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The Hawaiian gazette. [volume] (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, March 17, 1891, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1891-03-17/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL XXVL No 11 i
Hawaiian Gazette
PTBLISHED BY
HAWAIIAN GAZETTE CO Limiied
Every Tuesday Morning
Ai FIVE DOLLARS PER ANNUM
PAYABLE IX ADVAXCE
KorelsaStthscrlIiersS600 In Advauccj
Winch Includes postages prepaid
H M WHITNEY Business Manager
Office No 46 Merchant Street
RATES OF ADVERTISING
afauored In
SoapreU
In
1 in
2 in
3 in
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5 in
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i Coi
Iff
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9 03
1500
1750
lJW
3wlm 2m 3ml Om
1 DO 2 00
3 001 4 00
500 600
GOO1 750
7 501 9 00
mnn ta rtfV
iuwavu
120014OUI
ISOO2200
i22003003i
25003200
300 400
50Ql 600
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12 00 15 00
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3000 4000
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5000
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csrCorrespondencc intended for pnbHcaUon
of the Hawa
theEditor
should be addressed to
iian Gazette Post Office BorO
Correspondence relatlnr to
nbcrintions and Job Printinc should
te iedw the ilanaccr of the Hawaiian
Gazette Post Office Box O
sarBnness Cards and all quarterly or yearly
adzance or on
adTwtUemeBti are payable in
repientatlon of the bill
N B Ml foreiun advertisements must bcac -no
companied with the pay when ordered
notice will be taken of them The rates pi
in the above scale and remit
narr es are ziven
ancPs for European or American advertise
tatnU r ascriptions may be made by postal
order
THE
Daily Pacific Commercial Advertiser
Coll
bt the IUwaiiax Gazetib
la published
and delivered
ar t its Office in Merchant Street
livered by Carriers in the City at
Six Dollars S6O0 For Annum
Oaty and Weekly to one address
DllyHHEE7StOSdannnm
xar Address all Commnnications
HAWAIIAN GAZETTE COMPACT
No 46 Merchant Street
gmstoteS SayflS
PROFESSIONAL
CHARGES li CARTER
3ttornoy - Xio
1S0I o 24 Merchant Street y
A ROSA
Attornoy - mm xtr
So 15 Kaaucmash Street
1301 Honoluln II I 5L
- C PARKE
Attorney at Xaavcr
And Agent to take Acknowledgments
OFFICE 13 Kaaucsiako Stkee
1341 Honolnln II I 3
R CASTIE
And Notary Public Attends all the Courts of
1801 the Kingdom V
J ALFRED KEAGOON
Attorney and Counselor At Law
OFFICE 42 Merchant Street
1315
Honolulu II I
THOMAS W HOBRON
Notary E i3toXcT
Office with W O Smith GC Fort street
163 lW 1301 y
UEC11 BBOffS
VTT0RNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW
NOTARY PUBLIC
And Agent for Acknowledgments of
netraments for the Island of Oahu
Jam Jbcll Block Merchant Street Honolulu
rwi I
LORRIN A THURSTON
Attorney atpLsarsr
HONOLULU II I
Cos Bask
Office oveo Bisuor
fl333 lyl
JOHtl K IATl
VOTARY PUBLIC and COMMISSIONER
of DEEDS
For the States of California and New York
ffice at the Bank of Bishop Co Honolulu
1301
J H WHITNEY M D D- D- S
-Dental Rooms on Fort Street
in Brewers Block corncrHotel and Fort
1301 y streets Entrance Hotel street
WILLIAM 0 SMITH
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
65 Fort Street
13J4 y
Honolulu
E GHITCHCOCK
Attorney and Counsellor at Law
Office at HILO HAWAII
N B Bills PnostPTLT Couected -a
li9iy
WILUAM C ACHI
Attorney and Counsellor at Law and
Eeal Estate Broker
ATTSSD3 ALL THE CoUBTS 07 THE KlXGDOX
OFFICE No 36 Merchant Street
1319 Honolulu n I ly
NELYLIE M LOWRET
Tffotary -
OFFICE with W R Castle opposite
1311 Post Office iy
JOIOT WATERHOUSE
IMPORTER AND DEALER IN GENERAL
MERCHANDISE
12C1 Queen Sitreet Honolulu H I y
Business cirus
MISCELLANEOUS
BISHOP COMPANY
E ST ABXiISHCBD HAT 1858
BANKERS
IIOXOItIiU HAWA1UK IS1AKD
DRAW EXCHANGE ON
THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO
ASD THEIB AGENTS IN
Sew York Boston Paris
MESSRS H M ROTHSCHILD SONS LONDON
Commercial Banking Co of Sydney
London
The Commercial Banking Co of Sydney
Sydney The Bank of Nev Zealand Auckland
and its Branches in Christchnrch D jnedln and
WelMnRton
The Bank of British Columbia Portland
Oreaon
The Azores and Madeira Islands
Stockholm Sweden
Th Chartered Bank of London Australia and
Gnina
HonckonR Yokohama Japan Andtransacta
1301 General Banking Business y
J K KAHOOKANO
Attorney and Counsellor at Law
Attends all the Couhts or ihe Kingdom
1273 15 Kaahnmann Street Honolulu Iy
W E RGWEIX
ENGINEER AND SURVEYOR
1343 ROOM 5 SPRECKELS BLOCIC Iy
H L HOLSTEIN
Collections PnoirrrLY Attended to
1S63 KOIIALA HAWAII ly
HAWAIIAN WINE CO
FRANK BROWN Manager
23 and 30 Merchant Street
133My1
HONOLULU TUESDAY MARCH 17 1891
nonoluln II I
H H WILLIAMS CO
Importers Manufacturers Upholsterers
AND DEALEHS IN
FURNITURE OF EVERY DESCRIPTION
Pianos and Musical Instruments
1317 105 FORT STREET ly
LAUSSFBECKELS WM OinWTN
WM a IRWIH 4 CO
Sugar Factors and Commission Agants
1204 Honolulu HI y
II IIACKFELI CO
General Commission Agents
1301
Queen StroelIlonolulu n I y
F A SCDIAEFKK CO
Importers Commission SVlrcs
1301 Honolulu Hawaiian Islands y
M S GRINBAUM CO
uiroKTEns op
Gcnl Mcrchnndiso and Commission
1304 McrcHants Honolulu HI y
M S GRINBAUM CO
Commission Merchants
No 121 California Street San Francisco Cal
1304 y
MRS A M MELLIS
Fashionable Dress and Cloak Maker
1304 No 1 Emma street ly
WILDKR A CO
Corner of Fort and Queen Steets Honolulu
Lumber Paints Oils Nails Salt Building
1304 Materials of every kind- v
Importers of General Merchandise
peom
FHANCE ENGLAND GERMANY AND THE
UNITED STATES
No 58 Queen Street - Honoluln II I
HYMAN BROTHERS
Commission merchants
206 Front Street San Francisco
Particular attention paid to filling and shipping
1S04 Island orders y
PIONEER STEAM
Candy Manufactory and Bakery
DE EC O 3Ei KT
Practical Confectioner Pastry Cook and Baker
1304 71 Hotel St betNuuanu and Fort y
B LEWERS r J LOWKEY C 5 COOKE
1E WEISS te COOKE
Successors to Lewers Dickson
Importers and Dealers in Lumber
And all kinds of Building Materials
1304 FortStreetHonolulu y
G W MACFAREANE CO
Importers and Commission Merchants
Honolnln Hawaiian Islands
AGENTS JOB
Mirrlces Watson Co Scotland Street Iron
Works Glasgow
John Fow lcr Co Leeds Limited Steam Plow
1301 and Locomotive Works Leeds ly
If E JlcISTlKE BRO
Grocery Feed Store and Bakery
Comer pnjt and Fort Streets
1304 Honolulu H I T
EMPIRE HOUSE
J OLDS Proprietor
Corner Nuuanu Avenue and Hotel Streets
Choice Ales Wines and Liquors
1304 li
E S CTJNHA
detail Xixi o IDeolor
UNION SALOON
In rear or the Hawaiian Gazettebuilding
1304 No 23 Merchant Street y
WJt HAEBTENSPBlLOPPEIlOELTHEBMAN FOCKE
Honolnln Honoluln Honolulu
E 1IOFFSCIIJLAEGER CO
King and Bethel Streets
Honolnln H I
Importers and Commission Merchants
y
jBusincss QTarus
MISCELLANEOUS
DEKTTISTIIY
J W WINTER DDS
LATE OF KEARNY ST S F
Is located on the Hawaiian Islands all Dental
operations known in Dentistry Neatly and Skil
fully performed
AT SAN FRANCISCO PRICES
Teeth Inserted without plate or clasp teeth
filled with Dr J W WINTEKS celebrated
7CTXXaHE3 - 3WEETAL
Filline teeth with gold a specialty Teeth inser
ted from one to a fall Set IJecoIIect SAN
FRANCISCO PRICES
DrWinter will be at ICohala March 12 to
April 10 And at Wailuku Lahaiiia Sprcckcls
Yillo from April 12 to May 10 and continue to
Tisit the above Towns twice a vear See Posters
1366 lyr
WM J WRIGHT
HOOKENA SOUTH KONA
Notary JE clToc
Agent to Grant Marriage Licenses
Agent to Acknowledge Labor Contracts
General Easiness Agent
Collector of Debts
Auctioneer 13G2 Gm
OKT3S3XJ
BUTTER
ALWAYS SWEET AND GOOD
J5
f - Vi
In 1 2 ii and 7 lb Tins
S FOSTEH CO
SOLE AGENTS PACIFIC COAST
2G and 23 California Street San Francisco
1309 ly
ANDERSON LUNDY
ARTIFICIAL TEETH JTROM
Ono to jaxx Tl ntiro Sot
Inserted on Gold Silver Alluminuru
and Rubber Bases
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty
To persons wearing Rubber Plates which arc a
constant source of irritation to the mouth and
throat we would recommend our Prophylactic
Metal- Plate AH operations performed in ac
cordance with the latest improvements in
dental science Teeth extracted without pain
by the use of Nitrons Oxide Oas
S Hotel Street Tregloan Premises
ISM ly
Mil W F ALLEN
AN OFFICE WITH MESSES BISHOP
HAS
CO corner of Merchant and Kaahumami
streets and he will be pleased to attend to any
usiness entrusted to him 1221 Cm
HONOLULU IRON WORKS CO
y5j5 Steam Engines SngarMillsBoilers
Coolers Iron Brass and Lead Casting
Machinery of Every Description1
Made to Order E3
Particular attention paid to Ships Black
smithing JOI1 WORK executed on tLeiliortest
1304 notice y
E O 33A11L SOIV
LIMITED
Importers and Dealers in Hardware
Plows Paints Oils and General Merchandise
OFFICERS
WmW nail President and Manager
E O White Sccretaryand Treasurer
WmF Allen Auditor
ThoMayand FWundenburg Directors
1304 Corner Fort and King Sts y
TKEO M DAVIES Co
Importers and Commission Morchants
- AKD AlSEHTS rOt
Uoydsand the LiverpoolUnderwritcrs
Briiish and Foreign Marine Insurance Co
1301 And Northern Assurance Company y
C HUSTACE
Formerly with B F Bolles Co
Wholesale and Retail Grocer
111 King Street nndcr Harmony Hall
Family Plantation and Ships Stores sup
plied at short notice New Goods by every
steamer Orders rom the other islands faith
fully executed
1304 TELEPHONEXoUO
THE WESTERN AND HAWAIIAN
Investment Cnmnanv
Iimitea
Money loaned for long o suort periods
ON APPROVED SECURITY
Apply to W L GREEN Manager
1304 Block Fort St v
UNION FEED CO
DEALERS1N
HAY and GRAIN
Queen and Edinburgh Sts
Toloplaorto 178
Island orders solicited
1343 3m
C BREWER COMPANY
Limited
Ger eral Mercantile and Commission Agents
QUEEN STREET HONOLULU H I
LIST OP OFT1CEBS
PC JONES jr - - President and Manager
JOSEPH O CARTER TreasurerandSecretary
Col W F ALLEN Auditor
DIRECTORS
HonCRBISHOP HENRY WATERHOUSE
1304 SAML C ALLEN ly
-
mMimxu
--
uttt
10 MGE EDITION
TUESDAY MAECH 17
IS91
AMERICAN SUBSIDY BILL
Frong a San Francisco paper of
March L wo clip the following par
ticularbf the hill as passed by
Congress
Thijtbill authorizes the Postmaster-General
to enter into con
tracts fcr a term of not less than
five norjinoro than ten years with
American citizens for the carrying
of mailg on American steamships
between ports of tho United States
and povls in foreign countries the
Dominion of Canada excepted- Tho
mail sjjrvico on such lines to be
equitably distributed among tho
Atlantis Mexican Gulf and Pacific
ports Mio vessels employed in tho
service shall be American built
steamers owned and officered by
American citizens and the follow
ing proportion of the crew shall be
citizensjpf tho United States Dur
ing the first two years one fourth
thcreofdunng tho next three suc
ceeding years ono third and dur
ing tberemaining time of the con
tinuance of the contract at least-one-half
The vessels shall be divided into
four classes Tho first class shall
bo ironor steel screw steamships
capablcv of maintaining a speed of
twenty knots an hour at sea in
ordinary weather and of a gross
registered tonnago of not less than
8000 tons the second class shall
bo iron or steel steamships of a
speed of sixteen knots an hour at
sea and of a gross registered ton
nago of not less than 5000 tons
the third class shall bo iron or
steel steamships of a speed of four
teen knots an hour although tho
gross registered tonnago may bo
less than 1500 tons the fourth
class shall bo iron or steel or
wooden steamships of a speed of
twelve knots and of a gross regis
tered tonnago of not less than 1500
tons
All Steamships of tho first sec
ond and third classes shall bo con
structed with particular reference
to prompt and economical conver
sion into auxuliary naval cruisers
and shall be of sufficient strength
to carry and sustain tho working
and operation of at least foui effect
ive rilled cannon of a caliber of not
less than six inches and shall bo
of the highest rating known to
maritime commerce The rate of
compensation to be paid for first
class ships shall not exceed G a
mile and for Ejecond class ships 3
a mile by the shortest practicable
route for each outward voyage fur
third class ships SI 50 a mile and
for the fourth class ships SI a mile
for the actual number of miles re
quired by tho Postoffico Depart
ment to be traveled on each outward-bound
voyage
One cent Coffee Stands
The New York and Brooklyn St
Androws One Cent Coffee Stands
it well known charity is to have
its third annual benefit at tho
Lenox Lyceum Fifty ninth street
and Madison avenue on tho ovon
ing of April 4th William Stein
way has consented to act as treas
urer Tho charity is in its fifth
year and was last year extended
to Brooklyn where thero also ap
pears to be much needed good
warm Avholesome food at 1 cent a
portion Tho daily bill of fare con
sists of
Half pint of coffee with milk and
sugar and one slice bread 1 cent
Beef soup with vegetables and one
slice bread 1 cent
Pork and beans 1 cent
Fish cakes 1 cent
Sandwiches 1 cent
Friday fish chowder 1 cent
Cereals and extras occasionally
Soup ami coffee supplied to families by
the quart or gallon at same rates
tread to accompany each
portion
Booths open daily from G a m to 7-
p m Sundavs from 7 a m
to 2 p ji
This is what Mrs J M Lama
drid has been doing since 1886
with her New York and Brookyn
coffee stands These coffee booths
are never closed on account of
weather or for any excuse what
ever and they feed thousands
daily
Santa Barbara February 16th
The trial of A J Lawrence for
the murder of his wife at Los
Olives last November commenced
to day A motion for a change of
venue -was denied and five jurors
were obtained
THE ADVERTISER IS THE
leadine daily pater of tho Kincdom
LATEST NEWS PROM PONAPE
Terms Offered the Natives by
the Governor The Span
ish Make an Attack
Severe Storms
Under date of December 31 1890 Rev
F E Rand a missionary of the A B C
F M at Ponape has written to friends
in Honolulu these interesting items
about matters at that island
Ve arrived at Ponape August 20
Found Miss Palmer and Henry Naupei
still at Oua with most of the pupils of the
two training schools but they were all
ready to go to Kusaie The meetings
were still kept up at all of the fifteen
churches but all of the schools except
ing tho two training schools had dis
banded The day we arrived at Ponape
I called on tho Governor but he did not
seem a bit glad to see me He made no
objections to our landing our goods at
Oua but he would not permit the Horn
ing Star to anchor there The Governor
seemed very anxious to settle the trouble
with the natives without more blood
shed He requested mo to assist him in
getting them to accept his terms Ho
required them to brinf all their guns
and nine of the chiefs whom he con
sidered leaders of the insurrection As
ho would not tell them what was to be
done with these leaders or anything in
regard to how the trouble would be set
tled excepting that if they accepted his
terms it would be a great deal better for
them when the troops came Of course
they did not accept these terms
From August 2Jth to September 3d
I labored hard to persuade the natives to
assent to these conditions but this
trouble was a much more serious affair
than the one in S7 September 1st the
troops came two cruisers with about
six hundred soldiers These with the
marines and the garrison already here
made about one thousand ficjhting men
The soldiers were commanded by a
colonel The Governor and colonel gavo
the Metalamm tribe two days to accept
the terms already given them with ex
termination of the whole tribe as the
alternative As the Governor and col
onel would not promise us any protec
tion except at or near the Colony we all
went on board tho Star September 3d
and remained thero till September 11th
when she sailed for Kusaie with Mrs
Rand Miss Foss Miss Fletcher and
thirteen girls Miss Palmer Nanpeiand
I remained at Kiti with what was left of
tho Training School
September 13th tho Spanish forces
began their assault on the Metalamin
tribe with the purpose of exterminating
it The two cruisers and tho armed
IrarisportMariTTabeganfHe alsahltr Tffo
first day they threw a few shells at Oua
as they passed but most of tho shelling
the -first five days was atTumau and
other villages in ttie Metalamin harbor
Tumau is the home of the King He and
all his people were at Oua Several
hundred shells were thrown but did very
little damage except to tho breadfruit
cocoanut and other valuable trees On
the second or third day of the assault
they sent men ashore at Tumau and two
other villages near and burned the
church the Kings house and all the
other buildings There were no natives
at any of these villages Tho third or
fourth day they tried to burn Tulapail a
village near Tumau on the mainland
The three villages destroyed were on
small islands They did not remain on
shore long enough to burn all the
houses The natives were at home and
in this engaiieiiii i v itls t i -
onel was killed and several ct hi men
The Spaniards have three different
stories as to the manner of the colonels
death One is that in jumping from one
stone to another he fell and was killed
by his own revolver Another that he
fought a duel with his second in com
mand Still another that he committed
suicide The native belief is that he
was killed by the bullets from their guns
Sept19 the Spaniards began shelling
Oua The two cruisers the armed
transport and an unarmed transport
were anchored in the Morning Star har
bor at Oua They kept up an incessant
shelling all the 19th and the forenoon of
the 20th At noon they landed about
300 men After a severe skirmish with
about 50 of the natives the natives fell
back into the bush The Spaniards
burned all the mission property and
most of the native houses then hastened
aboard their ships and went back to
the Colony In tho weeks engagement
three natives and fourteen or more
Spaniards were killed
The second time I saw the Governor
he informed me that I was not to have
any meetings with the Metalamin tribe
excepting to persuade them to accept his
terms He also intimated that he might
soon stop all the meetings Sept 27the
Star returned from Kusaie with Mrs
Rand Miss Foss and Miss Fletcher As
the prospect of our being able to do any
thing at Ponape was even le3s favorable
than at first Mrs Rand and Miss Foss
her sister returned to Kusaie by the
Star which left Ponape Oct 3 Miss
Fletcher and Miss Palmer remained but
they deeply regretted it on hearing
from the Governor in less than forty
eight hours after the Star sailed that all
schools and meetings were to be stopped
They sent around to the Colony to see if
the captain of the Rose Sparks would
take them to Kusaie The captain was
willing to take them but the Governor
would not let Miss Palmer and Mrs
Cole leave the island
Octll I went to theColonyjto see the
Governor in regard to having one of his
mechanics repair my steam launch
While there he brought up a great many
accusations against me Some of the
most important were 1 that I had
been harboring the rebellious Metalamin
chiefs feasting them and building them
a house at Kiti AI30 2 that I had
been having meetings with them and the
Kiti king to influence them against the
Spanish rule He also said i3 that he
had positive prcof that I was one of the
principal leaders in planning the breast
works at Oua And 4 as the Mission
WHOLE No 1366
was responsible for the present outbreak
of the Metalamin tribe he did not think
that we would be permitted to carry on
our work much longer
Oct 13 the transport Manila went
around to Uana to take supplies to the
garrison there and to bring back the
300 soldiers that started for the same
place overland the same day Uana is
about thirty five miles from the Colony
It was expected that the troops would
get theie in one days march but it
took them three days They were a
sorry looking set Manila men nearly
half of theiusick Two hundred of the
Matalamin tribe wero waiting for them
just over the line in their own tribe
Uana is in the Kiti tribe less than a
mile from the boundary line The Meta
lamin people supposed that the troops
were on their way to attack Japalap the
village where most of them have been
living since the burning of Oua The
day the troops reached Uana some of
the boldest of the Metalamin tribe as
sisted the Uana people in helping the
lame ones into camp As the Spaniards
did not enter the Metalamin territory
there was no fighting It was a good
opportunity for the Metalamin people to
cut them off but out of respect for the
rights of tho Kiti king they would not
touch the Spaniards so long as they re
mained in his territory The soldiers
returned to the Colony in the Manila
By invitation of the Governor the Kiti
king and some of his chiefs went with
them The Governor had this conference
with them to get them to say that the
missionaries had influenced them against
tho Spanish rule But even tho King
a man who has always opposed our mis
sion work would have nothing to say
against us
Oct Jo Capt Taylor of the U S S
Alliance arrived at Ponape He was
sent by Admiral Belknap of the Asiatic
Squadron on receipt of communications
sent by Miss Palmer and Mr Bowker a
carpenter on Ponape to the U S Con
sul at Manila in regard to tho insurrec
tion of June 2 5 Capt Taylor acted
cautiously and wisely but was greatly
astonished to find the Governor and his
officers making every possible effort to
find some ground of accusation against
the missionaries that would justify them
in sending us from tho islands The
Alliance brought all the missionaries to
Kusaie
The Star has not yet returned from
the Gilbert Islands Wo had letters
from Ponape December 2Gth We hear
that the first week in December the
Spanish forces under the new Colonel
who had just arrived attacked Japalap
After a severe battle in which a great
many of the Spanish forces wero killed
they captured the place the native fall
ing back into the bush many of them
going to a hill npar Oua where they had
breastworks The Spanish forces as
saulted these breastworks and took the
outer one but did not succeed in driv
ing the natives from the inner one at
the top of the hill In this engagement
there wajj -again great loss of life on tho
Spanish side The captain of the vessel
that brought our letters reports tour
natives killed and from three to five
hundred Spaniards Our letters said
four natives and a great many Spani
ards
Wo have no plans for the future
shall get back to Ponape as soon as pos
sible I am thinking of returning on the
Star going to Honolulu or to San Fran
cisco to communicate directly with tho
Board
A letter from Capt Garland of the
Morning Star has also been received
dated at Jaluit February 2d and sent to
Honolulu via Sydney by a New Zealand
steam trading vessel He reports that
in a calm between Maiana and Ape
mama the starboard boiler gave out
The troubles at Ponape delayed the ves
sel four weeks beyond her allotted time
Thpn five days were spent in Tarawa
r - f i of wind At
Kusaie the best boat was badly stovo
Strong currents had carried them past
Apemaraa The Star arrived at Kusaie
January 11th left January 22d and was
eleven days in getting to Jaluit Ldng
delays hero characterized the whole
voyage at one time taking ten days to
make 300 miles and at another time
fourteen days for 160 miles Tho Star
was just beginning the Marshall Islands
work had finished the first trip to the
Gilbert Islands but was expected to go
again for Mr Walkup before doing the
work in the Eastern Caroline Islands
and getting the mail from Ruk
The Star is getting along very slow
ly using ono boiler Among other dis
agreeable incidents of this disagreeable
voyage has been the peril of twice get
ting on to the rocks fortunately with
out any great damage All the mis
sionaries were reported well except Miss
Smith who had been sery sick while
making the trip on the Star with Mr
Walkup through the Gilbert Islands
A letter from Mr Walkup give3
brief account of the vexatious delays in
his touring among the Gilbert Islands
He estimates that fully one thousand
natives had died from the measles
Some islands he had not been able to
visit at all His second trip to the Gil
bert Islands as originally planned must
be shortened or abandoned entirely It
does not seem probable that the Star can
return to Honolulu before the middle of
June
Mr Pope to lecture
Mr J D Pope will deliver a lect
ure at the Y M C A Hall next
Wednesday morning The following
is what the Sydney Freemans
Journal has to say about him The
title of the lecture Robert Emmet
proved a most attractive one for
when the lecturer stepped on the
stage he found himself facing a
crowded audience who welcomed
the young man eloquent in char
acteristically warm Celtic fashion
From his opening sentence to his
glowing peroration he held the com
plete attention of his hearers and it
says much for his power that ho fre
quently roused the great audiance to
a pitch of enthusiasm which bad its
outward expression in loud and
genuine bursts of cheering1

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