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Worcester daily press. [volume] (Worcester, Mass.) 1873-1878, April 17, 1873, Image 1

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EVERY MORNING, SUNDAY EXCEPTED,
—AT—
BN per an num | 7 5 eta. per month.
Wtthlp |lrtss,
EVERY SATURDAY MORNING,
At 82... per annum.
EDWARD R. FISKE i CO., Proprietors.
F. H. FINKE. J. A. WALniNO.
fiouse jfuriiishiiift.
UPH IN O T R A D■ .
Carpets!
R. B. HENCHMAN,
as now in store a full assortment of every grade
of
BRUSSELS,
TAPESTRY,
INGRAINS, AC.,
WINDOW SHADES,
RIGS,
MATS.
LOOK AT MV
EXTRA BARGAINS!
Best Bodn Brussels
from 81.75 to 81.90 |>er yard.
English Tapestry
nt 81.25 per yard.
50 ROLLS
Straw Matting,
at 25c. per yard.
THE LARGEST ASSORTMENT OF
Oil Cloths
In this market, at the LOWEST PRICES, can be
found at
R. B. HENCHMAN'S,
No. 1 Foster St., cor. Main.
u 1 -11
REMOVAL.
L. M. Maxham & Co.,
HAVE MOVED THEIR STOCK OF
Fur niture
To chamber occupied by the late D.JB.jjMaynard
AISIA Ma i n Street,
Where they will be pleased te meet those in wan
of Chamber Sets and Upholstered
Furniture.
IF YOU WOULD HAVE A GOOD BLACK
Walnut Chamber Set for the least money, go to
MAXHAM & CO.’S, 515 Main street.
IF YOU W ANT A GOOD CUSTOM MADE
Parlor Suite of the latest style, MAXHAM &
CO., 515 Main street, make them.
HAVE YOU HAIR MATTRESSES THAT
have become hard? Send them to MAX
HAM & CO., 515 Main street. They will return
them as good as new, Price, $3.50 each.
DO YOU WANT A NICE, EASY CHAIR
for yourself or friends? Call and see what L. M.
MAX HAM & CO. have, or will make for you.
WHEN YOU WANT THE BEST BED
Lounge in the market, go to MAX HAM & CO.,
515 Main street, and get the Russ Bed Lounge.
IF YOU HAVE FURNITURE THAT IS
worn out, see what MAXHAM & CO., 515 Main
street, will repair it for; you can save dollars
by doing so.
DO YOU WANT A PURE NO. 1 CURLED
Hair Mattress? See those MAXHAM & CO.
make. They have only that kind.
L. M. MAXHAM & CO., 515 MAIN ST.,
receive and seil Furniture on commission,
look at their prices.
W HEN YOU HAVE LOOKED THROUGH
the larger furniture houses and are not satisfied
call ami see us ; we know the whole story. L.
M. MAXHAM & CO., 515 Main street- Up one.
flight. Im a 3
J OHN D. CHOLLAR & CO.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS
—IX—
FURNITURE
Upholstery Goods,
are now prepared to show as LARGE and COM
PLETE a Stock of Furniture as can be seen in any
city in New England, and we invite the people of
Worcester and neighboring towns to call and ex
amine our goods.
On Our First Floor
may be found a choice selection of
UPHOLSTERY’ GOODS,
LACES, CURTAINS,
SHADES, CORDS,
TASSELS, TRIMMINGS,
BED SPREADS,
PILLOW’ SHAMS, ETC.
—ALSO—
Book Cases, Hat Trees, Ladies’ Desks and Oflice
Furniture.
ON OUR SECOND FLOOR
We are offering PARLOR SUITES at very Low
Prices indeed. We have a new style Panel Frame
Parlor Suit, covered in Hair Cloth ami Terry,
which we are selling from BSO to 8125. The
same in Plush from 8100 to 8175. These suits
arc really worth more money than any we have
ever solci at that price. We have many other
styles in this line of finer stock ami materials,
which we shall be happy at all times to show. On
this floor also can be seen a large variety of MIR
RORS, TABLES, CHAIRS and DINING Fl RNI-
Tl ’ RE. We would call especial attention to our
SIDEBOARDS,
which we are selling at very low and medium
prices, ami would say to any one in search of such,
to give us a call and examine for themselves.
Persons wishing to see
CHAMBER FURNITURE
are taken to our THIRD FLOOR by a Patent
Safety Passenger Elevator, where we have a nice
stock* of
Painted Chamber Suits,
which are selling fast, at prices ranging from 826
to 875. These suits are of our own design and
finish, and are well worth the attention of buyers.
Our usual quantity of Ash and Walnut Chamber
Suits are kept up.to the well-known standard, ami
are marked at prices that will defy competition.
Call and see
MARBLE TOP WALNUT SUITS,
Selling from SBO to 8150.
Mr. GEO. W. GIBBS, for many years in the em-
Flov of the late D. B. Maynard*, will hereafter he
ound at our store, where he will be pleased to
see all his old friends ami as many new ones as
will give him a call.
JOHN D. (HOLLAR & CO.,
No. 472 Main Street.
OPPOSITE OLD SOUTH CHURCH.
ai-Hy
Momstw Llailv Ptm
VOL. I, NO. 15.
^lafhinn and ^'aalriix.
। L o t h i MG.
WARE, PRATT & CO.'S
* ANNOUNCEMENT OF
SPRING GOODS,
FOR
MEN, YOUTHS AND BOYS.
We have been in the imuket early this season,
and have been enabled to secure ah elegant line
of Spring Cloths in SUITINGS, O\ ERCOAT
INGS, TROWSERINGS, and VESTINGS of the
best foreign makes, including
French,
German,
English,
and Scotch,
and a fine line of AMERICAN GOODS, from mills
of established reputation. In our
MAMADE DEPARTMENT
w. have a full lino of SUITS, OVERCOATS, and
SINGLE GARMENTS, for both
MEN’S, YOUTHS' and BOYS’
WEAR,
and principally of our own manufacture. We
have always endeavored to manufacture our goods
to a high standard of excellence, and can say lor
ourselves this Spring that, with what knowledge
we have gained in the past, we haw produced this
year our goods at a higher degree of workmanship
and style than ever before. We invite careful in
vestigation of all our goods in this respect. Our
Furnishing Goods De-
partment
embraces everything essential to comfort in that
line, ami we are constantly receiving
NEW GOODS.
We have the exclusive sale of the
“FAVORITE SHIRT.”
It is giving general satisfaction. We give special
attention to orders for tine Custom Shirts.
We invite a full expmiiiation of our stock in the
different departments, feeling confident that we
CANNOT BE UNDERSOLD
bv anv house in Worcester. All goods marked in
plain figures, and those marks are not deviated
from.
The Orijiial One Price Clothiers.
WARE, PRATT & CO.,
408 and 412 Main Street,
FIRST NATIONAL HANK MARBLE BTILIHNG,
WORCESTER, MASS.
ap7-1y
JUST OPENED!
OIK SPUING ASSORTMENT OF
CLOTHS
FOR OUR
CUSTOM DEPARTMENT,
In the choicest varieties of Foreign and Domestic
ma’iufacture.
The reputation of c ’house for fine garments
is well known, and all desiring to leave their or
ders will do well to call e..rly before the rush com
mences.
D. H. EAMES & CO.,
One Price Clothiers,
CORNER MAIN AND FRONT STREETS,
al WORCESTER. MASS. dly
C P R I N G
OVER COATS,
NOW READY,
A good assortment of the most approved styles.
Prices from #7 to #2O.
Spring Suits
FOR
GENTS AND BOYS
In all varieties and prices, now in stock, at
D. H. EAMES & CO.’S
(hie Price Clothing House,
CORNER MAIN AND FRONT STREETS,
al WORCESTER, MASS. dly
W E OFFER TO-DAY,
465
PAIRS ALL WOOL CASSIMERE PANTS
AT ONLY
$5.00
A PAIR, FORMER PRICES FROM SIX TO
eight dollars, this is less than
THE CLOTH IS WORTH. WE BOUGHT
THESE IN A JOB LOT, AND GIVE OUR
CUSTOMERS THE ADVANTAGE OF IT.
WE ALSO OFFER TWO il UNDRED COATS
AND ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY VESTS,
AT EQUALLY LOW PRICES.
D. H. EAMES & CO.
al dly
LOTH ING.
Spring Opening!
We are now opening a complete assortment of
Spring Clothing,
consisting of the largest and best lot of
Scotch Suits,
both in medium and fine grades ever offered in
this city. A complete line of
Spring Overcoats,
nearly equal in style and make to custom work.
Also a full line of Plain and Fancy Suits, Pants
ami Vests at the lowest cash prices. We would
especially call attention to our
Custom Department,
which contains a large and choice variety of
Suitings,
Spring Overcoats,
Trowserings, &c.
That will be made in superior style and work
manship.
Furnishing Goods
of every description constantly on hand.
We are selling an excellent fine Shirt that is
meeting with great approval. Also, make Shirts
to order, and warrant a tit.
H. C. VALENTINE & CO.,
330 Main Street, Worcester, Mass.
aS Im
_____________
• CUTTER will cut two pounds of Pte Meat in
one minute and Hash for the Family in one half a
minute. Works extremely easy. Sells for §3.
May be taken on trial at 570 Main st. al 3m
WORCESTER, MASS., THURSDAY MORNING, APRIL 17, 1878.
^innstmenh.
P. T. BARNUM’S
^ATTHAVEL!.^
World’s Fair!
TEN TIMES LARGER THAN EVER!
WILL EXHIBIT IN
Worcester, Friday, Maj’ 2,
ON ELM PARK.
Giving THREE Grand performances of the en
tire 20 Shows.
20 COLOSSAL PA VI LIONS.
100,060 Curiosities.
1500 Animals and Birds.
3 Grout Circus Troops.
150 Railroad Cars.
Procession three miles long.
A FULL MENAGERIE FREE!
2000 Men and Horses.
12 Chariots.
100 Cages.
4 Bands of Music.
NOTHING LIKE IT EVER SEEN ON EARTH!
Admission to all 50 cents. Children 25 cents.
Doors open 10 A. M. 1 and 7 I*. M.
gy'FBEE Admission to the entire 20 Great
Shows is granted to all who buy the Life of P. T.
Barnum—WO pages, illustrated. Reduced from
§3.50 to §1.50.
•• Worth a §IOO Greenback to a beginner."
alO d*wtmy2 —Horace Greeley.
• ^int Art#.
P I N E ARTS!
LOVERS OF THE FINE ARTS
will findat my store one of the best collections of
Fine Steel Engravings; English, French,
German and American Chromos,
in Oil and Water Colors, to be found in New
England outside of Boston.
Stereoscopic Views,
Prangs’ Beautiful Productions
Photographs,
BRACKETS AND WOOD CARVINGS,
PICT TTHF, FRAMES
MADE TO ORDER
from latest patterns of mouldings.
GOLD FRAMES, BLACK WALNUT, iC„
of all desirable kinds. Picture Knobs, Cords and
like fixtures.
Particular attention given to re-gilding old
frames.
A. E. PECK, Art Dealer,
alts Lincoln House Block.
sarriaflts and flarntss.
ESTABLISHED A. D. 1850.
B. McALEER
Successor to D. Brown,
Manufacturer of
Fine Harness
AND DEALER IN FIRST CLASS
Stable and Carriage Goods,
228 Main St.
aldtf
f£HE ARCHIBALD IRON-HUBBED
AV II E E L S
Are the best wheels for wagons and carts. Sam
ples can be seen at the office of
MASON & LINCOLN,
alts No. 11 Mechanic Street.
(JEORGE T. AITCHISON,
Manufacturer of Carriages
—AND—
TOP AND OPEN SLEIGHS.
I have now finished a fine assortment of the
best and latest styles of Phaetons, Prince Al
berts, Goddard style, Piano box, Top and Open
Buggies; side spring Buggies; very light Road
and Track Wagons, constantly on hand of my own
make.
Express and Job Wagons of all kinds; also 1..
T. Bancroft’s .Monitor street sprinkler the vety
best in use made tn order.
Repairing of Carriages in all its branches
promptly and thoroughly done.
Also, Wheels Made to Order of the Best Stock.
Corner of School and Union Streets.
WORCESTER MASS,
al 3m
flunky and flanker#.
JJICE, WHITING & BULLOCK,
BANK E R S ,
Corner Main and Pearl Streets, Worcester,
Buy and sell Railroad, City and County Bonds.
Special attention given to orders for the pur
chase and sale of Stocks at NEW
YORK and BOSTON
BOARDS.
Agents for the Various Lines of
European Steamships.
Persons contemplating going abroad will find
at our office Cabin Plans of the S:eainers of the
several Lines, thus enabling them to select and
secure rooms without the delay and expense of
applying at the principal offices in New Yorker
Boston. Letters of Credit furnished available in
all the principal cities of Europe.
Drafts Drawn Payable in any City in Europe.
ty United States Passports procured without
charge. ts al
MONEY
TO LOAN
BY ESTABROOK & SMITH,
424 Alain Street, Worcester, Mass,
a 8 ly
Jflour, ^rain and ^fred.
P L O U R! FLO U R! I
THE PLACE TO BUY YOUR
FLOUR, GRAIN,
HAY, STRAW,
BUTTER, EGGS,
. and CHEESE.
DOON & BARRETT’S,
Th™. &TT. I WORCESTER, MASS.
a 4 ts
A R T I N KELLEY,
FASHIONABLE
Boot and Shoe Maker.
Repairing Neatly Done.
No. 398 Main Street, - - Worcester Mass.
a2<ltf
T ETTER PRESS PKTOTING.
Eveiy description of Letter Press Printing
neatly and promptly executed at this office.
Job flrintinff.
yyHO DOES VOLK PRINTING?
THE PROPRIETORS OF
THE PRESS
Respectfully announce to the old patrons of our
long established
“Franklin Job Printing Office,”
and to the new friends which we arc making
through the colums of this paper, that our
Job Printing*
DEPARTMENT
is now receiving fresh additions of
New Type
-AND-
MAC 111 MER Y,
and that we are much better prepared than ever
before to do all kinds of
FINE JOB PRINTING,
as well as the ordinary grades of work. The re
putation of this Establishment during the score
or more of years that it has been under the man
agement of Mr. FISKE, has been higher than
most other houses in this section of New England.
We propose to fully maintain this reputation by
the increased and increasing
Excellence of our Work,
ami by the reasonableness of our charges. We
shall make a specialty still of
ELEGANT LETTER PRESS,
ami respectfully invite the attention of those who
desire and appreciate the beautiful in this “art
preservative," to our samples and facilities for
skillfully executing everything in this particular
branch.
The publication of the The Press will in no
way interfere with the
Job Department,
further than to improve it as it increases the de
mand.
The public are cordiaily invited to look through
our extensive works, and are always welcome,
whether ordering work or not.
Remember that everything in the line of
Book and Fine Job
PRINTING I
is done here at shortest notice and in a manner
thoroughly satisfactory.
Onr Business Office, Newspaper and Job De
partments are conveniently located on
Mechanic Street,
-IN-
C romp ton’s Block,
(SECOND FLOOR)
where, with competent men in all depaitinerts.*
weare always prepared to serve those who u ay
favor us with a cal).
Orders by Mail or Express will also meet with
the same careful person al attention.
EDWARD R. FISKE & CO.,
Proprietors.
WORCEST ER, MASS.
a 2 ts
$1,500,000 IN CHALLENGES.
P. T. BARNUM TO THE PUBLIC.
In view of the fact that certain unwiupulous
Showmen, on all sides of me, arc copying my ad
vertisements and my titles for their shows, as far
a* they dare, headings of my posters, my pictorial
hills, and employ men to scour the country to mis
represent my show and myself, to pbu-e their date*
on my bills, and by sundry misrepresentations In
duce the people from the country to visit the city
MUppoalng my great World’s Fair w as to lie seen In
stead of their show, made up of a few old tents,
a lew common wagons, a few < heap animals, and
a circus company hired with a view to economy
rather than talent. In some instances they have
vainly endeavored to bribe the public press, Ido
not Inteml to compete with these shows, or to in
terfere with any of them when they state facts; but
1 cannot calmly sit by and sec the public (whom 1
have for years catered for) deceived by concerns
u hieb, notwithstanding the ]mverty w ithin their
small tents, spread more pictorial bills, and show
1110^ picture animals than “Barnum'a largest
Show in the World" even contains.
I do not wish to Im* undenhood as saying that
all shows are of the class to which 1 have alluded
to here. There are good showa besides mine—but
what I assert, ami I do it without fear of success
ful contradi< ti«m, (if put to the test), is, that nig
Show, as now organised, is by far the largest anti
most ejiwneice Traveling Ejhibition in the
trorbl—fully double that of the largest shows in
this country, and three times larger than most of
them.
In order, therefore, to set myself right Iwfore
the public, and that there may be no mistaking
my meaning, I offer the following challenges on
the following conditions:
CoMUTioNs;—Whenever these Challenges, nr
or any part of them, are accepted, the successful
party shall donate the whole amount of winnings
to Charitable Institutions.
CHALLENGES.
Challenge No. I.—
Fifty Thousand Dollars
Tbitt mine is by far the largest and most expen
sive combination of traveling exhibitions ever be
fore seen in this country, or, in fact, in the world,
at any price, (although I exhibit the whole for
only 50 cents.)
Challenge No. 2.—§50,000 that no traveling ex
hibition ever contained all the specimens of rare,
livipg wild animals found in my Zoologies! Col
lection.
Challenge No. 3.—§50,000 that no traveling
show ever exhibited such wonderful mechanical
and musical marvels as are included in my com
bination.
Challenge No. 4.—§50,000 that the pcrf<»rmers
aud novelties engaged for my Three Rings are
greater in numbers and receive more salaries than
any two of the best Circusses in America.
Challenge No. 5.—§50,000 that I have more
Musicians than any traveling show in America.
Challenge No. g.—§50,000 that I have more
Ring Horses than any tiro traveling shows in
America, that are used for no other purpose.
Challenge No. 7.—§50,000 that I have nearly,
if not quite,double the numberof cars of my own
(betides those hired from the railroads) than are
used by any two traveling shows in this country.
It Is easy enough to learn the above facts by ap
plying to Railroad Superintendents anywhere, or
of station agents.
Challenge No. 8.—§50,000 that I have more
Chariots. Vans and Wagons than any traveling
Show ever organized in this country.
Challenge No. 9.—§50,000 that my Hippodrome
1 Tent is the largest ever built for a traveling ex
hibition within the memory of man.
[ Challenge No. 10.—§50,000 that I have more
,-nen than any Show that ever traveled.
Challenge No. 11.—§50,000 that f have more
Wild Animals, Birds and Reptiles than any travel
ing Hhow in this country, or ever organized as a
traveling exhibition on this continent.
Challenge No. 12.—§50,000 that I have the
ONLY TALKING MACHINE ever invented; and
that 1 have the testimonials of the Principals of
almost all the Colleges in this country and Europe,
as well as the testimonial of the Emperor of
Russia.
It cost more time and money to construct the
TALKING MACHINE which I have on exhibition
than has all the animals in any Menagerie—ex
cept my own—now in the Eastern States.
Challenge No. 13.-850,000 that I have a bigger
team of Camels and Elephants together than any
other traveling Show in America.
Challenge No. 14.—§50,0Q0that I have more
yards of tent than any traveling Show in America.
Challenge No. 15.—§50,000 that I have living
Sea Lions with my great traveling Show, carried
in massive water tanks.
Challenge No. 16.—§50,000 that there is not so
large a traveling Troupe either in this country or
in Europe; and that it is the most stupendous
affair on either continent.
Challenge No. 17.—§50,000 that the like was
never seen before in a traveling show.
Challenge No. is.—§so,ooothat I am, ami have
been, copied more by showmen than any other
man in the world.
CiiALLmiE No. 19.—§50,000 that my traveling
Show is the only one in the world using a Steam
Engine to run Mechanical Novelties.
Challenge No. 20.—§50,000 that no traveling
Exhibition ever used so many or so expensive,
gorgeous and elaborately carved Chariots, Vans,
Cages and Wagons as 1 do.
Challenge No. 21.—That I am the first this
season to give two performances in two rings, in
full view of the whole vast luidicnce at the same
time.
Challenge No. 22.—§50,000 that no other trav
eling establishment ever made such a long, beau
tiful, extensive ami costly Street Procession as I
give almost every morning by 9 o’clock, (Sundays
excepted.)
Challenge No. 23.—§50,000 that no other trav
elin< Exhibition could ever give, as 1 do, early
Morniifg Peiformances;— having the tents crowd
ed with flighted visitors who have traveled
from ten to sixty, and even one hundred miles,
expressly to see, (as they do . THE GREATEST
AN D BEST SHOW ON EARTH.
Challenge No. 24.—§50,000 that some of these
impostors advertise to exhibit animals ami curi
osities they never owned nor expect to own.
Challenge No. 25.—§50,000 that they will
fully advertise and promise very many things
they never intend to exhibit, simply expecting in
this way to swindle thousands out of their half
dollars; many of these impostors, totally regard
less of the denunciations that follow tlwni, think
that they can easily come out under a new name
another year, and by another alias deceive the
same people over again.
Ch allenge No. 26.—§50,000 that all who adver
tise a living Hippopotamus are impostors—that
not one of them has such an animal—and that
there never was but one in America? which was
th*t exhibited by me.
Challenge No. 27.—§50,900 that of all the im-
IMWdorswho advertise living Giraffes, not one of
them has such an animal—that no manager has
lu done for the last three years, except myself,
ana that I have purchased seven within that
time*-that 1 lost four at my late fire, and that 1
am now the only man in America who has two
living Giraffes in Europe, and am awaiting the
proper season to arrive before shipping them to
America.
Challenge No. 28.-850,000 that the Curiosities
in my Museum Collection—animate ami inani
-1 mate-cost me more money-than all the ( uriosf
ties in all the so-called traveling Museums tn
| America combined.
ChallB»;e No. 29.—550,000 that no Manager in
America overpaid so much for the use of all his
living Curiosities as 1 pay for the use of I’ROt.
FABER’S wonderful TA LKI NG M ACHIN E alone!
CHALLENGE No. 30,—§50,000 that I have the
onbi Eiji Islandersnow on exhibition on this Con
tinent. (As this feature of my Show is impor
tant, and as some doubt has been expressed about
their g» uuineness, I make this challenge §loo,uoo
—th*- specimens I exhibit are genuine. Many
people belbwe that while they themselves are
looking at them, they are humbugged: hence, if
any are in doubt, let them take the chance of a
1 small fortune, by hunting up their origin and ex
y»>se me to the public.
Ch allenge No. 31.—§50,000 that there is but
mW traveling show, besides my own, that has liv
ing MARINE MONSTERS, and that the excep
tional phow is not in the New England States, nor
will it bo in the Eastern States this season.
Challenge N0.22,—810,000 that there is not a
traveling exhibition on this continent that em
ploys, permanently, 250 ineu—except my own—
with their exhibitions.
Challenge No, 33.—810,000 that I have uu,n*
that* twice as many cars of mg own as are used by
anv Other traveling show now in New England,
«ud that juv daily expenses are firetimos that of
ouHnarv shows. It is easy to learn the facts;
ask railroad a £ entß an<l aH otbe ” iM
’ authority, the ,no,,t faw *
Challenge No. 34.—§10,000 that there la no
traveling show having an AQUARIUM. 1 cstalx
llshed the first in America, and found it very dif*
llcult to maintain one, even Mulionary, in my
New York .Museum, und it is simply an IMFOBB
TION to advertise such a novelty ns traveling
with any show.
Ch allenoe No. 35.—§i0,0n0 that the show now
advertising *■ 200 performers" in New England
does not employ, altogether, two hundred men,
women and children In their show for all pur*
poses eoinbined. Why have these Shows never
given the jienple their money's worth? It is be
cause they could, with a capital of §IO/MX) (of
§JM*oo at the outside), buy a few s|>otkMl bones,
hired circus performers, and make a fortune each
year.
Challenge No. 36.—Sio/Mio that no allow has a
ri<ling ornng outang—no one that don't ride—and
further, that thert never was one in America.
Challenge No.37.—§io,nnotliat I will exhibit—
FREE To ALL—lna tent, what is called a ('ir
ciiMian Girl. 1 will also exhibit—FßEE—a won*
derful specimen of a man aithtmt anus, who will
give an exhibition of astonishing'interest. Also—
FRKE—the wonderful lleartleil ('MM, and the
original What In It. A Digger hutiaii will amuse
the crowd by throwing a "lasso," in this free
tent or on the ground near by—the most wonder*
ful performance of the kind ever seen. Bring
your dogs, wild horses, hogs, or anything else you
want lassoed; and If you are bent on sport, only
give him room and he will astonish ami amuse
you. My object in giving the EREE MENAG
ERIE ami this FREE SHOW, is io amuse the
public should there be any delay in getting ticket
wagons open, and to protect ladies and children
in my brer Tent from the rays of the sun, or
from rain, while they are waiting for tickets to
my big show.
Challenge No. 38.—§10,000 that I am the first
man who has ever engaged a full band of South
ern Negroes—or, as sometimes called, “Jubilee
Singers’’—for a Menagerie and Circus, in this
country. There are ten of them, and they will
appear ami play in my Great Street Parade. This
band is, of course, separate and distinct from
Prof. Hartman s Brass Band of twenty-two instru
ments.
Challenge No. 39.-810,000 that I have the
largest Musical Instrument now traveling in this
country.
Challenge No. 40.—§10,000 that I have by far
the largest and most expensive Chariot Van in
this country, and that I have twelve, including
my Tableau Vans.
Challenge No. 4L—§lo,ooo that I am the only
man who owns Palace Stock Cars which were
built expressly fortransporting ring horses.
Challenge No. 42.—§10/100 that when my rail
road project was first talked of last season, the
very men who now advertise so largely offered to
wager that I could not travel my show by rail;
hut / did, amt gave three performances each day
the entire season, with a few exceptions.
Challenge No. 43.-810,000 that there is
neither a permanent Circus or a permanent Circus
building in New York, nor has there been since
mine was destroyed by fire in December last; but
if I live there will be one, and that one will be the
grandest ever erected in any country.
Challenge No. 44.-810,000 that I have a
GLASS STEAM HIGH PRESSURE ENGINE ex
hibited in my FREE MENAGERIE, together with
a full corps of Glass Blowers, and it costs the en
tire populace nothing to see it or the Glass Blow
ers. The Juke Brothers authorize me to say they
will compete with the best in the world. I will
wager §IO,OOO to that effect.
Challenge No. 45.—§10,000 that I have the
smallest intelligent Dwarf on exhibition in
America, Admiral ls>t, the smallest man ever ex
hibited.
Challenge No. 46.—810,000 that there are not
twelve first class lady riders in America, the best
having been hired by me last fall for my 14th
Street Himiodrome 1 now have ten, beautiful
aud accomplished, ami if any other concern has
twelve as they advertise, ten of them ride in a
side-saddle and the other two are not first class.
Challenge No. 47.—§10,000 that I have the
largest Rhinoceros imported within three years.
I .-pend more money every season in fitting up
my “Great World’s Fair,” than would buy the
largest show on the continent, and I believe the
people will appreciate me when they know this
fact.
LOOK OUT! BEWARE! Don’t believe false
reports that may be circulated by rival concerns.
Although I will carry DETECTIVES with my
show, who will co-operate with all local authori
ties, 1 advise everybody not to bring to the show
jewelry or valuables, and limit themselves to an
amount of money sufficient only for admission
tickets ami refreshments.
Look out for all games. It is hard to keep pick
pockets away from State, county or other fairs or
shows, where great crowds congregate, for there
these light-fingered ^chevaliers" most congre
gate. I therefore warn every Iwdy in advance.
N. B.—l had arranged, as I thought, definitely,
for a delegation of Modoc Indians before the late
war broke out. Mr. Hays, my agent in San
Francisco, now writes me that it “will be impos
sible to dispatch them to my show till after the
Modoc war is over.”
In conclusion, I will say that, if the above chal
lenges are, in the aggregate, too large for accept
ance, I am willing to reduce the amount to 85,000
or §IO,OOO on each, and that all of or any of them
are open for acceptance.
P. T. BARNUM.
438 Fifth avenue, New York, April 7,1873.
This, the greatest traveling show ever organized
in the world, will exhibit in Worcester, Friday,
May 2; and in Woonsocket, Saturday, May 3.
THE HOUSEWIFE’S TABLE.
The following is a very valuable house
wife’s table, by which persons not having
scales and weights at hand may readily
measure the article wanted to form any
recipe without the trouble of weighing. Al
lowance is to be made for an extraordinary
dryness or moisture of the article weighed or
measured.
WEIGHTS AND EEASUKES.
Wheat flour, one pound is one quart.
Indian meal, one pound two ounces are
one quart.
Butter, when soft, one pound is one quart.
Loaf sugar, broken, one pound is one
quart.
White sugar, ])owdered, one pound one
ounce are one quart.
Best brown sugar, one pound two ounces
an* one quart.
Ten eggs are one jxnmd.
Flour, eight quarts are one pock.
Flour, four pecks are one bushel.
LIQUIDS, ETC.
Sixteen large tables|>uonfuls are half a
pint.
Eight large tablespobufuls are one gill.
Four large tablespoonfuls are half a gill.
Two gills are half a pint.
Two pints are one (piart.
Four quarts are one gallon.
A common-sized tumbler holds half a pint.
A common-sized wine glass is half a gill.
A tea cup is one gill.
A large wine glass is one gill.
A tablespoonful is half an ounce.
Forty drops are equal to one teaspoonful.
Four teaspoonfuls are equal to one table
spoonful.
Nutritive Meat Jelly.—Dr. Ansti, in
his lectures on diseases of the nervous sys
tem. says that when it its necessary to give
condensed nutriment in the smallest possi
blebulk, “nothing equals this jelly" Lean
beef fillet, 3 pounds: lean veal, 3 pounds;
lean mutton, 3 pounds; cut up small and put
into a saucepan with no water; simmer
(never boiling) by the side of the tire for
eight hours; strain the liquid (from a small
quantity of tasteless insoluble fibre that re
mains) and let it jellify into a soft mass.
This is an immensely concentrated meat,
minus very little but the water which has
been driven off; a teaspoouful or two of it
Is wonderful supiwrt, and can be taken
every hour with ease.”
Corn Bread. —Two teacups of sweet
milk, one egg. one and one-half teacups
wheat flour, two teacups Indian meal, two
tablvsjHxmfuls of sugar, a little salt, four tea
sjioonfuls of eream tartar put oil with flour,
two teaspoonfuls of soda dissolved in warm
water: add this tho last thing. Bake in gem
pans in a quick oven.
A suit has been instituted in the United
States Court at Boston against Oakes Ames
for *30,000, the trial being assigned for May.
The suit grows out of certain cotton transac
tions at New Orleans during the war, for
which the Government obtained a judgment
against A. 8. Mansfield ami others, and now
sues Ames for the amount, alleging that he
was a piirli^r wiUi
PRICE 3 CENTS.
THE ENGTJHH PARSON.
The aoAunta from the wreck of the ni«fatcd
Atlantic fl**om ur in awarding high praiae to the
gallant clergyman, the .Rev, Mr. Ancient, whose
courage and self-devotion was conspicuous among
his fishcruian-parishloners, in their efforts to res*
cue the victims of the disaster. Joan Ingelow,
In her flni poem “Brothers and a Sermon,"
aketebea oat juataueha brave fellow as this, in
thia strong passage:
“Tlivy ring for service," quoth the fisherman;
Our parson preachc- in the church to-night."
“And do the people go?" my brother asked.
“Ay, Sil; they count it mean to stay away,
Hr takes it so to heart. He's a rare man,
Our parson; half a bead above us all."
“That’s a great gift, ami notable," said I.
“Ay, Sir, and when he was a young man
He went out in the life-boat very oft,
Before the ‘Grace of Sunderland’ waa wrecked.
He’s never been his own man since that hour;
For there were thirty men alioard of her,
A nigh as close as you are now to me,
And ne’er a one was saved.
“They’re lying now
With two small children, in a row; the church
And yard are full of seamen's graves, and few
Have any names.
“She bumped upon the reef;
Our parson, my young son, and several more
Were lashed together with a two-inch rope,
And crept along to her; their mates ashore
Ready to haul them in. The gale was high,
The sea was all a boiling, seething froth,
And God Almighty’s guns were going off,
And the land trembled.
“When she took the ground,
She went to pieces like a lock of hay
Tossed from a pitchfork. Ere it came to that.
The captain reeled on deck with two small things,
One in each arm—his little lad and lass.
Their hair was long and blew before his face,
Or else we thought he had been saved; he fell,
But held them fast. The crew, poor luckless
souls?
The breakers licked them off; and some were
crushed,
Some swallowed in the yeast, some flung up dead,
The dear breath beaten out of them; not one
Jumped from the wreck upon the reef to catch
The hands that strained to reached, but tumbled
back
With eyes wide open. But the captain lay
And clung—the only man alive. They prayed;
•For God’s sake,captain, throw the children here'.’
‘Throw them,’ our parson cried; and then she
* struck;
And be threw one. a pretty two years’ child,
But the gab- dashed him on the slippery verge,
And down he went. They say they heard him cry.
“Then he rose up and took the other one.
And all our men reached out their hungry arms.
And cried out, ‘Throw her, throw her!’ and he did,
He threw her right against the parson’s breast,
And all at once a sea broke over them,
And they that saw it from the shore have said
It struck the wreck and piecemeal srattereii it,
.hist as a woman might the lump of salt
That 'twixt her hand into the kneading-pan
She breaks ami crumbles on her rising bread.
“We hauled our men in: two of them were dead—
The sea had beaten them, their heads hung down;
Our parson’s arms were empty, for the wave
Hail torn away the pretty, pretty lamb;
We often see him stand beside her grave:
But ’twas no fault of his, no fault of his.”
REPENTANCE.
He kissed me, and 1 knew ’twas wrong,
For he was neither kith nor kin.
Need one do penance very long.
For such a tiny little sin?
He pressed my hand. Now that’s not right,
Why will men have such wicked ways?
It d idn’t take a minute, quite.
And yet it seemed like days and days.
There’s mischief in the moon. I know,
For I’m quite sure I saw her wink
When I requested him to go.
• I meant it too—at least I think.
But, after all, I’m not to blame—
He snatched the kiss. Ido think men
Are quite without all sense of shame.
I wonder if he’ll come again?
CORRESPONDENCE.
LETTER FROM BOSTON.
A Word About the Indians of the North
west.—The Past and Future of Brigham
Young.—The Streets and the Post Office
Question.—Rev. C. A. Bartol and Robert
Dale Owen on the Marriage Question.
Boston, April 15, 1873.
The Quakers have voted! I should think
so. And their ballots arc bullets, deposited
in the bodies of white men. The peace
policy has borne its fruit, and now it is hoped
its advocates will look at the Indian as he is.
I am in favor of peace, but there is only one
way to obtain it with the infernal redskins:
exterminate them. They are a treacherous
class, clear to the core, and it is time that
the Government should deal with them for
what they are, and not for what a few thin
skinned pseudo-philanthropists de>ire them
to be. If the coaxing, petting, sugar-plum
business is to be continued I would urge the
sending of Howard and a few of his Young
Men's Christian Associations to do the work,
and not men the sacrifice of whose lives
would be a loss to the country. Ido not
see any good reason for not dealing with all
refractory Indians in the same manner that
we do with infected spots that are known to
be dangerous to the health of a community :
have them officially declared a nuisance and
abated. The Indians have proven to be a big
nuisance in the great Northwest, checking
the advancement of civilization, butchering
defenceless women ami children, murdering
settlers and travelers, and in every way pos
sible hindering the proper occupation of the
most valuable portion of Uncle Sam's do
main. They have spilled the red blood of
our citizens without stint, and now let them
find by experience that it is ••nominated in
the bond” that as they have taken so shall it
be taken from them. The country, the
world, will sustain the severest measures.
Go out, B. Young. I think he will go.
He flickers gently. He presents the appear
ance of an expiring ember. His twin sister
is dead. Abraham was “in’’ at her taking
off. It took place a short time previous to
another decease whereat Abraham went out.
The living sister is verv sick. She has been
ailing for a long time. I think she has got
the consumption, but I guess it will termi
nate in cerebro-spinal or epizooty, I don’t
know which. It may end in a choking sen
sation, plainly visible under the left ear—it
the rope don't slip. He is the last of a cele
brated trio—Stephen A. Douglas, Abraham
Lincoln, Brigham Young. Ye gods, what a
tree-o! That galaxy lived, taught school,
sold poor whisky and made soft soap at one
and the same time in Morgan county, 111.
The school teacher and the whisky seller are
gathered to their fathers, but the soap-maker
lingereth in the vale of tears. When stirring
together in the boiling chaldron, in his early
days, that mass of bones and grease; out of
which evolved soft soap, did he think that
the entire product would Im? required to
wash away the foul stain which he was to
aid in fastening ui>on Columbia's escutch
eons. But time, if not wisdom, has taught
B. Young that he can be young no more;
consequently he is putting his traps in order
for a journey which he prefers not to take,
but one that he is well aware cannot be
evaded; and however distant the “starting
time” may be, it is quite evident that he will
soon “pass” from the stage of active life.
The Post Office streets question is grad
ually working itself clear. The Commv*’
sioners and the Board of Aldermen have
agreed upon fifing tl|e now famous “Uian-
Jails Ifrtss.
AbYKHTUINa KU**:
One square, one Insertion •! O
aach snbeeqaent laaertlou AO
•• •• one year 30 OO
UTA heduh l of fun rate* furairthed on applh
cation.
Fiildiration Office:
CROMPTON'S BLOCK, MECHANIC STREET,
WOHCENTER, MAHN.
gle” lot on the caat aide of the Post Office
site extended, And also twenty feet of the
Water street front of the Ronton Pott build
ing. The Common Council will probaldy
have a protracted wrangle over the matter,
and finally agree, by a close vote, w ith the
upper branch. The proprietors of the Post
threaten to surrender the whole estate to the
city, but if sufficient room can lie purchased
in the rear of their present estate to admit of
moving it back, it wouhl l»e much the wisest
plan. It is regretted that the criminal blun
dering w hich permitted the construction of
the buildings on Devonshire, between Water
and Milk streets, will probably not be reme
died for a generation to come. The whole
square bounded by the three streets naiutd
and Washington ought to be converted into
an open space, but the greed of money
making and esthetics never did go hand in
hand. The building between Spring lane
and Water street will come down, ami Scliool
street may be widened, but that will I* all
this generation will live to see.
Rev. C. A. Bartol read a very able and
pungent paper at the meeting of the Second
Radical Club, Monday evening, upon ‘‘Free
Ijove and Marriage,’’ taking decided grounds
in favor of the present marriage system.
The reading was supplemented by remarks
from Robert Dale Owen, who thought the
advocates of free love too insignificant to
deserve notice from intelligent people.
Base ball, boat racing and other summer
complaints arc having their opening season.
Ox Ford.
A STRANGE CAREER.
The San Jose Mercury of the 20th inst.
states that William Byrnes, a well-known
California pioneer, was sent to the insane
asylum from that place a few days ago.
(’apt. Byrnes, as he was generally called, is
well known in this vicinity. His life has
been one of remarkable experience. He was
born in Maine, but removed to Missouri
with his parents when very young. When,
at the age of twenty years the Mexican Gov
ernment offered a prtmiiuni of §SO for every
Apache scalp taken in Mexico, Byrnes and
others fornwd a company to go into the
scalping business-in Chihuahua. Among
his associates were Robert Carson, (bn
ther of Kit Carson.) Jim Beckwith and
Jim Lansing. The last-named was not the
ex-sheriff of this county, but an ex-pirate,
who had associated with Lafitte, and had
been pardoned by President Jackson on ac
count of services rendered against the British
in the war of IS 12. The first raid among the
apaches proved profitable. A second was
projected, but Byrnes ex|>erienced a strange
dream, in which the inhumanity of the
scalping business was vividly presented to
his mind. He at once determined to return
to Missouri, and so informed his companions,
who, without him, persevered in their origi
nal design. The Mexican war commenced
soon afterward, and Byrnes joined Colonel
Price's regiment and served until the end of
the war. In this regiment he became ac
quainted with Peleg Smith, who. when
wounded in the knee, amputated his own
leg because none of his companions had
nerve enough to perform the operation for
him.
The two men came to the State together
soon after gold was discovered. Smith died
a few years ago. in the San Francisco County
Hospital. Byrnes commenced mining at
llangtown or Placerville. The Indians soon
became troublesome to the miners, and
i ues m selected as ( apialn of a Company
to* pursue them. After an effective cam
paign, Byrnes applied himself to private busi
ness until 1853, at which time the State be
came very much excited on account of the
murders and mblwries of Joaquin Murieta
ami his band of highwaymen. The Legisla
ture authorized the organization of a com
pany of twenty-four men, under command
of ('aptain Harry Love to pursue and break
up the Joaquin gang. Byrnes joined the
company. After a pursuit of three months
they encountered the Joaquin band on the
Tulare Plains. A fight ensued which lasted
half an hour. Byrnes and Joaquin ap
proached within thirty feet of each other,
each shooting at his ailversary. One of
Byrne's shots struck Joaquin, who fell dead
from his saddle. Three fingered Jack and
several others were also killed, and nineteen
of the band were taken prisoners. Byrnes
preserved the head of Joa<iuiu which was
soon exhibited in San Francisco. Love and
his men were all allowed extra pay by the.
Legislature for their services, and Byrnes
was granted a special reward, which he de
clined. Byrnes afterward settled in Carson
Valiev, anil engaged in ranching. He was,
at a later date, called into the field again to
fight the Indians, and was active throughout
the war with the Pintes under Wlnnemauces.
He was badly wounded by the Indians and
also short* by a woman while engaged in
mining. He was at one time engaged in the
management of the State Prison under Gen.
Estell.
During his entire career, he received thir
ty-one wounds, three of which were near
the heart and one on the head. It is not re
markable that a man of such vicissitudes in
life should, at the age of about fifty, lie
broken down in body and mind. Byrnes has
been for some time an inmate of the Sacra
mento County Hospital, and left the estab
lishment about a month ago. A few years
back he gave way to excessive indulgence in
the use of liquor, but more recently has
been abstemious. The Mrrcury describes
his present condition as follows: “His mind
is terribly shattered, and he is seldom able to
recall a single circumstance that has occurred
in his life. " Singular as it may seem, on
meeting Joseph Patton, assistant jailor, he
recognized him as an old acquaintance, and
remembered to have met him twenty years
ago. A few minutes afterwards the circum
stance passed from his memory, aud he said
he had no recollection of having ever seen
him. We saw the unfortunate man in his
cell on Monday. He stands about six feet
high, and has been a man us rather prepos
sessing appearance, but scarcely a vestige of
his former self remains now’.”
A London Detective in New York.
A New York paper published tile following
store, which, if true, looks like a "put up
job” by New York detectives: Sergeant
Green, of the London detective force, who
was made fatuous by Charles Dickens as the
smartest of the London detectives, came
here two weeks ago with an extradition war
rant and other legal papers necessary to bring
Alf. Bidwell, the Bank of England forger,
from Havana, where he had been arrested.
Sergt. Green desired to see the sights in the
city, and of course the New York detectives
agreed to show him around, but to leave his
jewelry behind, as the thieves in this city
were very smart. "Oh. nonsense,” said
Sergeant Green, "they can’t steal from me
you know.” He was shown Harry Hill’s, the
Eighth Ward, the Water street dens, and the
fashionable resorts up town, and was left by
his New York friends at 2:30 o’clock. At 5
he woke up ill Union Square, and found
that his extradition papers and warrants, his
private memorandum book, his watch and
chain studs, and a gold snuff box, pre
sented liim bv the London merchants for his
brilliant genius, were gone—stolen from his
pockets. Sergeant Green was astonished.
He had been invited to have a bottle of wine
by a perfect gentleman who wore large
diamonds, and asked the Sergeant to have a
drive on the lane the following day. No
trace of the Sergeant’s valuables could be
obtained until late Thursday evening, when
a huge package was thrown through an open
window into the Twenty-sixth Precinct
station house in the City Hall. The package
contained the Sergeant’s papers, his jewelry,
including the famous snuff box, and the
following short but expressive note:
"Give this stuff back to that English
chump who says he is a detective. He is a
duffer. One of tub Boys.”
Sergeant Green has changed his opinion
regarding American thieves.
Nixon's condition has much improved of
late, and he eats and sleeps well, but fortu
nately is not buoyed up by the hope that his
counsel will be of any further use to him.
An application for a stay of proceedings was
made yesterday before J udge Brady. King,
it is said, is dying of consumption. He eats
very sparingly, and is compelled to remain
constantly in his bed at tire Tombs. Sim
mons still hobbles about upon crutches, and
thinks it i» very hard that his fractured an
kle should eoufme him so closely.
The capital of the Bank of France i»
182,500,000 francs.

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