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Worcester daily press. [volume] (Worcester, Mass.) 1873-1878, April 12, 1873, Image 1

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Jailg
r W IWLRHIRD
EVERY MOIIMMb, aiLN^AY tiCßfatD,
, —AT—
• H P«r annmni 16 ctn. per mouth.
Jbt Wtrhlfi fuss,
EVERY HATT RDAY MORNING,
At BX per annum,
EDWARD R. FIRE 4 CO., Proprietors.
>:. K. rMKK. J. A. MI'ALDINu.
—- ——7^ ■ t W —-p— ’
jfousr ^fumishiH/i.
$ I' H 1 N G TK A DE .
Carpets!
R. B. HENCHMAN,
Ham now in store a full gMsortment of every grade
of
HRUHHELB,
TAFEETRY,
INGRAIN*, AC.,
WINDOW SHADES,
RVOB,
MATH.
L(X)K AT MY
EXTRA BARGAINS!
i
Best Body Brussels
fYom *1.75 to 51.90 per yard.
English Tapestry
at •1.25 yer yard.
50 ROLLS
Straw Matting,
at 25c. per yard. •
THE LARGEST ASSORTMENT OF
Oil Cloths
in this market, at the LOWEST PRICES, can be
found at
R. B. HENCHMAN’S,
No. 1 Foster St., cor. Main.
at-ts
EMOV A L .
L. M. Maxham & Co.,
w*
HAVE MOVED THEIR STOCK. OF
Furniture
To chaintier occupied by the late D.JB^iMaynard
At 515 Main Street,
Where they will be pleased te meet those in wan
of Chamber Sets and Upholstered
Furniture.
IF YOU WOULD HAVE A GOOD BLACK
Walnut Chamber Set for the least money, go to
MAXHAM & CO.’S, 515 Main street.
IF YOU WANT A GOOD CUSTOM MADE
Parlor Suite of the latest style, MAXHAM &
CO., 515 Main street, make them.
HAVE YOU HAIR MATTRESSES THAT
have become hard? Send them to MAX
HAM & CO., 515 Main street. They will return
them as good as new, Price, $3.50 each.
DO YOU WANT A NICE, EASY CHAIR
for vourself or friends? Call and see what L. M.
MA\.HAM &CO. have, or will make for you.
WHEN YOU AVANT THE BEST BED
lamnge in the market, go to MAXHAM & CO.,
515 Main street, and get the Russ Bed Lounge.
IF YOU HAVE FURNITURE THAT IS
worn out, see what MAXHAM & CO., 515 Main
street, will repair it for; you can save dollars
by doing so.
DO YOU AVANT A PURE NO. 1 CURLED
Hair Mattress? See those MAXHAM Ji CO.
make. They have only that kind.
L. M. MAXHAM & CO., 515 MAIN ST.,
receive and soil Furniture on commission,
look at their prices.
WHEN YOU HAVE LOOKED THROUGH
the larger furniture houses and are not satisfied
call and see us; we know the whole story. L.
M. MAXHAM X- CO., 515 Main street- Up one.
Hight. Im a 3
JOHN D. CHOLLAR & CO.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS
FURNITURE
—AND—
Upholstery Goods,
are now prepared to show as LARGE and COM
PLETE a Stock of Furniture as can be seen in any
city .in New England, and we invite the people of
Worcester and neighboring towns to call and ex
amine our goods.
On Our First Floor
may be found a choice selection of
UPHOLSTERY GOODS,
LACES, CURTAINS,
SHADES, CORDS,
TASSELS, TRIMMINGS,
BED SPREADS,
PILLOW SHAMS, ETC.
—ALSO—
Book Cases, Hat Trees, Ladies’ Desks and Office
• Furniture.
ON OUR SECOND FLOOR
We are offering PARLOR SUITES at very Low
Prices indeed. We have a new style Panel Frame
Parlor Suit, covered in Hair Cloth and Terry,
which we are selling from *BO to *125. The
same in Plush from *IOO to *175. These suits
are really worth more money than any we have
ever sold at that price. We have many other
styles in this line of finer stock ami materials,
which we shall be happy at all times to show. On
this floor also can be seen a large variety of MIR
RORS, TABLES, CHAIRS and DINING FURNI
TURE. We would call especial attention to our
SIDEBOARDS,
which we are selling at very low and medium
prices, and would say to any one in search of such,
to give us a ‘call and examine for themselves.
Persons wishing to see
CHAMBER FURNITURE
are taken to our THIRD FLOOR by a Patent
Safety Passenger Elevator, where we have a nice
stock of
Painted Chamber Suits,
which are selling fast, at prices ranging from *26
to *75. These suits are of our own design and
finish, and are well worth the attention of buyers.
Our usual quantity of Ash and Walnut Chamber
Suits are kept upjo the well-known standard, and
are marked at prices that will defy competition.
Call and see
MARBLE TOP WALNUT SUITS,
Selling from *BO to *l5O.
Mr. GEO. W. GIBBS, for many years in the em
ploy of the late D. B. Maynard, will hereafter be
found at our store, where lie will be pleased to
s ee all his old friends and as many new ones as
will give him a call.
JOHN D. CHOLLAR & CO.,
No. 472 Main Street.
OPPOSITE OLD SOUTH CHURCH.
»l-dly
Worcester press.
VOL. I, NO. 11.
tfMhinn and ^’oottnx.
M L I) THING.
WARE, PRATT & CO.’S
announcement of
SPRING GOODS,
FOR
MEN, YOUTHS AND BOYS.
We have been in the market early thia Mawm,
and have been rmabbal to weme an i-leaant line
nt Sirring Cloth- in SUITINGS. OVEW.'Ogr-
INtIS, TROWHEKINGS. and VKSTINUS of (h«
Iren londgn makes, including
French,
German,
English,
and Scotch,
and a flue line of AMERICAN GOODS, from mills I
of established reputation. In our
READY-MADE DEPARTMENT;
we have a full line of SUITS, OVERCOATS, and '
SINGLE GARMENTS, for both
MEN’S, YOUTHS' and BOYS’ i
WEAR,
and principally of our own manufacture. We
have always endeavored to manufacture our goods
f<> a high standard of excellence. and can say for
ourselves this Spring that, with what knowledge
we have gained m the past, we have produced this j
year our goods at a higher degree of workmanship ,
and style than ever before. We invite careful in- ;
vestigation of all our goods in this respect. Our
Furnishing Goods De-
partment
embraces everything essential to comfort in that
line, and we are constantly receiving
NEW GOODS.
AVe have the exclusive sale of the
“FAVORITE SHIRT.”
It is giving general satisfaction. AVe give special
attention to orders for fine<'ustom Shirts.
We invite a full explanation of our stock in the
different departments, feeling confident that we
CANNOT BE UNDERSOLD
bv anv house in Worcester. All goods marked in
plain’figures, and those marks are not deviated
from.
The Oripal Oue-Price flotilla
WARE, PRATT & CO., I
AOS and 412 Main Street,
FIRST NATIONAL BANK MARBLE BTILDING,
WORCESTER, MASS.
ap7-ly
JUST OPENED!
QUR SPRING ASSORTMENT OF
CLOTHS
• FOR OUK
CUSTOM DEPARTMENT,
In the choicest varieties of Foreign and Domestic
ma nfacture.
The reputation of o •house for fine garments
is well known, and all esiring to leave their or
ders will do well to call e.rly before the rush com
mences.
D. H. EAMES & CO.,
One Price Clothiers,
coiCner main and front streets,
al WORCESTER, MASS. jtly
gPR I N G
OVER COATS,
NOAV READY,
A good assortment of the most approved styles. '
Prices from *7 to *2O.
Spring Suits
FOR
GENTS AND BOYS
In all varieties and prices, n<»w in stock, at
D. H. EAMES & CO.’S
One Price Clothing House,
CORNER MAIN ANO FRONT STREETS,
al WORCESTER, MASS. dly
E OFFER TO-DAY,
465
PAIRS ALL WOOL CASSIMERE PANTS
AT ONLY
$5.00
A PAIR, FOR Al ER PRICES FROAI SIX TO
KIOHT DOLLARS. THIS IS LESS THAN
THE CLOTH IS WORTH. AVE BOUGHT
THESE IN A JOB LOT, AND GIVE OI K
CUSTOMERS THE ADVANTAGE OF IT.
AVE ALSO OFFER TAVO HUNDRED COATS
AND ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY VESTS,
AT EQUALLY LOW PRICES.
D. H. EAMES & CO.
al dly
£JLO THING.
Spring Opening!
AVe are now opening a complete assortment of
Spring Clothing,
consisting of the largest and best lot of
Scotch Suits,
both in medium and fine grades ever offered in
this city. A complete line of
Spring Overcoats,
nearly equal in style and make to custom work.
Also a full line of Plain and Fancy Suits, Fants
apd Vests at the lowest cash prices. AVe would
especially call attention to our
Custom Department,
which contains a large and choice variety of
Suitings,
Spring Overcoats,
Trowserings, &c.
That will be made in ’superior style and work
manship.
Furnishing Goods
of every description constantly on hand.
AVe are selling an excellent fine Shirt that is
meeting with great approval. Also, make Shirts
to order, ami warrant a fit.
H. C. VALENTINE & CO.,
330 Main Street, If oreester, Mass.
a 8 Im
H~wiIITTEMORE ; S MEAT
• CUTTER will cut two pounds of Pie Meat in
one minute and Hash for the Family in one half a
minute. Works extremely easy. Sells for $3.
May be taken on trial at 570 Main st. al 3m
WORCESTER, MASS., SATURDAY MORNING, APRIL 12, 1873.
^inustnirnfx.
P. T. BARNUM’S
World's Fair!
TEH TIMES LABBEB THAH EVER I
STEP EXHIBIT IX
Worcester, Friday, May 2,
ON ELM PARK.
Giving THREE Grand performances of the en
tire 20 Snows.
20 COLOSSAL PAVILIONS.
100.000 ( urlOsitieH.
1500 Animals and Birds.
3 Great Circus Troops.
150 Kailroad Cars.
Procession three miles long.
A FULL MENAGERIE FREE!
2000 Men and Horses.
12 Chariots.
100 Cages.
• 4 Bands of Musir.
NOTHING LIKE IT EVER SEEN ON EARTH!
Admission to all 50 cents. Children 25 cents.
Doors open 10 A. M. 1 and 7 I’. M.
ty^FKEE Admission to the entire 20 Great
Shown is granted to all who buy the Life of I*. T.
Barnum—sou pages, illustrated. Reduced from
$3.50 to $1.50.
“ Worth a SIOO Greenback to a beginner.”
alO d&wtniy2 —Horace (ireeb y.
^inc Arti.
| ’ INE ABTS!
LOVKRS OF THE FINE ARTS I
will find at my store one of the best collections of
Fine' Steel Engravings; English, French,
German and American Chromos,
in Oil and Water Colors, to be found in New
England outside of Boston.
Stereoscopic Views,
Prangs’ Beautiful Productions
Photographs,
BRACKETS AND WOOD CARVINGS,
PICTURE FRAMES
MADE TO ORDER
from latest patterns of mouldings.
GOLD FRAMES, BLACK WALNUT, iC.,
of all desirable kinds. Hctcre Knobs, Cords and
like fixtures.
Particular attention given to re-gilding old
frames.
A. E. PECK, Art Dealer,
alts Lincoln House Block.
^arriugt,^ and ^arntas.
ESTABLISHED A. D. 1850.
R. McALEER
Successor to D. Brown,
Manufacturer of
Fine Harness
AND DEALER IN FIRST CLASS
Stable and Carriage Goods,
228 Main St.
aldtf
rpHE ARCHIBALD IRON-HUBBED
W II EELS
Are the bent wheels for wagons and carts. Sam
pies can be seen at the office of
MASON & LINCOLN,
alts No. 11 Mechanic Street.
JEORGE T. AITCHISON,
Manufacturer of Carriages
—AND—
TOP AM) OPEN SLEIGHS.
I have now finished a fine assortment of the
best and latest styles of Phaetons, Prince Al
berts, Goddard style, Piano box, Top and Open
Buggies; side spring Buggies; very light Koad
and Track Wagons, constantly on hand of my own
make.
Express and Job Wagons of all kinds; also L.
T. Bancroft’s Monitor street sprinkler the veiy
best in use made to order.
Repairing of Carriages in all its branches
promptly and thoroughly done.
Also, Wheels Made to Order of the Best Stock.
Corner of School and Union Streets.
WORCESTER MASS.
al 3m
^anlt^ and ^anltcri.
J^ICE, WHITING & BULLOCK,
BANK E R S ,
Corner Main and Pearl Streets, Worcester,
Buy and sell Railroad, City and County Bonds.
Special attention given to orders for the pur
chase and sale of Stocks at NEW
YORK and BOSTON
BOARDS.
Agents for the Various Lines of
European Steamships.
Persons contemplating going abroad will find
at our office Cabin Flans of the Steamers of the
several Lines, thus enabling them to select and
secure rooms without the delay and expense of
applying at the principal offices in New York or
Boston. Letters of Credit furnished available in
all the principal cities of Europe.
Drafts Drawn Payable in any City in Europe.
^^United States Passports procured without
charge. ts al
MONEY ~
TO LOAN
BY ESTABKOOK & SMITH,
424 Main Street, Worcester, Mass.
aS ly
^lonr, ^rain and <setd.
P L O U KI FLOUR!!
THE PLACE TO BUY YOUR
FLOUR, GRAIN,
HAY, STRAW,
BUTTER, EGrGS,
and CHEESE.
DOON & BARRETT’S,
&BTT. I WORCESTER, MASS.
a 4 ts
A R T I N KELLEY,
I'AsUIONABLB
Boot and Shoe Maker.
Repairing Neatly Done.
No. 398 Main Street, - - ■Worcester Mass.
a2dtf
Letter press printinil
Everv description of Letter Press Printing
neatly and promptly executed at this office.
tfob ffriitliiiff.
W uo DOES ^OUK PRINTING?

i
.w
THE PROPRIETORS OF
THE PRESS
Respectfully announce to the old patron* of our
long established
.f. .1 ’
“Franklin Joli Printing Office,”
and to the new friends which we are making
through the colubih of this iuqH'r, that our
Job Printing'
DEPARTMENT
is now receiving fre^h additions of
New Type
-AND-
M ACUL NERY,
and that we are much better prepared than ever
before to do all kinds of
FINE JOB PRINTING,
as well as the ordinary grades of work. The re
putation of this Establishment during tlw score
or uiuie <»f year., that it haw been under the man
agement of Mr. FISKE, has been higher than
most other houses in this section of New England.
We propose to fully maintain this reputation by
the increased and increasing
Excellence of our Work,
and by the reasonableness of our charges. We
shall make a specialty still of
ELEGANT LETTER PRESS,
and respectfully invite the attention of those who
desire and appreciate the beautiful in this “ art
preservative,” to our samples and taidlities for
skillfully executing everything in this particular
branch.
The publication of the The Press will in no
way interfere with the
Job Department,
further than to improve it as it increases the de
mand.
The public are cordially invited to look through
our extensive works, and are always welcome,
whether ordering work or not .
Remember that everything in the line of
Book and Fine Job
PRINTING 1
is done here at shortest notice and in a manner
thoroughly satisfactory.
Our Business Office, Newspaper and Job De
partments are conveniently located on
Mechanic Street,
-IN-
Crompton’s Block,
(SECOND FLOOR)
where, with competent men in all depaitments,
weare always prepared to serve those who may
favor us with a call.
Orders by Mail or Express will also meet with
the^ame careful persomal attention.
EDWARD R. FISKE & CO.,
Proprietors.
WORCESTER, MASS.
a 2 it
ffress.
SATURDAY MORNING, APRIL 12.
HER LIFE AND MINE.
CORMK LAWS MT. JOHN.
To-morrow will come, ami the sun may shine,
And the heavens be blue, and the day divine;
And the earth avid the sky may sing together
Of the glory and joy of the summer weather.
Let it come with the sun, or come with the
shower, .
It will bring in its round the fateful hour,
That I promised to yield to a wife's sweet claims
My life's fierce joys and its fevered alms.
To-morrow will come; and yet, and yet,
1 tremble to Nee yon golden nun set;
1 tremble to see the dim starlight strengthen,
1 tremble to see the gray shadows lengthen.
And to see the last lights burn low in the sky,
And the shades and the glooms of earth magnify;
More than all, I tremble to ask my soul why
It should shrink from a day that with heaven
should vie.
Her life into mine, like a soft moonlMMun
That kissed the breast of a sullied stream,
To-morrow shall fall; and God only knows
whether
These lives, so unlike, shall mingle together.
Iler’s chaste and sweet as the Seraphim’s dream;
Mine, so defiled it would almost seem
They never could blend, more than oil with the
sea,
Though they flowed on together through eternity.
She will yield on the morrow her snow-white life,
With its gentle aims and its sinless strife;
Her heart's first love, so deep and tender,
And her rich, young years, unto me she’ll render.
And 1, in return, will give her , ah! What?
But the evils that fall to the sinner's lot,
A guilty soul, and a deadened heart,
Where the impulse of youth hath never a part.
When to-morrow shall come, and in the dread
calm,
As we stand before angels and men palm to palm,
While the low wedding-chants high over us hover,
U, then will my soul its full shame discover!
And when her soft lips shall tremble and say,
“ In sickness, in health, in death—and alway!”
Humbled, abashed, by her pure, sweet trust,
My spirit shall fall at her feet in the dust.
Perhaps she would lift it; but then her white
hands
Would gather the dust and the Stains of the
sands.
O, women who stand with men at the altar!
Your pure, sweet lips would tremble and falter
Did their sin-stained lives lie open like scrolls,
Or an angel in waiting stand weighing your souls;
Yours, mounting upwards, as if unto God,—
Theirs, sinking down, like the dark, foul clod.
FAMILY READING.
The following clever Jeu d'esprit, by Orpheus
Kerr, has a bit of quiet sarcasm which may be
9 uggestive to parents. It appeared in the New
York Graphic:
Au American male parent, unto his babes said he;
Come hither, pretty little ones, and sit on either
knee,
And tell me what you’ve lately heard your mother
read, and me?”
In his fatherly assurance, and fond, parental way,
He wanted to discover what the innocents would
say
Al>out a Missionary-book they’d heard the other
day.
Full of glee spake young Alonzo, all legs and
curly hair;
“ You yead about the man they hung, and all the
people there;
And mamma yead the funny part, of huw it made
him swear.”
Joining quickly 111, Crtnl Minute —all waiot au<l
dimpled neck:
“It wasn't half ho funny, though, as that about
the check.
They caught somebody forging, ’cause he was so
green I ’speck.”
“ But the thing I liked the bestest,” Alonzo piped,
amain,
“ Was how somebody vanned away, and won’t
come back again,
And tookt somebody’s wife with him upon a yail
yoad train.”
“Then you wasn’t list’ning, ’Lonzo,” came swift
from Minnie, small,
“ When papa read about the girl that tookt her
only shawl,
And wrapt a baby up in it, and left it in a hall.”
“ Oh, I wa’n’t, hey?” trilled Alonzo, dismayed to
be outdone;
•• I’m go’n’ to learn to yead, myself; and you can
have the Sun;
And I'll yead Herald • Personals,’ and never tell
you one!”
The American male parent, his hair arose on end;
On either knee an infant form he did reverse and
bend,
And from their little mouths straightway made
dismal howls ascend.
The Ice Business. —The New York ice
companies are contemplating an advance in
the price of ice the coming season, for rea
sons which, if valid, are applicable to ice
men in other sections of the country. Mr.
McClay, vice president and treasurer of the
Knickerbocker Ice Company, in reply to in
quiries. said he thought there would be an
advance of about ten )>er cent., perhaps
more. The two cardinal reasons for an ad
vance, he said, were the increased cost of
gathering the ice the past winter, and the
fact that for two years the prices have been
so low that absolutely nothing was made at I
the business. It cost forty per cent, more to |
harvest the ice this winter than heretofore. |
This was the result of the extreme cold and
the rapid succession of deep snows. No
sooner would they get the ice cleared and
ready to cut than a snow storm would
take place, and all the work had to
be over again. A canal nine
miles Jong and 150 feet wide was
cut through ice twelve inches thick, con
necting Rockland with Piermont Dock, to
enable the company to load barges and bring
them down. So intense was the cold that
while they were removing the snow from tho
ice that had once been prepared, this canal
would freeze over again, necessitating the
cutting of another canal. To these facts
were incidental other little matters, which,
though seendnglv trilling in themselves, in
terposed grave obstacles to the operations of
the ice-cutters. But there is still another
unforseen cause for an increase of price, and
that is a foreign demand, which will draw
away at least 50,000 tons of their stock.
Germany has had an open winter, and is
iTbliged to look abroad for ice. Our compa
nies, said Mr. McC’lay, are expected to con
tribute their share. Already the German
lines of steamships take out from New 1 ork,
for their own use, ice for the round trip.
This is a market that was never open to the
dealers before. The president of the W ash
ington lee Company also stated that the ice
business for the last two years has been un
profitable. In January a thaw occurred, of
ilist sufficient duration to sodden the snow,
which immediately froze hard, forming on
top of the good ice a layer of “anow ice
unfit for use, and which had to be removed
bv the slow and laborious processof planing.
There was about six Inehes of the snow’ ice
to be removed. The process was by first
cutting groves to guide the planer, which
afterward loosened up two inches of the ^e.
The same process was then repeated,
off two inches at a time until the solid ice
was laid bare. In 1871 he laid out $31,000
for horses for the company, more than one
half of w hich were killed « dlsab ed by me
intense heat of last summer, so that he
had to expend *17,000 more to fill up then
rauks.
The first installment of the five per cent,
bonds to go abroad under the new syndicate
arrangement will leave with ex-Senator
Cattell and party on Saturday. The last
operation necessay to finish the entire
ainount of the $500,000,000 of five percent.,
the signing in the register’s office of eacli
Iwnd, will be begun at once. Tins signing
wa. formerly done by the regiater, who
affixed his own autograph to each bond, and
was allowed extra compensation al the rate
of one cent for each signature, but the
labor has become so great, owing to the
rapidity witli which the Issue must be made,
that this work has to be done by another
person, and hereafter the bonds will bear the
written signature, “Thomas A. Maguire,
followed by the printed words, "tor the
yepster," 1
MISCELLANY.
DIAMOND CUT DIAMOND.
Colonel Nathaniel J. Cooling—better
known as Cool Nat—of Coolington, Nan
Joaquin county, in the Ntate of California,
VM i fellow JMMMIMr of Bitot OB that
well-known trans-Atlantic steamship, the
Mongolia, famous alike for the rapidity of
her ocean voyages, the absence of napkins at
meal times, and the bluff heartiness of her
excellent commander. As is, or rather was,
invariably the case, the Mongolia had re
ceived a very good “send off,” the friends of
the passengers mustering in great strength,
ami accompanying their hearty wishes fora
swift passage, quick return, and a “good
time’’ generally, with a brisk consumption
of the sparkling fluid which flows with such
unfailing liberality on the oil >ide oi the
Atlantic. Busy as 1 was in pledging my nu
merous friends. I yet found a moment
to steal a glance* at my room-mate—
the traveler who occupied the one other
berth in my state-room—and, exchanging
cards with him over a glass of champagne,
was charmed to find my domiciliary part
ner for the next eight days, the’ cele
brated, or notorious, parson whoae name 1
have mentioned. Dim rumors of daring deeds
done, or as some hypercritical purists would
rather say, perpetrated, during the early
days of the Golden State, had reached my
ears from time to time, and w ith many of
those the name of Nat Cooling was ass<»ciat6d.
Of the origin of this great man but little was
known. Those who loved him best and
obeyed that excellent law, “Speak well of
the rich,” declared that his youth had been
passed in the lucrative busine>s of importing
“blackbirds,” in other words, in the slave
trade, while those who were actuated by
higher principles, that is, hated or envied
the successful speculator, declared that a
short but brilliant career of piracy had laid
the foundation of his great fortune. All
that was certainly known was that the
colonel turned up in California during the
first symptoms of the gold fever, ami that
his speculations in mining and other opera
tions had been attended with solid success.
Where he was “raised” remained a mystery,
for the colonel, although very communi
cative on all subjects relating to his residence
in California, maintained a severe reticence
as to his happy boyhood and probably stormy
youth. Neither his appearance nor his
speech betrayed his supposed nautical ante
cedents, nor did his outline betray the
numerous angles that the American phys
ique is often credited withal, lie was a
plump, broad-shouldered man. the said
broad shoulders being surmounted by a large
bullet head, covered with a close-cut crop of
stiff black hair. His face, with the exception
of the upper lip, was clean-shaven, and his
general expression was one of frank bonho
mie. There were moments, however, when
a singular expression flashed from his fine
dark eye, ami on these rare occasions it was
not difficult for persona of an imaginative
turn of mind to conjure up a scene in the
summer sea of the Indian Archipelago with
a scuttled ship slowly settling down in the
(lark blue water, and a rakish-looking craft
almost hull down upon the horizon.
Colonel Cooling rejoiced in a velvet coat
and a loose necktie of sanguine hue, but it
was impossible to enjoy his society for any
length of time without observing the immense
diamoml solitaire which adorned his large
but well-shaped hand. This was hot merely
a large diamond, but a brilliant such as Is
rarely seen. It throws out flashes like a
lime-light, and blazed with almost intolerable
radiance. One splendid summer afternoon,
as the Mongolia was doing Iter best to make
short work of the Atlantic, the colonel caught
my eye fixed in admiration on his magnifi
cent jewel, and launched at once Into the fol
lowing story I
“I guess, neighbor, you are takin’ advan
tage of the fine weather to kinder photograph
mv diamond. It’s worth the trouble, yea,
sir! Not only for the valley of the stone,
but for the high old time I had in gettin’ it.
Yuli see I ain’t <* Now Y^rkwr, and novor unt
eye. uu the Empire City till a few weeks
ago, when I kirn around from Frisco to make
a European tower. In Califomy we air
heavy on gold, that’s a fact, but we don’t
pan out much on diamonds, though they are
mighty useful goods when a citizen finds
things pretty well pottered out In Ids old
diggin., and wants to vamoose the ranch,
and make track. for a new placer. But no
sooner had I landed, and got well fixed at
the New York Hotel, than, making a bee
line for the bar, I found all the folks run
diamond mad. In most settlements I am
acquainted with, the talk runs mostly on
dollars, but In tint big city I heard of nothing
but diamonds. It .com. that some old don
married a pretty young gal come little time
ago, and that the show of jewels at the dia
mond weddln’ had set everybody stark-tarin
mad on brilliants. Every boy was braggin'
on bis diamonds, end some of 'em .eometl to
hold a full hand. Wal, after my third cock
tail. 1 lit a fresh elgar ami began to fuel that
tiie diamond fever was kinder kutcbln', and
said I to myself, ‘Nat Cooling, you never
was a one-horse person nor a cuss as would
take a back sent anywheres. If you air
coin’ to pan out on diamonds you must do it
heavy.’
‘•Bein’ on such oncommoß good terms
with myself, I took another drink, and then
fell talkin’ diamonds with a very elegantly
dressed gentleman, who gave me a lot of
points on the subject. After a few more
cocktails I told my new friend that I must
get a diamond, bui that it must be the big
gest in New York. The gentleman wore a
handsome stone himself, which he said was
as good as he could pay for, but remarked
that he thought he knew where to find an
A 1 brilliant; in fact, the avewunnest stone
in the world. 1 laugh, I do, when I think
how anxious I was to see it, ami how much
I felt indebted to the young gentleman when
he consented to mention my desire for the
biggest diamond in New York to his friend.
He told me that he did not think his friend
would sell. In fact, he was pretty sure he
wouldn't, but that 1 might have a sight of
the stone, if I would breakfast with him at
Delnionico’s at 12 o’clock next day.
“This looked all right; and the next morn
ing 1 waa punctooal to my appointment, was
introduced to my friend’s friend—also an
elegant gentlemen—and sat down to the very
best breakfast I had ever seen. I didn't,
however, eat much more than a three-year
old b’ar, my mind was so took up with the
diamond. Nothin’ that 1 had ever seen in
the sparkling way was a circunistauce to it.
Long before we got to the coffee and cigars,
I made a resolution to have that diamond.
But when I led up to the subject, the owner
said no money would induce him to part
with a gem which had been given to him by
his deceased mother on her death-bed. I
felt kinder streaked at this, and wondered
why boys who never care what their parents
say when livin' should pay so much attention
to their wishes when dead. However the
party broke up, and 1 invited my new friends
to dine with me on the morrow. But I had
diamond on the brain, could neither sleep
nor drink, and actually lost a big pile of dol
lars at poker through trying for a straight
flush in diamonds. At our next meeting I
noticed that the proprietor of the diamond
looked discouraged about somethin’, and
told him what a bad time I had had at poker.
“Ah!” said he, ‘lam the most unlucky
man in the world. Last night I lost
at faro, coppering the jack. He won nine
teen times running, and left me dead broke
with nary a red in my pocket.’
“Now, thought I, is my opportunity; so,
after sympathizin’ with him, I raked up the
diamond subject agin. He did not like the
idee at all. at first, and kicked ami cavorted
like a vicious mustang, but at last, reflectin’
that his debts of honor must be met, he
caved in and parted with the diamond, after
kitin’ it agin and agin, with tears in his
eyes, for SIO,OOO cash, on my promising that
if ever 1 should want to part with the stone,
1 would give him the option of re-purchas
ing it at the same price, addin’ seven per
cent, interest for the time I had laid out of
my money, 1 must own that I felt pretty
murky over my bargain, and, promising my
sclf great pleasure in New York and In Europe
out of my big diamond, got pretty high, and
proposed a game of euchre to my compan
ions, just to while away the time, 1 have
played all sorts of games in my time, in all
sorts of company, but that game of euchre
was a caution. It seemed square enough,
even to me. but the cards certainly ran agin
me in the queerest way. So. after losing
quite a pile, I thought it time to give over,
and went to bed, thinkin that after all, my
diamond was some consolation. But when,
next morning, my friends did not drop in to
breakfast, as they promised. I began to feel
myself weakenin’ on die business altogether,
aud made tracks for a great lapidary down
town. After examiuin the gem, he told me
cooly that It was about the best bogus diar
piond be had ever seen, but that a sham it
PRICE 8 CENTS.
wan, and no mistake. You, «ir. may imag
ine my feelin'R, not ho much at lowin’ ten
thousand dollars on tin*diamond, and aheap
at play at that, m at the thought that I, Cool
Nat, of San Joa<|iiin, Inui been gobbled by a
couple of New York dead-taatN. I guoas my
language was pretty heavy when, just as I
hancUNNed all the wool off of my new over*
coat, an idee knock<*d up agin my brain and
struck in at once. I inquired where the
greatewt Jeweler and diamond merchatit in
Umi city kept, and after showing him my bo
gus gem, ami swearing him to Mecrecy, asked
it he could find me a real diamond like it.
“He told me be would do his level best to
match it, and did so within three hours,
charging me >I2JM)o for the -ton.', I then
had it set in the riug in the place of my
bogus one, and, putting Colonel Bogus in
my pocket, walked into the bar of my hotel.
Ah I had judged, there was more than two in
the little speculation 1 had suffered from.
My friend and his friend had cleared out,
biit I smelt powder when 1 heard the talk
run upon the number of sham diamonds
worn. “Yes. sir,” said one young blood,
dressed up like a barber's block; “I guess
them very big stones is mostly bogus,” cast
ing at the Minie lime a snaky look at my
ring. But they wouldn't let me alone, and
presently got up a bet among themselveH
about their rings, and pitched u|xm me as
umpire, for. said one of ’em, 'Guess that
strange gentleman as wears the Koh-i-noor
ought to understand the subject.’
“1 own I felt very like drawing my six*
shooter and cleaning out the crowd, but I
kept my temper and said: “Gentlemen, I
don't understand small potatoes. Them
little bits o’ things may or not be genuine,
but if you want to brag on diamonds I
guess I’ll take the pool? At this they kinder
sniggered, and asked U> look at my ring. I
let them look as long as they liked, but kept
the ring on my finger. At last one of them
said, “That stone must ha\ e come pretty high,
I judge.’ ‘Yes, sir.’ said I, 'ten thousand
dollars cash.’ At these words they sniggered
agin. So I, puttin’ on that I was riled,
rounded*on 'em sharp: 'I don’t know, gen
tlemen. what you see to laugh at.’ Then
the gracefulvst and politest cuss in the party
says, quite solemn-like, ‘I fear It’s no laughin’
matter for you, sir. I guess you air a
stranger, and 1 suspect some rascals in the
city here have stuck you with an imitation
stone.’ At this 1 pretended to rile right up,
and swore that I bought the ring of a perfect
gentleman, and had had no end of trouble to
buy it at all. The polite man stiffened up
his back at that, made some remarks on gen
tility in general, and wound up by offering
to bet a thousand dollars that my diamond
was bogus, to put up the money right away,
and leave the matter to be decided by any
jeweler named by the proprietor ofjthe tatel.
“Then I felt that I had struck a lode, and
turning round sharply, says, ‘Lookee here,
sir. bets of a thousand dollars is good enough
for a small game, but when my word is ques
tioned, and my property is run down, 1 put
down my whole pile, and 1 will back my
diamond with my bottom dollar.’ They kept
their faces very well, but I could see their
eyes glisten, and knew that I had 'em safe.
One said 'he couldn't put up much just then
but he could find eight thousand in half an
hour, and would stake it with pleasure agin
mine.’ Then another struck in, and thought
as ‘I didn't look satisfied with such a little
bet. lie would back his friend's opinion for
five thousand,' and as I still kept on sayin’ I
was not goiu’ to show my diamond except
for a bet of twenty thousand dollars, they
scraped up about eighteen among them. I
covered the money, and handed it over, with
the ring and a written memorandum, to
the proprietor. A lapidary was named,
called in, and decided at once that the
diamond was genuine. Quite a consider
able scene took place, and the swin
dlers insisted on callin' in another wit
ness, and I nearly busted myself with laugh
in' when they named the very man I bought
the stone of. When he saw the stone his
face was a study: but he never let on that he
had seen it Iwfore, and said only that it was
jwrliujm ‘the finest diamond he had ever
in a ring,’ bowed to the company, and
walked off. To do my rascals justice, they
showed gilt, drank the champagne I treated
them to. and walked off coolly enough. But
the best part of the joke is to come.
The story of my big bet somehow got
around, mid all sorts of versions got into the
papers. 1 was interviewed pretty heavily by
rejiorters, and Colonel Nathaniel J. Cooling,
of San Joaquin; was credited with owning
the biggest diamond ring in New York, when
who should walk Into the hotel but niy origi
nal friend and hjs friend, The cusses evi
dently believed that by some unheard-of
chance they had purchased a real instead of
a bogus diamond, and they were no doubt
raging in their innards to think that they
hadn’t sold me in the first instance, and had
put the gang (n the hole for SIB,OOO. But the
stone was now celebrated, and they began try
in’ to work on me to let 'em have it back for
ten thousand dollars, as 1 had made such a
good speculation iu bets. The original pro
prietor said he was in funds agin, and
couldn’t sleep for thlnklu* of his mother’s
ring. Of course he wanted it back to sell at
a big profit, and recoup the gang a bit. I
declined to sell, and kept him off and on till
I was ready to start, and told him 1 must
wear the ring till I was aboard ship, when, if
he would pay down the money iu gold, he
could have his ring agin. You guess what 1
did? No? Why theday before we sailed I
had the real diamond set in the ring you see
on mv hand, and Colonel Bogus put back
into the old setting. My friends came on
board, paid the money in gold, stranger
nary shinplasivrs—examined the ring and
the same old sham one they sold me, and
went off as happy as coyotes round a dead
mule. I wonder how they like the deal
now! As far as I can figure it 1 take about
eighteen thousand by the spec—two-thirds
in diamond and the rest in g- Id. Our glori
ous Golden State is, 1 guess, the place to cut
your eye-teeth in, and 1 judge the dead-beats
of New York city will not soon forget Nat
Cooling of San Joaquin.”— All the Year
Hound.
Like Without Wixteh. —Mrs. Beecher
Stowe writes from her winter retreat in Flor
ida: "We hear tliat the hotels and boarding
houses on the river are beginning to be
thronged, and no wonder. What is the use
of a glorious Union if one doesn’t use its
choice of climates? Shall people buy rocky
bits of land on the shores of the Atlantic
and put up houses at the cost of tens and
twenties of thousands for two months’ sum
mer bathing, and neglect the better chances
of a winter home for six of the severe
months of the year? Every year, as we
come down, we count new houses rising
on the shores of the St. John’s, attesting the
progress of common sense in this direction.
Many a delicate consumptive, many a dys
peptic and nervous invalid might be saved to
a long life of enjoyment merely by dropping
winter out of the category of things to be en
dured. As to expense, two hundred dol
lars invested in an acre of land, a simple, in
expensive cottage, would be speedily made
up in the cost of fuel for a Northern winter.
One lives here so simple—the requirements
of dress and society are so few, that, even
counting traveling expenses, it is a saving to
be here, if health and happiness ate left out
of the question. The life of Northern cities is
over stimulated, and we really never know
what rest is till we come here. Then the
whole hot, busy, anxious, running, breath
less North fades away into graceful, pearly
tints of blue distance. ’We feel almost as
souls may that have passed the great river
and turn to look back on the shores of life.
All is peace. A thousand anxieties drop
like a mantle. Voices of hot haste mid mail
hurry die in the distance. Slanders, gossips,
and scandals are things of the past. Do the
red birds understand them! Not one
whit. Will the mockiug-birdcare for them?
Not he. While we write a great yellow but
terfly, a living air blossom, is gossipping
round the gilded wires of the bird cages. A
sere tulip and opal and rainbow are chipper
iiig to each other, and a bright yellow canary
is giving lessons to the three in operatic
singing. What can be more beautiful, more
dream-like, than the life of a butterfly?
Does It rememlier when it was a poor, crawl
ing worm? With such eestacy, let us hope
some poor, faithful souls, who have crawled
over one little damp spot of earth, faithful
over a tew things, will burst forth when
deatli breaks their prison. Fancy a tioor
soul who never did anything but make shirts
at five cents apiece released and floating
about in Mich eestacy of life as this."—
Christian Vniun.
The milk that will make one |>ouiid of
butter will make two pounds of cheese;
and the butter is worth twice as much per
pound as the cheese. Then the buttermilk
is worth twice as much for feeding hogs or
calves as the whey, leaving a small balance
iu favor of making butter.
Jailn ^ress.
AIMERTIMING
Ona square, one Insertion •* ®
M each subsequentlnsertion. ••
•• M one year..'.‘.... , ...r..h...^ 30 OO
O* >kli®dule of fun rates furnished on appll*
oation.
Publication Office:
CROMPTON’S BLOCI, MECHANIC STREET,
WORCEMTEK, MANH.
GENERAL NEWS.
Too much Interest waa one of the issues Iu
Connecticut.
A cow of unblemished reputation mean
dered into the Baltimore lock-up, the other
day, and getting frightened ran into one of
the cells. The apartment was so narrow
that it took Momething more, powerful than a
habeas corpus to draw her out.
Miss Kellogg gave a free musical enter
tainment, last Saturday night, at the I onti
nental Hotel, Philadelphia, to the servants
employed in that house. It was a thoughtful
ami kind act, and worthy of tar generous
nature.
A Troy dentist became emotionally insane
while repairing a front tooth for a pretty
woman, and kissed her. She told tar hus
band, and he went around the next day and
borroweil SSOO of the dentist on long time.
Dr. Linderman, Director of the Mint
Bureau, is of the opinion that the loss by
the abrasion of coinage should be met by the
Government and not by the holder* of the
coin.
Mr. A. D. Williams of Richmond has become
the wealthiest man in Virginia by the simple
process of investing SI,OOO, a few years ago,
ui 40,000 acres of land, which has since
turned out to be Immensely rich in coal.
A project is on foot among numerous New
York ladies for forming an insurance com
pany. having only women for officers, agents
and policy-holders. They are down on
sparks.
It is a question whether the abolition of
the franking privilege will apyly to the widow
of President Lincoln, who received the rigl t
of franking, on her husband's death, for the
rest of her natural life.
A man in Fort Wayne, Ind., dropped his
well filled pocket-book in a depot, on the Ist
instant, and found it some time after, as
every body around had been afraid of being
“fooled.”
The celebrated establishment of M. Krupp
of Essen will be represented at the Vienna
Exhibition by a cast steel gun of seven metres
length and weighing thirty-eight tons, and a
huge block of cast-steel weighing fifty tons.
The two articles are forwarded by a special
train reserved all to themselves.
One of the most eventful epochs in a boy’s
history is when he first addresses his father
as the “old man.” It is a patriarchal term,
and if the boy is rightly treated afterward by
the family physicia i he lives a great many
years to enjoy it.
The latest comic song has a really comic
jingle for its refrain, recalling the punning
chorus of “1 Saw Esau Kissing Kate.’’
Thus it runs:
“Say so Sue, Sau-cy Sup,
Never leave me to sigh so, Sue;
If you love me, Saucy Sue,
Wouldn’t it be better for to say so, Sue?”
The American heel, broml and of medium
height, has quite displaced the high French
heels so injurious to health. Shoes are made
plain. The toes rather square, and the
stitching of black silk. Frencli prunella
for summer boots, with oxings of kid. But
toned boots are the mode.
A Parisian philosopher has made the
laughing gas market active by leaving the
following testatment: “It is my will that
any one of my relatives who shall presume
to shed tears at my funeral shall be disin
herited. He who laughs most heartily shall
be my sole heir.”
A rural lady in getting on the train at the
depot, Saturday, was polite enough to knock
at the car door. The brakeman managed to
control his visage into a semblance of gravi
ty tmtii he grit thu door ©Den., and then lift
preciptitately adjourned. He said bethought
he would laugh his head off before he got
through with it.
The effort to stock California with Eastern
fish must be very successful, if we c;m be
lieve the Sacramento Record. That journal
says that black bass have been already taken
to market weighing from eight to eighteen
pounds each. In the East they never weigh
more than six, or at most, seven pounds.
An exchange devotes a quarter of a column
to tell “how mirrors may be ruined.” There
is a vast difference iu people. We believe m
condensing things. If we were asked by an
anxious public “how mirrors may be ruined,”
we would say, “Poke ’em in their diaphrams
with a stick.”
The French sailors have introduced a new
luxury in New York. Garden snails, already
prepared and cooked, are now’ being publicly
sold in the streets, and they find ready cus
tomers. They are pronounced by epicures to
be a delicacy which cannot be too highly ap
preciated, and they are devoured with gusto.
The Montgomery Advertiser, speaking of
the cotton crop for this season, says: “The
money paid for it in its raw state will not fall
far short of $330,000,000. Of this sum almut
$35,000,000 will have gone to speculators and
first purchasers, leaving $295,000,000 to the
producers. Alabama's share of this magni
ficent sum is nearly $35,000,000, estimating
her crop at 400,000 bales.’’
A remarkable discovery has been made by
Mr. Willoughby Smith, the electrician to a
British telegraph construction and main
tenance company. He finds niat if a bar
of selenium placed in the dark has a current
of electricity passed through it. and lie then
subjected to the influence of light, its fiower
of conducting electricity is immediately
doubled, this result ceasing the moment the
light is withdrawn. It proved that this effect
is entirely due to the luminous rays, and in
no way due to the effect of Heat.
A curious instance of the readiness of the
French to turn a political dispute into a per
sonal quarrel is related in one of the pajjers.
Admiral Pothnau, the Minister of Marine,
invited two members of the Assembly, to
breakfast with him, the other morning. Hav
ing left them alone for a few minutes, the
conversation turnetl on the revolution of
1789, and the execution of Louis XII, which
one of the guests undertook to defend.
Thereupon the other flew’ into a passion,
and declared that he would not sit at the ta
ble with a num who held such principles.
At this stage of proceedings the host return
ed, and found hims 'lf unable to appease the
disputante, who exchanged cards and ap
pointed seconds for a hostile encounter.
The Hartford limes says that the snow in
the northern towns of Litchfield county,
Conn., is still so deep in drifts that on elec
tion day, the 7th, the roads were impassable
for teams, and many voters were compelled
to go to the polls on foot. In many instan
ces thev walked four, five, and even six
miles. Anson Norfolk, Esq., an old-school
Norfolk Democrat, aged 84, who never yet.
deviated from the faith, resolved that rather
than lose his vote, though he resided four
miles from the polls, he would walk the en
tire distance. And this he did—going both
ways over the snow-drifts, and deposited once
more the straight Democratic ticket. Sleighs
are still running in Norfolk, Goshen, etc.,
and for miles the snow is about four feet
deep. Folks that way do not care if the ice
men do raise their prices.
The Harvard Graduates’ Cup, to be con
tended for each year, is nearly finished, and
will soon be placed on exhibition at 158 Tri
mont street, Boston. It is of sold silver par
tially frosted: its height being some four
teen inches, and its breadth across the top
most part about twelve. The sloping pedes
tal rests on four sea shells of frosted silver,
and rises to almost a [mint, then sw< Hing
out into a shield form, and finally curving
into a basin-like top. Ou the opposite sides
of the basin are two handles, formed by
dolphins, with their tails in air, and sup
lioitiiig by their mouths chain cables which,
hanging downward are caught up in the
centre by miniature buoys. On the extreme
summit of the upper portion of the cup is a
sailor boy who stands, oar in hand, leaning
on a capstan, while about him are an anchor,
coils of cable and other nautical parapher
nalia in abundance. The cup is exquisitely
chased in portions, and on its surface are en
graven on one side the monogram composed
from the letters “H. U. B. C.,” and on the
other "Graduates’ Cup, 1872.” The whole
is enclosed in a glass case and mounted on
rich crimson velvet ground. The das* crews
are already upon the water indulging in vig
orous practice daily.

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