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The new age. [volume] (Portland, Or.) 1896-1905, August 25, 1906, Image 6

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BY RAIL AND WATER.
SEE
Nature’s Wondrous Handiwork
THROUGH UTAH AND COLORADO
Castle Gate, Canon of the Grand
Black Canon, Marshall and Ten
nessee Passes, and the World-
Famous ROYAL GORGE.
For illustrated and descriptive pamph
lets write to
W. C. McBRIDE, General Agent
124 Third Street
PORTLAND. OREGON
REGULATOR
LINE
“BAILEY GATZERT"” “DALLES CITY”
“REGULATOR” “METLAKO”
Connecting at Lyle, Wash., with
Columbia River & Northern Railway Co.
FOR
Wahkiacus. Daly, Centerville, Goldendale and
all Klickitat Valley points.
Steamer leaves Portland daily (except Sun
dnL) 7 &. m., connecting with C. R. & N. trains
at Lyle 5:15 p. m. for Goldendale. Train ar
rives Geldendale, 7:35 p. m. Steamer arrives
The Dalles 6:30 p. m.
Steamer leaves The Dalles dally (except Bun
deg) 7:00 &. m.
. R. & N. trains leaving Goldendale 6:15 a,
m. connects with thissteamer for Portland, ar
riving Portland 6 p. m.
Excellent meais servea on ail steamers. Fine
accommodations for teams and wagons.
For detailed infcrmation of rates, berth res
ervations, connections, etc., write or call on
nearest t‘tfi'em. H. C. Campbeil,
Gen. office, Portland, Or. Manager.
g WITH
BETWEEN
g '
['artland, Astoria = Seaside
y <
Leaves , UNION DEPOT i Arrives.
{For Ma 'gers; "RamA, "
Daily i ier, C% atskanie| Daily.
8:00a. m. | Westport, Clifton,| 11:10 a. m,
| Astoria, Warren
ton, Flavel, Gear
hart Park and Sea
side.
Astoria & Seashore
Express Daily.
7:00 p. m. Astoria Express 9:40 p. m.
T
C. A. STEWART, J. C. MAYO,
Comm’l Agt., 248 Alder St G.F.&P. A
Telephone Main 906.
On Your Trip to the East
NORTH COAST LIMITED
PULLMAN STANDARD SLEEPING CARS
(ELECTRIC LIGHTS)
PULLMAN TOURIST SLEEPING CARS
(ELECTRIC LIGHTS)
DINING CAR—DAY AND NIGHT
(ELECTRIC LIGHTS)
OBSERVATION CAR
(ELECTRIC LIGHTS)
ELECTRIC FANS
' BARBER SHOP
BATH
. LIBRARY
NUMEROUS OTHER COMFORTS
THREE
Daily Transcontinental Trains
TO THE EAST
The Ticket Office at Portland is at 255 Morrison St.,
Corner Third
A. D. CHARLTON
Assistant General Passenger Agent
PORTLAND, OREGON
BY RAIL AND WATER
Ask the Agent for .
T I K BT 5
VIA
THE COMFORTABLE WAY
To Spokane,
St. Paul, Minneapolis, Duluth, Chicago,
St. Louis and All Points East and South
TWO OVERLAND TRAINS DAILY
The ORIENTAL LIMITED The FAST MAIL
Via Seattle or Spokane
Splendid Service Up-to-date Equipment
Courteous Employes
Daylight trip across the Cascade and
Rocky Mountains.
For Tickets. rates, folders and full infor
mation call on or address
H. DICKSON, C. P. & T. A.
122 Third Street, PORTLAND
S.G. YERKES, A. G. P. A.
SEATTLE, WASH.
A Pleasant Way to Travel
The above is the usual verdict of the
traveler using the Missouri Pacfic Rail
way between the Pacific Coast and the
East, and we believe that the service
and accommodations given merit this
statement. From Denver, Colorado
Springs and Pueblo there are two
through trains daily to Kansas City
and St. Louis, carrying Pullman’s lat
est standard electric lighted sleeping
cars, chair cars and up-to-date dining
cars. The same excellent service is
operated from Kansas City and St.
Louis to Memphis, Little Rock and
Hot Springs. If you are going East or
South write for rates and full informa
tion.-
W. C. McBRIDE, Gen. Agt.,
124 Third St., Portland, Or.
TRY THE
The ‘“Rainy-Day Gazette.”
The children’s noses were flattened
against the window panes—Marjo’s and
Cecil’s at one window, Tom’s and Els
peth’s at the other. The trickles of
raindrops outside might as well bave
been tears trailing down from all their
eyes. A great, long, rainy, in-the-house
day ahead of them!
“What shall we do?” they sighed.
“Edit a daily newspaper.” That was
Uncle Ned's voice.
“Do wha-at?” four voices chorused.
“Get out a daily,” went on Uncle
Ned’s volce, cheerily. “Let me see:
Cecil can be managing editor and Mar
jo read the exchanges and get clip
pings, and the twins can be reporters.
Get paper and pencil and two or three
newspapers, and come here and get
started.”
Uncle Ned cleared the library table
in a hurry and set a chair at each end.
“This end is yours, Cecil. You must
write the editorials, you know. And,
Marjo—over at this end—see what bits
of Interesting news and information
you can find in these papers, and cut
them out carefully and paste them on
these half-sheets of paper, ready to send
to the printers. Tom, Elspie—well, I'll
be city editor at first and give you your
‘assignments,” over on the bulletin
board, you know.”
Uncle Ned wrote some lines hastily
and posted them on the atlas cover
slanted against the wall. The Ilines
read:
Elspeth — Interview Bridget. Get
“story” of trip over in the steerage
and make it “snappy.”
Tom—Go to mamma and Aune Helen
for locals. Interview the new woman
upstairs and get her ‘“views.”
“There,” Uncle Ned sald, “that will
do for a starter. After you've written
up your ‘stories,’ I'll give you some
more assignments. Off with you. Live
ly's the word for yéu reporters!”
Bridget had come across seag only a
few months ago, and her voyage was
fresh in her mind and full of enter
taining little incidents and accidents.
She received her interviewer cordially,
and that small scribe was scon writing
in big, swaying letters her story of
steerage life on an ocean liner.
Tom flew about collecting locals.
There was “Blue Shequer,” the homing
pigeon, just back from a 200-mile flight.
"There was the bab bantam rooster be
ginning to crow; Dame Trot, with her
pbrand-new pussies; the flag-raising at
school next week; the Pussy-Willow
children just “coming out;” oh, and,
best of all, the new woman's first
tooth! But that came properly into the
interview. Tom went upstalrs and
gravely interviewed the new woman.
She lay in her cradle and beamed and
bobbed up at him, and expressed her
“views” In the funniest language you
ever heard!
Dinner time came and Interrupted
things for a while, and then on went
the work again. The editorial oftice of
the Rainy-Day Gazette was as busy &as
a hive of bustling little bees. Repo:t
ers hurried in and out, pens flew and
the paper—how it grew! At three
o’clock it went to press.
“That didn’'t take long, you know,”
Elsple confided to mamma, In confl
dence. “We didn't have any machine,
so we pressed it by hand-—under the
dictionary, gou knoyw, an’ Tom an’ I
sat on top.”
The paper was a great success. FEv
erybody subseribed for it the moment
ithoy saw it—even the editors them
selves and the reporters! Bridget want
ed two coples.
l “Why, it's raining!” exclaimed the
managing editor, in his first leisure mo
ment, gazing calmly out of the win
dow.
“Why, so 'tis!” echoed the exchange
editor.
“Pooh!” cried the reporters. “Guess
we knew that. Been doin’ it all day.
It's a beautiful rain for the—the crops.”
“The news crops,” said Uncle Ned's
volce.—Youth’s Companion,
Pete Toddle’s Upsetting.
| What have we here? I do declare,
Something is raising Peter's hair!
Can it be he sees something fearful
That makes him look so far from cheer
ful?
Peter’s upset. If you'd discover
| What did it, just turn Peter over.
' A: first it may perplex your mind
| How any one so soft and kind
' As Mr. Luvly here appears, ¢
Could so raise Peter Toddle’s fears,
But though he seems so good a creature,
It happens he is Peter's teacher,
And though so innocent’s his look, he
- Knows that Peter’s playing hookey.
| Iridescence of Pearl.
‘ You have all noticed the beautiful
‘prismatic colors on the inner surface
of shells, even of the common oyster
shells. This surface is composed of tha
substance called mother-of-pearl, and
its iridescence and its gloss make it
beautiful. Do you know what makes
it iridescent? The substance [s made
up of an infinite number of little parts,
separated by minute lines, and this has
the effect of breaking up ordinary light
into its prismatic colors. It is a sim
flar arrangement of the particles that
makes the opal iridescent. The so-called
“unlucky” nature of the opal consists
in the fact that it sometimes bursts
without apparent cause, but the burst
ing is merely a natural result of its pe
culiar composition. Sometimes a sud
den change of temperature makes it
burst; sometimes the breakage Is due
to a cause that even a lapidary can
not determine. The belief that the
stone is “unlucky” is nothing but a silly
superstition.
Those Famous Fogs.
Newfoundland {8 famous for Its
heavy fogs, which, under certain condi
tions, drift out to sea and make navi
gation dangerous. It may be that you
do not know why the fogs are so heavy
there. They are caused by the mingling
of the Arctic current, with its ice fleids
and icebergs, with the warm waters of
the gulf stream. This produces great
masses of vapor, which, when westerly
winds prevail, is carried out to sea;
but when the wind I 8 from the south
or the southeast the fog is ecarried in
on the island, covering the bays and
the headlands.
A Good Swim.
~ Daniel Perkins was a man of few
words, and a man of true worth and
courage, says the author of “The ILog
of a Sea Angler.” Early in his life
he was the skipper of a coal schooner
which traded up the coast from Bos
ton.
Off Ogunquit a gale struck the
schooner so quickly on one trip that
before anything could be done the ves.
sel was over and going down, and Pawu
lel was thrown Into the water, ten
miles off-shore in his oilskins.
He managed to get out of the oll
skins, and then, taking his bearinga
started to swim to Ogunquit
Captain Sam told me the story. A
friend of his, it happened, was going to
Boston in his schooner. e had reach
ed Boon Island, and was bowling along
at a good c¢lip when he heard a hall.
“Hold on, will you? I want to come
aboard!”
The skipper was *“struck all of a
heap,” as Captain Sam said, for there
was not a sail in sight nearer than five
miles; but he jammed the tiller over
and came up into the wind, and nearly
ran into Daniel Perkins.
“How are ye, Daniel?” said Captain
Sam. “Which way ye goin'?”
“Why, I was going home to Ogunquit,
but if it's all the same I'll come
aboard.”
So Daniel swam up to the quarter,
and Captain Sam hauled him in. He
had swum five miles, and had been in
the water nearly half a day; but Cap
tain Sam said, “He didn’t seem tuck
ered, and would have struck the coast
somewhere between Portsinouth and
York Beach, sure.”
Trial by Ordeal.
In é¢he Sinai peninsula trial by ordeal
is still practiced. In all eriminal cases
where no witnesses are forthcoming the
judge, “el mabashaa,” tests the sus
pected person by fire, by water or by
dream. In the first the judge places an
iron pan in the fire until it is redhot
and gives It to the accused to touch
three times with his tongue. If marks
of burning are shown on the tongue the
accused is pronounced guilty, The the
ory apparently Is that if he is not gulilty
the moisture on the tongue prevents l¢
from being burnt; if guilty his tongue
would dry up from fear of being dis
covered.
The test by water Is described as fol
lows: “The ‘mabashaa’ sits with the
accused and the spectators in a circle
with a copper jug full of water placed
in the center. This jug is then made
to appear to move round the circle by
means of witcheraft or hypnotism. If
the jug returns back to the judge the
accused 1s pronounced not guilty, bui if
the jug stops opposite the accused bie i 3
pronounced guilty.”
T'his description is rather wanting ia
deiail, and it is difficult to know how
a jug which only appears to move can
be a trustwerthy index. In the test by
dream the “mabashaa” sleeps and sees
in a dream If the accused is guilty of
not.—Chicago News.
Remenyi’s Route.
On one of his early concert tours Hf
the West, before the famous violinist,
Eduard Remenyl, was tboroughly fa
miliar with the railway routes of the
United States, he inquired In Chlcago
concerning the best way te reach a
town in Illinois.
“C. B. & Q.,” replied the lLotel clerk,
without looking up.
Remeny! was qulte dazed. But, says
the contributor of the story to the re
cent memoir of the violinist, his sense
of fun carried him through.
“Ah!” he said gravely. “Then I will
go D. A. T.”
It was the clerk's turn to be puzzled,
“What does that mean"? he sald,
looking up this time.
“Well, what dld you mean?” demand
ed Remenyl.
“Chicago, Burlington and Quilncy, of
course.”
“Ah! I meant day after to-morrow,”
Had Stood the Test.
“What makes you think you are an
actor?”’ sald the manager coldly to the
applicant.
“Burglars came into my room last
night,” replied the young man with an
alr of pride, “and I pretended to be
asleep.”—Philadelphia Ledger.
Easy money is so called because It
is 80 easy to get rid of.,
:0000000000000“000“’000:
$ ST. PAUL MINN. ¢
Alfred J. Krank
(Successor to SCHNELL & KRANK))
DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF
BARBERS’ FURNITURE
AND SUPPLIES
FINE CUTLERY
RAZOR WORK A SPECIALTY.
142 B. Sixth St., Opp. Ryan Hotel.
St. Paul, Minnesota
Aguilas and
Seal of Minnesota
Cigars
ARE SOLD ON ALL TRAINS
Kubles & Stock Co.
MAKERS
SE.PAVE. - . MINNESOTA
EL FIRMA and
DUKE OF PARMA
CIGARS
You Will Like Them
HART & MURPHY, Makers
ST. PAUL
Established 1882 Incorporated 1900
GRIGGS, COOPER & CO.,
Manufacturers, Importers
and Wholesale Grocero
242-264 East Third Street
ST. PAUL MINN.
:00 9900000600 0“““’000000:
s OMAHA NEBRASKA 3
300000“0000000000000“00:
“THE ONLY WAY”
Have your Baggage checked from hotel and Residences over
any railroad to any place in United States by
Omaha Transfer Co.
Office 208 So. 14th St.
When Coming into’Omaha give your checks to our uniformed
agents on trains or at depot and receive cheapest and best service
New cabs to all parts oficity.
£ MINNEAPOLIS MINN. §
NORTH STAR
WOOLEN
MILL CO.
** Manufacturers of
Blankets, Flannels
and Blanketings
Minneapolis, Minn.
A. BACKDAHL C. A. BACKDAHL
A. Backdah!l & Co.
DRUGGISTS.
Opposite Milwaukees Depot. Psescriptions
are fully compounded. 313 Washington ave
nue South.
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Wear
CYGNUS $3.50 SHOE
North Star Shoe Co.
MINNEAPOLIS MINNESOTA
MINNEAPOLIS
OMNIBUS AND CARRIAGE LINE
MATTISON & FOYE, Proprietors
237 Hennepin Ave. Nicollet House Block
: MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA
LIVINGSTON ~ $
UNION MEAT MARKET,
FRESH DST MET
F.B. TOLHURST
Taxidermist
for the Tourist
OPPOSITE DEPOT,
Livingston,
GEO.W. HUSTED
Prescriptions, Drugs,
Patent Medicines, Ci~
gars, Toilet Articles,
Finest Soda Fountain
on the N. P. Railway.
OPPOSITE THE DEPOT
This card entitles you to a trip through the
National Park, providing you patronize
“THE SOLO”
And can make satisfactory arrangements with
the transportation companies.
The only first-class place of the kind in
Livingston. Bottle Goods a specialty
FRANK BLISS, Proprietor
117 W. Park St. LIVINGSTON, Mont.
2 OMAHA NEBRASKA :
g *
:00 PERPFPHIPCTRIPIPPP LI PPPEP
£ COUNCIL BLUFFS
z”mm’m..m.&
S. T. McATEE
Fancy Groceries, Bakery
Goods and Meats £ s
Supplies for Dining and Private
Cars Given Special Attention s &
230-32 Main St. 229-31 Pearl St.
Telephone 191
Council Bluffs lowa
EVANS LAUNDRY (O
Don’t Neglect Your Negligee Shirts
By having them carelessly or indiffer
ently ironed. Send them to a first-class
laundry, such as the Evans, where they
will receive proper attention, be re- -
turned to you clean and whole—not half
washed, torn or frayed. Goods called
for and delivered promptly. Moderate
charges. Phone 290.
522 Pearl St. COUNCIL BLUFFS, lOWA
Montana.

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