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The Vinita daily chieftain. [volume] (Vinita, Indian Territory [Okla.]) 1902-1913, December 18, 1912, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025020/1912-12-18/ed-1/seq-2/

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(Ly laily (El?iFftain
OFFICIAL CITV PAPER
Entered s second-class matter
August 3, 19iS, at poBtofflce in VlnlU,
Okla.. Kudor Act of March 3. 1879.
ISSUED DAILY EXCKI'T SUNDAY
Published by
M MARRS PRINTING COMPANY
Per week by carrier
.10
Per month by carrier 4S
Per year by carrier. In advance. . 6.00
One month by mail, in advance. . . .40
Three months by mail, in advance 1. 0
One year by mail, in advance 4.t
Editor
"
M. MARRS
UNIQH
Vinita, Okla. Wednesday, December 18.
. !
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THE TATTLER.
The tattler went forth at the
break of duy and took all the
scandal that drifted that way;
all the gossip and lies, all the
censure and shams, all the sly
inuendoes, the knocks and the
flams, then mixed in some
venom to keep them alive, and
scattered them broadcast to
flourish and thrive. And they
spread like the brambles, de
structive and wide, choking
all the tweet roses that grow
by their side; for gossip,
though idle, is thrifty and
strong; and a small word, well
planted, tuny cause endless
wrong. The tattlers belong to
no tribe, class or clan; they in
fest every rank in the species
of man; they pOiaOB the world
with their venomous daits,
they reek with the life blood of
innoecvit hearts; they ought to
be banished to some lonely isle
where none but themselves
would be hurt by their guile
All things in creation, no mat
ter what grade, are thought
for some purpose or use to be
made. Hut why is the tattler?
'Twould lighten our woes if
we'd haggle such (lends with
our scythes and our hor-s.
q
ooooooooooooooooo
. o
Our knowledge of the causes of in
fectious diseas. s has ud winced not
uniformly, but by leaps and bounds
as new methods liave been developed
and new Incentives have arisen. With
i he evolution of bacteriology, follow
ing the work of Pasteur and Koch.
there was a rapid expansion i:i our
knowledge of infections The discov-
ery that Texas fever was transmitted
by the tick started extensive studies
on the relation of insects to the trans
mission of disease. The demonstration
that certain diseases are due to germs
too small to be seen throng the mic
roscope rapidly led to a study of many
bscure diseases and cleared away
much of the confusion regarding them.
Ofeat epidjUlici have furnished an in
centive for the most exhaustive study
of some of our essentially epidemic
diseases, as cholera, plague, iniluen.a
and moningitis. In addition, greater
experience In Interpreting resudls;
the training and development of men
for research; the foundation and en
dowment of large institutions for re
search, such tse Roekfellef Institute,
the Memorial Institute and the lly
genic Laboratory i' the United states
Public Health Service, and lh' adop
lion of new methods by research work
Grand Theatre
Friday, December 27th
WOODS, F RAZEE and LEDERER Present for the first time here
The World's Greatest Musical Hit
A French Vaudeville in 3 Acts
With Special Cast and Original Comedy
and all the entrancing melodies, including
"Every Little Movement Has a Mean
ing of Its Own. "
Beautiful Scenery, Electrical
and Mechanical Effects
Prices 50c, 75c, $1, L50
ere, have made possible the recent
! M 1, i ., 1 ,,
increase In our khu it iirv "i mm Liuno
of diseases. The use of the money
as an experimental animal, instead of
the small animals uaually employed,
has contributed more than any other
fact 'i to the important recent addi-
Itions to our knowledge of the acute
.'infections, says The Journal of the
'.mrriea:i Medical As-c i.it: n Recent
wort has show ! that the mom (1 s bus-
I'Hibh mi: number of diseases which
i fleet man hut which are transmissible
with difficulty, if at all. to the small
laboratory animals, such as rabbits,
rats and guinea-pigs. Through this1
new medium of experiment we have
I1"'''11 1 'Produce these diseases
at will and to stdy them under labora-
, tory conditions. Without the monkey
as an experimental animal our knowi-j
ledge of typhus fever, poliomyelitis,
'measles, cerebrospinal meningitis and
Warlel lever would not have made its
recent great advances; indeed, it
ProbaUj wouW nav n lliaill,''l at a
standstill for maney years to tome.
Unfortunately
this knowledge
the
to
application of
ic control and
senses has not
'eradication of the
Qept pace with Its acquisition. With
q a few notable exceptions, such as the
q control of yellow fever through mos-
iuit i eradication and of bubonic
plague by rat campaigns, health an -
thorities have been slow to apply the
! great mass oi information now avail-
.b'-' to them by reaso i of the re -
earches of the last few years. What
t present ! more needed than re -
search is a more genual application j
of th result! already at hand. Our j
law -makers should be informed that
It requires money to carry out the
measures for the control of disease
which have been pointed out so con-
cingly by laboratory studies. Who
can predict how many lives would be
saved and how many cripples for life
prevented if means were provided for
lly campaigns next sum Bier in order
to carry into effect measures for the
prevention of poliomyelitis by the con
trol of the stable-fly?
O
BEST NEW YEAR RESOLUTIONS.
Tli" following is taken from the
January Woman's Home Companion:
"Very recently a fair-minded clergy
man, driven to the wall in an argu
ment, admitted that there are times
When lying is justifiable, it is true.
I he insisted the occasions are very
'rare. Every human being who has
.arrived at a reasoning age has met
. these oceaslani, and has been sadly
troubled. You know people who may
be well meaning, but who make truth
Idling almost a vice. New Year reso
lutions Dot to Hi' may sound line, and
coming from one who constantly jug
gles with truth) especially for personal
advantage, might be applauded if we
bad any confidence in the resolution
being made effective. Only a very
brave, a very ignorant, or a very dis
honest person would mahjO such a
resolution, especially if there are little
i lllldrei) in llii' family
"11 seems to us Hie besl New Year
resolution should he something that
men ami women feel is a kind of
1
creed; not a rub- to be slavishly fol
lowed; but a guide, something from
which We may depart when we are in
the grip of circumstances, but to
which we may always return.
"It must be the kind of resolution
thai we all ill! keep, in greater or
b ss degree; lor if must do real work,
an dthe measnrd of it must be this
work It must be so simple that a
child can understand it; so significant
thai the philosopher respects it; "so
real that all of us can feel it lo
these familiar, line resolves bale Ibis
cniality?
! In the January Woman's Home Com-
hQnlnn 1MIUM a airTv In Ufhieh ifl
'r"10 u'.'
related an account of a prescription
Riven to an exceedingly stingy farmer
by a doctor The farmer took the
prescription to the druggist. The
druggist told the farmer that he cou!d
not fill the prescription and said to
the farmer: "If you will read It your-
self you will see why." Whereupon i
the farmer adjusted his glasses and
read to his astonishment:
"One hired girl to lie taken as s:o :
you can get her, and kept constant-
ly on hand thereafter.
"A few new dresses that the wives
of your hired men wouldn't be
ashamed to wear, nnd a new hat and
wrap to replace those you bought her
last thirteen years ago.
"All to be tinctured with at least
as much daily consideration as you
bestow upon your cattle."
i O-
state Superintendent R. II
Wilson
is mailing out letters to the various
teachers and school boards. In part
he says: "We can't afford to he (are
less or indifferent in our work; we
i an t afford to treat the boys and
girls as if they w.-re common things;
their lives are tender, more so than
the young plant in the springtime, and
the had influence brought to bear
, early in Ufa is equally as destructive
'to the child as the frost is to the
plant. I am linorul enough to believe
1 that till boys and girls are good, if
given proper treatment: I believe that
'seventy - five per cent of the hoys and
gins wnose lives nave ueen wrecKea
have been driven Irom home and from
.school by cross, indirterent, unsympa
Miotic parents and teachers."
o
"I w
"1 w
try to Do Kind,
fry to find Hie good in others. !
"I will carry
sunshine with me, es-
peclally into the gar)
"I will try lo maki
places.
lomeone happy i
each day.
"Perhaps it woird be better to leave
out the word 'try' because the mere
suggestion of 'attempting' leaves yii
sort of loophole for not 'doing.' On
the other hand, any one of those re
solves involves a pretty big contract
for most of us to live up to. You can
see bow failure to live up to resolves
like these and there are bound to be
many failures doesn't destroy their
working value."
O
GRADING THE SINS OF MEN
Women of Paris Submit a Long List
Beginning With Egoism as the
Root of All.
A Tails newspaper, the Femlna. put
the following question to Its women
readersnreently : "What do you Miink
classing them In order of import
ance are the ten principal failings 01
men?"
The majority of the women said
egoism was man's most besettirig sin
And what is egoism? It is simple and
unadulterated selfishness; and (hat Is
man's chief fault, according to the
women. And then these faults come
next in the answers infidelity, jeal
ousy, intemperance, cowardice. That
Is s -selfishness is the taproot of
Mono all. They are all logically con
netted,
following tl.eso five leading sins
onio, in the women's answer., immor
i.lty. despotism, temper, stupidity and
ilteness. It will be interesting to fo!
ihv these answers In grading the sins
ind pursuing the gradual descent?
from egoism to laziness.
It will be found that they preserve
a natural order. For instance, Infidel
Ity follows egoism ; cowardice fdihswi
ntemperSDCej despotism follows im
morality, and idleness is just behind
-ifopldliy. The answers are interest
ing and just. The women know more
about men's fallings than men do
I'.iey know more than they let, on.
Beginning of Big Industry.
The Pietermarltzburt (N'atal) Cor
oration have just embarked on an
n t erpriae which Is being watched
?ilh interest. The enormous extent
f town lands In the Zw.trtkop dlrec
ion have bren shown to i e well adapt
I for wattle treo growing. The an
...lilies have therefore decided W
rrrn (his land to account, for which
wrpose they have already placed
out 1,000 acres under cultivation,
ml from all accounts the ycung trees
IV doing splendidly. The wattle tree
principally grown In Natal for lis
ok. the tannic properties of which
rr very valuable. Of late years a
t ry big Industry has been created In
nnectton with this tree, and if Pie
i . luaritssburp experiment is a success
i should result In a consider? ble re
,i tion of the city rates.
To Prevent Screws From Rusting.
The best method of keeping small
lews, brads and tacks from rust
:ig Is to place them In small wide
louched bottles, tightly corked. The
lottles should be perfectly dry beforo
:sing. Sand-paper can be kept per
ectly dry and In good working condl
1011 by rolling it and keeping it in a
'ide-mouthed Jar and screwing down
he lid.
Odd.
Everett Shlnn, whose painting ol
ballet girls have made him well
known, said at a dinner In New York:
'Very few artists can draw a horv
et any horse can draw an artist, an l
i the same token, few artists caji
iRint a bullet girl, yet any uallet glil
:au patnt herself."
lr
Seven Days
Christmas
..
Dec. 1 8
Just One Week More.
Start It Right by Finish
ing Your Christmas
Shopping.
THE GOLDEN
Poor Man's Rise to Success Due
to Ability to See and Use
an Opportunity.
BUILT UP FAILING BUSINESS
What Was Done In This Case May
Be Duplicated by Anyone Who
Will Use Brains and Will
Power to Achieve s
Desired End.
I Everything has Its blessing, I sup
pose, and there is an example of this
I In my own experience. If I had not
I become 111 with typhoid fever 1
might still Iim a $15 a week office
man. Hut as It was well, the ill
ness changed things, writes John
Howland In the Chicago Tribune.
I had been working In a mercan
tile office in Omaha for three years
an ofBce where the owner of the
business took an interest in the work
of every one, where there was good
discipline, absolute order, and cer
tainly the best of system. The own
er was making money, but he was at
tending to every feature of bis busi
ness to do It.
Naturally, we In the ofllce absorbed
many of his ideas. We had to. I
had worked up from bill clerk to thp
position I held, and I fancied that 1
was getting along fairly well Then
came the typhofd
After three months of ft my par
ents decided they had better send me
away for a time that I might recuper
ate. They chose the town of Cregg
town, la I went
After a week or so of sitting
around the hotel there I began to
wander around town a hit. T was
not strong, and so one day. after a
walk of a few blocks. I went Into the
town' only dry goods store and ask
ed permission to rest awhile This,
nf course, was given me.
1 COUldn'l help noticing the slip
shod manner In which things were
run. The clerks seemed to have no
active knowledge of the business,
and neither did the employers. As I
sat there a plan formulated In my
mind and as soon as I felt able fo
work I sought out the owner of the
store I found him disgusted with
things In general and esieclally with
his business lie bad been losing
money on It I saw that was mv
chance.
"The reason why yon havp been
losing money Is because you don't
know how to handle your bush.- -If
you'll allow me to speak stretch'
from the shoulder" T said "Tha' h
why I have come to you f have b4
a good deal of experience In tilt
kind of work, and I believe I ronM
help you. Will von give me a trial'
Well, we Itntlty arranged things so
that If I built up (be business. 1 a
t have a in per cent commission on
all profits above the amount that
came in nh.cn the store was makln
n fair amount of money I Started
nut
first of all 1 systematized thing
In regard fo the clerks. I stopped the
practice of their leaving- the star
whenever they wanted fo of cnilier
Inc In groups to "talk things over "
nnd fhetr inclination to iarleniM
Then I
n after the blivlni
nd
found out that poor DUVtflt bad
'" ne I found that the svstem of ad
rertislng was carried on without anv
regard to the savlncs thai smnld
,1!ve a "punch" In th. m Ami so It
went 11 1 1 through the store.
N'ot that I had any special hul
ress acumen myself may havp
now. tint it has been developed I'.ut
st that time 1 was simply acting the
parrot; I was using the knowledge I
bad absorbed from mv old boss In
Omaha. And It won out for me.
Within a month business began to
P'ek up Within six weeks It hsd
passed the former mail mum and I
was making money. Within a year
We were putting an addition to the
"tore. And now well, a few months
sgo I bought out the old man who
save me the place, and own the btisi-
ness sayseif.
- 'Pi'
to
Our Big Sale
IS STILL GOING ON
BIGGER AND BETTER BARGAINS
THAN EVER
HOLIDAY
Do Your
VINITA'S BARGAIN CENTER
Grand Theatre
Thursday, Friday and Saturday
Vaudeville and
Pictures
Le Nonts Nonkey and
Dog Circus
15 MONKEYS AND DOGS
The highest priced vaudeville
act that has ever played this
theatre.
Also 3 Reels of
Pictures
NO ADVANCE
Adults 10c.
Children under 8 yrs. 5c
Two Shows7:30 and 8:45
RAILROAD TIME TABLES
FTISCO.
North ana East Baimii.
Leave VtniUi
No. 112 K. C. Meteor 1:10 a. in j
No. 12 California Kxpress. ::: 45 a 111
No. 404 .loplin Express ";8pk 111 I
! No. 4uk st. Louis Limited. .6:40 p. in
No.
10 St. louls Meteor. .11:4. p m ;
South and West Bound.
9 Okla. City & S. W. .2:05 a. m. I
No.
No. Ill Okla. (ity fr K. C. .3:30 a. in. :
No. 407 Ok C. fr K. C.-St L.8:44a. tn. j
No. 411 California Kxpress 1:05 p.m.!
No. 40H Sapulpa Kxpress. . .9:05 p. 111 I
M. K. & T. TIME TABLE.
North Bound.
No. 2 Kausas City Special . 1 : IS a. in
No. 4 Local Passenger .... S : 53 a. in '
No. 6 Fiyer K. C. & St. L.f.:20 p. m. ,
No. 8 Iocal Passenger ....3:24 p.m.
No. 10 Katy Limited 5:34 a. m
South Bound.
No. 1 Texas Kxpress 4:25 a. 111
No. 3 Texas Kxpress 7: 23 p. m
No. 5 Flyer 9:44 a. m.
No. 7 Local Passenger .. 11 :16 a.m.
No. 9Katy Limited 10:33 p. m
GOODS ARE ARRIVING
DAILY
Shopping Early
RULE
IN
DR. R. L. MITCHELL
Gunter Building
Phones: Office607 Residence Red 479
VINITA OKLA
Lr. Louis Bagby
lr, C. S. Neer
onio 101 1
Hee. 110 1
PHONES.. 1 Ufflce 101
1 Hes, 4TJ3
DRS. BAGBY & NEER
Oliji in First National Bank Buildin
DR. F. L. HUGHSON
Physician and Surgeon
Phones 025 Residence 525 W. Delaware
CfFceOver Wimer Drug Store
R. E. MOSS
Florist
North Avenue nnd Thompson Street
Phone 521 and 461
PRICE

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