again
with just such a crowd as the previous one.
Then* were several afflicting scenes on the
Delta as the passengers were collected in her
from the different jioints where they had
been stopping. Friends who had separated
fn>ni eaeh other after the Atlantic struck,
and never expected to meet in this world
again, were brought face to face in the Delta’s
cabin. They grasped hands and wept for
joy. and returned to Him whose mercy had
spared them while so many of their fellows
had been sent into eternity.
NUMBER OF PASSENGERS.
The Atlantic had on board 33 cabin pas
sengers, KM) steerage passengers and a crew,
officers included, of 143 men Total 976
souls. Those known to be saved numbered
430, leaving the number lost 546. This may
not Im* precisely correct, but is nearly so.
When the Russian Duke Alexis was en
tertained at Music Hall in Boston, a bust of
Ben jamin Franklin fell uixm a lady’s head
and wounded her scalp. She hits sucil the
city for SIO,OOO damages, and also brings
suits against the two Aldermen who had
charge of the ceremonies. Another jieculiar
case is that of David Griggs against the Bal
timore and Ohio Railroad Company for $lO,-
000 damages, on account of a delay of the
train on which he was a passenger, by which
he was prevented from witnessing Presi
dent Grant’s inauguration. These suits
are about as reasonable as some others in
stituted by persons who slip down on the
ice formed in a night or an hour.
James McQueen, the killer of the noto
rious Boss Strong, one of the Lowery gang,
has been (>aid the $6,000 reward offered for
his dead body, some time since, by the State
of North Carolina.
®|?c Jailii |)ress.
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JUDGING BY FACEM.
A man’ll character h stamped upon hh
face by the time that he Im thirty. I liad
rather put my trust in any human Mug’*
countenance than in his words. The lips
may lie, the face cannot. To lie sure, “a
man may smile and be a villainbut what
a smile It is—a false widening of the mouth
and creasing of the cheeks, an unpleasant
grimace, that makes a close observer shud
der. Rascal is written all over It, somehow.
Among the |M)wers that are given us for
our good, is that of reading the true charac
ter of those we meet by the expression of
the features. And yet most people neglect
it, or doubt the existence of the talisman
which would save them from dangerous
friendships or miserable marriages, and, fear
ing to trust a test so tangible and mysterious,
act in defiance of their impulses, and suffer
in consequence.
Then* an* few who could not point out an
actual idiot, if they met him, and many
know a confirmed drunkard at sight. It is
as easy to know a bad man as either.
If you are afraid to judge in this way, I
am not. We are all bail enough, it is true;
but the special cases are as plainly marked
out as though they were branded on the
forehead.
The miser wears his madness in his eyes,
in his pinched features, in his complexion.
1 The brutal fellow shows his brutality in his
I low forehead, and prominent chin, and bull
I neck. The crafty man, all suavity, and ele
i gance, cahnot put his watchful eyes and
snaky smile out of sight, as he does his pur
pose. The thief looks like nothing else un
der heaven; and those who lead unholy
lives, of which we may not speak, have so
positive an impress of guilt upon their fea
tures, that it is a marvel that the most igno
rant and innocent are ever imposed upon by
them.
Perhaps it is the fear that conscientious
people have of being influenced by beauty,
or the want of it, which leads so many to
neglect the cultivation of the power which
might be brought to such perfection; but a
face may be beautiful and bad, and positive
ly plain and good. I scarcely think any one
would mistake in this way; and I aver that
when a man past the earliest youth looks
good and pure and true, it is safe to believe
that he is so, and to trust him; and that
when the countenance is evil, the heart is
probably evil also.
Mary Kyle Dallas.
The Academy of Mvsic Marriage.—
The Brooklyn Academy of Music was the
scene of an odd occurrence on a recent even
ing. Several days since an advertisement
appeared in one of the daily papers, in which
it was stated that any resjiectable couple who
wished to be married free of cost and in cos
tume of a hundred years ago on the stage of
the Brooklyn Academy of Music, would be
provided with the necessary costumes and
outfit temporarily by the managers of the
Tabernacle, free. To this advertisement
there were fifty-two answers, and it was
necessary to select one couple. The happy
twain who drew the lucky number were
James Willetts and Minnie Willetts of
Stamford, Conn., who held the relation of
cousins. Costumes supposed to represent
the New’ England fashion of one hundred
years ago were loaned for the occasion by
a masKea nan costumer, anu an mnuv.nX
assemblage gathered to witness the cere
monies. The price of admission was fixed
at fifty cents, and the proceeds of the en
tertainment were devoted to purchasing
the bride's presents. Up the main aisle pro
ceeded a heterogeneous procession of about
thirty persons clad in ancient costumes.
First came the bridegroom, a country lad of
twenty years, in a blue velvet coat trimmed
with silver binding, a white satin vest edged
with gold buttons and white silk stockings.
Then came the bride in a pearl-satin dress
looped up with ornaments; a point lace
veil covered her lovely shoulders, and her
dark brown hair was powdered to the con
sistency of Mont Blanc on a wintry day. As
the happy pair reached the base of the stage
the orchestra struck up Mendelssohn’s 4<Wed
ding March," and the bridegroom and bride,
followed by all their attendants, mounted
the stage and formed a wide semi-circle, ex
tending nearly the whole w idth of the pro
scenium, the bride and bridegroom remaining
in the centre, faced by the brilliant au
dience. The ceremony was then performed,
and the two were pronounced man and
wife by the Kev. T. Dewitt Talmage.
Law and Expediency. —When the Pre
sident dodged behind the Attorney-General
to prevent General Sherman from filling the
office of Secretary of War during the tempo
rary absence of its regular incumbent, he
was doubtless unaware that his unwonted
regard for constitutional law was a derang
ing element in the revolutions of his own
White House satellites. Yet such is the
fact, and it falls with greatest severity upon
Babcock, the President’s major domo, his
avant courier in these little excursions, the
repository of his secrets, and, in short, his
dear Babcock. The Attorney-General has
decided that civil and military offices cannot
be held in common, yet General Babcock is
a living contradiction of the efficacy of any
such prohibition. He has as many different
things to attend to as Boston's Postmaster,
though he possesses the advantage of a com
mission, legal or otherwise, for them all. He
is Commissioner of Public Buildings, Chief
Engineer of the Washington Aqueduct, and
Private Secretary to the President. Yet he
is also on the army list, as if three civil ofli
ces were not enough to hold ami draw pay
for. The Dents are also involved more or
less in the same unpleasant dilemma. On
the unwarrantable assumption that there is
a principle of consistency and respect for law’
animating the Administration, the prospects
of these gentlemen would be gloomy, in
‘deed; but the President cuts worse Gordian
knots than this without difficulty’, and the
White House ring may rejoice in a patron
with whom affection for his friends is a more
controlling influence than the restraints of
law.— Boston Post.
It is estimated that the double freight
track which Commodore Vanderbilt pro
poses to lay from New York to Buffalo, will
enable the Hudson River and New York
Central Railroads to move freight from ten
to twenty per cent cheaper than the present
rates, and the capacity of the road is in
creased three or four fold. Locomotives
earn nothing when standing still, although
the expenses go on. The rules of the New’
York Central road require freight trains to
be run on side tracks, at least fifteen minutes
before an approaching passenger train is due,
and to remain on the side track ten minutes
after one has passed. Consequently the
freight train loses at least a half hour every
time a passenger train passes it, and the ex
penses of fuel and wages continue, and adds
to the freight charges. The additional
tracks, which will avoid the larger tow ns and
cities on the route, if by avoiding these a sav
ing in distance can be made, will add to the
safety of the road, and the saving in expense
will, it is thought, pay the interest on the in
vestment.— ProcMen^e Herald,

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