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The new age. [volume] (Portland, Or.) 1896-1905, March 31, 1906, Image 2

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Topics of
the Times
As to the popularity of Alice, “Know
all men by these presents.”
The Insurance companies might as
well grin and bear it. There is still
more to follow.
If Witte were to lose his job there
would be some confusion in the public
mind as to what he had lost.
The American women may ruin the
nation, as the London lecturer says, but
the nation will enjoy the process.
Tfe result of the insurance investi
gations shows what a lot of punish
ment can be Inflicted without even an
arrest.
Turks and Servians continue to kill
each other, but if the innocent bystand
er's good luck abldes there will be no
fuss made.
The Topeka Capital is conducting a
search for the most useless word in the
English language. What's the matter
with “illy?”
In view of his frigid sarcasm, It
would seem that George F. Baer ought
to be president of the Ice Combine, in
stead of a calorific coal concern.
The Omaha jury notifies Pat Crowe
that he was mistaken when he confess
ed to kidnapping the Cudahy boy. Pat
must have fits of absent-mindedness.
Another way to avold the danger of
doped soothing syrup would be to cut
out the soothing syrup. Bables were
raised for a good many thousand years
without lit.
When the future develops ragtime
into classic music, may we not expect to
see beside the busts of Wagner and
Beethoven the classic features of Marie
Cahill and Fay Templeton?
Before she would marry a man
named Gander an Indiana girl had him
go into court and have his name
changed to Ganser. She didn’t propose
to make a goose of herself.
Ten thousand Russians of noble fam
flies are said to have taken refuge in
other European countries. According
to this, noblemen in Russia are almost
as numerous as officenolders in the
United States.
In the Sahara Desert, says a recent
writer, there is a continuous process of
reduction going on. The sand blast
wears away rocks and the heat splits
them. At Nefsauoa stood a line of
pinnacles, Only one remains of the
original height. The others are worn
away. That which remains is protect
ed by a topknot of shrubs and earth,
nourished by a spring which flows from
its summit. It is not the hardness
of the rock, but this patch of soll and
vegetation, frail and soft as it seems,
which has preserved the pinnacle. The
picture suggests many analogies in hu
man life.
At the recent meeting of the Interna
tional navigation copngress at Milan
some Interesting data were furnished
respecting the influence which the de
struction of forests exerts on the dis
tharge of rivers. A summary of seven
important papers read at the congress
shows that it was allowed by all the
authors of thesé papers that the re
moval of forests, especially In hilly
countries, has a marked effect on the
water supply of the neighboring rivers.
Where deforestation has taken place
brooks have disappeared and small riv
ers once furnishing power for ‘mills
have ceased to be sufficient for this
purpose.
Of one thing we may be sure, which
is that the world has not the same
China to deal with that it had six
years ago. China, wonderful to relate,
has changed and is changing now with
rapidity. It Is much to be doubted
that another military . expedition to
Pekin similar to that or 1900 could now
be safely undertaken. And, certainly,
were the new army to be usetl against
an international force such an under
taking as the Pekin expedition of 1900
would be madness. An invading force
enormously larger than the allied con
tingents of that year would now be
necessary. The belief is based on trust
worthy reports concerning the size and
character of the reorganized Chinese
army, whose maneuvers late in the
autumn were critically watched by ex
pert foreign observers.
The growing tendency of legislatures
to pass laws has become a source of
alarm to many who view with candor
the results attained by the various ses
sions. What can be done to check the
flow of useless and nuschievous law
making is a question that affects our
democracy. The pressure upon mem
bers of legislatures for laws is two
fold. It comes from those who make
a special demand upon those they have
asisted to elect. On the other hand,
there is a strong motive working upon
the legislator himself—a desire to
make a record. To make a record and
gecure his re-election the member feels
that he must connect his name with
some bill which will inake a stir. Such
men are often re-elected upon their
#“record” and other men who did noth
ing but vote “no” are left at home be
cause they “did not do anything.”
There are other “entangling al
flances” than those agalnst which Gen
eral Washington, in his farewell ad
dress, warned his country. Next in im
portance to the avoidance by the gov
ernment of the United States of al-
liances with foreign powers lis the
avoidance by pulilic officials of such
connection with business Interests as
might embarrass them in the perform
ance of their official duties. While it
may not be practicable for all persons
holding important places in the gov
ernment, in either the legislative, exec
utive or judicial departments, to be en
tirely free from counection with cor
porations, such as railroads, express
companies, national banks and manu
facturing combines, it would be advis
able for obvious reasons for such offi
clals to reduce such connections to the
smallest practicable limits, not only
that personal interests may not swerve
them from the straight path of publie
duty but that they may not be liable to
a suspicion of such infidelity.
It has once more been demonstrated
that men can build automobiles which
can be driven at a rate of a little more
than two miles in a minute. But what
the Ingenuity of man has not been able
to discover is the practical use of any
such achievement. The world is not
aware of any need for such machines
or for the maniacal spirit in man which
drives them at such speed. Driving an
automobile at tbat rate calls for a kind
of courage which from some viewpoints
{s admirable. But is there such a large
surplus of courage in the world that it
needs to be wasted in senseless dar
ing? In the making of such machines
there is no new development in me
chanical principles. Nothing is con
tributed to science or the useful arts.
The *“good” of a racing machine is in
separable from the danger and disas
ter that attend it. Wonder is excited
not by the machines, but by the driving
of them. In comparison with that the
engineer of a locomotive at top speed
has nothing to do and his work is mere
ly gentle amusement, ridiculously safe.
What a pity that when the world is
hungering for heroism in a million use
ful and noble occupations, men should
lightly carry their lives into such use
less danger.
There is a superstition in this coun
try that there is distinction in being
rich. But a board of tax revision has
just discovered that Charles Lockhart
of Pittsburg, who was little heard of
while he lived and whose death, some
months ago, attracted small attention,
left an estate worth $180,000,000,
Charles Lockhart? Charles Lockhart?
Who was Charles Locknart? And yet
$180,000,000 is a lot of money. If there
were distinction in mere wealth, the
name of Lockhart would be famous in
stead of unknown. One hundred and
eighty millions is eighteen times the
wealth of Stephen Girard when he was
the American Croesus, in 1831, It is
six times as much as was left by the
original Astor in 1848. It is just equal
to the sum William H. Vanderbilt left
when he died, the richest man in the
courtry, and one of the very richest in
the world. But to-day an obscure man
quietly drops off, and it takes a board
of tax revision with Its magnifying
glass to discover hls little estate of
$180,000,000. And yet still we foolishly
suppose wealth gives alstinction. Why,
a young author of a popular novel has
a thousand times more distinction than
this Lockart. A good artist or a suc
cessful scientist basks in the sunshine
of fame, while this man with mere
wealth Is In the shadows of obscurity.
In these days the man who can do
nothing but make money, though he
makes it in the hundreds of millions, 1s
a nobody. .
CITY MAN IN THE COUNTRY.
Shows Ignorance When He Calls
Young Cattle “Bull Heifers.”
Lennie Merril, a popular guide at
Belgrade lakes, is responsible for the
following one on us “city folks:”
“Of course, we know that you clty
folks have lots of chances to laugh at
us hayseeders, but once in a while the
laugh is on our side. I never was so
tickled in my life as I was last sum
mer when I was guiding Mr. L., from
New York. He is as much as 50 years
old and a mighty smart man, too, every
other way, but he was just ‘scairt’ to
death of cattle.
“Well, one day when we were fly
fishing for bass he wanted to go
ashore, so I rowed him up and he went
off into the woods. Pretty soon he
came tearing down to the boat, a-holler
ing for help at the top of his voice, so
you would have thought there was a
big she bear after him, and I jumped
up and asked him what was the trou
ble. He sald:
“‘There’'s a lot of cattle coming this
way.’
“] knew It was a parcel of young
stock, so I says to him:
“‘You needn't be scared of them;
they're nothing but a lot of heifers.’
“And what do you suppose he up and
said? I thought I should die. He
says to me, and this is the Lord's
truth:
“‘How do you know they ain't bull
heifers 1”"—Boston Herald.
Rheumatism and Tan.
The discovery of a remedy for rheu
matism by means of tan was accident
ally made by a tanner of Ulm, Wurt
temberg. One day he fell into one of
his own vats, and, a 8 no one was near,
he had to remain in the tanning liquid
for over half an hour. When rescued
he found, it Is said, that his rheuma
tism had entirely left him. He then
turned doctor and treated by means of
a system called electrotannotherapia.
Another reason to behave which 1s
as important as the starry crown:
When you do anything wrong your
enemlies pick it up and get a ten-mile
start of your friends.
ioomo»»mo”mowwi
i.I.DAHO AQYERTISIN%
Thos. Blyth, Pre Lyman Fargo, Vice Pres
The Blyth & Fargo Co.
Pocatello, Idaho
General Merchandise
STORES AT
Evanston, Wyo. Pocatello, Idahe
BANK OF NAMPA, Ltd.
CAPITAL STOCK $50,000.00
Established 1899. Dewey Palace Hotel Bld’g.
FRED G. MOCK, President
F. J. CONROY, Vice-President
C. R. HICKEY, Cashier
FRANK JENKINSON, Assg’t Cashier
NAMPA, . IDAHO
J. A. Mum(. Wm. A. Anthes,
President. Cashier
D. W. Standrod, 1. N. Amathes,
Yice President Asst. Cashier
THE
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
of Pocatello, Idaho.
POCATELLO, -~ - « [IDAHO
TUTTLE MERGANTILE GOO., LTD.
Wholesale Grocers
GOODWIN MINING CANDLES
Judson Powder, Fuse and Caps
AGENTS FOR THE
CELEBRATED OLYMPIA BEER
Nampa, Idaho
CHURCH & WHITE CO.
Real Estate
And Insurance
Pocatello " Idaho
?00“000000“0000“00000:
¢ HELENA MONTANA
§0000000000“““m000:
San Francisco Bakery
JOHN WENDEL, Proprietor
A Full Assortment of Fine Goods
Always on Hand Our Bread. is
on Sale in Neighboring Towns
Ask Your Grocer for Wendel’s Bread
Orders by Mail Receive
Prompt Attention
611 First Street 9 State Street
Phone 3-F Phone 260-M
HELENA, MONT.
Capital Brewing Co.
HELENA, MONTANA
0090906000000 00000000004
GREAT FALLS
Clothe Man, Woman, Boy—in
Modern Up-to-Date Fashionable
Clothing—at Popular Prices.
Visit Often the Popular Priced
Store for Men and Women.
Great Falls, = = « Montana.
E. A. REICHEL, President.
W. F. SENGBUSCH, Vice President.
H. W. GRUNWALDT, Sec. & Treas
THE
AMERICAN BREWING
& MALTING COMPANY
Office: 109 Central Avenue,
P. O. Box 86,
Qreat Falls, = e « Montana.
e e e e
BY RAIL AND WATER,
REGULATOR
PORTLAND AND THE DALLES
ROUTE
All Way Landings.
STEAMERS
“BAILEY GATZERT” “DALLES CITY”
“REGULATOR"” “METLAKO”
Conuecting at Lyle, Wash., with
Columbia River & Northern Railway Co.
FOR
Wahkiacus. Daly, Centerville, Goldendale and
all Klickitat Valley points.
Steamer leaves Portland daily (except Sun
day) 7 a. m., connecting with C. R. & N, trains
at i.yle 5:15 p. m. for Goldendale. Train ar
rives Geldendale, 7:35 p. m. Steamer arrives
The Dalles 6:30 p. m.
Steamer leaves The Dalleg daily (except Sun
day)7:oo &. m.
(,z. R. &N. trains leaving Goldendale 6:15 a,
m. connects with thissteamer for Portland, ar
giving Portland 6 p. m.
Excellent meals served on ail steamers. Fine
accommodations for teams and wagons.
For detailed information of rates, berth res
ervations, connections, ete., write or call om
nearest :gent. H. C. Campbell,
Gen. office, Portland, Or. Manager.
Ask .the Agent for
TICKETS
VIA
To Spokane,
St. Pau, Minneapolis, Duluth,
Ch cago, St. Louis
and All Points East and South.
2 OVERLAND TRANS DAILY 2
The Flyer and the Fast Mail
Splendid Service Up-to-date Equipment
Courteo u Employes
Daylight trip across the Cascade and
Rocky Mountains.
For Tickets. rates, folders and full infor
mation call on or address
H. DICKSON, C. T. A.
122 Third Street, PORTLAND
S.G. YERKES, G. W.P. A.
612 First Avenue, SEATTLE, WASH.
A Pleasant Way to Travel
The above is the usual verdict of the
traveler using the Missouri Pacfic Rail
way between the Pacific Coast and the
East, and we believe that the service
and accommodations given merit this
statement. From Denver, Colorado
Springs and Pueblo there are two
through trains daily to Kansas City
and St. Louis, carrying Pullman’s lat
est standard electric lighted sleeping
carg, chair cars and up-to-date dining
cars. The same excellent service is
operated from Kansas City and St.
Louis to Memphis, Little Rock and
Hot Springs. If you are.going East or
South write for rates and full informa
tion.
W. C. McBRIDE, Gen. Agt.,
124 Third St., Portland, Or.
SALT LAKE CITY
USE
Salt Air Extracts, Baking
Powder, Spices and Coffees
ARE THE BEST OR MONEY BACK
Salt Lake Coffee & Spice Mills
SALT LAKE, UTAH
LEAVER DRUG CO.
Prescription Druggists
Cor. Third West and South Temple. Tele
phone 1892.
Salt Lake City, Utah.
:0000“00000“000“0“0“:
&
2 NORTH YAKIMA 3
&OW““““MQQ“OOO‘
MEADOW BROOK
CREAMERY
H. Q. WEINSTEIN COMPANY.
Manufacturers of .
Fancy Creamery
BUTTER.
North Yakima, Wash,
BY RAIL AND WATER.
SEE
Nature’s Wondrous Handiwork
THROUGH UTAH AND COLORADO
Castle Gate, Canon of the Grand
Black Canon, Marshall and Ten
nessee Passes, and the World-
Famous ROYAL GORGE.
For illustrated and descriptive pamph
lets write to |
W. C. McBRIDE, General Agent
124 Third Street
PORTLAND, OREGON
Through Pullman standard and tourist sleep
ing cars daily te Omaha, Chicnfio. Spokane;
tourist ulee{»’ing cars daily to Kansas City:
through Pullman tourist sleeping cars (f{erson
ally conducted) weekly to Chicago, Kansas
City; reclining chair cars (seats free) to East
HOU IE S
PORTLAND TO CHICAQO
KNo change of cars
DEPART TIME SCHEDULES ARRIVE
FOR from Portland, Ore. FROM
Chicago igql¢ Lake, De Ft.
Portland [u& e, Lenvyer,
Bpecial |8 ort O, teace| 5:25pm
9:lsam via| 71T o SOLS, CRICAgO
H'ntingt'n!‘n the Eas
Atlantic |Salt Lake, Denver, Ft.
Expren |{Worth, Omaha, Kansas 7:lsam
8:1-€>mvia Citg. St. Louis, Chicago| ‘*l°®
H’ntingt'n and the East
St. Paul Walla Walla, Le wiston,
Fast Mail |Spokane, Wallace, Pull
-6:15p m man, Minneapolis, St.| 8:00am
via Paul, Duluth, Milwau-
Bpokane |kee, Chicago and East
River Schedule
For Astoria, Way Points and North Beach—
Daily g,xcept Sunday) at 8 p m; Saturday at 10
Evm. aily service (water permitting) an the
illamette and Yamhill rivers.
For further information, ask or write your
nearest tirket agent or
A. L. ORAIG
General Passenger Agent,
The Oregon Railroad & Navigation Co., Port
land, Oregon.
On Your Trip to the East
NORTH COAST LIMITED
PULLMAN S'l"(él;{l?fi&l?fi }%I_EFEPING CARS
PULLMAN TOURIST SLEEPING CARS
(ELECTRIC LIGHTS)
DINING CAR—DAY AND NIGHT
(ELECTRIC LIGHTS)
OBSERVATION CAR
(ELECTRIC LIGHTS)
ELECTRIC FANS
BARBER SHOP
BATH
LIBRARY
NUMEROUS OTHER COMFORTS
THREE
Daily Transcontinental Trains
TO THE EAST
The Ticket Office at Portland is at 255 Morrison St.,
Corner Third
A. D. CHARLTON
Assistant General Passenger Agent
PORTLAND, OREGON
BY RAIL AND WATER
ASWHII & COLUMBIA
b RIVER RAILROAD CO.
Tho Slraiamt Possenger [rains Daily
THROUGH PARLOR CARS
Portland, Astoria 2 Seaside
Leaves UNION DEPOT Arrives.
7:00p.m. | Astoria Express 9:40 p. m.
°'c%l.§s’%"l‘,‘s.‘?m Alder St J'(?.'lg.‘ 2‘;’9'»
Telephone Main 906,
: COLFAX WASH
Interior Warehouse Co.
BALFOUR, GUTaH‘I.IIE & C 0.,,
General Warehouse System
Both 0. R. & N. and N. P. roads.
All Kinds of Grain Bought and Sold.
A. M. SCOTT, General Agent,
Calfox, Waiington.
£ JAMESTOWN, N. D.
Jamestown Steam Laundry
J. E. HALSTEAD, Proprietor
Short Time Work a Specialty
JAMESTOWN NORTH DAKOTA
@
The Seiler Co.
OSCAR J. SEILER, Attorney-at-Law
President
Paid Up Capital and Surplus $35,000
Collections
Investments
Real Estate
Jamestown, North Dakota

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