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The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, January 01, 1889, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1889-01-01/ed-1/seq-1/

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1'UISL1SUK1 liV
AIIAN GAZETTE UU., CLimuea,;
Every Tuesday Morning,
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PA YABLK IS ADl'AXCE.
feJKU .Niihserincr o.uu in .mvnnce,
Which includes
. WHITNEY, Business Manager.
u, Gazette Building, Merchant St. up stairs)
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Iries-M 5 " GOJ 0(10 14 00,18 00 58 00 4000
d 7 x 800 laooUeoorajoowoo cooo
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Correspondence intended for publication,
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BQ to tlic "Jianagcroi inc uawauuu ujzuic,
Office Box, O. "
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All foreien advertisements must
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scriptions may DC maue uy
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Pacific Commercial Advertiser
Bblishedbj the Hawaiian Gazette Company
UKlcc In Jlcrcuam street, anu uciivenu uy
4rs in the City, at
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abs
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ouc address.
suvsar
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all Communications,
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PROFESSIONAL.
FRANCIS M. HATCH.
at'XiaTC.
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A. ROSA,
bttoraoy . Xjarw.
No. 15 Kaaiiumanu Street,
Honolulu, II. I.
W- R. CASTLE,
-A-T X,-A.-VV
fotary Public. Attends all the Courts of
the Kingdom. y
gj. AXFRED MAGOON,
ley and Counselor At Law.
OFFICE-12 Merchant Street.
Honolulu, U. I.
y
UKCISi BKOWA.
KNEY. AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW,
.NOTARY PUBLIC,
B"cut for .aking Acknowledgment of
Bents for the Island of Oahu.
JI Block, Merchant, Street, Honolulu
y
JOIS? SJ. 1AT1',
PaflLIO and COMMISSIONER
of DEEDS
States of California and New Yorv
It ic Bank of Bishop & Co., Honolulu.
MS WHITNEY. M. TJ., D. D. S
lental Booms on Fort Street,
rlSlllrener's, Block, corner Hotel aud Tort
fya streets Entrance, Hotel street.
WILLIAM 0. SMITH.
TORNEY-AT-LAW,
art Street,
1201-y
Honolulu.
fHOMAS W. HOBRON,
3x."kXc,
swith W. O. Smith, G6 Fort street.
165-1 w 1205-y
1SCELLANEOUS.
Wil. (..IRWIN
Factors and Commission Agents,
Honolulu, II. 1. y
lUOKfr'KM) Ac 4;.
leneral Commission Aeents,
Qucca 5trcet,Houolulu, 11. 1. y
tv. scHAEivnn &. o.
ters& Commission Merc's.
Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands. y
S. GRIirBATIM & CO..
IMPORTERS or
I Morokandise and Commission
torckants. Honolulu. H. I. y
PIONEER STEAM
lanufactory and Bakery,
sc o e?l .
afectioner. Pastry Cook and Baker.
tel St.. bet. Nuuanu and Fort y
3HANGE ON CHINA.
frsigncd are prepared to draw on the
India, Australia and China
HongJcojie .
I J& Kill. O
MACFARLANE & CO
and Commission Merchants,
aiioluhi. Hawaiian Iil.iniU
AOENT8 ron
faVMUl & Co. ScOtlllP.il Strt
Works, Glasirow.
Iron
&qo.,CLcels) Limited Steam Plow
urs. t.ceu. ly
Branches in
inzton.
The Bank of
Oregon.
Xhisiucss Ulartrs.
MISCELLANEOUS
BISHOP & COMPANY.
lESTABLISHED X3V 1858.
BANKERS.
IIONOITI.U, HAWAIIAN ISLANDS.
DRAW EXCHANGE ON
THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO
AJfD TIIEIH AGXNTS IN
Sew York, Boston, Paris.
MESSRS. N M. ROTHSCHILD & SONS, LONDON.
-FRANKFORT-ON-THE-MAIX.-The
Commercial Ranking Co. of Sydney,
Loudon.
The Commercial Banking Co.of Sydney, Sydney.
The Bank of Ne-v Zealand, Auckland,
Christchnrch,
The Azores and Madeira I
Stockholm, Sweden.
The Chartered Bank of London, Australia and
China,
Hongkong, Yokohama, Japan. And transact a
1204 General BankiupBnsinebs. y
MRS. A. M. MELXIS,
Fashionable) Dross and Cloak Maker
1199 No. 17 Emma street. ly
Corner of Fort and Qnecn Steets, Honuluiu,
Lumber.
1215
IJVMAS $a:4s..
Importers of General Merchandise,
prom
FRANCE, ENGLAND, GERMANY A.ND THE
UNITED STATES.
No. 58 Queen Street. Honolulu. 11 . 1,
HYMAN BROTHERS.
Commission Merchants.
Ckoico
nay
20ti Front Street, San Francieco
articular attention paid to filling and shipping
1213 Island orders. y
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Commission Merchants,
No. 121 California Street, San ranciseo, Cal.
12J1 y
HOL..LISTER & CO.,
DRUGGISTS AND TOBACCONISTS,
-WHOLESALE" AND
t! Fort Street. y
it. v.. ncix'wuii ic Kitn.
Grocery, Feed Store and Bakery.
Corner King and Fort Streets,
1199 Honolulu, 11. I. v
EMPIRE HOUSE,
OLDS, ::::::::: Proprietor
Corner Nuuann Avenncand Hotel Streets.
Alos, "Wines and
TUIIO. SI DAV1KS fc Co..
Late Jaxion. Green & Co.
Importers and Commission Merchants,
AnD AuZliTs rOI.
Lloyd'sand the Liverpool Underwriters,
British and Foreign Marine Insurance Company,
1199 And Northern Assurance Company, y
C. HUSTACE.
(Formerly with B. F. Boljes & Co.)
Wholesale and Retail Crocer,
111 King Street, under Harmony Hall.
Family, Plantation, and .Ships' Stores sup-
plied at short notice. New Goods
steamer. Orders rom the other islands
fully executed.
1199 TELEPIWXEXo.lW.
C.
HONOLULU, TUESDAT, JANUARY 1, 1889.-
and its
Dunedin and Well-
British Colnmbla. Portland,
slands.
Liquors
y.
E. S. CUNHA,
Wlno Doolor.
TTNIOir
In rear of the " Hawaiian Gazette " building.
1199
No. SI Merchant Streel.
WM.MAEnTESS, 1'IIIL. orrcncELT, uehmasn
Honolulu. Honolulu. Honolulu.
KiU( and Bethel Streets,
Honolulu, II. I.,
Importers and Commission Merchants,
1201 y
IRON WORKS CO
-i Steam Engines, Sugar Mills, Boilers,,
Coolers. Iron, Brass aud Lead Casting
Machinery of Every Description
Mad to Order. S3.
Particular attention jiaid to Ships'
JOit WOKK etecuteu on the shortest
1231 uotlce. v
K. . HALli Jt SOS.
LIMITED.
Importers and Dealers in Hardware,
Plows, Pain,s0ils and General Merchandise,
i OFFICER?! :
WmW Hall President and Manager
L C Abies Secretary and Treasurer
Win F Allen Auditor
Tho- May and E O White Directors
I 121-5 Corner Fort and King Sts y
by every
BREWER & COMPANY.
faith-
j o its rr. iva'i'i: is is vsa.
IMPOETZK AND DEALER IN GENERAL
MERCHANDISE.
12 In Queen Street, Honolulu. II. I. y
R. LEWEns. P.J.LOWREr. C. Jt. COOKE
Successors to Lewers &Dickox,
Importers and Dealers m Lumber,
And all kinds of Building Materials,
1220 FortStreeUHonolulo. y
IMPORTER. MANUFACTURER,
UPHOLSTERER AND DEALER IN
FURNITURE OF EVERY' DESCRIPTION,
Wauebooxs and Work Shop at
Thpold stand oil ITntnl Strpr.t. Orilnrs from
I the other Islands promptly attended to.
I 1227 y
THE WESTERN AND HAWAIIAN
Investment Company,
Money loaned for long or short periods,
ON APPROVED SECURITY
Apply to W. L. GREEN, Manager.
1215 BeaTer Block. Fort St. v
(Limited)
General Mercantile and Commission Agents
QUEEN STREET, HONOLULU. H. I
list op owjcers. '
I.C. JONES, fa - - President and Mauager
JOSEPH O.CARTER. Treasurer and Secretary
Col. W. F. ALLEN Auditor
DIRECTORS.
Hon. C.R. BISHOP, IIEXRY WATERIIOUSE
1201 SAM'L. C. ALLEN. ly.
atuaiianferite
TUESDAY,
JANUARY 1, 1389:
VOLUME TWENTY-FOUR.
"With this number, iho Hawaiian
Gazette commonces the twenty-fourth
year of its publications. During
the period of its existence, it has
established for itself a world-wide reputation
as a reliable
a powerful influence for good
in the building up of an independent,
intelligent and cosmopolitan
nation in the Hawaiian Archipelago"
a law-abiding people determined
to maintain a clean and upright government
at all hazards peaceably
if they can, forcibly if they must.
"With such a platform this paperwill
.Paints, Oils, Kails, Salt & Building , .. ,,. , ., . ..
its 24th and asks the
Materials of every kind- v I ener volume,
continued patronage of its many
patrons, some of whom date their
subscriptions from the fiist number
of the first volume. But to each and
all its patrons and readers we send
our greetings for
A Happy "New Year.
PACIFIC COMMERCIAL ADVERTISER
The Hawaiian Gazette Company
also publish the Daily Pacific Commercial
Advertiser at Six Dollars
(6.00) a year,. The two papers
the Daily Advertiser and the "Weekly
Gazette will be sent to one address
on either of the Islands, for Ten
Dollars per annum if prepaid at the
time the order is received.
Foreign Subscribers will be charged
postage in addition to regular
subscription rates, viz:
Hawaiian Gazette, one year, including
postage, $6.00.
Daily P. C. Advertiser, one1 year
including postage, 10.00.
Address,
Hawaiian Gazette Company.
PERSONAL.
Judge Dole hits gone to Kauai.
Chief Justice Judd was on the Koolau
side of the island on Friday.
It is rumored in Paris- that M. Gounod,
the composer, is losing his mind.
Mr. W. Marshal, Sprcckclsvillc, and
Mr. John Arthur, Heeia, are at the
ilawaiian Hotel.
Mr. J. P. Bowen has received news of
the death, in New York, of his aged
mother.
Mrs. Kate M. West airived by the
Mariposa to teach in the service of the
Board ot Education.
Mr. AValter Hill, proprietor of the Bulletin,
has been confined to his house
some days by illness.
Mr. J. T. Arundel left for Ilowland
Island, his mid-ocean property, by the
schooner Twilight. He expected to return
in March.
By mistake the name of Mrs. Boyd
was given as " Kebecca at the well," instead
of Miss Annie Cleghorn, in our re
port of the charity fair.
His Excellency L. A. Thurston, Minister
of the Interior, and Mr. "V. E.
Howell, Superintendent of Public Works,
returned by the W. G. Hall from their
official tour of Hawaii.
Mr. H. J. Creighton's mission to the
Colonies is to attempt the establishment
of an Australian commercial agency in
San Francisco for the mutual benelit of
America and the Colonies.
Frederick Wolseley, a brother of the
General, and an Australian squatter,
claims attention for having invented a
sheep-shearing machine by which one
man can shear 140 sheep a day, clean as
a wnistie.
Mr. C. B. Heynolds. resident superintendent
of the leper settlements on Molo-
kai, came to town by the steamer
He reports a heavy surf on that island,
also that his residence is in course
of construction.
Dr. John S.McGrewittained his sixty-fifth
birthday on Sunday, 23d inst. On
Monday morning the hale and hearty
doctor was seienaded at iiis residence by
the Itoyal Hawaiian Band, Dr. McGrew
wears his three score and five years well,
and this paper wishes him many nappy
returns of his natal anniversary.
The U. S
Nov. loth.
loth.
Naval Notes.
S. Juniata was
at Aden on
Surgeon Simon of the V. S. S. Boston
died in New York from yellow fever contracted
on that ship's visit to Hayti.
The U. S. S. Kearsar 'e is reported to
be greatly improved b;
chinery. She was at 01
Callao for Payta, Peru, on Nov. 20. She
was to meet the Dolphin there, from
which Admiral Kimberly was to
fer his flag to the Trenton.
,"i-H
KEEPING CHRISTMAS.
Splcmliil 'Weather Marine Decoration
Keligious Music at
Thomas Square.
A finer Christmas morning never
passed over this latitude than that of
Tuesday. Bright skies and refreshing
breezes made an atmosphere as of paradise.
The shipping generally displayed
flags, the bark C. D. Bryant beautifully
dressing ship, and a line of flas connecting
H. B. M. ships Cormorant and Hya
cinth
Religious ceremonials in observance, of
the Christian anniversary were maintained
at short intervals from 4:80 a. m.
throughout the day in the Roman Catholic
Cathedral. Thev were attended by'
large congregations.
Sacred rejoicings also filled the stately
arehesf of St. Andrew's Anglica'n Cathe-
urm, iiu unci intermissions, irom.eany
morn fill balmy eve. The popular services
of both congregations were well attended,
prominent lights in other communions,
as well as many oflicers of the British
and American warships in port, being
present. The musical renditions by the
augmented choir at the second congregation's
11 :15 service were very fine. Mr.
Wray. Taylor presided with accustomed
power at the organ. Rev. Alex. Mackintosh,
of the first congregation's clergy,
assisted the pastor in the readings. The
church was tastily decked in the freshest
of foliage and flowers.
Rev. Geo. AVallace, pastor as above,
preached an appropriate sermon upon
the Nativity. Great leaders of thought,
the most illustribus conquerors, all had
been wrapped in swaddling bands. Their
mothers had crooned over their cradles,
singing lullabies just as that Jewish
mother had soothed her babe, wilhthe
maternal melodies otJudea, in the lowly
manger. Science had made gieat
but was confessedly hauled
when it encountered ultimates." It could
not get back the life germ whence
the greatest of earth had grown. So the
wisest men are impotent when they
would seek behind the event for the
origin of the man Christ. Infinite possibilities
were comprised in the declaration,
'jA manchild is born." He may
become the powerful leader of the minds
of men, or the victorious conqueror
whose name will be forever emClazoned
on the world's history. Great men had
been remarked a3 the product of an
epoch or a nationality. Such were
Goethe and Burns, and some whose
memories are perpetual for evil as well
as good' works. But who should be able
to specify a period or a nation that could
claimxclusive possession of the Messiah.
Expectancy of him was raised in
Eden, found expression throughout the
books of Moses, was proclaimed by
Isaiah, Jeremiah and their peers the
messajje traininjr clearness as the fulness
of time approached: "The Lord shall
come suddenly to his temple." The
Jewish nation failed to recognize him
when he came, because they looked for
a conquering Redeemer coming with
banners and pomp, but it was given to
the lowly shepherds on the plains of
Bethlehem to see his star and rejoice at
his appearance. The Christ was claimed
by every nation, as witness the ideals
of artists. German painters gave him
their national features, as did the Italian,
mo iingiisii, anu others theirs respectively
; while even the Central American,
grasping his rude pigments to decorate
his sanctuary, delineated the portrait of
an Aztec as his conception of the Lord.
It was natural that this should be so.
when the man thus conceived had swayed
an influence over men, down through
the centuries, such as none other had
ever approached. The question on this
anniversary came home to all, "What
think ye of Christ?" All who appeared
before the holy altar, to observe the
sacred memorial of his death, confessed
by their participation in the riles that
Jesus was the Son of God. It was most
appropriate at this season that gift3 of
love and mercy should signalize Christian
rejoicing." For, "If ye love not
your brother whom ye have seen, how
can ye love the Father whom ye have
not seen t o taught Clip Master himself,
whose advent was celebrated in the
Christmas festival. The discourse, of
which the foregoing outlines merely the
tenor, was listened to with close attention
by the large congregation.
A grand Christmas concert was given
at Thomas Square, by tbe.Royal Hawai
ian Baud, at 2 -30 o'clock in the afternoon.
The attendance would have looked
large in a smaller space, but the two
or three hundred of young and grown
people in holiday attire had ample room
in the spacious sylvan shades of this increasingly
popular retreat. There were
seven new pieces out of nine numbers
not counting interlude and dismissal
tunes. The opening march, "Merry
Christmas," was the composition of
David Nape, a member of the band, and
proved very acceptable. " Forge in the
Forest" was played" by request, its ringing
anvil refrain being appreciated as
highly as ever. Hearty applause was
accorded this fantasia. Although the
band boys had been out pretty much all
night serenading, they came to time with
creditable fidelity to duty, while Prof.
Berger Eeemed to be in "his element,
with his baton eliciting the harmonies
that made for other people a large share
of their whole "Merry Christmas."
Knights of Pythias.
Mystic Lodge, K. of P., Wednesday
evening elected the following oflicers for
I next term: F. Waldron, C. C; C. W.
' Ziegler, V. C. ; F. Harrison, P. ; J. M.
I McChesney, K. of R. and $.; Chas.'T.
, Wilder, M. of E.; Geo. Farr, M. of F.;
.T 1". Tnrhorf V at A W H WtMnr
' - . wa wua w &vabs vr w
iy lier new ma-1 t r ; ... r Kw!.ll n a 7. v Aror
Id Point on Nov. , and j. A. Hassinjrer. Trustees.
I After the meetinu bv invitation the
The U. S. S. Trenton sailed from j members, with visitinz Bro. H. C. Aus
tin (founder of Aloha Lodge, Wailuku),
retired to the Elite Ice Cream Parlors and
accepted the hospitality of Bro. Knight
J. Steiner.
3" i j
7
AIT IMPORTANT CASE.
Question of
Ownership
in Seashore
Alluvion.
A treflRass case important in its ultimate
bearings was. decided by Police
Justice Dayton on Wednesday. It turned
upon the point of ownership in the accretion
of land, to property of unambiguous
title, by the action of the sea. From the
evidence the following statement of the
case is made. Mr. Robert Halstead,
proprietor of Waialua plantation, held
certain of his lands to the sea. By the
action of the waves a considerable area
known in law as "accretion" or
was added to the territory. The
proprietor had the fences extended to
meet the ocean. Mr. James Gav. neigh
bor of the gentleman above-named, had
occasion to transport some freight from
the beach beyond Mr. Halstead's property.
It was a long way around to the
gates leading to the landing, and Mr.
Gay, without asking permission of the
presumptive owner of the alluvion, lowered
the fence rails and took his freight
home by the short cut. Mr. Halstead
demurred to the liberty thus taken and,
failing to get satisfaction, employed Mr.
Castle as attorney to sue for $200 damages.
Mr. Gay defended against the ac
tion, employing Mr. Hartwell as attorney.
Counsel for defendant stated at
the trial that the amount of damages was
nmV nnminnl TTn fnr
rnent upon tho matter of right, which
would be accepted without pecuniary
damages. To make the case perfectly
clear categorical questions were drawn
up by counsel and answered by the par-
ties.
j ustice u.iy ton gave judgment lor
plaintiff m the sum of one dollar and
costs. An appeal was thereuon noted
to the Supreme Court, which, if prosecuted
by the defendant, will lead to a
final eettlementof the question involved.
This will be valuable as a precedent in
the absence of legislation defining alluvial
rights specifically. In one or more
of tho Australian Colonies land is only
sold to a line within a certain distance of
the actual sea front, the Government reserving
the entire coast for navigation
facilities and improvements.
AMERICAN SEAM12N.
AVhere an American Citizen Is Not Entitled
to ltellef An Important Decision.
Judge Durham, First Comptroller of
the Treasury Department, Washington,
on Dec. 12th rendered an important de
cision on the term "American seaman"
by rejecting the claim of tho United
States Consul at Smyrna for $72.18, expended
by him as relief for men claiming
to be American seamen.
as related by the Consul, are that
in November, 18S7, three Americans,
Win. Platter, Wm. Anderson and Samuel
Alleyne, shipped at New York on the
bark Jung Frau, flying the Greek flag
iuin uiiuui registry, ior a voyage
to Port Said, Egypt. The seamen were
put off the vessel on the Island of Chios
in the Turkish Archipelago. They applied
to the Consul and obtained relief
as American seamen. Judge Durham in
his decision holds that although they
may be American citizens, yet when
they shipped under a foreign flag, they
lost tho right to the claim of American
seamen, as they must be judged by the
flag under which they sailed. He, therefore,
rejects the claim of the Consul, but
commends him for his charity and re
commends that he apply to Congress for
relief.
A SENSATION.
A Sermon that Astonished the
Canadian Annexationists.
A sensation has been created among
the French Catholic advocates of annexation
in Montreal bv a sermon delivered
on a recent Sunday by the Rev. Abbe
Housselot at the aristocratic church of
St. James of which he is the cure. Abbe
Rousselot selected as his subject the system
of education in the schools of the
Province. Ho exhorted tho French
Canadians to repel the idea being putr
forth by the enemies of the church of annexation
to the United States. "It
would be much better," said he, "to live
with our present system of Government,
with a confederation of the Provinces. If
we should be so foolish as to annex our
selves to the Republic across the border
with its free thinkers, heretics and laxity
of religious morals, the mixed schools
which there predominate would in a
short time become part of our system of
schooling. The danger that would result
to Catholics from this mixing of morals
and religion can hardly be estimated."
Interregnum on the Police .Bench.
Counsel, defendants and civil suitors
were ready for business in the Police
Court room on Friday morning, but no
magistrate appeared to hold the scales
of justice. The lawyers waited and
laughed to each other over the evident
"deadlock in the peace judiciary. After
an hour's suspense Deputy Marshal-Hopkins
announced that the Court
would not sit that day. The two years'
term of Justice Dayton had, it appears,
expired. One of the Ministers (Mr.
Thurston) had not returned from the
other islands. The Chancellor of the
Kingdom, who signs the commission,
was, moreover, out of town. A good
deal of inconvenience was caused by the
hiatus, not only to parties to cases already
in Court, but to persons desiring
to have important writs signed by the
1'olice Justice.
The Cricket Match.
The cricket match between H. B. 31.
ships Hyacinth and Cormorant teams on
24th ult. was well contested throughout.
It lasted four hours and resulted in a victory
for Ihe Hyacinth, by 117 runs to 92.
Captain Nichols of the Cormorant made
the best score, namely, 4? runs.
1WHOLE No. 1251.
FATAL ACCIDENT.
Melancholy Death of Iter. TV,
D. Oleson's Kldcst Son on Christmas
Day.
A terrible bereavement suddenly fell
upon the household of Rev. W. B. Ole-son,
Principal of Kamehameha School
for Boys, on Tuesday. Charles, the
eldest son, a lad of 12 -years, met with
an accident on the premises in the forenoon
which resulted in death in the
afternoon.
The bright little feHow had gone over
to the Preparatory School In the
wish his youug Hawaiian friends
Merry Christmas and distribute presents
to them. Starting to return home, nobody
saw how it happened, he went
through a window. The broken glas3
cut him below the knee, severing tho artery,
and in the few minutes elapsing before
he was discovered he had lost much
of the vital fluid. Dr. McGrew being
hastily summoned was at the house in
half an hour, but the loss of blood before
its flow was stanched proved to have
been too great for the unfortunate child
to rally from. He died at half-past 5
o'clock.
The very esteemed couple and their
young family will have the most heartfelt
sympathy of the community in their
exceedingly sad. bereavement.
i'uncral of Charles Oleson.
The late Charles Oleson, son of the
Principal of Kamehameha School, was
buried from that institution yesterday afternoon.
A large concourse attended the
funeral, including many of tho lamented
boy's mates in day and Sunday school.
Rev. Dr. Beckwith conducted the service,
assisted by Rev. W. C. Merritt,-Principal
of Oahu College. The former delivered
a sympathetic address, voicing the
community's condolence with the afflicted
parents, in the sudden taking off
by accident of their promising son.
Tho exercises were opened with an anthem
beautifully sung bv the pupils under
the leadership of Hon. H. S.
Townsend, a member of the faculty.
Floral offerings were exceedingly beautiful
and in number. Pupils of the
school lined the driveway in front of the
house, the hearse passing between the
ranks as the procession started. Older
pupils of the institution were the pallbearers.
There were 35 carriages in line
on the sad march to Nuuanu Cemetery.
I'KAUS OF A l'KST.
Ituuiored Introduction or Mongoose on
this Island.
" "A'gentletnan expressed to the
rejiorter grave apprehensions regarding
a reported intention of introducing
the mongoose on a plantation of this
island for the purpose of clearing off
rats. He would like to know whether
tho planter in question was taking into
account the responsibility incurred in
letting the rapacious little animals loose.
Whenever they got the rats out of the
way they would begin upon tho market
poultry ranches abounding near the
plantations, thus menacing an important
department of the city's food supply.
They would also multiply all over the
country, threatening tho extinction of the
few species of our wild game, such as
the pheasant and the teal duck. As the
mongoose does not devour its prey but
subsists by bloodsucking, it makes rapid
execution of poultry and small game.
The matter is of sufficient importance to
elicit a general expression of opinion
through the pajers.
Educational.
At meetings of tbe Board of Education
held during the past week, the following
assignments of teachers' places
were made :
Mrs. Katie West to an assistant's
place in Fort Street School; Miss Lillie
B. Low to principal's place, Hakalau;
Mr. O. P. Paine to an assistant's place,
Waihee ; Miss Mary Brown to an assistant's
place, Ulupalakua; Mr. II. D.
Wishard to 1st assistant's place, Lihue
(English) ; Mr. L. E. Imlay to a principal's
place, Kekaha (English); Mr. W.
Muller to 1st assistant's place, Kekaha
(English) ; Miag K. Lindsay to 2d assis
tant's place, Wairaea (English); Miss
Sophronia Lewis to principal's place,
Paauilo (English). Mrs. West, Miss
Low, Mr. Imlay and Mr. W. Muller have
quite recently arrived.
Mrs. M. E. Ross resigns from Paauilo
on account of changing location. Miss
Sorenson resigns from Wairaea, Kauai,
to act nearer home. Miss Hines leaves
Lihue shortly for a protracted absence
abroad.
Presiding Justices for 1880.
The following assignments for 1889 are
posted in the Supreme Court office:
January term, Honolulu, Justice Bicker-ton;
February term, Kauai, Justice Mc-Cully;
April term, Honolulu, Justice
Dole; May 'term, Kilo, Chief Justice
Judd ; June term, Wailuku, Justice Mc-Cully;July
term, Honolulu, Chief Justice
Judd; August term, Kauai, Justice
Dole; September term, Kau. Justice
Bickerton ; October term, HonolulUj Justice
McCully ; November term, Waimea,
Justice Dole ; December term, Lahainar
Justice Bickerton.
incited Chicago.
The Chicago Times publishes a long:
article giving results of its investigation
of child murder in the city. It S3V9r
" Horrible crimes are being perpetrated-here
daily, and bo Coroner's isaefets awe-held.
The victims are so qwetly deposed
of that Hot a ripple is caaaed m Unsocial
stream. Proaisent iJiysidawi.
and well known nidwives are eagaed
to commit HMirders, d cowrait them,
without compunction of coseciencs."

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