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The new age. [volume] (Portland, Or.) 1896-1905, June 23, 1906, Image 1

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YOL. XI.
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF KALISPELL
KALISPELL, MONTARA
D. R. PEELER, Pres., F. J. LEBERT, V. Pres., R. E. WEBSTER, Cash., W, D. LAWSON, A. Cash.
Transacts a general vanking business. Drafts issued, available in all cities of the United
‘States snd Europe, Hong Kong and Manila. Collections made on favorable terms.
LI}DD & TILTON, Bankers Portland, Oregon
Established in 1859. Transact a General Banking Business. Interest allowed on time de-
Eoolu. Collections made at all points on favorable terms. Letters of Credit issued available in
uror and the Eastern States. Sight Exchange and Telegraphie Transfers sold on New York,
"Washington, Chicago, 8t Louis, Denver, Omaha, San Francisco and various goinu in Orefl(;n.
Washington, Idaho, Montana and British Columbia. Exchange sold on London, Paris, Berlin,
Frankfort and Hong Kong.
OF PORTLAND, OREGON. ,
-J. C. AINSWORTH, President. @W. B, AYER, Vice-President. R. W. SCHMEER, Cashier
A. M. WRIGHT, Assistant Cashier.
Transacts & general banking business. Drafts issued, available in all cities of the United
:States and Europe, Hong Kong and Manila. Collections made on favorable terms.
NORTHWEST CORNER THIRD AND OAK STREETS.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK of North Yakima, Wash.
Caplital and Surplus $130,000 00 :
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY
‘W.M. LADD CHAS. CARPENTER W. L, STEINWEG, A.B.CLINE
President Vice President Cashier Assistant Cashier
FIRST NATIONAL, BANK
Walla Walla, Washington. (First National Bank in the State.)
Transacts a General Banking Business.
CAPITAL $lOO,OOO. SURPLUS $lOO,OOO.
'LEVI ANKENY, President. A. H. REYNOLDS. Vice President. A. R. BURFORD, Cashier
TN D Y OWSAN, Awc Canbier. " MAKK SKINNER, Asst. Cotmier,
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF GREAT FALLS, MONTANA
Capital, $200,000. UNITED STATES DEPOSITARY Deposits $1,200,000
ASSOCIATE BANKS: Daly Bank & Trust Co., Butte; Daly Bank & Trust Co., Anaconda
THE NATIONAL BANK OF COMMERCE
TAGCOMA, WASH. .
UNITED STATES DEPOSITARY
Capltal $200,000 Surplus $200,000
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT i
OFFICERS—Chester Thorne, President: Arthur Albertson, Vice President and Cashier;
Frederick A. Rice, Assistant Cashier; Delbert A. Young, Assistant Cashier.
JNO. C. AINSWORTH, Pres. JNO.S. BAKER, Vice Pres. P. C. KAUFFMAN, 2d Vice Pres.
A. G. PRICHARD, Cashier. F. P. HASKELL, JR., Assistant Cashier.
THE FIDELITY TRUST COMPANY BANK
General Banking CAPITAL AND SURPLUS, $390,000 Safe Deposit Vaults
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT: Interest at the Rate of 8 per cent per Annum, Credited Semi-Annually
TACOMA, WASHINGTON
ALFRED COOLIDGE, Pres. A. F, McCLAINE Vice Pres AARON KUHN, Vice Pres.
CHAS. E. SCRIBER, Cashier. D. C. WOODWARD, Asst. Cashicr.
THE COLFAX NATIONAL BANK of Colfax Wash.
Capital, $120,000.00 '
Transacts a general banking business. Special facilities for handling Eastern
Washington and Idaho items. ; e
W.F. KETTENBACH, Pres. J. ALK AN IR R, N O O
"LEWISTON NATIONAL BANK
: Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits, $215,000.00
«Capital recently increased from $50,000 to $lOO,OOO Surplus increaséd from $50,000 to $lOO,OOO
DIRECTORS—Jos. Alexander, C.C. Bunnell, J. B. Morris, Grace K. pfaflin. R. C. Beach,
.G. H Kester, W. F. Kettenbach, O. E. Guernsey, Wm. A. Libert, Jno. W. Givens, A. Freidenrich.
Twenty-two Years a National Bank. Oldest Bank in Lewiston, Idaho.
Send Your WWashington, Idaho and
: Montana Business to the
OLD NATIONAL. BANK
Spokane Washington
“THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK T
Moorehead, Minnesota
JOHN LAMB, DAVID ASKEGAARD, LEW A, HUNTOON, ARTHUR H. COSTAIN,
President Vice President Cashier Asst, Cashier
Interest Paid on Time Deposits
FIRST NATIONAL BANK of East Grand Forks, Minn.
Farm Loans Negotiated. Fire and Cyclone Insuranee Written. Does a
General Banking Busidess.
Capital, $50,000 E. ARNESON, Pres. G. R.JACOBI Cashier
T 4 Per Cent lryterest Paid on Time Deposits
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
BISMARK, NORTH DANKOTA
Established In 1879. Capltal, $lOO,OOO. Interest Pald on Time Deposits
C. B. LITTLE, President. F. D. KENDRICK, Vice President.
8. M. PYE, Cashier. J. L. BELL, Asst. Cashier.
Om‘!. BANKING BUSINESS TRANSACTED.
THE JAMES RIVER NATIONAL BANK
Of JAMESTOWN, NORTH DAKOTA.
The Oldest and Largest Banking House in Central North Dakota
Collections made &m‘fingrmm tfm domestic exchange bough
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF DULUTH, MINNESOTA.
CAPITAL. 8500,000 SURPLUS 728,000
U S. Goyernment Depositary.
GEORGE PALMER _ F.L.MEYERS _ GEO.L.CLEAVER W
President Cashier Anst. Cashier o BRENAHuO&‘ El:shier
-
La Grande National Bank "“Réon"
OREGON
DIRECTORS: J xono . 0, SOO, POB
. J. M. Berry, A. B. Conley, F.J.
= 4
The Merchants National Bank
OF SAINT PAUL, MINNESOTA
United States Depository
CAPITAL, ONE MILLION DOLLARS
"Transacts & general banking business. Drafts issued, available in all cities of the United
States and Burope, Hong Kong and Manila. Collectionsz made on favorable terms.
OFFICERS—KENNETH CLARK, President; C. H. BIGELOW, Vice President; GEO. B
PRINCE, Vice President; H. W. PARKER, Cashier; H. VAN VLECK, Assistant Cashier.
DlßlC‘l‘Ous-anford Livingston, Kenneth Clark, J. H. SBkinner, Louis W. Hill, Geo. H
Prince, C. H, Bigelow, D. R. Noyes, V. M. Watkins, L. P. Ordway, F. B. Kellogg, E. N. Sasunders.
PORTLAND, OREGON, SSITURDAY, JUNE 23, 1906.
NEWS OF THE
In a Condensed Form for
Busy Readers.
HAPPENINGS OF TWO CONTINENTS
A Resume of the Less lmporhnffi
Not Less Interesting Events
of the Past Week. «E
The peasant revolt is growifl'f_in
Southern Russia. *
English woman suffragists bave been
arrested for rioting. .
Fresh mutinies have occurred xn:‘fhv
eral big Russian garrisons. §i<
Bryan says his kind of conservati
were he president would be to dastroy
the trusts utterly. s
The passage of the lock canal bill by
the senate is considered a penongvie
tory for Roosevelt. &
Idaho is asking or information re
garding the insurance companies which
refuse to pay their San Francisco los
in full. ¥
A bulletin just issued by the ¢ensus
bureau shows that there are 83 meanu-|
facturing concerns in Alaska witha|
capitalization of $10,000,000.
Los Angeles physicians have jflt re
moved the heart of 'a man and after|’
‘washing it replaced the organ. The
‘patient’s chances of recovery are good.|!
In an accident the prong of a wooden
rake pierced the man’s breast, carrying
in dirt which lodged or the heart. 4
The United States has a lower death |¢
rate than any country in Europe except | ¢
Norway and Sweden, according toa|.
bulletin issued by the Census bureau. |1
Consumption is far in the lead a 8 the |
cause of death, but this disease has|!
shown & decrease of nearly 40 per cent |
in the pait six years. e 1
The Corean revolt is spr ‘;, :
Japan plans to monopoloze the trade
of the Orient. Y I
Fire at Los Angeles dutroyo&i bhek !
in the wholeeale district. | |+
A number of Russian newspapers|t
have been suppressed for mm ‘news | ¢
of the Bialystok massacre. =~ |}
casd of the sala of publicgd pet Pro:
‘lt is expected that the TiRIAN Sty
ernment will soon i-:r’ an order for|y
the complete exclusion of American |
canned meats,
Count Witte expresses the opinion |’
that the Russian dovma is becoming|®
revolationary in its character. He|!
also says the Jews have brought their t
troubles on themselves. i
A submarine eruption recently threw
up a small island near Boroslov, an is
land in Alaskan waters. Boroslov was
upheaved in the same way 100 years||
ago and another srall island in 1882,
Dr. W. T. Harric, commissioner of
education, has tendered his resignation |(
to the president and the latter has an-|)
nounced the appointment of Dr. Elmer |1
E. Brown, professor of education at|!
the California university, as his suc- |
Cessor. |
Revolutionary feeling is spreading in |-
Russia.
Tobacco trust officials have been in- |
dicted for conspiracy. ‘
Evidence is being found that Dreyfus
was convicted by forgery.
California is pushinrg the fight on
t‘gix.bit’’ insurance companies.
The president and house committee
have agreed on a meat inspection bill.
The Hermann land case trial at Port
land is expected te fake place the first
f July.
The Russian nobility will refuse to
divide their estates with the peasants
in order to prevent a revolution.
The 131st anniversary of the battle
of Bunker hill wus celebrated at Bos
ton, where the day is always regarded
as a hoiiday.
AI. L. Craig, general paseenger agent
of the O. R. & N., has resigned to take
s better position with the Great North
ern. William McMurray, of Portland,
will likely be Mr. Craig’s successor.
Presbyterian churches throughout the
United Btates are raising a fund of
$300,000 with which to rebuild the
edifices of that denomination destroyed
by the SBan Francisco earthquake and
fire.
Japan has suppressed the outbreak
in Corea.
Castro will resume the presidency of
Veneszuela July 5.
The army will soon abandon San
Francisco relief work.
The czar is preparing for an open re
volt in Southern Russia.
A Texas pegro has been sentenced to
the penitentiary for 999 years.
AFTER STANDARD OIL.
Fresident Decides to Have Criminal
_ Action Begun at Once.
{ Washington, June 22.—Plans to be
gin immediate criminal prosecutions
against officials of the Stundard Oil
‘company for violations of the Sherman
anti-trust law and prosecution against
Standard Oil offiicals and bigh officials
of railroads for violation of ihe Elkins
rebate law huve been completed by the
administration, according to informa
tion from a high authority tonight. -
These plans, it is understood, were
considered at & mysterious meeting of
five cabinet officers at the White House
last night whieh aroused much spee Ila
tiom in all circles today. It is said to
have been the intention to keep the
ms bler secret for a few days until the
department of Justice was ready to
strike the initial blow. \
Wall street, however, which seems
to get information from every conceiv
able esource, even when the secret is
supposed to be confined to the presi
dent and his confidential advisers, got
a ‘“tip”’ today that Standard Oil and
the railroads were in for new trouble,
and on the strength of this stock tum
bled. Reports from New York tonight
say that Washington had already heard
of the ‘““leak’’ and that steps had been
taken to loeate it.
A persomn of high .authority declares
that the department of Justice, as a re
sult of investigations conducted prior
to and since the Garfield report, has
enough ‘evidence on hand to secure the
conviction of high Standard Oil and
rail-oad officials under both laws under
which prosecutions are to be made.
PREDICTS MUTINY OF SAILORS.
Narodny Says Army and Navy Officers
and Nobles are Rebels.
New York, June 22.—Ivan Narodny,
a 8 Russian who came here in the inter
;:h of the Revolutionists, said yester
y:
‘““There will be soon a great mutiny
in the Baltic fleet at Cronstadt, with
vastly more success than the already
historic mutiny of the Black Bea fleet.
The captains commanding are 1n sym
pathy with the revelutionary move
ment and will declare at the appointed
time for reforms.
‘“The army officers” drawn from the
noble class are on sympathetic terms
with the men from the peasant and ar
tissn classes. The common people and
the nobles in Ruesia are not separated
by the gulf that stood between these
clastes under the ancient regime in
mnge. The nobles throughout Rus-
Sl B the peatey, 100, re the peas
ants’ closest friends, on the most cor
riendly footing. The nobles
teacthggbackbone of the revolution in
claesee. S TTESRTTMSEROO. DY DOLE |
“It is the system WRlCH"enwecl
riots like that at Bialystok. The
gon why the bureaucracy stirs up this
resentment against the Jews is that
they are seen to be an element strong
for revolution—radicals.”’
TEST CASE ON INSURANCE.
Lawsuit About Earthquake Clause —
Losers Unite for Defense.
San Francisco, June 22. — Two test
cases, brought by two women, who are
refugees from San Francisco, against
the Palatine Insurance company, of
London, England, to recover $6OO in
gurance money, were tried in Justice of
the Peace Quinn’s court in Oakland
yesterday and decided in favor of the
plaintiffs. Notice of appeal was given
in each case, and the matter will be
thrashed out eventually in the superior
courts.
The defendant company announced
its intent to rest its defense on the le
gality of the ‘‘earthquake clause’’ in
the policies.
The judge said no evidence had been
produced showing tbat the loss was
caused by the earthquake.
The several commercial bodies of San
Francieco will meet Monday, June 25,
to organize a policy holders’ protective
association for the purpose of securing
prompt and fair settlemenis for their
members from the various insurance
companies in which they hold policies.
Britain Will Not Intercede.
London, June 22.—1 n the house of
commone today Walter Runciman, par
liamentary secretary to the local gov
ernment board, in bebalf of Foreign
Secretary Gray, again declined to in
form the government of Rassia of the
views of the British people concerning
the anti-Jewish outbreaks. He said
the impression made and the sympathy
aroused not only in this country but
everywhere by the disturbance and loss
of life in Russia were known to the
Russian government, and further pro
tests would be useless.
Hail Destroys Corn and Fruit.
Dallas, Tex., June 22.—A severe
wind, rain and bail storm caused much
damage throughout the Brazos river
section tonight and bas practica:ly de
<troyed all the growing corn and fruit.
Travel on the Texas Pacific railroad be
tween I'allas and Fort Worth has been
‘snspended because of washouts, and all
of the section crews bhave been called
lont to repair the damage.
MOB ATTACKS JEWS
Soldiers Come to the Rescue and
Prevent Setond Massacre.
SOLDIERS MUTINY, KILL OFFICERS
Troops Again Control at Bialystok
and Government Will Prevent
Further Rioting.
St. Petersburg, June 21. — Another
outbreak at Bialystok Wednesday after
noon was only quelled when troops
charged the mob and dispersed it. Dur
ing the trouble one Jewish woman was
killed and another wounded, while sev
eral persons were struck with stones
and more or less hurt. A further dem
onstration is feared, and the govern
ment has been asked to send additional
Cossacks there to cope with the situna
tion.
~ The anti-Jewish rioting at Bialyetok
is now ended. The troops are in full
control, and, in view ot the outery
raised, it is certain that the authorities
will not permit a renewal of the hor
rors recently witnessed at Bialystok.
The most imperative orders to prevent
further outbreaks have been issued to
the governors and governor generals
from Bt. Petersburg
When the correspondent arrived at
Bialystok Sunday morning, the worst
was already over, but on all sides was
revolting evidence of savage bestiality
on the part of the blood-drunken mobs,
which sacked and burned the Jewish
houses, shops and stores. Over 72
hours, with a slight abatement during
the daytime, the mad orgy of blood and
pillage went on unchecked. The inhu
manity displayed would have done
credit to the Mongol hordes of Genghis
Kban, in his conquests of China and
Central Agia early in the 138th century.
APPEAL TOQ CIVILIZED WORLD.
Jews of Russia Cable to Compatriots
in All Countries.
New York, June 21.— Jacob H.
Schiff has received cable messages from
abroud asking aid from this country to
prevent a general Jewish outbreak in
Russia. Dr. Paul Nathan cabled on
June 17 from Berlin that Bialystol ie
but the beginning of systematic masea
cres similar to those of October, and
:;ti::h l(tll'“ Eal:fi‘;o exercise pressure
ro States government
and financial circles.
~Anosher cablegram reads:
IR T prinni) ;.,,r b /
can p v . 3 R L RRTR kg
On June 18 the Alliance U
cabled Mr. Schiff from Paris as follows®
““We have received the following
from Finland signed by & member of
the douma, St. Petersburg: “The aw
ful occurrences at Bialystok signify a
new scheme leading to moet difficult
complications. Intervention omn your
part alone would prevent disaster.”’
On June 18 Bir Samuel Montague
cabled Mr. Schiff from London: ‘“We
are seeking intervention of our govern
ment. Try yours.”
STATE WILL SUPPORT CLAIMS.
Attorney General to Defend Rights of
Losers by Disaster.
San Francisco, June 21.—Depaty At
torney General George A. Sturtevant
came to San Francisco today to com
mence the state’s fight against the fire
‘insurance concerns that have not lived
up to the law. For some hours he was
in consultation with Insurance Com
missioner Myron Wolf.
““From now on it will be made the
especial business of the attorney gen
eral’s office,’”’ said Mr. Sturtevant, ““to
prosecute every action by which the
state can cunserve the rights of the in
sured who lost property in the great
fire. We want the smaller logers, the
mechanics and retailers who have be
come confused in their efforts to receive
just treatment from the insurance com
panies, to feel that they have an office
which is fighting their side of the
case.”’
Wwill Not Be Pinned Down.
San Francisco, June 21.—0 f the 120
insurance companies to which tele
grams were sent by Mayor Schmitz and
Governor Pardee calling upon them for
a-me oatline of their policies relative
to the payment of insurance losses in
this city, 49 bave given answer. The
‘majority of the companies operating
here content themselves with the gen
eral statement that they will deal fairly
with policy holders; that the claime
against them will be settled equitably
and that the insured can be confident
of honorable and just treatment.
Wrecked by Big Wind.
Chicago, June 21.—One man was {a
tally injured, four were slightly burt
and the Illinois Steel company’s plant
at South Chicago was damaged to the
extent of $l5O 000 as the result of a
violent rain, wind and hail storm.
DISHONEST MORTAR THE CAUSE
Japanese Tells How to Make Earth
quake-Proof Buildings.
San Francisco, June 20.—‘‘Dishonest
mortar—a corrapt conglomeration of
sea sand and lime— was responsible for
nearly all of the earthquake damage in |
San Francisco,’”’ said Dr. T. Nakamura,
professor of arghitecture of the lmper
ial university of Tokio and a member
of the committee dispatched to this
city by the Japanese government to in
vestigate the effects of the tremblore
and fire. Dr. Nakamura will sail on
the Korea today, to report to his gov
ernment.
“I find,” said Dr. Nakamura yester
day, ‘‘that much of the damage to San *
Franciseo from the earthquake was due
to poor mortar and faulty construction,
and the greater portion of the damage
to the class *A’ buildings by fire was
the result of misguided use of hollow
tiling and so-called fire blocks instead
of concrete.
‘‘There has developed as a result of
the earthquake in Ban Francisco, great
prejudice against brick buildings. How
ever, they are largely employed in
Japan, where earthquakes of greater
severity than the one experienced in
this city are not uncommon. The se
cret of their success, however, lies in
the fact that good mortar is vsed. The
mortar should either be composed of
one part cement to two parts of sand,
or of one part cement, three of lime
and five of sand. The bricks should be
thoreughly wet before being laid, and
when the mortar has set under these
conditions, a wall becomes practically
one stone.’’
COMPANIES WOLF MAY SUE.
Names Those Which Disobey Law
and May Forfeit Licenses.
San Francisco, June 20.—The follow
ing insmiance companies, by reason of
their failing to comply with Insurance
Commissioner Wolf’s demand that they
either sign stipulations extending the
time for filing proofs of loss to August
18 or furnish the commissioner with
their lists of policy holders, have ren
dered themselves liable to forfeiture of
their right to do business in the etate
of California:
Agricultural, American of Boston,
American of Philadelphia, Dutchess,
Eagle, German of Peoria, Germania,
Globe and Rutgers, Girard, New York
of New York, Northwestern Fire & Ma
rine, National Union, North Germana
of New York, Spring Garden, Security
of Baltimore, Traders, Union of Phila
delphia, Westchester, Western Under
writers.
Commissioner Wolf intends to pro
ceed against these companies without
delay unless advised to the contrary by
the attorney gemeral of the state. He
made this statement yesterday and
_““Furthermore it will be my business
S uen N 4_, i -', o i “'" b rv‘ . i
porated.” 7oS oy ‘.
v, e ol]l] a’bos " S
SHAW WiILL MARe %2y, ~ oy, 20
San Francisco Assured of 3!2,%?3%
000 of Government Funds. -
Washington, June 20.—A tacit agree
mant was reached today by the. presi- .
dent. Secretary Shaw and the delega
tion of representative citizens of San
Francisco by which substantial aid will
be given San Francisco by the govern
ment. It is proposed that the United
States treasury deposit with the Ban
Francisco banks $12,000,000 of govern
ment money, with boads of the city as
gecurity, the money to remain in the
banks until the government shall call
for it.
Under the law the secretary of the
treasury has authority to deposit gov
ernment funds in this way, but cannot
bind his succeseor. It is hoped in Cal
| ifornia to organize a corporation with a
| capital of several millions of dollars, to
| issue bonds to guarantee the govern
| ment against loss through the banks.
.| Other plans have been suggested for
| the raising of money to enable the peo
| ple of California to rebuild their hoftves
.| and business houses, but thus far noth
| ing has been proposed that will meet
. | the ideas of congress.
porated.”
Troops in Mutiny.
Odessa, June 20.—General Kaulbars
has received word from 11 of the best
garrisons in Russia to the effect that
the troops there are mutinous and have
refused to act as police in qnolllz
street disturbances. The identity
these garrisons is being concealed, but
all the facts have been telegraphed to
the minister of war. It can be stated
on the authority of a general officer of
the staff that the reason why the gov
ernment has not carried out its plan to
mobolize 700,000 Cossacks is the fear
of civil war.
Militia Fund is Doubled.
Wasbington, June 20.—The milithi
bill, which finally passed congress yes
terday, will double the annual M»fi
ment to various states for their Nations
al Guard. Under the new spportions
ment Oregon will receive $15,968;
Washington, $19,947, and Idaho $ll,
984. This annual appropristion '&
NO. 9'

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