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The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, January 01, 1889, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1889-01-01/ed-1/seq-3/

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77
CORRESPONDENCE.
Wo not hold ourselves responsible for&e
statements made, or opinions expressed by dur
correspondents.
Koliala KoimI.
Kditoh : The people of this Hs-
are rejoicing as never before, in ex-
lent roaife.
From Mahukona on eastward, to the
Hamakuajine, our highways have been
or are being put into very superior order.
jr If these are Keform roads, as doubtless
theyjare, then commend us to this tort
of practical reform all our days.' The
more, the better.
The district is largely indebted to Mr.
H.J?. Wood, the indefatigable head of
our road commission, as well agio his
fellow-commissioners, for their new
source of for their sen ices
are without pecuniary remuneration.
Mr. Wood particularly, as the execuive
of the Road Board has been called to bestow
a large amount of personal
upon this public service, affording
us thereby gratifying evidence that the
class of public spirited citizens lias not
yet fully passed away from among uf.
If all other districts are as highly
in this matter of roads as we ire,
there -will be cause for iieneral iubilaton ;
and the islands will justly be entitlel to
the credit of a substantial civilizatioi as
attested by its suix?rior highways.
CrnzEf.
.English Schools for Hawaiian A lt)ily
to Mr. Knudsen.
" Mit. Editok : In your issue of the L'Oth
inst. appears a communication fron. Mr.
Knudsen, entitled, " Whither is the Hawaiian
Youth Diifting?" which engages,
or ought to engage the attention of very
thinking man or woman, whether r not
employed in educational work. Tie article
in question is creditable tc Mr.
Knudsen as a man and as an inteligent
resident of Hawaii, although I beg leave
to differ from him in some of hs premises
and conclusions.
At the very beginning, he introduces
an analogy between this countrv and
"Germany, which is, unfortunate', not
apropos. The language of Gemany is
German. Her commerce, industry, law,
schools, universities are all in
the German tongue. Moreover German'
has a language, not only perfected
by centuries of use, but in which i found
a body of literature upon all
concerning man, not excelled, nay 'jardly
equalled by any other nation, either ancient
or modern.
Kow, no one knows better than Mr.
Knudsen that the business of this country,
except, perhaps, taro raising and
bullock driving, is carried on in English.
There is neither business nor literature
in Hawaiian. I submit, then, that the
comparison is inapplicable.
Mr. Knudsen says: "A native Hawaiian
child comes for the Drst time to school.
Nature has already gifted it with wonderful
acquirements. It has taught the
child a language by which it can easily
comprehend what it is told." This is
questionable. It is about as probable
that nature " gifted" the Hawaiian child
with a language, as it is that the same
power taught it how to make poi, or the
New England child to make pumpkin
pies. The Hawaiian child learns its language,
in the fust place, like even other
child, from its parents and associates. I
own this to be a natural method and one
too often ignored by unintelligent teachers
in teaching English to Hawaiian
children.
This same method, conscientiously and
intelligently carried out from the s th to
the fifteenth year of the child's school
life, will " gift " it witfi just as goo! command
of the English tongue, and t len it
will have a "highway" as much superior
to its native one, for intellectual an.bling,
as Nuuanu street is superior to . Jlilo
gulch.
No doubt, there is some trutli iii the
statement that the Hawaiian chill loses
something in the change from its native
tongue to English. Mr. Knudsci is a
gentleman of far too great intelligence
and too' much experience in the world
not to know that in all change, be physical,
moral, or intellectual, there ii loss.
I am told and I fully believe it that
many of the best traits of the old Hawaiian
have suffered a decadence in
their effort io change to a higher plane
a niguer civilization; yei who ivouiu
denv that the gain has been greater than
the loss?
In all chanties for the better all
igher development there is what the
naturalists would call retrograde metamorphosis."'
We must expect that in so
great a change as the substitution ot one
language for another, some of this
" sloughing off" would earn- something
good with much that is bad." I
If to be possessed of a wrong language
can be likened to a disease, it is a
9 treatment will be of any avail. SciWiOg
t i untivft shnn1 fnrl tVo
first three or four years of their sclirijl
life, and then changing them to
bcuuois is, J. ucnetc, icauuuaiuiu isr
much of whicl
ii Jrr.
Knudsen complains. It a waste m
time to send a Hawaiian child into ah
English school, .after having
or four years in a native fechooITlyk
has been, unfortunately, too genera lithe
case hitherto. The Board of Ediii
no doubt, has its shorteotninjv ;
but the attempt it seems to be
to get all Hawaiian children into t ie
English schools at the early age of ,r
years, is certainly not one of them. If
an average Hawaiian child beginning
English at the age of six and purguin it
five hours a day for eight yearsls unable
to acquire sufficient English for all
practical purposes, then it is high time
to let the native language "die out anyhow,"
and the race with it.
M. M. Scott
Chinee Christmas Festival, -
Wednesday evening the Chinese Sunday
School conducted by Rev. H. II.
Gowen of St. Andrew's Cathedral held
its Christmas festival in the school-room.
The scholars mustered in full force, and
there were many interested spectators.
Bishop Willis took part in the religious
exercises, delivering a brief address.
Singing hymns in Chinese and a magic
lantern exhibition of scriptural scenes
were parts of the programme. There
Tras a large Christmas tree brilliantly illuminated,
from which a choice lot of
'gifts was distributed among the children.
Everybody was happy, the givers as well
as the receivers of the entertainment.
..
THE JAPANESE CHRISTMAS.
Delightful Festival of Japanese Sumlar
School at Queen Emma Hall.
A beautiful Christmas entertainment
was given the Japanese Sunday School
in Queen Emma hall on Tuesday night.
The room was trimmed and decorated
with the most delicate ferns and
greenery. Outside, the front of the
building was adorned with evergreens
dotted with Chinese oranges, making a
rare composition of esthetic loveliness.
Some of the interior decorations were
artistic to a degree, such as a cross of
roses above the pulpit, a crown and
other floral emblems of these people's
new profession. Everything was in
such thorough good taste as to suggest
elegance and refinement. This
was the first occasion upon which
the Japanese" Christians here celebrated
Christmas, and peoples who have
been nurtured m the observance of the
day might learn a great deal from the
manner in which "this young flock acquitted
themselves.
Mr. Taro Ando, Japanese
as Superintendent of the School,
presided. He delivered a brief address,
as did Kev. Dr. Hydo, who also offered
the opening prayer. Short speeches
were made in English, Hawaiian and
Japanese. For the rest the exercises
were chiefly singing, part of the
"Immanuel"- cantata being the main
performance. This portion being over,
a real Japanese Santa Claus, excellently
made up, walked in followed by a
harlequin, gay in paint and tinsel. The
latter character distributed the gifts as
they were allotted by numbers which
had previously been passed round on a
tray to everyone. There were all sorts
of "desirable presents, useful as well as
for play or ornament. When all had
thus been made happy and merry, they
were invited into an adjoining room,
where tables were spread with inviting
refreshments. There was a large audience
present, mostly composed of the
Japanese parents and friends.
Deepening the St. larencc.
A very interesting and important commercial
event was the celebration last
week of the successful completion of the
great work of deepening the channel of
the St. Lawrence river from Montreal to
Quebec. This work was first agitated
over sixty years ago and was begun in
1S44, and the result is that where there
was formerly only eleven feet of water
there is now twenty-seven and a half feet,
and large ocean steamers can at present
sail triumphantly into their docks at
Montreal, COO miles from the mouth of the
St. Lawrence, without let or hindrance.
There arc now no less than twenty-two
lines of ocean steamers that sail to and
from Montreal, and the deepening of the
river will be a gieat thing for the commerce
of that port. Engineers say that
the commerce of a port increases according
to the cube of the increase in the
depth of the channel, and statistics show
this law of increase has been fulfilled at
Montreal as the channel has been gradually
deepened, and there is no reason
fo doubt that the completion of the deepening
will still further increase the commerce
of the port.
Some idea of the magnitude of the
work which has been done can be
gained from the fact that in Lake St.
Peter no less than 8,000,000 cubic yards
of clay were removed, an amount of ex
cavating equal to wnat was uone in
building 800 miles of the Canadian Pacific
Railway. In some places solid rock
has been" scooped out" to a depth of
several feet, and altogether it was quite
fitting that the engineers in charge, and
the Montreal, Provincial, and Dominion
Governments should rejoice together
over what has been accomplished. Engineers
gineers everywhere have followed the
pjAfreaS of the who!
JRwith much int
Herschel of Holvoke,
holesale channel
terest, and Ulemens
the well-known
engineer of the Holvoke Water Power
Company, was present at the celebration
as the guest of the engineers Who have
had charge of the work. Montreal now
has a population of 250,000, and with a
deepwater outlet on the one side, and
the Canadian Pacific Railway on the
other, she looks hopefully and complacently
out into the future, and pictures
for herself many times her present population
and commerce. Springfield,
(jJIass.) Union.
The Sunday MoVemeitt in the States.
The First National Sabbath School
Convention, under the auspices of the
American Sabbath Union recently organized,
was held in Washington, Dec. 11th.
Colonel'Elliott P. Shephard of the New
York Mail and Express presided. Petitions
to Congress from every part of the
country were presented, urging the passage
of the bill which was introduced
last session and known as the ' Sunday
Rest" bill. Thcv ' contained approximately
G.OOO.OOO names. Mrs. J. C.
Baleham of Painesville, Oliio, reviewed
the history of the movement in the
society. Six million Protestants, 7,000,-000
Catholics and nearly a quarter of a
million members of labor organizations,
she said, had united in an earnest appeal
to Congress for the enforcement of
the Sabbath laws that Sabbath desecration
might be checked.
General A. S. Dived of Elmira, N. Y.,
took the twsition that Sunday railroad
, trains were not justified fiom any jwint
of view.
Rev. W. F. Crafts of New York read
extracts from letters from' Chief Arthur
of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers
indorsing the movement.
PJanters' Monthly.
FOLLOWING IS THE TABLE OF COS-tents
THE
of the number for December:
Notes and Comments.
Close of Volume Seven.
WatsonTille Beet Sugar Enterprise.
Progress of the Sugar Industry In the Hawaiian
Islands.
Young's Superheater Apparatus.
Darkened Sugars.
Report of Committee on Fertilizers.
Coffee CaltiTafion A. Proposition from a
Coffee Planter.
Steam Boilers.
Delivery of Sugar Cane by Carts and by Cars.
Fecundation of Plants.
Sugar House Chemistry.
1ST Subscriptions received by the HAWAIIAN
GAZETTE CO. and the News Agents. Price $2.50
year; foreign subscribers SJ.O0.
HAWAIIAN GAZETTE, TUESDAY, JANUARY 1, 18S9.
p
tduerfisrnicnis.
ASK IFOIR
And sse that each Jar hears Baron Liebig'a Signature
in Bine Ink across the Label.
FINEST AND CHEAPEST
STOCK FOR SOUPS,
HADE DISHES AND SAUCES.
Invaluable for India aa
an Efficient Tonic in all
To b had of all Storkeeprs and Dsaleri throaghont India. "a3 JL ,f Ii
, - ... , Keeps pood in the hottest
Cookery Books Post Free on Application to the Climates, and for any
Company. length of time.
LIEBIG'S EXTRACT OF MEAT Co.! Limited, Fenchnrcb Avenue, London, Englani
HE mm ROABSTES BICYCLE!
WE STILL HOLD OUR OWKT.
Moderate Prices, Good Quality, Hill Climbing, Safety, Speed,
are features of merit which are sure to lead.
RECORDS FOR 1888.
L. A. W. meet at Baltimore,
Canada, professional track record,
Md., three victories. Woodstock,'
May 24. Binghampton, N. Y., one
mile safety, and one mile team race. Toronto, Canada, three mile road
wheel, and one mile safety race. Rochester, Is. Y., one mile, open to
all, track record, 2.44J; three mile handicap; five mile, open to all, last
quarter in 80 seconds best on record; half mile dash, open to all, 1.15
best competition half mile on record; also, two mile, 6.45 class.
J. 11. AVkld, of Medina, writes:
"In a club of twenty 18 ride Springfield Roadsters, and still, we
want more."
HEMEMBER OUR HILL CLIMBING RECORDS.
Eagle Rock, New Jersey, 12 times without a dismount. Corey Hill,
Boston, 10 times without a dismount. Stickney Hill, Lynn, Mass., one
time and return.
SHURMAN AT IT ACA3H.
The members of the Lynn Cjcle Club took n trip down to Portland. The party comprised
J. II. Yonnc, J. H. Shurmr.u, A. 11. Cc.rsley, E. G. llorfiholtz, J. F. Allen, J. F. Dow, J.
H.Littlefielu, A. W. Lewis mid A. Wiswell. On their nrrival in Portland, and after ft Rood
brcaKfast at the Preble lloase, the Portland Wheel Club took the visitors in hand for a
ran to Fronts Keck, n distance of some fourteen miles. On tho way out the party passed
Spnrwick Hill, an eminence that has never been climbed by a cyclist. To the surprise, of
the Down Easters, Shurman announced that he would ride np the hill if any one of the
Portland men would ride 'down. This was very promptly agreed to, as tho local men
thought the hill unrideable. Some of the men rode down tie hill, as also did Shurman,
and then on arriving at the bottom Shurman turned round and rode to the top,
to the amazement of those who had never seou Shurman ride. This as on Sunday,
and the achievement of the Lynn man made the locals anxious to see what the visitor
could do with the Park Street Hill, a terror to Portland wheelmen, and one that has
never been climbed more twice in succession. So on Monday the party repaired to
the hill, and after Cirsley, Alien and Lutltfield had climbed it once and cried enough,
Shurman went at it and went up and down six without a dismount. To say that
the Portland men were dnmfounded is putting it mildly. Shurman rode his. Springfield
lioadster. Will some Portland reader kindly give ns the grade3 of the Spnrwick and
Park Street Hills, and oblige? Ed. Bicycle Would.
We give you the facts. Draw your own inference. But remember
our prices are moderate, our goods warranted agaiiibt defective material
and workmanship for one-year; absolutely safe against headers, speedy
and a good all around road wheel. CATALOGUE FREE.
SPRINGFIELD BICYCLE MANUFACTURING CO. 9 Cornhill, Boston, Mass.
FOR SALE BY
PACIFIC HARDWARE CO., Ld
SOLE AGEVl'S FOR HAWAIIAN ISLANDS
IMITATION GIN:
1247-lm d-lm
It having come to our notice, that-an inferior
quality of Gin, purporting to be J. J. Melcheks'
" Elephant " Brand, is being offered for sale in
this market, we have to
tlie Public
That we are the Sole Agents in the Hawaiian .
ands, for the said Brand, and that EyEBV genuine' -bottle
bears our " Sole Agency " label.
a".
W. G. PEACOCK & Co.,
Sole Agents for J. J. Melchers'
Schiedam, V. Z.
91
BIHACH ! BUMACH !
The Only Genuine California Buhach is For Sale at
BENSON, SMITH & 00. 'S
Who are the SOLE AGENTS and ASSIGNEES of the
BUHACH PEODUCINGr OOLUPMY
-:o:-
OF
STOt'KTOX,
CI LA.
Furchasere are CAUTIONED aramst an INFERIOR POWDER put
up in similar style and labeled California Buhach.
O
CERTIFICATE OF REGISTRATION OF TRADE MARK from the
Interior Department, and Assignment of Sale and EXCLUSIVE RIGHT to use
the name and trade mark liuliacn in tne Hawaiian lsianua, irom tne tJunacn
Producing and Manufacturing Co., of Stockton, California, to Benson. Smith &
Co., may be seen on application. BEWARE OF IMITATIONS.
-:o:
BENSM, SMITH & COMPANY,
SOLE AGENTS AND ASSIGNEES.
jforciqu StfiwrttKHunts.
WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO.,
Shipping & Connissisn Merchants,
318 California Street. San Frsnclfco. 11(0
W. H. CHOSSMAH & BEO ,
COMMSSION MERCHANTS
77 niKi 79 Jlroml street, Xew Yorli.
Rtftrence Castle ii Cool
house.
tuio. n. DAVIBS.
in
, and J. T. Water-
laxily
HAROLD JAXXOX.
THEO. H. DAVIES & CO.,
Commission Merchants,
12 &. 13 Xko Albanv,
LIVERrOOL. llWly
Only "Pebble" Establishment.
Muller's Optical Depot,
133 Montgomery St., near Bush, S. t. Cat.
"Specialty 35
Th, most- complicated catcs of defective
vision thoroughly diasnoscd FREE OF
CHARGE. Orders by mall or eipress promptly
attended to.
ESComponnd Astigmatic Lenses Mounted to
order at two hours' notice. 11US 1 v
DR. J. COLLIS. BROWNE'S
CHLORODYSTE.
TI1E ORIGINAL and OLY GENUINE.
Advice to Invalids. If you wish to obtain
quiet refreshing sleep, free from headache, relief
from pain and anguish, to calm and assuage
the weary achlngs ot protracted disease, invigorate
the nervous media, and igulate the
circulating systems of the body, you will provide
yourself with that marvellous remedy discovered
by Br. J. Collis Brownie (late Army
Medical btaff). to which he gave the name ot
CIILORODYNE, aud which is admitted by the
profession to be the most wonderful and valuable
remedy ever discovered.
CIILORODYNE is the best remedy Vnown for
Coughs. Consumption, Bronchitis. Asthma.
CIILORODYNE acts like a charm in
and is the only specific in Cholera and
Dysentery.
CIILORODYNE effectually cuts ehort all attacks
of Epilepsy, Hysteria, Palpitation, and
Spasms.
CIILORODYNE
is the only palliative in Neu-
ralgia Rhcnmatism, Goat,
Meningitis, &.C.
Cancer, Toothache
From Symes &. Co., Pharmaceutical Chem
ists. Medical Hall. Simla. Jann.irv 5 1RSI). t.
J. T. Davenport, Esq.. 33. Great Russell Street.
liloomsbury, London. Dear Sir. We embrace
this opportunity of congratulating you upon the
wide-spread reputation this justly esteemed
medicine, Dr. J. Collis Bromie'a Chlorodyne
has cameo, for Itself, not only in HIndostau,
but all oer the East. Asa remedy for general
utility, we must question whether a better Is
Imported into the eonntry, and w c shall be glad
tp hear of its rinding a place in every
home. Tho other branus, we are sorry
to say, relegated to the native bazaars,
and, jndging from their sale, we fancy their
sojourn there will bo but evanescent. We
could multiply instances ad lrflnitum of the extraordinary
efficacy of Dr. Collis Browne's
in Diarrhoea and Dysentery, Spasms
Cramps, Neuralgia, thoVomitlng of Pregnancy,
and as a general sedative, that have, occmed
unacr our personal observation during many
years. In Choleraic Diarrhoea, and even In the
more terrible forms of Cholera itself, we have
witnessed Us surprisingly controllin" power
We have never used any other form of this
medicine than Collis Browne's from a firm
Conviction that It is decldelythebcst.andalso
from a sense or duty we ove to the profession
and the jmblic, as we are ol opinion that the
substitution of any other than Collis Browne's
Is a DELIBERATE UltEACU or FAITIt ON THE TAUT
OP THE CHEMIST TO rHESCBIEKK AND PATIENT
alike. We are. Sir, faithfully yours, Symes &
Co., Members of tho Pharm. Society of Great
Britian. JIIs Excellency the Viceroy's Chemists.
CAUTION. Sir W. Puc
Wood stated that Dr. J. Collis Browne was,
undoubtedly, the Inventor of Chlorodyner that
the story of the defendant Freeman was deliberately
untrue, which, he regretted to say,
had been sworn to. Scc"The Times,' Jnly 13
186-1.
Sold In bottles at Is. lHd., 2s. 9d., 4s. 6d.,
and lis. each. Xone is gennine without the
words "Dr. J. ColKs Browne's Chlorodyne "on
the Government stamp. Overwhelming niedi
cal testimony accompanies each bottle.
Caution. Beware of Piracy and Imitations.
Sole Manufacture J. T. DAVENPORT. 33
Great Russell Street. Bloomsbnry. London.
11!)9 6m
JX'ctu fttiDcrtiscnicnts.
FRANK GERTZ,
Importer pi Dealer in
-AND
-
Doscrlotiom of
AXD YOUTHS' FINE
ALL-
Ladies', Misses', Gents'
BOOTS AND SHOES
OF THE BEST AND LATEST MAKE,
lias removed to the
above centrally located
premises. lately occupied by Mrs. Wilkinson,
where he has ju9t received an Invoice of New
Goods in his line, ox S. S. MARIPOSA. maUnir
I his Stock one of the most complete and varied
iu uc lonnu in Jiunoiuiu.
These Fine Goods Vrill be sold at prices to
suit tho times. All those desiring first class
and serviceable articles in the Boot and Shoe
line will do well to give him a call.
tST No trouble to show Goods. 1138 3m
GEO. LUCAS,
Contractor and Builder
ot
;m
Honolulu Steam Planing Mills
Esplanade, Honolulu, H. I.
Manufactures all kndi of
Mouldings, Brackets,
Window Frames,
Blinds. Sashes, Doors
And all kinds of Woodwork Fimlela.
Taroinz, Scroll and Band Sawing. All kinds
of Planing and Sawing, Morticing and
ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTFNDED TO
and Work Guaranteed.
3 Orders f roa tke ether Islands sellclted.
HonolBla.1fayS,19W. lyj911 J
5Tnu 2tttxrtteniHf.
C. BREWER & CO.,
OFFERS FOR SALE!
-TO
AP.niVK TER-
MARTHA DAVIS
NOW NEARLY DUE!
White Oak, Yellow Oak
Eastern Ash,
Western Ash,
Hubs, Spokes,
Forces, Bar Irom,
KEROSENE OIL, 150
Kerosene Oil, 1300 ,
Spirits of Turpentine,
Matches, R. R. Barrows.
Charcoal Irons,
Ox Bows, Grindstones
HORSE SHOES!
Horse Shoe Sails.
Farmers' Boilers,
Oakum, Cut A'ails,
Store Trucks,
C4R OOE RISS
Cases Jn'-Gal. Gherkins,
Cases Clam Chowder,
Cases Fish Chowder,
Cases Tomato Ketchup,
Cases Clams Cr. Mackerel,
Tar, Pitch,
LIGHT EAKD CARTS !
Cotton Duck,
Common Wood Scat Chairs,
Gunny Uags,
It uubcr Hose,
Flax I'acklnj,
Canned Lobsters
C. BREWER & CO.
QUEEN STREET.
1238 3m
IMPORTANT TO
STAMP COLLECTORS!
T HAVE TO THANK THK
X LATE LISTS of Hawaii for tbe liberal appreciation
which my lato advertisement has
received. It is safe to say that hundreds of
thousands of Hawaiian Stamps have been sent
away without receiving more than hall their
value in return, and what s far worse, every col
lector sets a qnanlity of useless duplicate. Br
he so successfully worked
the plan which I
up. evenone cets only mien stamps as be needs.
anu besides, he sets lull value for each end ererr
kind (If Hawaiian Stamp. The prices which I
allow are better than those of AN YEl'ItOPEAS
DEALER, and are higher than most American
Stamp Dealers pay.
I. receive frefh ilioets of stamps by every
steamer, and will send tbcui on request to any
address. The prices for thcie stamps are a low
as those of the largest dealers. Hawaiian Stamps
art) rood for exchange, and it should be to the
mutu.il Interest of all our Philatelic friends to
assist me in ray efforts lo aakc every hundred
stamps brins only what will add to collections,
and not a host of worthless duplicates.
In less than nine months I hare an nlbam ot
nearly Four Thousand specimens
myself to the above plan.
W.F. REYNOLDS
No. 8. Union Street-
a few Numerals at fairrates.m
BY TAKING
Ayer's Pills you will relievo tho system
ol those germs of disease which surely,
though olten slowly, undermine health.
As a cathartic, they are unexcelled.
They are gentle yet searching, healthfully
stimulating both the secretory and
excretory organ. They are composed
of vegetable ingredient' only, and are,
therefore, free from the objectionable
qralities found in other Pills
Ayer's Pills
are sugar-coated, and agrecablo to tho
eye and taste. By apportioning the doso
in accordance with the directions accompanying
each package, these Pills
may bo administered with Perfect
Safety to patients of all ages. As an
after-dinner I'ill. taken to assist tho
process of digestion, they arc of great
benefit, and ai such arc largely used
throughout Europe, Amcrira, and all
tbe countries of the civilized world. For
Cinstipation er Casiiveness,
Indigestion, Dyspepsia, Biliousness,
Headache, Foul Stomach, Loss V AP
petite, Disorders of the Liver, and Kid-Hey
CoaaplaiBts, Ayer's Pills am ia valuable,
aad should be at band with every
family fee uw in emergency.
TBZPXHZB XT
If, 1 1 AYEI I M., Law), Nut, It 4.
BM tar DniigM awl MeJitet Te.
H0LLISTEB
x
3
CO., 1M Fwt St.
.Mt3U.

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