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The new age. [volume] (Portland, Or.) 1896-1905, December 23, 1905, Image 2

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Topics of
the Times
Football, for lack of a better name
to describe it, is still designated as a
sport.
Doctors will doubtless agree with
that London scientist who asserts that
disease is a blessing.
Too many men allow their religion
to hang in the-closet through .the week
with their Sunday clothes
Some of the watchdogs of our na-
tional banking system seem to have
lost the faculty of finding and follow
ing the scent, )
Just to show what heroes they are,
some of the life insurance experts an
nounce that they carry policies instkeir
own companlies.
It is expected, meanwhile, that the
forests will remain in their place until
the courts have decided whether or not
they are to be preserved.
In Japan Admiral Togo is fondly re
ferred to as a lobster. The admiral is
a small man physically and can’t fight
much except when he is on his ship.
It is asserted, on the other hand,
that big hats for women are not going
out of fashion. The report that they
were, doubtless, was started by some
designing masculine person.
“Three saved by chewing gum” s
the head over a news item. It seems
that the three used chewing gum to
plug a hole in thelr canoe. Then they
were saved by not chewing it, after
all.
Russia’s bad way never could be
more forcefully illustrated than by the
lamentable fact that the stroke of one
man’s pen could open the dungeons
where political prisoners have been
left for years to wither and die.
- Professor Wiley proposes to test the
effects of cold storage food on the hu
man system. It is to be hoped that he
will try the cold storage egg himself,
80 that he may speak from personal
experience instead of merely observing
its effect on some hired man.
About half a century ago England
took notice of one fleet only, the
French. Now things have changed.
Japan has revealed her naval power;
Italy has a fairly good navy; Wil
helm 11. rules over Germany and has
announced that the country’s future
welfare must be sought for on the
geas; the United States wish to have
no rivals on the ocean and Russia is
beginning to rebuild her fleet.
"9 ) "
This contitent is no longer the scene
of the most striking innovations; Amer.
ica is an old story. Africa is the new
world. The French are stretching a
telegraph wire from the Mediterra
nean across the Sahara to Timbuktu.
The wire has already reached the Tuat
oases. It will pass thence to the Ahag
gar Mountains, where live the Tuareg
bandits, and so into a country which
a few years ago was extremely dan
gerous to an avowed Christian.
No matter how profound and learned
a lawyer may be, he seems to be in
capable of drawing his own will so
that it will not be set aside. This was
the fate of Samuel .J. Tilden’s will, and
now we are informed that the will of
Chief Justice Edward M. Paxon of the
Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, be
queathing $3,000,000 for the establish
ment of a farm school for boys, is void
for such an obvious defect as the ab
sence of subsceribing witnesses. Some
times it looks as if people who know
how to make money never know any
thing else.
There are men who have never been
detected in wrong-doing whose per
fermances are nevertheless so hostile
to the public welfare or so acceptable
to self-seekers that their honesty is
fmpugned and their patriotism dis
counted. Any prosecuting officer will
testify tha‘t there is nothing in the
whole catalogue of crimes so difficult
to trace as political corruption, noth
ing so difficult to fix as bribery. The
public should not wait for proofs. The
vote should not wait for evidence. It
is not only essential that public men
have their dishonesty unproved, but
that they be men of such proved hon
esty and absolute integrity that no
breath of suspicion has ever tainted
their reputations.
A friend of the editor asks this ques
tion: “Why do Americans as a rule
go after the dollar harder than Euro
peans?’ Plainly, because dollars will
buy more in this country than in Eu
rope. Dollars will buy some things
there, but here they will buy every
thing that is worth buying. In Eu
rope it makes no difference how much
money a man has, nor how decent his
character, neither he nor his family
can amount to anything in particular.
He must be born to the manner. Else
the door of opportunity is closed. In
this country, if he is the right sort of
a man, he can buy freedom from fear
and worry, recognition, independence.
He can aspire to be and become all
that any other American can aspire to
become. And that is why our eritics
across the waters fail to understand
us. Years ago they called us a nation
of shopkeepers. They can see us only
as doilar chasers. But the fact is we
want money because of the things it
will buy. We do not hoard it. We
are royal spenders. Of course there
are some among us who believe that
money will buy anything—contend:
ment, happiness, or even character.
They learn differently. But surely it
is not altogether an unworthy motive
that we should desire money that we
may minister to the wellbeing of those
whom we are fond of. It is not a sor
did desire, this one of wanting money
to educate our children and give them
a chance in life better than our chance.
And that i{s why Fritz and Patrick and
Nels and Antonio and Moses, when
they come to us over sea, join with us
in the dollar chase. It is only when
we begin to long for dollars we cannot
use that we become money mad. The
American wants dollars for what they
will buy and he buys what he wants.
There ig close relation between be
lief and reasoning, but there could be
no greater error than to suppose that
reasoning is the only thing that can
produce beliefs and that all of our be
liefs are the result of reasoning. Most
people would feel insulted if told that
they believe anything whatever with
out reason, and yet the truth 4s that
of all the beliefs that exist in any
human mind not one in a thousand has
been produced by reasoning and not
one in a million by investigation, re
flection and reasoning. The greater part
of our most cherished convictions are
inserted in us ready made, just as a
cartridge 1s inserted in a gun or a box
put into a wagon. This is easily prov
ed by asking people why they believe
certain things. In most cases it will
be surprising to see how they are em
barrassed by the question and what
trifiing and inconsequential replies
they make. Sometimes they become
Impatien\ and indignant and intimate
that what they believe is self-evident,
or they say: “Any foo: knows that.”
They drop the subject as soon as they
can, but not until they have made it
evident that they believe without rea
son and without ever attempting to
reason. How, then, do we come to be
lieve certain things? Evidently by
mere imitation or by a sort of hypnotic
suggestion, In childhood and youth
we believe everything we hear. What
ever is constantly said in our homes
or by our associates we install among
our settled convictions and retain
them long after we have forgotten
when, where and from whom we first
heard them. We are as passive in re
celving these impressions as a colt is
in getting used to harness. We would
naturally suppose that convictions that
were acquired so easily would be just
as easily upset and abandoned, but it
is just the reverse. The beliefs which
we have acquired we know not how
and which we are at a loss to defend
are exactly those that are most invin
civle. We would at least expect them
to melt away before strong argument,
but argument has no effect on them.
Argument will often overthrow and re
verse beliefs which were acquired by
argument, but these beliefs which are
foisted upon us hypnotically do not
yiéld to reasoning. These traditional
beliefs cannot be said to be an evil
The fact is our very life is founded
on them and governed by them and
we could not live without them. Life
is too short for everything to be rea
soned out. We must be set up in busi
ness with an immense stock of ready
made convictions or else we would be
more helpless than the brute creation.
They are valuable also for the very
reason that they cannot be over
thrown, for without this quality there
would be absolutely no stability in hu
man character. On the other hand, it
is obviously absurd to reason that cer
tain opinions and beliefs are well
founded because they are widespread
and of great aptiquity. A belief may
be perpetuated from generation to gen
eration in an ever-widening circle for
thousands of years and even becowm=
universal without ever having a parti
cle of fact or logic for its basis. That
we can never entirely free ourselves
from involuntary beliefs is certain,
and that we would perish if we were
deprived of them is cercain also, and
vet our safety depends on keeping
them in check by reasoning and inves
tigation. We must be continually
sloughing off our groundless beliefs or
we shall be completely swamped by
them. This is not an attractive pic
ture of human nature, but it is a faith
ful liceness.
Queer Indian Custom.
Some of the Indian women have a
very pathetic custom. When an In
dian girl dies her mother often substi
tutes a doll for the lost little one. She
fills the empty cradle with feathers ar
ranged in the form of a child, and car
ries this about as she did her child,
crooning to it and caressing it. Some
times, instead of doing this, she ties
the clothes, toys and other articles be
longing to the little one, and, fastening
them to the cradle board, carries it
as she originally did her child. The
Ojibways call these “unlucky dolls,”
because they represent the dead, but
the Indian woman's idea is tha# the
little dead child is too small to And
its way to paradise, and that by sub
stituting the doll she will assist it
to get there.
Papa’s Viewpolint.
Her Father—What are your pros
pects, sir?
The Suitor (modestly)—l am fifth
vice president of the Brazen Assur
ance Society.
Her Father—Well, you may come
and see me again, if the jury acquits
you!—Puck.
Not Much Loss.
“Oh, my!” exclaimed Mrs. Schoppen,
“I've lost my pocketbook!”
“Never mind, dear,” replied her hus
band, “I’ll get you another pocketbook
and you can easily collect more dress
goods samples.”—Philadelphia Press.
IDAHO ADVERTISING
Thos. Blyth, Pre Lyman Fargo, Vice Pres
The Blyth & Fargo Co.
Pocatello, Idaho
General Merchandise
STORES AT
Evanston, Wyo. Pocatelio, Idaho
il
BANK OF NAITPA, Ltd,
CAPITAL STOCK $50,000.00
Established 1899. Dewey Palace Hotel Bld'g
FRED G. MOCK, President
F. J. CONROY, Vice-President
C. R. HICKEY, Cashier
FRANK JENKINSON, Ass’t Cashier
NAMPA, e IDAHO
J. A. Murray, Wm. A. Anthes,
President. Cashier
D. W. Standrod, 1. N. Anthes,
Vice President Asst, Cashier
THE
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
of Pocatello, Idaho.
POCATELLO, -~ - - IDAHO
TUTTLE MERGANTILE GO., LTD.
Wholesale Grocers
GOODWIN MINING CANDLES
Judson Powder, Fuse and Caps
AGENTS FOR THE
CELEBRATED OLYMPIA BEER
Nampa, Idaho
CHURCH & WHITE CO.
Real Estate
And Insurance
Pocatello = Idaho
'HELENA MONTANA
1 i
San Francisco Bakery
JOHN WENDEL, Proprietor
A Full Assortment of Fine Goods
Always on Hand Our Bread is
on Sale in Neighboring Towns
Ask Your Grocer for Wendel’s Bread
Orders by Mail Receive
Prompt Attention
611 First Street 9 State Street
Phone 3-F Phone 260-M
HELENA, MONT.
Capital Brewing Go.
HELENA, MONTANA
GREAT FALLS
Cloths Man, Woman, Boy—in
Modern Up-to-Date Fashionable
Clothing—at Popular Prices.
visit Often the Popular Priced
Store for Men and Womean.
Great Falls, - = = Montana.
E. A. REICHEL, President. :
W. F. SENGBUSCH, Vice President.
H. W. GRUNWALDT, Sec. & Treas
THE
AMERICAN BREWING
& MALTING COMPANY
Brewers and Bottlers of extra
%uality lager beer. ‘‘American
amily’’ bottled beer a specialty.
Office: 109 Central Avenue.
P. O. Box 86.
Great Falls, = = = Montana.
BY RUIL asu WATER,
LINE
PORTLAND ARD THE DALLES
ROUTE
All Way Landings.
STEAMERS
“BAILEY GATZERT"” “DALLES CITY”
“REGULATOR” “METLAKO”
Conmnecting at Lyle, Wash., with
. . - .
Columbia River & Northern Railway Co.
FOR
Wahkiacus. Daly, Centerville, Goldendale ‘and
all Kiickitat Valley points.
Steamer leaves Portland daily (except Sun
day) 7 a. m., connecting with C. R. & N, trains
at i,_\-le 5:15 p. m. for Goldendale. Train ar
rives Geldendale, 7:35 p. m. Steamer arrives
The Dalles 6:30 p. m.
Steamer leaves The Dalles daily (except SBun
day)7:oo a. m.
C. R. & N. trains leaving Goldendale 6:15 a,
m. connects with this steamer for Portland, ar
riving Portland 6 p. m.
Excellent meals served on ail steamers. Fine
accommodations far teams and wagons.
For detailed informatioh of rates, berth res
ervations, connections, etc., write or call on
nearest l‘.fi'em. H. C. Campbell,
Gen. office, Portland, Or. Manager.
Ask the Agent for
TICKETS
VIA
To Spokane,
St. Pau, Minneapolis, Duluth,
Ch cago, St. Louis
and All Points East and South.
2 OVERLAND TRANS DAILY 2
The Flyer and the Fast Mail
Splendid Service Up-to-date Equipment
Courteo u Employes
Daylight trip across the Cascade and
Rocky Mountains.
For Tickets. rates, folders and full infor
mation call on or address
H. DICKSON, C. T. A.
122 Third Street, PORTLAND
S.G. YERKES, G. W.P. A.
612 First Avenue, SEATTLE, WASH.
A Pleasant Way to Travel
i
The above is the usual verdict of the |
traveler using the Missouri Pacfic Rail
way between the Pacific Coast and the
East, and we believe that the service
and accommodations given merit this
statement. From Denver, Colorado
Springs and Pueblo there are two
through trains daily to Kansas City
and St. Louis, carrying Pullman’s lat
est standard electric lighted sleeping !
cars, chair cars and up-to-date dining
cars. The same excellent service is
operated from Kangas City and St. !
Louis to Memphis, Little Rock and
Hot Springs. If you are going East or ,
South write for rates and full informa
tion.
W. C. McBRIDE, Gen. Agt., }
124 Third St., Portland, Or. |
SALT LAKE CITY
USE '
Salt Air Extracts, Baking
Powder, Spices and Coffees
ARE THE BEST OR MONEY BACK
Salt Lake Coffee & Spice Mills
SALT LAKE, UTAH
LEAVER DRUG CO.
Prescription Druggists
Cor. Third West and South Temple. Tele
phone 1892.
Salt Lake City, Utah.
BUTTE MONTANA
" Butte Transfer Co.
THOS. LAVELLE, Proprietor.
Baggage w 4 Passengers Ghecked
70 ALL PARTS OF THE CITY.
Baggage Store Any Length of Time
Free of Charge.
Phone No. 468. OPEN ALL NIGHT
BY RAIL AND WATER.
With Your Journey
If your tickets read oqger the Denver
and Rio Grande Railroad, the **Seen
ic Line of the World
There are somany scenicattractions
- and points of interest along the line
between Ogden and Denver that the
trip never becomes tiresome.
If you are going East, write for information
and got a pretty book that will tell you all
about it.
W. C. McBRIDE, General Agent
124 Third Street
PORTLAND, OREGON
!\ & T
127 R o H
UNION :
L OREGON
) SHORT LINE
:I|m:\o\l m
ano UNION PACIFIC
Three Trains to the East Daily
Through Pullman standard and tourist sleep
ing cars daily te Omaba, Chicago, Spokane;
tourist sleeping ecars daily to fiansas City:
through Pullman tourist sleeping cars (person
ally conducted) weekly to Chicago, Kansas
City; reclining chair cars (seats free) to East
HOURS
7“ PORTLAND TO CHICAGOD 1“
No change of cars
DEPART TIME SCHEDULES | ARRIVE
FOR ‘ from Portland, Ore. | FROM
;,'(})‘:ffifl’d {Salt Lake, Denver, Ft.|
Sooetal ’“orth, Omaha, Kansas 505
P {City, St. Louis, Chicago| °'=P ™
9:lsam via flngth East
H’ntingt'n| ol I
Atlantic (Salt Lake, Denver, Ft.|
Expreag Worth, Omaha, Kansas 7415
B:l"pmvia Cit&'. St. Louis, Chicago Lo
H’ntingt'n and the East
St. Paul ‘Walla Walla, Le wiston,
Fast Mail 'Spokane, Wallace, Pull
-6:lspm | man, Minneapolis, St.| 8:60 am
via | Paul, Duluth, Milwau
sSpokane kee, Chicago and East
River Schedule
For Astoria, Way Points and North Beach—
Daily (except Sunday) at 8 p m; Saturday at 10
pm. Daily service (water permitting) an the
Willamette and Yamhill rivers. \
For further information, ask or write your
nearest tirket agent or
A. L. CRAIG
General Passenpger Agent,
The Oregon Railroad & Navigation Co., Port
land, Oregon. 3
On Your Trip to the East
NORTH COAST LIMITED
PULLMAN STANDARD SLEEPING CARS
(ELECTRIC LIGHTS) ¢
PULLMAN TOURIST SLEEPING CARS
(ELECTRIC LIGHTS)
DINING CAR—DAY AND NIGHT
(ELECTRIC LIGHTS)
OBSERVATION CAR
(ELECTRIC LIGHTS)
ELECTRIC FANS
" BARBER SHOP '
BATH
LIBRARY
NUMEROUS OTHER COMFORTS
THREE
Daily Transcontinental Trains
TO THE EAST
The Ticket Office at Portland is at 255 Morrison St.,
: Corner Third
A. D. CHARLTON
: Assistant General Passenger Agent
PORTLAND, OREGON
BY RAI . AND WATER
ASWHIB & EOLUMBIA
RIVER RAILROAD €0
- WITH
BETWEEN
. e “ *
ortland, Astoriaz Ceaside
y < wd
e e Y
Leaves | UNION DEPOT | Arriyes.
{For .\(a{gers, Rain-|
Daily { ider, € atskanief Dail
8:00a. m. | Westport, Clifton,, 11:10 a. &.
| Astoria, Warren-|
; ton, Flavel, Gear-| by
' hart Park and Sea-|
| side. i
| Astoria & Seashore|
| Express Daily. i
7:00 p.m. | Astoria Express | 9:40 p. m.
| “baily. i
C. A. STEWART, J. C. MAYO,
Comm'’l Agt., 248 Alder St G.F.&P. A,
Telephone Main 906.
COLFAX WASH
Interior Warehouse Co.
BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., /
S
General Warehouse System
Both 0. R.%& N. and N. P. roads.
All Kinds of Grain Bought and Sold.
A. M. SCOTT, General Agent,.
Colfax, Washington.
JAMESTOWN, N. D.
Jamestown Steam Laundry
J. E. HALSTEAD, Proprietor
Short Time Work a Specialty
JAMESTOWN NORTH DAKOTA
®
The Seiler Co.
OSCAR J. SEILER, Attorney-at-Law
President
Paid Up Capital and Surplus $35,000
Collections ‘
Investments }‘
: Real Estate
Jamestown, North Dakota

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