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The new age. [volume] (Portland, Or.) 1896-1905, December 30, 1905, Image 1

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YOL. X.
LADD & TILTON, Bankers Portland, Oregon
Established in 1859. Transact a General Banking Business. Interest allowed on time de
fidu. Collections made at all points on favorable terms. Letters of Credit issued available in
A mgo and the Eastern States. Sight Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers sold on New York,
‘Washington, Chicago, St Louis, Denver, Omaha, San Francisco and various cfoints in Oregon,
Washington, Idaho, Montana and British Columbia. Exehange sold on London, Paris, Berlin,
Frankfort and Hong Kong.
UNITED STATES NATIONAL BANK
OF PORTLAND, OREGON.
J. C. AINSWORTH, President. W. B. AYER, Vice-President,. R. W. SCHMEER, Cashier
A. M. WRIGHT, Assistant Cashier.
Transacts a general banking business. Drafts issued, available in all cities of the United
States and Europe, Hong Kong and Manila. Collections made on favorable terms.
NORTHWEST CORNER THIRD AND OAK STREETS.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK of North Yakima, Wash.
Capital and Surplus $130,000 00
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY
W.M. LADD CHAS. CARPENTER W. L, STEINWEG, A. B. CLINE
President Vice President Cashier Assistant Cashier
Walla Walla, Washington. (First National Bank in the State.)
Transacts a General Banking Business.
CAPITAL $lOO,OOO. SURPLUS $lOO,OOO.
QLEVIANKENY, President. A. H. REYNOLDS. Vice President. A. R. BURFORD, Cashier
JOHN D, RYAN, Pres. D.J. HENNESSEY, Vice Pres. JOHN G. MORONY, Cashier
E. J. BOWMAN, Asst. Cashier. MARK SKINNER, Asst. Cashier.
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF GREAT FALLS, MONTANA
Capital, $200,000. UNITED STATES DEPOSITARY Deposits $1,200,000
ABSOCIATE BANKS: Daly Bank & Trust Co., Butte; Daly Bank & Trust Co., Anaconda
THE NATIONAL BANK OF COMMERCE
TACOMA, WASH.
UNITED STATES DEPOSITARY
Capltal $200,000 Suerplus $200,000
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 2
OFFICERS—Chester Thorne, President: Arthur Albertson, Vice President and Cashier;
#rederick A. Rice. Assistant Cashier; Delbert A. Young, Assistant Cashier.
JNO. C. AINSWORTH, Pres. JNO. 8. BAKER, Vice Pres. P. C. KAUFFMAN, 2d Vice Pres.
A. G. PRICHARD, Cashier. F. P. HASKELL, JR., Assistant Cashier.
THE FIDELITY TRUST COMPANY BANK
General Banking CAPITAL AND SURPLUS, $350,000 Safe Deposit Vaults
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT: Interest at the Rate of 8 per cent per Annum, Credited Semi-Annually
TACOMA, WASHINGTON
ALFRED COOLIDGE, Pres. A. F. McCLAINE, Vice Pres. AARON KUHN, Vice Pres.
CHAS. E. SCRIBER, Cashier. D.C. WOODWARD, Asst. Cashicr.
THECOLFAXNATIONAL BANK of coifax Wash.
Capital, $120,000.00
Transacts a general banking business. Special facilities for handling Eastern
Washington and Idaho items.
W. F. KETTENBAG 1, cilcs.dent J. ALEXANDER, Vice Pres. CHAS. H. KESTER, Cashier
Capital and Surplus, $135,000 LEWISTON, IDAHO
DIRECTORS—W. F. Ketteubcchj.(ir.-.c‘e B. Pficzln,nk.xce' tßeet-c::h, J. Alexander, C. C. Bunnell,
Send Your Washington, ldaho and
{ Montana Business to the
Spokane Washington
W—
ESTABLISHED
1881
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK
Moorehead, Minnesota
JOHN LAMB, DAVID ASKEGAARD, LEW A. HUNTOON, ARTHUR H. COSTAIN, '
President Vice President Cashier Asst. Cashier
Interest Paid on Time Deposits |
FIRST NATIONAL BANK of East Grand Forks, Minn,
Farm Loans Negotiated. Fire and Cyclone Insuranee Written. Does a
General Banking Busidess.
Capital, $50,000 E. ARNESON, Pres. G. R.JACOBI Cashier
4 Per Cent Interest Paid on Time Deposits
BISMARK, NORTH DAKOTA
Established In 1879. Capltal, $lOO,OOO. Interest Pald on Time Deposlits
C. B.LITTLE, President. F. D. KENDRICK, Vice President.
8. M. PYE, Cashier. J. L. BELL, Asst. Cashier.
GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS TRANSACTED.
Of JAMESTOWN, NORTH DAKOTA.
The Oldest and Largest Banking House in Central North Dakota
Collections made on all flints in North Dakota. Foreign and domestic exchange bough
and so Telegraph transfers to all parts of America.
Triea FIRST NATIONAL. BANK
OF DULUTH, MINNESOTA.
CAPITAL., $500,000 SURPLUUS 725,000
Ue S. Government Depositary.
GEORGE PALMER _ F.L.MEYERS GEO.L.CLEAVER W.L.BRENHOLTS
President Cashier Asst. Cashier Asst. Cashier
- LA GRANDE
La Grande National Bank ":icon
Capital and Surplus, $120,000
DIRECTORS: J. M. Berry, A. B. Conley, F. J. Holmes, F. M. Byrkit, F. L. Meyers, Geo. L.
Cleaver, Geo. Palmer.
BSTABLISHED 1851. L i INCORPORATED 1897,
ALLEN & LEWIS,
Shipping & Commission Merchants
WHOLESALE GROCERS.
To save time address all communications to the company.
Nos. 46 to 54 Front St. North, PORTLAND, OREGON.
PAVID H. BEECHER, SIDNEY CLARK,
President. Cashier.
Union National Bank
Incorporated 1890
CAPITAL $lOO,OOO
Pays Interest on Time Deposits
THE OLD BANK CORNER
Grand Forks, .
NORTH DAKOTA
PORTLAND, OREGON, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 30. 1905.
LATE CHRISTMAS AFTERNOON.
|
The glad, glad bells of morcing. the laughe
| ter at the dawn! :
The lustre of the children’s eyes Is fine to
look upon— b
But, O, the best of Christmas—the best
day of them all— 5
Is when the lazy firelight makes plctures
on the wnlf, ;
And I may sit in silence and give myself
the boon A
Of going back to boyhood, late Christmas
afternoon. el
Here 1 siiull fall to musing of pictures in
the grate— RIEE
There, eager for my summons the host of
boydays walit, 4
And in and out a-marching I'll see them
come and go
With hands waved high in welcome—tbfi
boys I used to know; ‘
And there, if 1 am patient, 'twill be for
me to see, &
As one sees in a mirror. the boy I used
to bel o
S
Out of the swaying shadows will rise tfii
lonfl ago,
The sleigh-bells’ tinkle-tinkle, the soft kiss
of the snow, i
The white sea of the meadow, where Ng
pranking winds will lift £
The .l(‘)‘l’]‘d.s&veep t()lt lftthe billow foamed
1 rift on drift, 30
And crur across the valley will come &
bell-sweet tune ok e
To set me nodding, nodding, late Christm "
afternoon. By
Late afternoon, in Christmas! The twil gy
soothing in, o
And me with these my visions of glag
days that have been! Wi
For 1 shall dream and wander down ul=
forgotten ways, 3
My eager arms enfolding all of my yes=
terdays. e
Without, the mellow echoes of ble‘_
chime and hymn; et
Within, the bygone voices In murmurs I&&
and dim. g
O, mine the gift of fancy, and mine this
magie chalr, ; ‘~‘
And mine the dim procession of Christ
masses that were! -
I ask no richer token of love on Christmas
Day ';,«i
Than this which comes unbidden, than this
which will not stay— o o
This wealth of recollections that vanisi
oversoon, 350
The dreamland of the shadows, late Christ:
mas afternoon. S
—W. D. Nesbit, In Harper's Weekly." =
A Christmas Bridal
BY ETTA W. PIERCE, |
GIRL stood at the door, *fi
a red shawl pinned across her
bosom, and in a shrill r
1 oy -
S e
“Carol, brothers, carol; earol joyfully.
Carol the good tidings; carol merrily,
g 4 eT fi?
3 S IRAR. .TRSA : W T PR o
TUATrO ~proun ORI - oy T e
Christmas comes again.”
“In heaven’s name, who is that erea
ture?” said Cedriec. .
His easy chair, pushed into the bow
window, commanded a view of the gar
den walk and the singer. His crutch
leaned against the wall beside him; his
blond head rested languidly upon a crim
.| son silk cushion.
“I haven't an idea,” I answered, as
I put the last touches to the Christmas
pine above the high carved mantel. “A
tramp, evidently. Do you like the effect
of Christmas roses in silver bowls, Ced
rie?
‘““Arrange your roses in silver bowls,
or in iron-bound buckets, just as you
like, Beth,” answered Cedrie, peevish
ly. “I hate weddings—they are even
worse than burials. Cannot you see that
you are all riding, roughshod, over my
heart?”’
He raised himself on the arm of his
chair and looked out at the figure before
the door. The bleak December wind was
{ blowing through the girl’s thin gown.
Her face, which bore traces of beauty,
was llvig now with cold, and perhaps
illness.
“She is the image of despair!” he
cried. “I feel a fellowship with her!
Go, Beth, bring her in—give her meat
and drink, and whatever else you may
have at your marriage feast.” i
Cedric was the most unreasonable of
human beings. I was always afraid of
him when he®was in his dark moods, I
ran out of the room.
> But a third person had heard the sing
er, and, as I reached the hall, lo! there
was Jacquita, gliding down the shining,
shallow stair—Jacquita, with her dusky
|hair and creamy skin and great South
.| ern eyes—she whose bridal had filled our
old Plymouth house with bustle and ex
pectation.
For years we had been classmates in
a young ladies’ school. She was of the
hot South, I of the cold North. Yet we
|loved each other devotedly. Proud was
I when, at the end of our school days,
Jacquita came, an honored guest, to the
old house overlooking the gray waste
of Plymouth Bay—proud was I when
all hearts went down before ber there,
and that gallant. sailor, Captain Dacre
Holme, hastened to lay himself and his
future at her feet; and, alas! sad was I
when I found that she had also made
wild havoe of my poor crippled Cedric's
3peace.
“That girl looks sick and heartbrok
en,” said Jacquita, as she stepped light
|ly down into the hall. She flung back
.the hall door. The eyes of the vagrant
fell on her with an expression that I
luhall never forget. An unspeakable
llmtred and despair blended in the look.
’ “Here is a Christmas gift for you,
| poor girl,” said Jacquita, and she held
out the gold piece.
A wicked look flashed into the way;
farer's face. She took the money, spat
on it, flung it on the ground. Then,
'neeing my rising wrath, she snatched it
again and slipped it into her pocket.
| “For luck!” she mumbled, in apology
'for her strange action, and then added,
'eurtly, reluctantly, “Thank you, miss.”
| “Have you traveled far?’ asked Jac
lqnita.
“A good bit,” replied the girl
1‘ A 4 where are you going now?Y”
b o “Po find my man,” sullenly, ‘“He
“ Promised to marry me, but he went away
‘ i@g’idn’t keep his word—l'm looking
Q:'.(_ e ffi .
. liled the girl to the kitchen and di
im the servants to provide for her
_ Deeds. I went away soon after to dress
‘| Jacquita for her bridal. Guests came
4 trooping in and filled the house. Un
{ der an arch of Christmas pine, with the
S‘ 0w wax lights shining lovingly upon
| ber,” Jacquita, in tulle and lace and
| Batin, stood by the side of her bronzed
L Young viking, and took the vows which
{'made her his, and his only, till life
J{ishounld end. ‘
4% Throughout the ceremony Cedric kept
JAB chair and made no sign. She was
2 'ied—she was Dacre’'s wife!
s4s Then followed a hubbub of congratula
gtlons and farewells—a confusion of
g fmendly tongues; and presently Jac
v 4;,5 ; in a Paris traveling gown, with
; LSOEE bands of fur about her throat, and
) ,‘ brimming with happiness, came and
4 knelt by Cedric’s chair.
4 “Good-by,” she said, lifting her ‘beau-
Ftiful face to his reluctant gaze. “You
4 may kiss me; Cedric, if you like.”
“You belong to Dacre,” he answered
bitterly. “I do not want to kiss you.
Good-by.”
We saw them enter the carriage to
gether—both young and beautiful and
wildly happy. We flung the rice and
shoes after them; the horses pranced
down the drive; the guests departed, and
Cedric and I were left alone. »
Darkness had fallen. The wind tore
wildly up and down the curving Ply
mouth shore; the bay was white with
foam. 1 turned with a shiver to the
leaping wood fire.
“What a dreadful night for a wedding
journey!” I said.
In the red glow of the logs Cedric's
face looked like gray stone.
“I like storms,” he said, savagely.
“That pair is too happy to know whether
the sun is shining or a norther raging.
Beth, sweep those flowers out of the
room—their odor stifles me.”
“Where,” he asked, quickly, “is the
girl that sang the Christmas carol at
the door? Was she warmed and fed, as
I, directed ?”’
“Yes. Cook set her a good dinner,
and when we were rushing about, too
busy to notice, she just slipped off, with
out a word of thanks to anybody. Un
der her plate, cook found a gold piece.”
“Why, that must have been the money
which Jacquita gave her! How verx
odd! Evidently the girl had a sou
above gold pieces,” said Cedric,
I drew a stool to Cedric's side, and
sat down in the light of the blazing
brands. An oppressive hush had fallen
on the house. The riot of wind and sea
alone disturbed us. Cedric’'s eyes were
fixed on the red core of the fire—his
heart, as I well knew, was following
after the bridal carriage and its freight
of happiness and hope.
“She will go with him around the
world, Beth!” he groaned. “More than
once I have heard her say that she
was a bad sailor—that she cared noth
ing for the sea: but her love for Dacre
has changed all that. And but for an
accident, Beth—a blow from an iron
hoof—a mere trifle—l would have won
her, in spite of a hundred Dacres—jyes,
but for that I might have been in his
place this night!”
It was his one bitter, constantly re
curring thought. I stroked his white,
fevered hand, which he had laid on my
shoulder.
“By this time they have reached the
station, Beth—perhaps they are on the
train, whirling farther and farther from
us—— Listen! There is some one com
ing up the walk, 1 say—l hear foot
steps!”
It chanced that no one had thought
to lock the main door of the house after
the departure of our guests. Now we
heard it open violently, There was a
rush through the hall A hand flung
aside the curtain at the parlor threshold.
Cedric uttered a sharp cry, and made
as if to rise from his chair, for there,
before our astonished eyes, stood Jac
quita, the bride of an hour, her travel
ing dress all stained and disordered, and
powdered with the snow that was begin
ning to fall, her face like the face of
one who had looked on some ghastly
thing, and frozen with the horror of it.
“In heaven’s game, what has happen
ed, Jacquita?’ cried Cedric, wildly.
She held out her hands; they were
red with blood. Her white lips moved;
we heard her say:
“Down there, at the base of the hill,
near the station, in the shadow of the
trees, she was waiting for us—the girl
who sang the Christmas carol at the
door. I saw her by the light of the
carriage lamps. Something bright was
shining in her hand. She wrenched open
the carriage door—she glared in on us.
She hurled a terrible accusation at him
—at Dacre—my husband. Then she
fired, and he fell back dead. Look at
my hands! This blood is his! They are
bringing him after me—my husband—
dead!”
With the last word Jacquita reeled,
and fell face downward on the floor.
Then love for a moment conquered the
infirmity of the flesh, for, regardless
of the crutch which had been his con
stant support for months and years,
Cedric leaped from his chair, and with
a terrible cry rushed to the widowed
bride, and knelt beside her.
Two years later, in a terrific winter
storm,-an English bark was wrecked on
o neighboring beach.
Several bodies drifted ashore, and
among them was a sailor, slender, young,
beardless: When found by the patrol a
little life still lingered in him. He was
carried to the station among the rocks,
and every means which surfmen know
employed for his resuscitation. Only
once, however, did the wild eyes of the
boy open. and then they chanced to fall
upon Cedric, who had hurried to the
gcene of the disaster, and was standing
GEITING READY FOR A HOT TIME.
NO. 36.
with the life savers in the warm, brl‘a
ly lighted station. What memorles
the face of my brother conjure up before
this stranger lad? He tried to clutch a$
Cedric’s storm -coat. My brother ben#
down and looked at him.
“Great heaven!” he cried. *“This is
no boy, but the woman Who killed Dacre
Holme!”
At this accusation the young sailor
heaved himself up on the supporting arm
of a surfman, and in one shuddering
scream his soul passed into the night.
I stood in the bow window of the
parlor, peering out into the darkness,
when Cedrie returned from the statiom.
The lantern in his hand shone brightly;
his erect figure advanced sturdily through
the tempest of wind and smow. He
had grown hardy and strong in the last
year. His crutch was now a thing of
the pasdt; of the injury only a slight limp
remained. .
As his familiar halting step reached
the door Jacquita sprang up from the
hearth, where she had been feeding the
fire with dry pine cones, and flew to
meet Cedric. For three months she had
been his happy wife.
“Oh,” she cried, in alarm, “how grave
and strange you look, Cedrie! Some
thing has happened.”
He dashed down the lantern and press
ed her to his heart with passionate tem
derness.
“Tell me,” he said, huskily, ‘“do you
love me, Jacquita? Does the past seem
to you like a nightmare dream?”
“Yes,” she faltered; “oh, yes, yes!
“Then you shall know the truth. That
girl is lying dead at the station. She
came ashore from a wreck, disguised as
a sailor. Don’t tremble, darling—youn
must forget that portion of your life
altogether. You are mine, now-—mine!
and I mean to love and cherish you till
the end of my days.”—People’s Home
Journal.
The Dawn of Christmas.
Christmas day begins in the middle of
the Pacific ocean, and there is where
Santa Claus starts and ends his great
and only journey of the year.

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