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The new age. [volume] (Portland, Or.) 1896-1905, May 05, 1906, Image 1

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THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF KALISPELL
D. R. PEELER, Pres,, F. J. LEBERT, V. Pres., R. E. WEBSTER, Cash., W. D. LAWSON, A. Cash
Transacts a general panking business. Drafts issued, available in all cities of the United
Btates snd Kurope, Hong Kong and Manila. Collections made on favorable terms.
LAOD & TILTON, Bankers Portland, Oregon
Established in 1859. Transact a General Banking Business. Interest allowed on time de
g)sitl. Collections made at all points on favorable terms. Letters of Credit issued available in
urope and the Eastern States. Sight Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers sold on New York,
Washington, Chicago, St Louis, Denver, Omaha, San Francisco and various points in Oregon,
Washington, ldaho, Montana and British Columbia. Exchange sold on Lum;)on, Paris, Berlin,
Frankfort and Hong Kong.
OF PORTLAND, OREGON.
J. C. AINBWORTH, President. W. B. AYER, Vice-President. R. W. SCHMEER, Cashier
A. M. WRIGHT, Assistant Cashier.
Tramsacts a general banking business. Drafts issued, available in all cities of the United
Btates and Europe, Hong Kong and Manila. Collections made on favorable terms.
NORTHWEST CORNER THIRD AND OAK STREETS.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK of North Yakima, Wash.
Capltal and Surplus $130,000 00
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY
W.M. LADD CHAS. CARPENTER W. L, STEINWEG, A. B. CLINE
President Vice President Cashier Assistant Cashier
Walla Walla, Washington. (First National Bank in the State.)
Transacts a General Banking Business.
CAPITAL $lOO,OOO. SURPLUS $lOO,OOO.
LEV]I ANKENY, President. A. H. REYNOLDS. Vice President. A. R. BURFORD, Cashier
JOHN D. RYAN, Pres. D.J. HENNESSEY, Vice Pres. JOHN G. MORONY, Cashier
E..J. BOWMAN, Asst. Cashier. MARK SKINNER, Asst. Cashier.
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF GREAT FALLS, MONTANA
Capital, $200,000. UNITED STATES DEPOSITARY Deposits $1,200,000
ASSOCIATE BANKS: Daly Bank & Trust Co., Butte; Daly Bank & Trust Co., Anaconda
THE NATIONAL BANXK OF COMMERCE
TACOMA, WASH.
UNITED STATES DEPOSITARY '
Capital $200,000 Surplus $200,000
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
OFFICERS-Chester Thorne, President: Arthur Albertson, Vice President and Cashier;
Frederick A. Rice, Assistant Cashier; Delbert A. Young, Assistant Cashier.
JNO. C. AINSWORTH, Pres. JNO.BS. BAKER, Vice Pres. P. C. KAUFFMAN, 2d Vice Pres.
A. G. PRICHARD, Cashier. F. P. HASKELL, JR., Assistant Cashier.
THE FIDELITY TRUST COMPANY BANK
General Banking CAPITAL AND SURPLUS, $390,000 Safe Deposit Vaults
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT: Interest at the Rate of 8 per cent per Annum, Credited Semi-Annually
TACOMA. WASHINGTON
ALFRED COOLIDGE, Pres. A. F. McCLAINE Vice Pres @ AARON KUHN, Vice Pres.
CHAS. E. SCRIBER, Cashier. D. C. WOODWARD, Asst. Cashicr.
THE COLFAX NATIONAL BANK of Colfax Wash.
Capital, $120,000.00
Transacts a general banking business. = Special facilities for 'handling Eastern
"Wgshingw\and Idaho items. ! IY, j ¥, «
W. F. KETTEN BA(‘:‘l] Pres. J. ALEXANDER, Vice Pres. GEO. H. KESTER, (asuier
Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits, $215,000.00
Capital recently increased from $50,000 to $lOO,OOO Surplus inereased from $50,000 to $lOO,OOO
DIRECTORS -Jos. Alexander, C. C. Bunnell, J. B. Morris, Grace K. Piafllin. R. C. Beach,
G. H. Kester, W. F. Kettenbach, O. E. Guernsey, Wm. A, Libert, Jno. W. Givens, A. Freidenrich.
Twenty-two Years a National Bank. Oldest Bank in Lewiston, Idaho.
Send Your Washington, ldaho and
. * Montana Business to thc
OLD NATIONAL, BANK
Spokane Washington
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK ®"Esh®
Moorehead, Minnesota
JOHN LAMB, DAVID ASKEGAARD, LEW A. HUNTOON, ARTHUR H.COSTAIN,
President Vice President Cashier Asst, Cashier
Interest Paid on Time Deposits
FIRST NATIONAL BANK of East Grand Forks, Minn.
Farm Loans Negotiated. Fire and Cyclone Insuranee Written. Does a
A General Banking Busidess.
Capital, $50,000 E. ARNESON, Pres. G. R.JACOBI Cashier
4 Per Cent Interest Paid on Time Deposits
BISMARK, NORTH DAKOTA
Established in 1879. Capital, $lOO,OOO. Interest Paid on Time Deposits
C. B. LITTLE, President. F. D, KENDRICK, Vice President.
8. M. PYE, Cashier. J. L.. BELL, Asst. Cashier.
GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS TRANSACTED.
THE JAMES RIVER NATIONAL BANK
Of JAMESTOWN, NORTH DAKOTA.
The Oldest and Largest Banking House in Central North Dakota
Collections made on all foints in North Dakota. Foreign and domestic exchange bough
and sold. Telegraph transfers to all parts of America.
THE FIRST NATIONAL, BANK
OF DULUTH, MINNESOTA.
CAPITAL, $500,000 SURPLUS 728,000
U. S. Government Depositary.
GEORGE PALMER F. L. MEYERS GEO. L. CLEAVER W. L. BRENHOLTR
President Cashier Asst. Cashier Asst, Cashier
La G de Nati I Banlk "“o8ccon"
a Girange Naliona an OREGON
Capital and Surpius, $120,000
DIRECTORS: J. M. Berry, A. B. Conley, F. J. Holmes, F. M. Byrkit, F. L. Meyers, Geo. L
Cleaver, Geo. Palmer
DAVID H. BEECHER, SIDNEY CLARK,
President. Cashier.
Union National Bank
Incorporated 1890
CAPITAL $lOO,OOO
Pays Interest on Time Deposits
THE OLD BANK CORNER
Grand Forks,
NORTH DAKOTA
KALISPELL, MONTANA
PORTLAND, OREGON, SATURDAY, MAY 35, 1906.
NEWS OF THE WEEK
In a Condensed Form for Our
Busy Readers.
HAPPENINGS OF TWO CONTINENTS
} 4
A Resume of the Less Important but
Not Less Interesting ‘Evonts
of the Past Weok;‘
The new Russian cabinet is composed
of reactionaries.
San Francisco’s water supply is now
safe, but short. S
Tdle men in San Francisco are refused
food and made to go to work. ’
San Franciseo banks have reopened
and are doing a good business.
A new ecopyright law has:}been com
pleted, but its passage by congress is
doubtful.
Military forces are after another ban
dit band in the province of Cavite, Phil
ippine Islands.
Attorney-General Moody is preparing
to prosecute the Standard Oil a:garaiL
roads for rebating.
People of Zion City fight shy of meet
ings held by Dowie, at which he at
tempts to explain recent events.
The United States has beem accused
of buying the plans of the British bat
tleship Dreadnaught from a naval of
ficer who stole them.
James D. Phelan says the condition
of theusands in California is pitiful,
and it may be necessary to issue an
other appeal for public aid. .
Dowie is fatally ill with drogy.
Hermann’s trial has been set for the
first week in June. -
China opposes the immediate opening
of Manchurian ports. Fo&
Father Gapon has been execiited by
rebels for betraying them. & :
The Senate committee has disagreed
on procedure in the Smoot cas 1
Democrats éloctgfli’.fleir mayor and
ten councilmen in the Omaha dity elee
tions. oo TS RNE E
o s st o SReaRiEE R R
E fi’é [ rnia eal +"i.‘ -&n‘_“‘x’; ° n
island in Bolinas Bay, 30 miles from
San Francisco.
~ San Francigeo banks are paying de
‘positors through the mint, and the
money stringency has been lessened.
The labor situation in France is grow
ing worse. Cavalry has been called to
the sceno of the rioting, and many
workmen have been trampled under
foot by troopers’ horses.
The California earthquake revealed
a big graft in the erection of Stanford
University buildings. Structures for
which $6,000000 were paid cost the
contractor but $3,000,000.
Senator Heyburn is seriously ill.
Witte’s resignation as premier of
Russia has been accepted by the ezar.
Hearst has asked congress to appro
priate another $2,500,000 for California.
Three men were fatally injured in a
riot between striking miners and Penn
sylvania constabulary.
Each side claims a majority of the
| senators in the question of court review
on the railroad rate bill.
Senator Morgan has a plan for the
construction of the Panama canal which
he has brought before the senate.
The French government has arrested
many labor leaders, imperialists and
anarchists and is preparing for an out
break.
Millions of Chinese are learning Eng
lish and are translating foreign scien
tifiec books. The Chinese Reform Asso
ciation has worked wonders among the
natives.
The supply of food at San Francisco
is running low. Mayor Schmitz has is
sued a statement saying anything in
the way of funds, elothing and provi
sions, can be used.
Tt is believed the senate will vote on
the railroad rate bill this week.
Great Britain may force Turkey to
give up Tabah.
Every library in San Francisco, ex
cept one, was destroyed.
| Peddlers have been eaptured in San
Francisco selling relief supplies.
Suit has been begun to oust the
Standard Oil and its allies from Ohio.
Dowie has returned to Zion City. He
|was welcomed by a small erowd.
Prince von Radolin will likely he
‘named as the successor of Chancellor
{von Buelow.
| Premier Witte will be appointed pres
lident of the council of the empire by
| Czar Nicholas.
1 Secretary Metealf has reported recom
| mending an immediate rebuilding in San
Francisco. Roosevelt has approved the
report.
Luke E. Wright, United States am
bassador to Japan, says the Chinese
should receive better treatment at the
hands of the Americans than is now ac
corded them.
Senators from Oregon and Washing
ton have received telegrams from the
{lumber interests in those states oppos
/ing free lumber for the purpose of re
lbmldlng San Francisco and other
wrecked cities,
FIRE PANIC IN BIG HOSPITAL.
Blazing Laundry Causes Patients to
Flee Half-Clad.
San Francisco, May 4.—The 700 pa
tients in the general hospital at the Pre
sidio were thrown into a panic at 4:15
o’clock this morning by the ery of
i fire, "
At that moment flames were discov
ered in the hospital laundry, which was
only a few yards away. The close prox
imity of the two buildings gave rise to
the fear that the hospital would be
destroyed.
In anticipation of such a contingency
hurried arrangements were made for
the removal of the patients to a place
of safety.
For a few minutes, until the fire in
the laundry was gotten under control
and there was no danger of the flames
spreading beyond that building, pande
monium reigned among the hundreds
of patients.
Those who were not dangerously ill, or
could " help themselves, jumped from
their cots and beds, and, hastily don
ning what clothes they could find, fled
from the hospital out into the cool
morning air.
Many of the indisposed men and
women did not wait to secure their
clothes, but wrapped themselves in bed
ding and made their exit as quickly as
possible.
In more than one instance men and
women fled out into the air with noth
ing but their night clothes. Scores of
patients who had the physical strength
stopped sufficiently long to assist more
weak and unstrung men and women
from the hospital.
Within 15 minutes after the alarm
was given the majority of the patients
had left the hospital building and stood
in groups or lay upon the ground upon
bed clothes, watehing the firemen and
soldiers fight the flames in the laundry.
When the flames had been extin
guished the nurses, physicians and sol
diers turned their attention to the pa
tient-refugees, and assisted in taking
them back to their cots and beds in
private rooms and wands,
Men and women became hysterical
during the progress of the fire, and it
was with difficulty that many of them
could be induced to return to the hos
pital. It is feared that the shock to
many of the more seriously sick patients
will have a serious if not fatal effect.
~ When the fire was discovered in the
hospital a general alarm was sounded.
ißejdes the regular post fire department
the flames. It was only by hard work
thet “the f 8 were confined fc {
laundry,” which, with its contents, was
entirely destroyed, and prevented from
spreading to the general hospital.
The origin of "he fire is unknown.
| S el sk
| LIMIT OF INSURANCE PAID.
Companies Will Be Generous, but Not
Exceed Legal Liability.
New York, May 4.—The Tribune to
day says:
Representatives of both foreign and
American fire insurance companies, who
were in the eity yesterday, diseussed ae
tion to effect a compromise in the ad
justment of losses by the San Francisco
fire.
The great companies express a strong
purpose to be not only just, but gener
ous in cases of doubt, but one insurance
president said:
““The adjusters for this company will
not be allowed to waive the conditions
of its policies, nor the conditions and
restrictions of its charters. We have
no more right to pay a loss oecasioned
by earthquake than we have to pay a
ioss of life. We are not an earthquake
insurance company, nor a life insurance
company,”’’
Insurance men estimate that the com
panies will ultimately pay from 60 to
75 per cent of the aggregate amount of
the risk.
The message from London insurance
companies to adjusters in Oakland, pub
lished this morning, should have read:
““‘Under any circumstances, the Brit
ish offices will only pay the lossesg for
which they are legally liable, since to
go beyond their contracts would be Il
legal.
““They cannot recognize any liability
for damage by earthquake where no
fire ensued, nor for damage by fire to
fallen or partly fallen buildings, nor
for damages to buildings pulled down or
destroved by order of the San Francisco
authorities.”’
Heavy Loss in San Mateo County.
San Mateo, Cal.,, May 4.—The losses
in San Mateo County resulting from
the recent earthquake can never be even
approximately estimated. Practically
every building in the county suffered
some damage in chimneys, plaster,
broken furniture or crockery. Here, as
elsewhere, brick and stone buildings
guffered the most. The loss of life was
small. In Half-Moon Bay a painter and
two children were killed in the collapse
of an old adobe building. The heaviest
losses were in Redwood City, where the
new $£150,000 courthouse was almost to
tally destroved.
China Hates to Admit Fact.
London, May 4.—A dispatech from
Pekin to the Times today savs that
the only thing delaving the settlement
of the French eclaims growing out of
the Nanchang outrage of last February
is China’s reluectance to issue an im
perial edict admitting that the magis
trate committed suicide.
President Signs Appropriations.
Washington, May 4.—President Roose
velt today signed the bills passed by
congress making appropriations of
£lOO,OOO for Mare Island navy-yard and
$70,000 to meet emergencies in the post
office department in California.
FRANK SMITH KILLED
Murderer of Three Officers Meets
Death Near New Era.
STOLEN CAP IDENTIFIES FUGITIVE
Fugitive Had Doubled on His Track
and Was Heading Toward Port
land When Shot by Posse.
New Era, Ore., May I.—Frank Smith
is dead. The desperado was shot and
killed at 11:10 o’clock by Harry Drap
er, who was in charge of the blood
hounds that he had brought from Spo
kane to help in hunting the fugitive
down.
After being surrounded in the woods
between the Willamette river and the
railroad tracks at this place this morn
ing, posses began dynamiting the un
derbrush to bring him out. Draper, ac
companied by the dogs, went into the
timber and Smith was discovered be
hind a log. He made a desperate at
tempt to shoot, but Draper anticipated
him, shooting him through the neck
and killing him instantly.
Smith bore no wounds, showing con
clusively that he had not been wound
ed by any of the previous shots fired at
him.
Crouching in the underbrush between
the railroad tracks and the Willamette
river, about half a mile from this place,
surrounded by posses of armed men
who were dynamiting the woods to drive
the fugitive out, Frank Smith, the des
perado, who made a sensational escape
from the city jail at Portland, and since
his flight last week has killed three offi
cers, made his last stand.
~ After murdering Policeman Hanlon
at Oregon City, Smith was next located
near Woodburn by Sheriff Shaver of
Clackamas and Captain O. D. Hender
son of Woodburn, whom he mortally
wounded, both dying at Salem a few
hours later.
The bandit then disappeared as com
pletely as if the earth had opened up
and enfolded him. Many rumors were
smvalent of the m’nrd,Jms being seen
d\-ifig“the last few days in various
ez Yo ':;‘ ut f’ """»3*""*
be found until this morning, when,
weary and worn with his long flight,
he was driven into the brush.
The gray eap, slightly torn in one
seam, which was stolen from the Canby
postoffice, and which Smith were, proved
his undoing. The stolen cap belonged
to Willie Stuniger, who lives near New
Era.
Willie was pumping water for the
cows this morning when he saw a man
pass along the road wepring his own
cap. Willie recognized tue cap at once
and gave the alarm.
This positive identification brought
out the posses in force, and 200 armed
men with dogs were presently hunting
down the' fugitive.
Smith stopped to talk to Flagman
Archibald on the Southern Pacifie
tracks. While they were in conversa
tion one of the numerous armed parties
that has been scouring the country ap
peared down the road.
““Well, T must take to the woods,”’
said Smith. With that he dashed into
the brush.
He,was surrounded between the rail
way tracks and the Willamette river,
half a mile below New Era.
MONEY NEEDED FOR RELIEFT.
Red Cross Sends $300,000, and Has
Another $1,000,000.
Washington, May I.—Three hundred
thousand dollars were forwarded by
wire by the American Red Cross to
day to James D. Phelan, chairman of
the Red Cross and relief committee in
San Franecisco, and he was advised that
$1,000,000 more is at the disposal of the
committee.
Judge W. W. Morrow, president of the
California branch of the Red Cross, ad
vised the Red Cross today that it will
be better from this time on for the so
ciety to send money to California rath
er than food and provisions, as the im
mediate needs are provided for.
Dr. Edward T. Devine, special repre
sentative of the Red Cross at San Fran
cisco, made the following report today
on supplies sent to earthquake sufferers:
“‘T have tabulation from Quartermas
ter Devol of supplies reported to have
been received up to April 28 and of
supplies en route or ordered. It shows
on the whole remarkable diserimina
tion and intelligent purchases. Sup
plies received:
‘“‘Five carloads of stoves, 1,850 stove
pipe joints, 28 carloads of forage, 1,600
tons and 25 ecarloads of tentage, two
cars and 250,000 feet of lumber, 160
tons of lime, 170 tons of medieal sup
“:lies, two carloads of acid and chemi
cals, seven ecarloads of wood, 241 ecars
lanri four steamerloads of subsistence
stores, 1,570 tons of flour, five cars of
fresh meats, 185 cars of miscellaneous
stores, one car of oranges, five ears
of clothing, two cars of salt, camp out
fit of Los Angeles, 28 cars.”’
Two Slight Shocks Cause No Alarm.
San Franecisco, May I.—Two slight
earthquake shocks at an interval of an
hour were felt bere early this morn
ing. They were of the same nature as
a dozen other shoeks that have been
felt since the big quake of April 18.
No damage was done this morning, and
there was no alarm.
UNEREST IN ORIENT.
Russia Is Now Planning Another Inva
sion of Chinese Territory.
St. Petersburg, April 30.—1 n spite of
the defeat of her ambitions in Manchu
ria and Kwantung, and the obstacles
met with by M. Pokotiloff, the Russian
minister to China, in his negotiations
at Pekin, Russia is steadily pushing for
ward with the purpose of occupying an
other big slice of China, namely, the
two eastern provinces of Mongolia, cov
ering the route of the proposed railroad
from Baikal to Pekin, which, as an
nounced by the Associated Press, Feb
ruary 20, has been given over to the
Russo-Chinese bank.
Under the guise of the innocent-sound
ing name of ‘‘geographic ethnographic
expedition for purely scientific. pur
poses,’’ a party headed by Colonel No
vitsky, one of the brilliant younger
members of the general staff, will leave
DEMOCRATIC TICKET -OFFICIAL.
United States Senator, long term John
M. Gearin.
Congressman, Second Distriet, J. H.
Graham.
Governor, George E. Chamberlain.
Secretary of State, P. H. Sroat.
State Treasurer, J. D. Matlock.
Supreme Judge, T. G. Hailey.
Superintendent Public Instruction, J.
H. Ackerman (Rep.).
State Printer, J. Scott Taylor.
Attorney-General, R. A, Miller.
Labor Commissioner, O. P. Hoff
(Rep.).
St. Petersburg in the middle of May to
survey the hitherto unexplored region
between the Manchurian frontier and
Urga.
Though the expedition nominally is
to be under the auspices of the Im
perial Geographical Society, it is be
lieved it will be financed and officered
by the gereral staff, and its composi
tion will be almost purely military. The
strategic aims, in fact, are so thinly
covered that it is doubtful if it will
be accompunied by any representative
of the geographical society.
The region to be explored covers the
hazy ‘‘Mongolian Desert,”’ in which
during the war mysterious Japanese
armies were supposed to be hovering to
strike the Russian rear and into which
small scouting detachments of Japan
ese actually penetrated long distances.
Colonel Novitzky’s expedition probab
ly will find the work already well un
der way, as the Russian force stationed
at Urga certainly has not been idle dur
ing its long stay there. -
: - i it
ok .‘.Zm_ Ry ’fgfi__m .!‘.':‘ t
Devine Urges Nution Not to Slack
San Franciseo, April 30.—Dr. Devine,
of the National Red Cross, tonight is
sued the following statemont:
‘“lt is important for the entire coun
try to understand that the loss of homes
and property in San I'rancisco has not
been exaggerated. Expectations have
been aroused and plans have been made,
’basml on telegrams and newspaper re
ports, of large contributions for relief,
‘:mql these expectations should not be
‘disappointed.
~ ““The distribution of food will have
to be continued until there are enough
stores in which to buy on a money basis
and then it can be gradually diminished,
but relief of other kinds iz now and
will be required for weeks to come.
Sick and delicate persons will need
care for months. Inmates of institu
tions which have been destroyed must
be established elsewhere, and on some
plan yet to be devised families which
cannot get started otherwise may have
to be given a helping hand.
‘“lt is not intended to encourage
chronic dependence, but quick, gener
ous and efficient relief is needed here
for a very large number of persons
whose homes and means of livelihood
have been destroved.
GOVERNMENT LOST MILLIONS.
Appropriation of $3,387,630 Needed for
San Francisco.
Washington, April 30.—The secretary
of war today forwarded to the seecre
tary of the treasury for transmission to
congress urgent deficiency estimates of
appropriations amounting to $3,387 630.
This amount is required for the service
of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1906,
for the purpose of replacing military
stores destroyed by earthquake and fire
at San Francisco; also for repairing
damage to cable connecting Angel
Island and Aleatraz in the harbor of
San Francisco, and the repair of dam
age to the general hospital at the Pre
sidio, San Francisco.
Kill Odessa Police Chief.
Odessa April 30.—The chief of police,
who played such a prominent role in
the October massacres here and a police
man, were assassinated by revolution
ists here today in broad daylight. The
plot was far-reaching, and contemplated
also the assassination of Assistant Chief
of Police Poltavachenko and several
other policemen. A young girl named
Jerebtzova threw a bomb at Poltava
chenko, who was on his way to the
hospital to visit one of the wounded
police. Her aim was poor, and the offi
cer was not harmed. The girl was
seriously wounded by Poltavachenko’s
orderly.
Railroad Line Indicted.
Clarksburg, W. Va., April 30.—The
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company
was indicted five times by the federal
grand jurv t-..ay for alleged violation
of the interstate commerce law in fail
ure to distribute cars to coal operators
in a fair and equitable manner. These
indictments are the first of the kina
ever found in the United States. The
fine, in case of conviction, may be $5,000
.n each case.
NO. 2.

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