OCR Interpretation


The new age. [volume] (Portland, Or.) 1896-1905, February 17, 1906, Image 1

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025107/1906-02-17/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

TRV s
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF KALISPELL
KALISPELL, MONTANA
D. R. PRELER, Pres., F. J. LEBERT, V. Pres.. R. E. WEBSTER, Cash., W. D. LAWSON, A. Cash.
Tramsacts a general panking business. Drafts issued, available in all cities of the United
ißtates snd Europe, Hong Kong and Manila. Collections made on favorable terms.
LADD & TILTON, Bankers Portland, Oregon
Established in 1859. Transact a General Banking Business, Interest allowed on time de
godt.l. Collections made at all points on favorable terms. Letters of Credit issued available in
urope and the Eastern States. Sight Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers sold on New York,
Washington, Chicago, St Louis, Denver, Omaha, San Francisco and various goints in Oregon,
Washington, Idaho, Montana and British Columbia. Exehange sold on London, Paris, Berlin,
Frankfort and Hong Kong.
OF PORTLAND, OREGON.
J. C. AINBWORTH, President. W. B. AYER, Vice-President. R. W. SCHMEER, Cashier
A. M. WRIGHT, Assistant Cashier.
Tramsacts a general banking business. Drafts issued, available in all cities of the United
States and Europe, Hong Kong and Manila. Collections made on favorable terms.
NORTHWEST CORNER THIRD AND OAK STREETS.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK of North Yakima, Wash.
Capltal and Surplus $130,000 00
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY
W.M. LADD CHAS. CARPENTER W. L, STEINWEG, A. B. CLINE
President Vice President Cashier Assistant Cashier
Walla Walla, Washington. (First National Bank in the State.)
Transacts a General Banking Business.
CAPITAL $lOO,OOO. SURPLUS $lOO,OOO. j
LEV]IANKENY, President. A. H. REYNOLDS. Vice President. A. R. BURFORD, Cashier
JOHN D. RYAN, FPres. D.J. HENNESSEY, Vice Pres. JOHN G. MORONY, Cashier
E. J-BOWMAN, Asst. Cashier. MARK SKINNER, Asst. Cashier.
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF GREAT FALLS, MONTANA
Capital, $200,000. UNITED STATES -DEPOSITARY Deposits $1,200,000
ASBOCIATE BANKS: Daly Bank & Trust Co., Butte; Daly Bank & Trust Co., Anaconda
THE NATIONAL BANK OF CONMIMERCE
TACOMA, WASH.
UNITED STATES DEPUSITARY
Capltal $200,000 Surpius $200,000
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
OFFICERS—Chester Thorne, President: Arthur Albertson, Vice President and Cashier;
Frederick A. Rice, Assistant Cashier; Delbert A. Young, Assistant Cashier.
JNO, C. AINSWORTH, Pres. JNO. 8. BAKER, Vice Pres. P.C. KAUFFMAN, 2d Vice Pres.
A. G. PRICHARD, Cashier, F. P, HASKELL, JR., Assistant Cashier.
THE FIDELITY TRUST COMPANY BANK
General Banking CAPITAL AND SURPLUS, $350,000 Safe Deposit Vaults
‘SAVINGS DEPARTMENT: Interest at the Rate of 3 per cent per Annum, Credited Semi-Annually
TACOMA, WASHINGTON
ALFRED COOLIDGE, Pres. A. F. McCLAINE, Vice Pres. AARON KUHN, Vice Pres
CHAS. E. SCRIBER, Cashier. D. €. WOODWARD, Asst. Cashicr.
THE COLFAX NATIONAL BANK or colfax Wash.
Capital, $120,000.00
Transacts a general banking business. = Special facilities for handling Eastern
Washington and Idaho items.
AA oo Aottt o
W. F. KETTENBACH, Pres. J. ALEXANDER, Vice Pres. GEO. H. KESTER, Casiier
Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits, $215,000.00
‘Capital recently increased from $50,000 to $lOO,OOO Surplus increased from $50,000 to $lOO,OOO
DIRECTORS—Jos. Alexander, C. C. Bunnell, J. B. Morris, Grace K. Pfafllin. R. C. Beach,
G. H. Kester, W. F. Kettenbach, O. E. Guernsey, Wm. A, Libert, Jno. W. Givens, A. Freidenrich.
Twenty-two Years a National Bank. Oldest Bank in Lewiston, Idaho.
Send Your Washington, ldaho and
Montana Business to the
OLD NATIONAL., BANK
Spokane Washington
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK fmalysneo
Moorehead, Minnesota
JOHN LAMB, DAVID ASKEGAARD, LEW A. HUNTOON, ARTHUR H. COSTAIN,
President Vice President Cashier Agst. Cashier
Interest Paid on Time Deposits
FIRST NATIONAL BANK of East Grand Forks, Minn.
Farm Loans Negotiated. Fire and Cyclone Insuranee Written. Does a
General Banking Busidess.
Capital, $50,000 E. ARNESON, Pres. G. R. JACORI Cashier
4 Per Cent Interest Paid on Time Deposits
BISMARK, NORTH DAKOTA
Established in 1878. Capital, $lOO,OOO. Inferest Paid on Time Deposits
C. B. LITTLE, President. F. D. KENDRICK, Vice President.
S. M. PYE, Cashier. J. 1. BELL, Assts Cashier.
GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS TRANSACTED.
THE JAMES RIVER NATIONAL BANK
Of JAMESTOWN, NORTH DAKOTA.
The Oldest and Largest Banking House in Central North Dakota
Collections made on all points in North Dakota. Foreign and domestic exchange bough
and sof:. Telegraph transfers to all parts of America.
THE FIRST NATIONAL, BANK
OF DULWUTH, MINNESOTA.
CAPITAL, BsBoo,ooo SURPLWUS 725,000
.
U. S. Government Depositary.
GEORGE PALMER F. L. MEYERS GEO. L. CLEAVER W. L. BRENHOLTS
President Cashier Asst. Cashier Asst, Cashier
La Grande National Bank "ofiéon"
OREGON
, Capital and Surpius, $120,000
DIRECTORS: J. M. Berry, A. B. Conley, F. J. Holmes, F. M. Byrkit, F. L. Meyers, Geo. L
Cleaver, Geo. Palmer.
DAVID H. BEECHER, SIDNEY CLARK,
President. Cashier.
. : )
Union National Bank
Incorporated 1890
CAPITAL $lOO,OOO
Pays Interest on Time Deposits
THE OLD BANK CORNER
Grand Forks,
NORTH DAKOTA
PORTLAND, OREGON, S&TURDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1906.
'HON WILLIAM LAIRD M'CORMICKSIM. & O. railroad, in immense tracts of
ey i Mlbine* timber lands in Northern
Who Will Be Republican Nowinee 1 ‘ Visconsin, and became secretary and
Mayor of Tacoma. , surer of the North Wisconsin
The man most frequently and f . ’ imber Co., among his associates be
vorably mentioned for the Repu_ ling F. Weyerhauser, W. H. Laird, M.
can nomination for mayor of Tacom&G. anq J. L. Norton, A. J. Hayward
by the ensuing convention is H ; id others. The company bought 15
‘William Laird McCormick, a ves ,towuahipa of timber land and built
prominent, energetic, useful and l) a large mill, which it operated till
lic-spirited business man of that be #91902. This company also organized
tiful, important and rapidly-growin@Band conducted the Sawyer County
(n:ify:“'l‘hough a resident of Taco ibank. In 1890 Mr. McCormick organ
for but a few years past, Mr. McCot f!zed the Northern Grain & Flour Co.,
mick has long had business interesth t Ashlagd, Wis, and has been its
in that city and in Western Washl ecretary and treasurer ever since,
ton, and notwithstanding having h "' he company having offices in Chi
very large and important interests f ¥ cago and elevators at Manitowac
ROBERT S. McCORMICK
Republican Candidate for the Nomination as Mayor of Tacoma
Wisconsin and Minnesota for many
years, he became so_greatly impressed
and delighted with Tacoma and the
region of which it is the commerclal
center that he chose it for his per
manent home, and has ever since
been one of the greatest business fac
tors in its development.
Though modest and democratic in
demeanor, and not inclined to boast
of his many successes and prefer
ments, there is perhaps no citizen of
Tacoma who has held so many and
varied positions of trust and respon
sibility as Mr. McCormick. He is
every inch the progressive, success
ful business man, but he is more than
that; he is a scholar, a student, a
man who enjoys and can take a lead
ing place in educational affairs and
in society; a man utterly clean,
square, upright and above reproach in
all his methods and transactions; a
man to be trusted ‘implicitly in any
position, private or public, that he
assumes.
! Mr.McCormick has indeed had a
‘wonderfully busy and brilliant career,
one perhaps not paralleled in varietY.;
scope and success by that of any man
in the Pacific Northwest. He was
born in Pennsylvania on a farm in
11847' of Irish descent, and attended?
%school and did farm work till 1861,
when he went into the army, but wasl
sent home on account of his YOuth,j
and then attended a military institute
in Philadelphia. He then studied law
and was for several months in a rail
way office, and then became a clerk
in a store in Ohio for a year. In 1868
;he became cashier of a firp of lum
ber manufacturers in Winona, Minn.,,
with which he has ever since been in
timately associated. On account of
poor health from office confinement,
he opened a retail lumber store at
Wanseka, Minn., in which he has
since been interested. While at this'
place he filled the office of council
man, mayor and state senator. Ahont‘
1882 he became _interested, thm‘h’
the then president of the C., St. P.!
cago and elevators at Manitowac
with a capacity of 2,000,000 bushels.
He is president of the Mississippi &
Rum River Boom Co.; secretary and
treaSurer of lumber companies at
Clinton, Iowa; president of the Mis
sissippi Land Co., of Minneapolis;
_!ice-president of a land company at
St. Paul; president of the Duluth Uni
versal Mill C 0.,, and secretary and
treasurer of the Waeyerhauser Tim
ber Co., of Tacoma, perhaps the larg-
MR. ARTHUR G. PRICHARD
Cashier of the Fidelity Trust Company Bank, Tacoma
lest organization of its kind in the
world, and he is president of the Pa
cific National bank of this city.
Mr. McCormick has also many oth
er than strictly business interests. He
has been president of the Harvard
Free Library association and of the
State Historical society of Wisconsin;
president of the board of trustees of
the Ashland, Wis., academy, and trus
tee of the Congregational church
there. He is an eminent member of
the Masonpic fraternity, a member of
the Sons of Veterans, of the Sons of
the American Revolution, of the So
ciety of the War of 1812, and of the
Minnesota club. He served six years
in the 'Bos as treasurer of Sawyer
county, and was subsequently chair
man of its board of supervisors. He
was a delegate to the National Re
publican conventions of 1880 and 1900.
Mr. McCormick in his busy life has
found time to write considerable, hav
ing written several noted articles and
pamphlets on local educational, busi
ness and historical subjects. ‘
Mr. McCormick was married in
1870, and there are two surviving
children, his elder son, William Laird
McCormick, Jr., being a prominent
lawyer and public man of Ashland,
Wis. '
What he was for many years in
Wisconsin and Minnesota, Mr. Mc-
Cormick is in Tacoma and Washing
ton—a very active, progressive, en-'
terprising, useful and model business
man and leading citizen. His chief
interests are now here, and he has
done, is doing and will do, very much
toward building up and advancing the
interests of this city and region. Mr. !
McCormick has a national as well as |
}{a local fame, and his election as niay
or would be commented on in sev
%eral states of the Union. Mr. Mec-
Cormick has always dealt fairly and
liberally with wage-earners, of which
he has been one; he is liberal to
worthy charities; he is deeply and
zealously interested in education; he
believes thoroughly in good, clean
municipal government; he is a man
of vast experience in business | and
public affairs; he is a man to be thor
oughly trusted in any executive posi
tion, and would undoubtedly make an
ideal mayor of Tacoma, where his
business interests are now centered.
Personally Mr. McCormick is a
stout, strong, robust, handsome, at
tactive man, who looks several years
younger than he is; he is approach
able and affable; is endowed with
great capacity for work; is clgar
headed and in every respect reliable;
and the Republicans of Tacoma cer
tainly could not make a better selec
tion as their candidate for mayer.
He would surely be elected, and
would as surely serve that city well
‘and to its great advantage.
| Mr. McCormick is a man whom Ta
}coma. may well welcome and honor.
lHe has been and will be a great de
!veloper of that city. Besides possess
'ing remarkable business abilities, his
!is a most admirable nature and char
ac.ter. There is 7othlng shallow or
‘deceptive about him. His word is as
good as his bond, and he is truly one
of nature’s noblemen.
His nomination would doubtless
add strength to the whole Republican
ticket in Tacoma and Pierce county,
a consideration not to be overlooked.
ARTHUR G. PRITCHARD, CASHIER
_ FIDELITY TRUST CO., TACO
MA, WASH. 2
The subject of this sketch, whose
portrait appears herewith, is at the
head of one of the strongest financial
institutions in the Northwest—the Fi
delity Trust Co., of Tacoma. Mr. Ar
thur G. Pritchard is one of the ablest,
most progressive and popular finans
ciers on the Coast and has fully
earned the distinguished place he
holds among them. The popularity
and rapid development and growth
of the Fidelity Trust Co.'s extensive
business for many years is due large
ly to Mr. Pritchard’s business acu
men and faithful devotion to the af
fairs of the great concern of which he
is cashier.
The Fidelity Trust Co. has a paid
up capital of $300,000, a surplus of
$70,000 and deposits of $1,600,000. Its
savings bank department pays 3 per
cent interest semi-annually on depos
its.
The remarkably subs’tantial growth
of the Fidelity Trust Co.’s business sug
gests the leading characteristic of Mr.
Pritchard’s business policy. He is
known in financial circles f'ar beyond
the borders of the Pacific Coast as a
conservative, careful and safe finan
cier. The growth of the City of Des
tiny is in great measure due to the
progressive and public-spirited busi
ness methods and foresight of such
young stalwarts in the commerial
world as Mr. Arthur Pritchard,
COST $lOO,OOO A MILE.
Railroads Contractor Talks of New
Northern Pacific Cut-off.
Tacoma — ‘“When completed the
Northern Pacific Columbia river road
will be the best piece of trackage any
where in the West,”” said a railway
contractor on his way to take charge of
work 20 miles north of Vancouver.
“It will compare with any roade in the
Atlantic states. Some of the grading
will cost $lOO,OOO a mile. There are
two miles, at a point 17 miles north of
Vancouver, where there are no trees to
speak of and no rocks, that will cost
$50,000 each, but it is all steam shovel
wq'k. It is estimated that the sub
cohtractor, who will work a steam
shovel, about 20 men and several teams
of borses, will need at least a year to
complete these two miles.
““The grade of the road from Van
couver to Kennewick will not exceed
two-tenths of 1 per cent, as compared
with a 2 per cent grade in the present
line across the mountainge. No carve
will be greater than 3 degrees as com
pared with 7 or 8 degrees in the O. R.
& N. tracks south of the river.”’
Members Supplied the Cash.
Wenatchee — The Chelan County
Horticltural association held its regu
lar monthly meeting last week in
Wenatchee. It was found the cash on
hand was insufficient to pay the bills
presented -this month. To overcome
this about 20 members paid their billa
for one year in advance. The reason
for the many bille is the large expense
incurred in holding the farmers’ insti
tute a few weeks ago. The society is
in a prosperous condition and the
shortage of cash is only temporary
Won’t Make Sugar in 1906.
Ellensburg—C. W. Adamse, who has
been endeavoring to fdnance the beet
sugar factory here, is here {rom Seattle.
It is definitely settled that the factory
will not be built this year, but the pro
ject has by no means been abandoned.
A building may be constructed thia
summer and machinery installed so
that the crop of 1907 may be utilized.
An effort will be made to keep the as
sociation together and to sign up farme
ers for an acreage next year,
{ Good Price for Fruit Land.
North Yakima—Still another record
‘breaking price has been paid for choice
irrigated lande in Yakima county. E.
J. Haaze, who last week sold 10 acres
of fruit land on Nob hill, has purchas
ed from W. N. Irish two and a half
acres adjoining the tract he eoid, for
$5,000, or $2,000 an acre. The land is
planted to apples and pears. The
highest price heretofore recorded was
the sale made by Mr. Haaze—sl,9oo an
acrc.
NO. 43.

xml | txt