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The new age. [volume] (Portland, Or.) 1896-1905, November 03, 1906, Image 1

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YOle X 1
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF KALISPELL
KALISPELL, MONTANA
D. R. PEELER, Pres., F. J. LEBERT, V. Pres., R. E. WEBSTER, Cash., W. D. LAWSON, A. Cash.
Transacts a general panking business. Drafts issued, available in all cities of the United
#States snd Europe, Hong Kong and Manila. Collections made on favorable terms.
LADD & TILTON, Bankers Portland, Oregon
Established in 1859. Transact a General Banking Business. Interest allowed on time de
{onu. Collections made at all points on favorable terms. Letters of Credit issued available in
urope and the Eastern States. Sight Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers sold on New York,
“Washington, Chicago, St Louis, Denver, Omaha, San Francisco and various Jxoinu in Oreglon,
‘Washington, Idaho, hQ‘gnmna and British Columbia. Exchange sold on London, Paris, Berlin,
JFrankfort and Hong Kong.
OF PORTLAND, OREGON.
J. C. AINSWORTH, President. @W. B. AYER, Vice-President. R. W. SCHMEER, Cashier
A. M. WRIGHT, Assistant Cashier.
Transacts a general banking business. Drafts issued, available in all cities of the United
States and Europe, Hong Kong and Manila. Collections made on favorable terms.
NORTHWEST CORNER THIRD AND OAK STREETS.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK “BRES6NP
: Capital, $500,000
Surplus, $1,000,000 Deposits, $13,000,000
FIRST NATIONAL BANK of North Yakima, Wash.
Capltal and Surplus $130,000 00
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY
"W.M LADD CHAS, CARPENTER W. L, STEINWEG, A. B. CLINE
President Vice President Cashier Assistant Cashier
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
Walla Walla, Washington. (First National Bank in the State.)
Transacts a (General Banking Business.
CAPITAL $lOO,OOO. BSURPLUS $lOO,OOO.
LEVIANKENY, President. A. H. REYNOLDS. Vice President. A. R. BURFORD, Cashier
THE NATIONAL BANK OF COMMERCE
TACOMA, WASH.
UNITED STATES DEPOSITARY
Capltal $200,000 Surpius $200,000
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT ’
OFFICERS—Chester Thorne, President: Arthur Albertson, Vice President and Cashier;
Frederick A. Rice, Assistant Cashier; Delbert A. Young, Assistant Cashier.
JNO. C. AINSWORTH, Pres. JNO. 8. BAKER, Vice Pres. P.C. KAUFFMAN, 2d Vice Pres.
A. G. PRICHARD, Cashier. F. P. HASKELL, JR., Assistant Cashier.
THE FIDELITY TRUST COMPANY BANK
_ General Banking CAPITAL AND SURPLUS, $390,000 Safe Deposit Vaults
“SAVINGS DEPARTMENT: Interesi at the Rate of 8 per cent per Annum, Credited SBemi.Annually
TACOMA, WASHINGTON
ALFRED COOLIDGE, Pres. A. F. McCLAINE Vice Pres AARON KUHN, Vice Pres
CHAS. E. SCRIBER, Cashier. D. C. WOODWARD, Asst. Cashicr.
THE COLFAX NATIONAL BANK of Golfax Wash.
Gapital, $120,000.00 ' o
Transacts a general banking business. -Special facilities for handling Eastern
“"Washington and Idaho items. ;
W. F. KETTENBACH, Pres. J. ALEXANDER, Vice Pres. GEO. H, KESTER, Cashier.
. LEWISTON NATIONAL BANK
Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits, $215,000.00
“Capital recently increased from $50,000 to $lOO,OOO Surplus increased from $50,000 to $lOO,OOO
DIRECTORS—Jos. Alexander, C. C. Bunnell, J. B. Morris, Grace K. Pfaflin. R. C. Beach,
“G. H. Kester, W. F. Kettenbach, O. E. Guernsey, Wm. A. Libert, Jno. W. Givens, A. Freidenrich.
Twenty-two Years a National Bank. Oldest Bank in Lewiston, Idaho.
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK ="
Moorehead, Minnesota
JOHN LAMB, DAVID ASKEGAARD, LEW A, HUNTOON, ARTHUR H. COSTAIN,
President Vice President Cashier Asst. Cashier
Interest Paid on Time Deposits
FIRST NATIONAL BANK of East Grand Forks, Minn.
Farm Loans Negotiated. Fire and Cyclone Insuranee Written. Does a
General Banking Busidess.
Capital, $50,000 E. ARNESON, Pres. G. R.JACOBI Cashier
4 Per Cent Interest Pald on Time Deposits
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
BISMARK, NORTH DAKOTA
Established In 1879. Capltal, $lOO,OOO. Interest Pald on Times Deposlits
C. B.LITTLE, President. F. D. KENDRICK, Vice President.
8. M. PYE, Cashier. J. L. BELL, Asst. Cashier.
GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS TRANSACTED.
THE FIRST NATIONAL. BANK
OF DULUTH, MINNESOTA.
CAPITAL, 8500,000 SURPLUS 728,000
U. SBS. Government Depositfiry.
GEORGE PALMER F.L. MEYERS GEO. L. CLEAVER W. L. BRENHOLTS
President Cashier Arst. Cashier Asst, Cashier
= LA GRANDE
La Grande National Bank “45tson
Capital and Surplus, $120,000
DIRECTORS: J. M. Berry, A. B. Conley, F.J. Holmes, F. M. Byrkit, F. L. Meyers, Geo. L
<Cleaver, Geo. Palmer.
THE W. G. M'PHERSON COMPANY
Heating, Ventilating and Drying Engineers
WARM AIR FURNACES
“NOTHING BUT THE BEST” 47 First Street PORTLAND, OREGON
PORTLAND FUEL. COMPANY
Successors to PIONEER, C. R, DAVIS and PHOENIX FUEL CO.
PHONE EAST 26 287 E. MORRISON ST.
COAL—Rock Springs, Diamond, Richmond, Roslyn, New Cas
tle, New Castle Nut, Franklin, Carbon Hill, Coke.
WOOD—4-Foot Fir, 4-Foot Oak, 4-Foot Ash, Sawed Oak,
Sawed Fir, Sawed Ask, Sawed Knots.
-
The Merchants National Bank
Of St. Paul, Minnesota
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY
Capital, $1,000,000.00 :Surplus, $500,000.00
Transacts a general banking business. Correspondence invited
OFFICERS-KENNETH CLARK, President: GEO. H. PRINCE, Vice President; H. W,
PARKER, Cashier; H. VAN VLECK, Assistant Cashier.
DIRECTORS—Crawford Livingston, Kenneth Clark, J. H. Skinner, Louis W. Hill, Geo. H.
Prince, C. H. Bl{elow D. R. Noyul.lt". M. Watkins, L. P. Ordway, F. B. Kellogg, E. N. Ssunders,
Thomas A. Marlow, W. B, Parsons, J .M. Hannaford, Charles P. Noyes.
PORTLAND, OREGON, SATURBAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1906.
NEWS OF THE WEE
In a Condensed Form for d
Busy Readers. 7
HAPPENINGS OF TWO CONTINENTS
A Resume of the Less Important but
- Not Less Interesting Events
of the Past Week
~ Morocco is torn by anarchists of dif
erent bands and beliefs. :
- The Panama Cansl commission is
baving a hard time to find laborers.
An independent telephone company
has gained a right of way in Chicago.
A German steamer collided with a
four-masted ship and sunk, 23 of her
crew being drowned. _
A Germsn princess of royal blood has
been investigating slums ot Chicago un
der an assumed name.
Eight person, charged with com
plicity in a recent daring robbery in
Bt. Petersburg were executed. |
Ten anarchist speakers and leaders
were arrested in. New York charged
with inciting to riot and disorderly
conduct.
It has developed that San Francisco
saloons which bought their supplies
from one certain firm got their licenses
easier than others.
A W.O. T.U. speaker eays there
are 10,000 women and girls in Chicago
working for $5 a week or less, and
there are 5,000 saloons.
People in Montana and - adjacent
states are in grave fear that the entire
Cheyenne Indian nation, numbering at
least 800 fighting men, will go on the
war path. :
A crisis is approahcing in the Nor
wegian court, A y'
Vice President Fairbanks is drawingt
great crowds in Kentucky. =+ "
by Ohio indee; when law permitied &
fine of millions. i ;
Wealthy widows of Chicago have
been robbed of $lOO,OOO or more by a
pretended broker.
Money transports in Rusesia are now
guarded by strong forces of Cossacka in
stead of gendarmes.
Demands for a shorter work day and
new wage scale have been made on all
lines of the Penneylvania railroad.
A second consignment of 100 labor
ers from Vigo, Spain, has arrived at
Colon for work on the Panama canal.
Widow of Ruseell Ssge gives $50,000
to build a schoolhouse at Bag Harbor,
L. [., in memory of her grand parents.
Fifty-three bodies have been taken
from the wrecked street cars at Atlan
tic City. It is believed this is all.
The English horse of lords has ap
proved a bill making the teaching of
religion compulsory in the English
echools.
It is reported that one of the accused
board of supervisors in SBan Frauncisco
‘has made a full confession of the illegal
‘acts of the grafters.
" Three more bodies were found in the
ruins of the burned tenemeat houere in
Kaneas City. This matkes 13 dead and
three are still missing.
A band of 100 COrow Indians is on
the trail of the runaway Utes in Wy-‘
oming. They Crows are peaceful and
will try to persuade the Utes to return
to their reservation.
Taft speaks plainly for tariff revision.
Bix bodies have been recovered from
the lost French submarine. \
Heney is as determined as ever to
win his fight against alleged San Fran- ‘
cisco grafters. |
Secretary right pledges Japan that no'
boycott will be tolerated against Japan
sse in this country. |
Three Chilean engineers are en route
to Ban Francisco to study the rceoun
struction in progress there. |
Onaregie says Rosoevelt has done
more to accomplish spelling reform
than all the philologists in the past 20
years,
A two story building in Coffeyville,
Kan., wwas blown up by an explqnlon
of natural gas and two persons killed
and 24 hurt.
Two women at Logansport, Ind., en
gaged in a bairpulling while endeavor
ing to get near the Longworths during
tkeir visit there. i
The Chicago railroads refuse to grant
the switchmen an eight-hour day; but
still hold to their offer of an .dm‘
of 2 cents an hour in wages. |
Mrs. Mary Baker G. Eddy, founder
of the Christian Science church, is dd‘
to be dying, and an immense fortune
supposed to be hers is missing. i‘
Many duels are taking place in Cuba
to settle revolutionary grudges.
| FISST BRUSH WITH INDIANS.
Sol tted and Lose Band of
g,,: ‘ ptured Ponies.
;‘.}“’ b . I.—A special to the
M m Sheridan, Wyo., says: Re
w f th fi‘lt brush between troops
? LSEEB have reached here by tele-
P prom Birney. A troop of the
4% gߥairy rounded up and at
#o firive off 50 head of ponies
1 @ by the fugitive Indians.
'he [8 sent the alarm to the
mea A‘ the soldiers were driv
@ghies away a band of 100
Dyci iriding up, and, circling the
roo ioeeded in stampeding the
oI P récovered all but five,
whi &u by the soldiers.
bdians did not fire, but their
,‘;‘ §Bd rescue of their ponies in
dicatél “their temper. The soldiers
felt themselves unable to cope with
the fORES and the shots killing the ani
‘é Pe fired as the herd was being
drivi n N "
- The 5 are outwitting the
lroops mow in the field. A troop of
ie Tenth Cavalry marched all Tues
day m iin hope of capturing a small
band of"Utes on Bitter Creek, arriv
ing ‘only to find the band had
lovedeLater a scout reported the
ndia } milegs away. The troops
then™ & forced march to Powder
. Soldiers ar co:’nplalnlng bitterly
ZAINST the- actions of the Indian
couts, American Horse, Women’s
Dress and White Cow Bull, employed
Dy the g ent, The Indians pro
-888 MOt 0 know the country, but the
beiief ‘g owing that they are pur
posely Jeading the troops in a fruitless
earel in order to gain time.
__Another detachment of the Tenth
iyalty met and turned back a small
band, | ;f@ heyennes under Chief Two
Face. He sald they were hunting and
they w ire started toward the reserva
tiom. The band of a hundred Crows
undes Sweet Mouth, which hurriedly
leff Sheridan Monday night, was also
met and turned back by the Tenth
ca N
. The }s’ idians are making forced
marghes at night to elude the soldiers,
and, owing work or treach
ery of the seouts, the soldiers are un
al e ] 2 .fi;., ck of them.
*Railroad men running into Sheridan
tonight report having passed a band
easi sAthig §0 miles west of Sheridan.
g e ;\\ ,; A ’“».'--fr;:;,:;(?:.:‘,;‘fi*
~ The settlers r#“}?*@ {k
enne uprising if the Utes“ressh the
reservation border near Ashland.
Troops from Fort Keogh and Fort
Meade are converging on Ashland..
ALCOHOL, MAKING AND USE.
Bulletina Containing Useful Informa
tion to Be Issued.
Washington, Nov. I.—The Unlited
States Department of Agriculture has
in press and will soon issue two farm
ers’ bulletins, Nos. 268 and 269, relat
ing to industrial alcohol, the former
treating of its sources and manufac
ture and the latter of its uses and sta
tistics. These bulletins have been pre
pared by Dr. H. W. Wiley, chief of the
Bureau of Chemistry, and are designed
to meet the popular demand for infor
mation in regard to denatured alcohol,
relating to which a law was passed by
Congress on June 7, 1906.
These bulletins define in a proper
way what denatured alcohol is, the
gources from which it is obtained, the
processes and appliances used in its
manufacture, the cost of manufactur
ing, the uses to which it may be ap
plied. and the officials of the govern
ment charged with the enforcement of
the law,
The bulleting are illustrated and are
for free distribution. Application
should be made to members of Con
‘gress or to the United States Depart
‘ment of Agriculture.
No Soldiers Need Apply.
Leavenworth, Kan., Nov. I—Two
soldiers of Company K, Eighteenth In
fantry, stationed at Fort Leavenworth,
were refused admittance to a skating
rink here recently and Captain M. Mc-
Farland, commanding the company,
who was appealed to by the men,
wrote a communication to the Military
Secretary of the War Department stat
ing that the proprietor had said that
he would admit soldiers only in citi
zens’ clothing.
Captain McFarland referred the let
ter to Lieutenant-Colonel William
Paulding, who indorsed it by stating
that “it is very unfortunate and to be
deplored that the uniform of the Na
tion’s Army should be held in such
lack of esteem by individuals in this
community, and it is to be hoped that
some means may be found in correc-
ST *
Badges to Identify Soldiers.
Washington, Nov. I.—Acting upon
the recommendation of Surgeon-Gen
eral O’'Reilly, Acting Secretary Oliver
has ordered that hereafter identifica
tion tags of aluminum, the size of a
silver dollar, stamped with the name,
company, regiment or troop of the
wearer, be suspended from the neck
of each officer and soldier underneath
the clothing by a cord or thong.
These badges will be issued gratui
tously to enlisted men and at cost
price to officers. The importance of
such badges is shown by thousands of
graves of unidentified soldiers.
Mint Buys Silver at 70.71.
Washington, Nov. I.—The Director
of the Mint today purchased 100,000
ounces of silver at 70.71 c per fine
ounce, for delivery at the Denver mint.
LEGISLATORS MEET
Oregon Solons Seeking Informa-
tion on Public Matters.
PENDLETON ENTERTAINS THEM
Visit Washington’s Jute Mill and Ore
gon State Normal School
at Weston.
Pendleton, Or., Oct. 80.—Whether
Oregon should supplant its stove foun
dry in the Salem prison with a jute
mill was studied today in the Walla
Walla jute plant of the Washington
state prison by Governor Chamberlain,
of Oregon, 33 members of the Oregon
legislature, C. W. James, superintend
ent of the Oregon penitentiary, and
others. While the lawmakersg have not
expressed their opinions on the sub-
Ject freely, it is evident that many of
them do not favor the change.
This is the attitude also of Governor
Chamberlain and Superintendent
James. They argue that the stove
foundry brings to the state a revenue
twice as big as a jute mill would do,
that a jute mill would launch the state
in a business which is in large meas
ure speculative and risky and liable
to heavy losses because the raw pro
duct from India is manipulated by a
trust; that the finished bags would be
sold to consumers near the factory,
thereby discriminating against others
not favored by proximity to the plant;
that Oregon’s participation in the bus
iness would not regulate prices, be
cause it could make only 12 per cent
of the bags used, and the Washington
plant doubled in size could make only
25 per cent of the bags used in that
state; and that the change to a jute
mill would entail upon the state an ex
penditure of perhaps $125,000.
The Oregonians examined the jute
mill with keen interest. It was not
Fulining, because the day. was one of
R T B L T BT e
: e "»;;@hggev .M%i%‘@%»&a& :7 Sl ”‘!
healed by Governor Chamberlain,
were cunducted through the plant by
Governor Mead and M. F. Kincaid, the
new superintendent.
The chief argument for the jute mill
is that manufacture of grain sacks, un
like that of stoves, does not compeis
with free labor and that it gives farm
ers sacks cheaper than the market
price.
After viewing the Walla Walla plant,
the visitors went to Weston to view
the Normal School at that place and
thence came to Pendleton, where they
attended a dinner and smoker tonight,
given by the Commercial Association.
At the Weston Normal School the
party was greeted by Robert C.
French, president of that institution,
and was led to the assembly hall of
the school where some 240 students
were gathered. President French, to
show that the institution wag not a
local high school for Weston, asked
the pupils residing in Weston to arise,
then those whose homes were beyond
the town. The latter number visibly
exceeded the former.
President French said afterward
that of the 138 pupils in the normal
department, only 22 are residents of
Weston, In addition are 102 young
pupils in the training department, all
from Weston, their studies raunging
from kindergarten to eighth grade The
age of normal pupils ranges from 15 to
27, most of them being 17, 18 and 19.
~ Governor Chamberlain spoke com
‘mendingly of the school, saying it
would always have a place in his
‘heart. Representative Davey, of Ma
rion, encouraged the friends of the
\school by declaring that it is one of
the indispensable educational institu
tions of Oregon. Representative Vaw
‘ter, of Jackson, spoke the same senti
‘ment and jocularly said that Governor
Chamberlain’s remarks had put him on
record and that they would be remem
bered when he should pass upon the
appropriation bill of the Republican
legislature. Other speakers were
Senator Smith, of Umatilia, and J. H.
Raley, of Pendleton.
The town of Weston tnok an after
noon holiday to receive the visitors.
At the station, a mile distant from the
school, numerous conveyances were
waiting their arrival, to convey them
up town. The keen interest of Weston
in its normal school was evidenced by
the appreciation its citizens showed of
the visit of the Governor and the Leg
islators.
At tonight’s dinner Governor Cham
berlain urged co-operation of Oregon
and Washington for improvement of
the Columbia river and the protection
of salmon. Governor Mead responded
that in improvement of that river
‘Washington “ought to co-operate with
your state.” But he pointed out that
Seattle controlled a great part of the
legislative power of Washington
that it was not so well informed of the
needg of the Columbia river as it
might be.
NO. 2SB.
THE REASON WHY
Bourne Should Not
Be Elected U.
S. Senator
The New Age has said before and it
now says again that it doeg not be
lieve that the next legislature will
elect J. Bourne, Jr., to the United
States senate. It has been said that
our opposition to Mr. Bourne is in
spired by prejudice, and that we can
give no good reason for opposing him
since he was regularly named by the
republican voterg for the office.
We opposed Mr. Bourne during the
primaries for the reason that we knew
him to be unfit for the high office to
which he aspired.
Firct—Thag he is not a loyal and
consistent republican.
Second—That he is a traitor and
political ‘black-leg. -.
Third—That he could not be depend
lipubllcm jhe woul(_! Mr&h%j
his party in the hour of its dire dis
tress, when ‘the‘ blight of Bryanism and
populism overshadowed the country in
1906. But as a true and foyal repub
lican would have put self aside and
rendered whatever service he could
for his party and his republican
friends, If Bourne's will had prevailed
and Bryan had been elected who can
say that there would have been today
a strong, invincible republican party
in Oregon to honor him for his perfidy.
The legislative session of 1895 was
the most spectacular in the history of
Oregon and the King Pin of that ses
sion was J. Bourne Jr., whose mal
odorous record is even yet 3 stench in
the nostrils of decent people. With a
goodly supply of money and other cor
rupting influences the trick of thwart
ing the will of the people and debauch
ing the honor of the citizenry was the
special mission of this political monte
bank, who, now, ten short years after
ward, has the brazen affrontery to seek
this high and honorable position at
the hands of the party, whose murder
he conspired to bring about.
In the light of the past record of
Mr. Bourne, who is so unsuspecting as
to trust him in the future? Does any
one who knows him, save his hired
‘henchmen, think for a minute that he
can be depended upon to stand up for
frepubllcan principles and policies in
the United States senate, and to up
hold the hands of life-long, true and
tried republican leaders in that body,
and to “stand pat” with the party's
matchless leader, mose profound
stateman, patriot and humanitarian
since the days of Lincoin—Theodore
Roosevelt.

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