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The Hawaiian gazette. [volume] (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, August 21, 1894, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1894-08-21/ed-1/seq-6/

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THE NAVIES OF IE FIGHTERS,
What Ships China and Japan De-
" pend Upon.
COMPARATIVE STRENGTH OF BOTH,
rimme and Tonnacr of tlir let Ship
of the I'IchtiDc Artlcli
from the san Iranelc chronicle
"tVhleh OIe an Iilea of the liroilt.
As the present struggle must be
largely a maritime one, a comparison
of the naval strength of the warring
powers is of interest just now, says a
late San Francisco Chronicle. A recent
article on the subject, by a writer
-who obtained his information from
naval experts at "Washington, had this
to say of China's sea forces: "The
Chinese navy has live armored steel
battle ships, which are among the .finest
in the world. The two biggest
the Chen-Yuen andtthe Ting-Yuen
each have 7450 tons displacement.
Kadi of these sister vessels carries
four great Krupp guns and numerous !
machine cuns. These shins are nearl v
aslareeastheew York, which has ! fenders of this type lies in their
-. .. , ,.,- . ! ability to go to sea with impunitv,
a displacement of SloO tons. and to fisht guns in a 6eaway,
"la addition to thete formidable qualities not possessed by the monitor
battle ships China has , type.
nuarmored vessels of war-seventeen fTe.ret are fo"r ,new gunboats
... .,.., , . , of 61o tons displacement each the
of tbem built of stel and equipped ; Akagi, the Atag, the Maya and the
with Krupp, Armstrong, and Tiokal all built recently. There are
rapid - firinc suns. The bigeest I handy little boats, eachTcarrying one
of tbn isthe"Hai An. She has a ' ? 4J"?H nd on5 KmP.P
., , . ... , , . breech-loaders. Somewhat larcer is
displacement of 26S0 tons, aud carries , the Tijima the second of thesame
twenty-two Krupp guns of large name a gunboat of 753 tons,
bar. The Yang Tao, 3500 tons, has ; Two excellent new vessels are the
three tea-ton guns ami seven more of steel cruisers Chivota and Shiodo, of
half that siae. The Ye Sing is pre- about 400 tons each somewhat
eisely like the Yang Tao a"? to larger than the United States
ami armament- The Foo ship Marblehead armed with high-
A TYPICAL JAPANESE
Ow f Ikr irwrM Coift Deftnf
Ching, 2500 toos, has tea Krupjj guns,
The Cbfng Yuen, 2300 tons, is" pro-!
vxied wita ttiree guns, two 4-
ton guns, seventeen rapid-firing guns,
ami I!C machine Timi '
"It mast be uuderstood that the'
su!j,oi me tn uese navy are w me
mht improved modern pattern.
2Ctrly all of them were built in Germany.
Most of tbem carry torpedoes.
Besides the thirty armored and
vessels referred to, there is
one smalt armored craft, the Tien
Sing, of 200 tons. There are also
eleveu gunboats of 325 to 410 tons displacement,
named with the letters of
the Greek alphabet; thirteen gunboats
of 100 1 1 33U tons, aud six floating
batteries for river service, each
carrying three -ton Armstrong guns
in n wooden fixed turret. The uavy
of China is divided into provincial
fleets, designated squadron- ot Canton,
Foo Chow, Shanghai, Pei Ho, and the 1
"North Coast i
The Japanese navy now consists of
six armored vessels, three protected
coast defenders, five protected steel
cruisers, twelve other steel vessels
and thirteen wooden or composite
vessels, a total of thirty-nine ship-,
in aoditioo to which there are twenty-nine
tocpeJo boats, several transports,
dispatch boats, etc.
The armored vessels are not large,
but ooeof them, the armored cruiser
Tschiyoda, is of 450 tons, built of
steel, with twin screws and a speed of
nineteen knots. Her armament consists
of teu and fourteen
rapid-fire guns and three machine
guns. She has a 41-inch belt
of armor and a one-inch protective
deck.
The other armored vessels are as follows:
Omst.
Catla
Xum. Tjp. IBtBt. b&ltcrr.)
. Anaarr4 crsfeer
Araered cnittr t
Bi-J . Qaebatt 6
Gaabott 1469 too
The guns of all these vessels are
Krupp or Vavasseur breech-loading
rifles. The Tislma is an effective little
craft, built in 1SSS, but the others
are somewhat obsolete.
It is in her unarmored vessels, however,
that Japan can take the greatest
pride, for amonc them are some of
the finest of their respective classe
all oat.
Chief in importance among them is
the pewerful cruiser Yoshino, which
was launched last December from the
Armstrong yard in "Newcastle, Eng-laud.
She is of 4150 tons displacement,
built of steel theoughout, and
with the remarkable great speed of
knots. Iu
she embodies the most advanced
ideas, and embraces all the desirable
features that a cruiser should possess.
Next in importance is the protected
cruiser Akitsuschlma, ol 43.xnons displacement,
a vessel similar to the
Medes class of the British navy. She
was launched in 1S9L Her
consists of one
rifle, twelve 4 7-inch rapid-fire
guns, six machine guns and four
HAT7AHAK GAZETTE: TUESDATT.
torpedo tubes. Her speed is sixteen
knots.
Two more notable vessels are the
twin cruisers and Taka-
both alike in every essential
particulars. These vessels were
built in 1SS5. and attracted much
at the time, being considerably
in advauce of the period. The
indeed, was the prototype
after which the United States
steamer Lnarlestou was designed, a
description of the will
answer for both vessels. She is a
steel twin screw, protected cruiser of
3650 tons displacement and IS
knots speed, which eight years
ago was phenomenal and is even
now extreme. Her protective deck
is two and three inches thick on
crown and slopes, respectively. Her
armament comprises two 10 men and
six 5.9-inch breech-loading rifles, two
small rapid-fire gnns and ten machine
guns. She al carries four torpedo
tubes.
In her coast defeuse vessels Japan
departs from conventional types and
adopts a high-freeboard type, the chief
feature of which is the "fact that her
hull is "protected," but unarmored,
while her battery is heavily armored.
She has three such vessels, all alike,
of which tlie Itsukusima may be taken
as a sample. She is an unusual
looking affair, of 4277 tons displacement,
a speed of 16 knots and a good
coal supply. Her hull protection consists
of a two-inch steel protective
deck and a belt of water-excluding
material. She carries one heavy 12
inch breech-load ing rifle, mounted
forward in a barbette protected by
twelve inches of steel armor. There
are also twelve -LT-inch rifles, sixteen
smaller rapid-fire gun: anu four
Pdo tubes. The great beauty of coast
' A
i i.
SHIP.
of Ik vtr Morjf. from tkt
power rapid-fire guns of the latest
pattern, and with nineteen knots I
tjred. i
There are also several good, well-:
armwl stool nr nnmnneito nnliurc nf !
about 1500 tons displacement York-
town qui v demerit of which
j? iucii tun zjfctru, nuicu uirtrs uu. ca- '
ceeu mirteen Knots.
The remainder are unimportant
vessels, noue of great size or speed,
but good, serviceable, well-armed vessels.
PEARL HARBOR. i
Feasibility of a Coaling Station
Shown by Report.
The Secretarv of the Naw has
j .r.1 . r i j" :.i
"J"uc puunu me xepuic ui
Walker in regard to the establishment
of a naval coaling station at
Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, showing I
indirectly the entire feasibilitv of seen upon our streets.
the project savs a late Washington ! . e ha hard,-v Sone a b,?1k
V. l further when we passed firo white
c. c i. - i
Star. Detailed figures showing the jmenj "dead drunk," lving bare-depths
obtained at the different headed in the blazing sun on the
borings are given, and then sum-! sidewalk near Alapai street ! And
merized hv Admiral Walkpr ; !
follows : They show that nothing
but loose sand is to be met on the
linetif the proposed cut to a depth '
of at leat thirty feet at mean low i munity, so in the power of a few
water; that the dredged sand lawless rumsellers that our police-could
be safely discharged over the ' me,n dar nrot' or .d not 4cuarf to'
enforce the few mild laws that we
western reef bv a short pipe,
the of the
whence it would be carried off by ave "E1 usurpation
the current. Allowing $6000 for j 1,cluor tiram" ine Pce
m.tnf onpmtinr th drPA "rs not see that we are going from
per month, the average cost of the
removal of the deposit is 40 cents
per cubic vard. But allowing 50 1
cents to cover contingencies, the
admiral Eavs that if the proposed
cut in the bar be 250 feet wide,
which is as wide as it can be made
without touching the coral, and
thirty feet deep at mean low water,
it will necessitate the dredging of
200,000 cubic yards, and will cost
$100,000. If the channel be 200
feet wide the cost would be 130,000.
It would -take thirteen and a half
months to accomplish the first and
ten and months the latter,
although it is recommended
that fifteen and twelve months, respectively,
be allowed. At one
place inside the bar it will be
necessary to widen the channel at
a cost of $5000.
Dr. Hatzu polos, alias Greek
George, has hung his shingle out on
Alakea street, as a specialist '
'M& i'Mr
A PLEA FOR HER RACE.
Miss Ida B. Wells, Agitator Against
Negro Lynching, Speaks.
New Yobk, July 29. Mis3 Ida
B. Wells, the advocate of the
rights of the colored people and
the agitator against lynching, who
has just returned from a four
months' tour of lecturing on the
subject in England, spoke tonight
at the Bethel African Methodist
Episcopal church. The church
was filled, many white people being
among the listeners. T.Thomas
Fortune, president of the Afro-American
League, introduced Miss
ells, who said she went to Lng
land at the invitation of some of
the prominent thinkers there, after
having been denied the privilege
in Boston, New York and before
the President. She addressed 102
meetings in England, she said, and
as a result an anti-lynching committee
composed of prominent people
was formed at each of these
meetings. Resolutions were passed
urging the American public to
abolish the barbaric outrage against
human life. Miss Wells said that
the people of the South are as bitter
against the negroes as they were
before the days of freedom. When
she was in England copies of newspapers
containing articles attacking
her personal character were
spread broadcast there and that
everything was done to influence
the British public against her.
"We want the colored race to be
placed in the proper light before
the people of this country," Miss
Wells said, "for there is in literature
no true type of the negro as
he is today. The lawless
in the South for alleged
crimes against the whites are in
ninety-nine cases out of a hundred
simple outrages against our race.
The press is in control of the
whites, and the attacks upon us
are colored to suit "themselves.
"The colored people of this country
should organize themselves
from one end of the country to the
other. They should at least contribute
the sinews of war with
which to fight the battle. The
South knows that we are much
disorganized. It is our duty to
see that every story published from
the South, in which some negro is
-accused of some fiendish act and
lynched for it, is run down by our
own detectives, if necessary, and
the other side of it published.
There are two sides to every lynch-in?:."
CORRESPONDENCE.
Wh.it Are We Coming To? '
Mr.. Editor: When Rev. Dr.
Coyle was here a few weeks ago, he
surprised and shocked some of us
by a remark made in public that
he had never seen a city where
fuprp PTP Bn mnv n1Pn
on the streets in proportion to the
population as in our beautiful Honolulu.
Passing along Beretania
street toward the plains today, just
after leaving church, we saw a
crowd about a carriage, and police
men lifting the limp, unconscious
form of a young native man into
it. We stopped to inquire into the
matter, and the reply was : "Only
a drunken native, who fell from
his horse." We drove on, thinking
sadly of the present contrast with
the time, not many years ago.when
a drunken Hawaiian was never
this on bunday when the saloon
are supposed to be closed ! What
a sight in a law abiding, Christian
community! What are we going
to do about it? Are we, as a com-
bad to worse : that, with the best
Government these islands have
ever had. intemperance is steadily
on the increase, and the rumseller
is more defiant of law and order
than he ever was? Is it not time
that the indignation which any
righteous man must feel at such a
state of affairs should take some
form which would demand from
our authorities an enforcement of
the laws we have, and, as soon a3
possible, better laws and more in
keeping with the progress of events
in other civilized lands? Y.
Honolulu. August 19, 1S94.
In order to introduce Chamberlain's
Cough Remedy here we sold
several dozen bottles on strict
guarantee and have found every
bottle did good service. We have
used it onrselves and think it superior
to any other. W. L Moweet,
Jarvisrille, W. Y. For sale by all
Dealers, Bessox, Smith & Co.,
Agents for H. I.
JTod
i
Direct
---o
-
HO LUSTER. DEUG CO., I'D.
023 Fore Street. Honolulu.
OHN
IMPOKTEH A.STXJ PTC A IYER
Steel and Iron Ranges, Stoves and Eixtnres,
aUOSKKKSPlKQ GOODS 1HD EUGHSS UTEfSIIi.
'AGATE WAKE IN
WTiUe, Gray sad
RUBBER HOSE !
LIFT AUD FORCE PUMPS, WATER CLOSETS, HETALS
PIuEiiers Stock, Water and Soil Pipes.
Plum bin jr. Copper
?MOKD BLOOK. 95
In tbe summer season when the water
supply gets low and it's impooaible to get a
a glass of pore water, is tbo time when
Give the Baby
T
FOR C AND
y t. u
INFANTS IMVHUUW. imwai
SPAItKirN"G -:-
MM SODA W I
is appreciated. We liavo a fresh lot of this
King of Table Waters
from the Springs and bottled with special
care for this market.
Every Bottle Warranted !
For sale by the
-! Dozen - or -
and delivered to any part of the city by the
NOT T
GREAT VARIETY.
Silver-plated.
ami Sheet Jron Work,
&Hd 97 KIKQ STSBBT.
A Perfect Nutriment
For GROWING CHILDREN.
Convalescents.
Consumptives.
dyspeptics,
andtoe ,crtl,nd
In Acute IUh.m'.ii''!
all Wastius Diseases.
-THE
Best Food
inc
for Hand-fed Infants.
Orii nOOIv for the lntrcetlon
of mothers, "The Care mid
of InCinl,"TCtll It milllr
to any address, upon request.
DOLIBER-GOODALE CO,
boston, Mass., U. s. A.
SMITH & CO.,
for the Hawniian Islands.
ARRIVED
J). BRYANT.
MATS in the latest patterns,
Sewing: Machines
with the latest improvement.
hand '
w
Cottage Pianos
other Musical Icstruments.
ITOFFSCHLAEGER & CO,,
Street, opposite Castle e Coose.
Cents per Month
BY CARK3ER.
BENSON,
Sole Agents
FXJBT
PER BABK C
BABY CARRIAGES of all styles,
CARPETS, RUGS, and
" "
Household
Hand Sewing Machines, all
Also on
Westermayer's Celebrated
Parlor Organs, Guitars and
' tSTFor sale by
ED.
King
Daily Advertiser, 75
DELIVERED
SUtocrfonnmLB.
SX; W. iiiti?S
ftaiu ZxS&H
w., ... - riiiiffliii -,., iiJBi
' .i. -. i'.K1.f1WJI.T: ,ff . -
3
, o. -,.a-i jk
6f.nr.ral 2Ur)misrmrxU.
OaclifeldMo.
are just la receipt of lnrgs importations by
tbeir Iron Harks "l'anl Ircnbcrc" and
"J. O. MoRer" from Enropo nnd by
n number of Trawls from America
consisting of
A Large and Complete Assortment
OF
TKY GOODS,
SUCH AS
Frints, Gingham?, Cottons, Sheetlnps,
Denims, Tickings, ltesattas. Drills,
Mosquito Netting, Canning, Lawns,
X flNE SELECTION or
DRESS GOODS, ZEPHYRS, ETC
in tbo latest styles.
A splendid line of FLANNELS, blnck and
colored MEHINOS nnd OASHSlEltES,
SATINS. VELTETS nnd PLUSHES,
CIUPE. AC.
TAILORS' GOODS,
a full assortment,
SUiM is. Sleevelinines, Stifllinen,
Italian Cloth, Moleskins, Meltons,
Serge, Kamisgarns Ac, .to., Ac
Clothing, Underwear, Shawlc
Blankets, Qallte. Towels. Tnblecovers.
Napkins, Handkerchiefs, Gloves,
Hosiery, Hats, Umbrellas,
lines nnd Carpets,
Itibbons, Laces nnd Etnboidery,
Cutlery, I'erfnmery and Sons,
Ac, Ac, Ac, Ac. Ac
A large vnriety of
SADDLES,
Vienna nnd Iron Garden Furniture,
Itechstein A Seiler Pianos,
Iron Itedsteads, Ao
American nnd European Groceries,
Liquors, Beets nu(l Mineral Wntera,
Oils nnd Paints, Canstio Soda,
oukui, nice anu uauonges,
Sail Twine nnd Wrapping Twine.
Wapping Paper. Burlaps,
Filterpress Cloth.
Hoofing Slates,
Square nnd Arch Firebricks,
... . . , . ,. Lubricating Grease
Sheet Zinc, Sheet Lend,
Plain GaW. Iron Best and 3 Best,
b. . r, .. . . g1t. Corrugated Iron.
Steel Bails, 18 nnd 20.
It. H. Bolts, Spikes nnd Fishplates,
Market Baskets,
Demijohns and Corks, Ac.
ALSO
Hawaiian Su-ar and Rice,
Golden Gate. Diamond, Sperry's. I
Merchnnt's nnd Eldorado Flour,
Salmon, Corned Beef.
Ac, Ac, Ac, Ac.
X3T For sale on the most liberal terms
nnd at lowest pricea.
Br
H. HACKFELD & CO.
EINTIAR CUSTOM HOUSE, HONOLUU
Imported and Doalor In
Japanese Provisions,
. Dry Goods,
AND EVERY LINE OF
JAPANESE MANUFACTURE.
XaP Islandjordcrs falthf ally filled at reajo
able prices. In quantities to salt.
P. O. BOX 116. JIUT. TEL. 192
(S
IMPORTERS,
Hardware i- and i- Commission.
xEIiCHANTS !
Gatieral Merchandise t
AGKICULTUKAr. 131 ri. 3IKNTS,
PLANTATION SUPPLIES.
PIONEER
Steam Candy Factory and Bakery
F- HORN,
Practical Confectioner and llaker,
?fO. 7X HOTEL STREET.
The Most Comp letestorkMijfieiy
IN ALL ITS BTYLK8 AT
J. J. Egan's, 514 Fort St.
A large aseortmentof Woolen Dress
Goods, Storm Serge in Bine, Black and
PinlftJ' En8li8h.an'I American
Ginghams in large quantities.
Gotds!118 llDe iD ash
nif vCiapJfte B.tock of K'"ped and
Flannels. This is the nlace
Hoy7rLaCe8' EroiderVPad
Hosiery, cheap; a complete line.
, "Dressmaking done in all ita
Bl 'ertker, 75 cents a-month.
n.
Delivered by Carrier
WW
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