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Cedar Falls gazette. (Cedar Falls, Iowa) 1860-1895, December 29, 1871, Image 1

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VOLUME
THE GAZETTE,
PUBLI8IIBB EVERY FKIDAT,
*r« C04 FALLS, BLACK UWK 0ODMTT, IOWA.
fR W. At E. A, SNYDER,
Editors and Publishers*
4Win« -92 For Antra In Ai**ne«,
RATES OF ADVERTISING.
Space. 1~w~~ i n
I Square,
i Squares.
S Hqoares.
4 Squares.
U (Vtlntnn.
$ Column,
Column.
(broiier ~W.
Da. 1 r.
on ITiTi.tTi
15.1*1
$ l.&Oi# :|.M) 5.00
».6C B.00I 7.i«0| 10 00
s.so! 7.00 lo.ooi
ia.«w
4 MM S 00 «S.U0 15 001
4.50i 0.00 15.00: W.OOl
K.OO: 15.00 20.00 95.0(1
14.00 20.00! ao.ou, 5').ooI
Wl.00
4VI.«»
:r,if0
11,00
1(10.00
Ten line* of this type make a square.
Legal advertisements at legal rates.
Bnsines* card* of Ave lines or less $3.00 cach
additional line #1 00.
Speelal notices 10 cents per line.
General Directory.
RAILROAD TIMK TABLE.
ILLINOIS CKNTHAL -IOWA DIVISION.
DAY PASSENGER GOING BAST.
Leave Sloux City 6 90 A. M„ arrives at Cedar
Fall* 4:43 P. M., Dubuque 9-.30 P. M., Chicago
7:15 A. M.
DAT PASSXNOSR OOIHO WIST.
Leave Chicago 9:00 P. M., arrive at Dubuque 7:15
A. M., arrive at Cedar Falls 12:15 P. M., Ft. Dodge
5:15 P.M.
KIUIIT
rtKHlNOIR
OOINO WEST.
liCftvc Chicago 9:00 A.M., leave Dubnqne 7:88
P. W.. arrive at Cedar Fa.ls 1:25 A. M., Si-jux City
1*16 1*. M.
NIGBT PASSKNGEK OOINO *A8T
Leave Ft. Podge 5:40 P. M., arrive at Cedar
Fall* 10:11 P. M, Dnbuqae 8:40 A.M., Chicago
i:90 P.M.
^VHKIOIIT.
doing east, leave Cedar Falls at 8:08 P. M. So
lii^ west, passes Cedar Falls at &07 A. M.
OBDAn
FALLS
AND
MINNESOTA.
OolB£f north, leave the Junction at 13:S5 P. M.
Bud l:Rr A. M. Returning, arrive at Junction at
fcQS 1*. M. and 9::V, p.
W. T. KENDALL, Station Agent.
BURLINGTON. CEUAR RAPIDS A MINN.
I K1IAII HAI'lDS ACCOMMODATION.
Leaves Cedar Fails at 5:05 P. M. Arrives at
Csdar Rapids 7:45 I'. M.
Cedar Falls Accommodation.— Leaves Cedar
Kipids at 8:40 A. Arrives at Cedar Fall* 12:06
P. M. Make* connections at Cedar Rapids with
the Northwestern.
DAT EXi'ltBSS.
leaves Burlington 8:2T« A. M. arrive* at Cedar
Falls at 4:55 P. M. Leave* Cedar Fall* at 4 A. M.
Arrives at IJnrlinjM on P. M. Makegeonnec
iluna at Cedar Rapid* both ways.
rnnmiiT -eotNo SOUTH.
leaves Cedar Fall* at 5:10 A.M.
Rnrttegtou at 9:15 P. M.
FRKKIHT —OOINO WORTH.
Leaves Burlington at 10:05 A. M. Alrtm at
^darFall-at 1:10 A. M.
G. D. ADAMS, Station Agent.
CBDAR FALLM POST OPPICB.
ARniVAL
AND DEPAETUBK OF NAIL*.
Bast cm— Arrives at 8 A. x. and 1 p. *. doses
atl and 8 P. m.
Western -Arrives at 4:45 p. x. Closes at 124
P. M.
Southern—Arrives at 5 P. e Closes at 8
p. *.
Northern—Arrives atB r.
m.
Wednesdays and Sat­
urday*.
Office honrs (except Sundays) from 8 A. M. Ill]
CP V..
office epea on Sundays for one honr Immediate
ly after morning serviees in the (Churches.
No Mall- arrive or depart on Sunday, except the
through Mall.
WM. M. MORRISON, P. M.
OBDAH FALLS OMNIBI N LIMB.
'Hnsses rnn to and lrom 1). & S. C. C. F. A M.
snd B..
V.
1{. fc I(. K. Depots, in connection
with all train*. Also 'Busses furnished on all oc
tasion* when desired. Ofliee at the Carter House.
UEO. W. CLARK, Pnprtator.
DISTRICT COURT.
JMWs—Hon. J. M. Brayton.
/Hit. AtCy—J.
B. Power*.
tOierif—W.
F. Brown.
Cltrk—
O. A. Eberhart,
M«si S«asi«ii Monday, January 8th, 187*.
CIR«fIT~COIJRT.
Juijt--Hon. s. Bagt,'.
Next Session Monday. November 27th, 1871.
COUNTY OFPIOHRS.
fttpn
I
l*ort
B. Van Satin, A. T.\Wtttkn-
*ax. Close
lonnfy Auditor—D.
i y A
W. Foote.
iMunty ('lerk—G.
A. Eberhart
Vtnmt* Trecumr***-*.
A. WIM«
(Xrvntu Tifconier
-Jus. W. McClnre
Sher\M-
W. F. Brown.
CrmiDy Surrryor
.John Rail.
Co. Sujtf. Cmnmon School*
-A. H. N^fc"
O. Richards
Mrectora if I'oor-IIoute—W,
A8««s$or~G.
F. Brown, G.
Niger, Caleb May.
tegular Session* of the Board—Vint Hoadtn
Mnary, June and September.
TOWNSHIP OFFICERS.
Trv*1ee*-¥.
H. ltichmon'l
Ju»iic«» nf lk« Rxtee—Laufevr
Barnard.
CtonrtaNtt—J.
Knapp^ ft, W.
J. Royce, Geo. Pliilpot.
CITY OFFICERS.
).
1
JUmyor—
st Ward—3.
B. TOWNSEND.
Aldermen,
Adams
Allerm*n,
Brown.
Andre wa.
Aldermm,
F. Zeizlay. B.
Benjamta, Xdwin
%J Ward—J.
Ahltrmen, id Ward—Bliaa
4th
City A*»e**or ~Lanfear
O. 8.
Overman,
A.
Ward—
J. Kartori, 8.
Bishop.
City Treasurer—C.
C. Knapp,
Kaaufe
City Clerk- N.
Pierce.
6'tty Jtarthai8.
—J. P. Leister.
City Council meets first Tuesday la eaeh
CBDAR FALLS SCHOOL BOARD.
/'rert'hxt
Van Haun.
Secretary
-S. N. Pierce.
Treatur'er
-J. T. Knapp.
IHrertor*—
Byron Culver, II.
O.
8. Van Der Vaart.
Remenway, A.
O. Thompson, Shepard Wllsen, G.
B.
Van Sa
an.
CEDAR FALLS CHFRCIIES.
BAPTIST Corner or Main and Sth Sirei-ts, Rer.
Pastor Service* every Sahhnth at
10i4 A. M. and 7J4 P. M. Sabbath School at lj M.
METOODIST-Corner Washington and 7th St.
Uw. 1). Sheffer, Pastor. Services everv
Sabbath at 10^4 A. M. and 74 P. M. Sabbath
School at (t A. M.
PRESBYTERIAN—Main Street between «t»
and 7th, Rev. S. R. Griffith, Pastor. Services ever*
iabbath at 104 A. M. and 74 P. M.
School at li M.
CONGREGATIONAL— Comer Clay and 6th Mt.,
Rev. chas. Oibbs, Pastor. 8ervlc«s every Sahbaili
A. M. and 7'/, P. M. Sabbath School at
CATHOLIC—Washington Street between 7th
Mid 8th Father Flavin. Services every 8ab-
Ifli
10* A' M' 8»bbath
School
GERMAN LUTHERAN—Fremont Street, Rev.
Bernard Foelach Pastor. Servioea every Sabbatk
at 10^4 A. M.
EVANUELICAL—Corner of Franklin and Stk
Streets, Rev. J. Hariacher, Pastor. Services ever*
abbath at 10^4 A. M. and 7H P. M. Habbatk
itktHil al i P. II.
MASONIC,
BLACK HAWK LODGE NO.flk A. f. AAM.
-Regular Meetings at Masonic Hall, on the Men
lay (»ii (r be fun* the Full Moon in i-ach month. Q«
R. Van Saun, W. (i. Huffman, S. W.
J. Bradley J. W. T. F. Whitney, Sec'y.
VALLEY CIIA1TER. H. A M.. NO. 20 -Ke»
ar Meetings at Masoulc Hall, on th« Wednesdaj
'.r ^'J}' 1^*' I'11" Moon of each month. P.
I Icktou. E. II. P. s. H. Packard, E. K. 8.
A. Uishop, E. S. A. (}. Ihompsou, Sec'y.
BALDWIN COMMANDERY, K. NO. 11.-.
H"i!ular M*H.'tingi» at Masonic Hall, on Friday on 61
before the Full aloon of each month (i Van
9ann, B. C. 8. A? Bishop, (Ha.: B. TownMnd.
C. O. 8. H. Packard, Itocorder.
1. O. OF O. W,
CEBAR FALLS LODGE, NO. 71, I. •. OF O. F.
meets at Masonic Hall, on Thursday evening of
each week. Traveling Brothers are cordially in
vited to attend. Goo. L. Stoarna, iti. G.. W. A.
Robins oil,
Sec' y.
W&w* Holism
WOOIV8 H()TEL,
396 STATS 8TB££T,
ooamta mnum oocn,
OHlCGp ttJ.
HAH
s-ffc
....
ENOCH WOOD, Prop'r.
N»"e Hotter lu Uirs City,
New Meat Market.
O. RITTER,
fitted up in the most neat and tast]
style a new Meat Market ou Main Stre.
ast side, batween Second aud Third Streeta, I
W prepared to supply the people of Cedar Fi
With all kinds of
Frcah Ac Salt Heata, Poultry, Ac.,
flarkut.
ind everything osnally kept at a First Class Meat
and respectfully invito a share of the po»
ic patronage.
TtM inchest market prluv In cash paid for stock
CHRIS. RITTBR.
Cetor Falls. Nov. l, wro.
And all kind* of Ixx'ki, Key^, l*ock»»t Kipfci
2tU!l!e iiUti^r7" trnbrellM reimir.id
At the New Gun Shop of K. A. Mi Nti|[u!
o doors east of th« Post-Otllce ,Ciyl„r p"i„
Business Directory.
JULIEN HOUSE,
.woonwoRTH.rRopnnrroS,
rner id as:d Main st-., Dubuque. Iowa.
w.s
TREMONT HOUSE,
GCO.
L. DICKINSON A SON,
Parks:itsiti
h«jh, iowa,
S. VANDER VAART,
PIIYSK
iN
AND SC K( KW.N.
ot
OFFERS
AiHtm
at
Clones at 114 A.v
Wllloughhy—Arrives at 4 P. x. Tuesdays and
Fridays. Closes at 8 A.
m.
W. T. MEOARY Sl CO.,
ram:rs in leather, saddf^bry
Hardwarv. Shoe Findings. Saddles, Collars,
to. Cedar Falls, Iowa. Ow-li paid for hidca.
D'
A. Hotchkiss. Pvaak M.
.enjamin.
Town Clerk—I^infear
Knapp.
CHARLES NEELY,
REPRESENTS THE
A ,yn UaCIXXATI,
E O V E
TORRET & KINSLEY!
Ilave removed th«-ir
E A A K E
To the stand
OppositeE.H.Gregg's Drugstore
Wtow ttoy ar#w«B tfoofcea with allkinfa
Cedar
THE CEDAR
i
PROP'fv
ComiT Sth and Iowa Streets, l'ubuiue, Iowa,
KEY CITY HOUSE,
W. PlfNB, PROIMU ETOK,CORNRjR
Main and Third Streets. Utilmqae, lown
w.
WILCOX'S RAILWAY HOTEL."
TIj.U
II.COX, Proprietor. Illinois (n
trrtt -md Iiit.ri(j• .- ,y Sioux City, Itallr vid l),»
[ot, Uubii.ju' l.iiu.
Jiitl
WILLIAMS HOUSE.
ha*
boen
well Btted up for tbe convenience of the trav
eling public. Livery stable connected with the
house.
FARMERS' HOML
Mainstrkkt.cedahfallh.iowa,
Meals cents e.n li. Teams to pay 10 ccntt
well. iood Stabliiu an.! J'.irds.
J. J. TOLERTON,
ATTORNEY
AND COCNHEI.LOR AT
il LAW. Offlc.e over Townsend & Knapp1!
Bank, Cedar Falls, Iowa.
H. PACKARD,
"UUNSB
Office No. 1, Mill-
S.
A TTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR kf
xV LAW, Cedar Falls, IowA.
arky'n BltK'k.
1. H. POW KM, H. C. HUIMWAT.
POWERS A HEMENWAY,
Attorneys
& cor
Ble
KICK i:i is,-
Hawk i'onniy, iowa.
KI.I.OKS, OF
lar Kails, Black
J. BEEMER
VTTORNKY
AT LAW, NOTARYPUBLIC
and Lard Asrent, will ^ive Special Attmtirm
o Buvinp and Selliiu.- Real Estate in Butler and
3rtindy counties on Commission, Furnish AostrcU
)f Title, and Pay Taxes for Nonresidents, Par
terwburg, Butler County, Iowa. W-iW
ALONZO CONVERSE,
ATTORMCY AND C(rNSKI.I.OR AT
ZV. Uiw and Collection Agent, New Hartford,
Jntler County, Iowa. vlOnttyl
N. T. JOHNSCN,
ATTORNEY
& COI'NCKLOIl AT LAW,
Notary Public and Collection Agent. Otflce
in Exchange Hank. Pnrkersbiirjr, Iowa. Will at
te'.ut nil the Courts in Butler and (Jrnndy Counties.
LAIK
Surgeon of the 'inh Wisconsin Vulonteera.
OfBce at Wise & Bryant's dnur
corner
store.
Residence
Main and Pith streets. 12-4
S. N. PIERCS*
PHYSICIAN
AND Kl'IiC.KON, OFFIOS,
In Pivnlx Block, Cedar Fulls lowu,
L. W. WARREN, M. D.
Ills PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
to tin' people of 'edar Falls and vicinity. Of
Ic. at Thompson Jfc Oivens'. Residence on 2nd
Jtreet. between Washington and Chu'.
J. W. YOU NO,
PHYSICIAN
AND ST KG ICON. OFFICB
Over E. E. Gregg s Diug Store. Cedar
Falls, Iowa. vlinl'J
F. A. M7d.
PHYSIC'IABRYANT,store.
N AM srttoisoN. oFFio*
in Wise Jt Bryant'* Drug Residence,
orner of Sixth and Franklin Streets, Cedar Falls,
owa.
WM. ROBINSON, M. D.,
[Ijitu Snri" ui of ilie lthlowa Cavalry.]
HASe
LOCATED IN CEDAR FALLS, FOR
th uractico ot Medli ine imd Sarv-ury. Of
iCe at E. II. (Gregg's Inif Store Residenee list
onse south o Mew School House.
H. M. ADAMS, MTdT,
PHYSICIAN
ANI) Sl'RGEON. ALSO,
Mechanical ar.d Surgical Dentist, is prepared
perform all operation* pertaining to Surgery
id Dentistry, and to furnish Artificial Eyes,
Teeth, Palates, &c. Charge* reasonable. Office,
First Door west of the Inuian House, Cedar Falls.
Dealers
HOWLAND,
FARM MACIHNRRY,
HUNT &
in
Field.
(or the Celebrated C. Anltnian Co.'s "Sweep
stakes" Tbri sher, Marsh Harvester. Ksterly and
other Reapers and Mowers, Schul tier Wagons, Ac.
A full stock of Farm Tool* always on hand. Offi
ce Corner of Main and Hecoud, St*..Cedar Falls.
Mrs. A. GIBSON,
PHOTOGRAPH
RTIST, CORNER
1st. ami Main Streets. i 'an-s. Cedar Falls,
•wn. Photographs, Ambmtype.s, Gems, Porce
ain and Ivorytype Pictures of every atyic, taken
short notice.
H. C. DAVIES,
HOI
SE,
SI(iN AND OltNAMBNTAL PAIN
ter and Paper Hanger, Shop on First St.,^
Jclar FhII*. Iowa.
E. BAKER,
llorsB, CARRIAGR AND I
fl RAINER,
JLJT Sign Painter,
Mnr Fall*, and will give entire satisfaction to all
*ho entrust him with work in his line of business.
Shop over Fosdick's watrnn shop. l*aper hanging
lastly done on short notice.
I'D Painter", lias taken It. Wild's place at!
i:
iv Tisr i
PR. A. RTBEGUN
Over
11
AM9
Aneta, tl.l81,nee.ee.
MANHATTAN, NEW TORK%
AaaetSa $1.4oT«IMe.
GREAT WESTERN, CHICAGO.
Aaaotn, l,an^M|»a.
A. C. THOMPSON, President.
B. BHODflS, Vtoe-Fnaldenl. k
J. L. BTUABT, Cashier.
CEDAR FALLS
CNklarFalla, Iowa.
CAPITAL/ i •100,000.
Jhm a Qwiwl BatM^g Bariim
Comspjodeutsi
Ninth National Bank, New York C||^.
Vtftli National Bank, Chicago, Illinois.
Merchants' National Rank, Dubuque,
MreeMRM
J. 8. Jndd,
J. L. Stuart,
A.Spaulding, J. E. Rhodes
A. C. Thompson.
lrom Logansport, Indiana,
Has located In Cedar
Fall* in the practice of
i •ntlstry. Office over
ise A Bryan)'* New
Tilf Store. Phtenlx
M'k. Refer* to Wise
Bryant, Cedar Falls
Dr. A. B. Mason, Water
loo. 12-29
PHCENIX HALL,
CEDAll FALLW, IOWA.
THIS
Beautiful Kail Is now fhlly completed and
ready for use. This I* one of the tlnest Ilalls
in Iowa. SIa». 4-1x80 height, 20 feet, and i* buanli
fully finished and furnished. Has a tine Stance and
Drop Curtain 500 Chairs well lighted and ven
tilated. For Terms, Ac., Applv to
Tl2u2U II.'
C.
tta grocery
12:8
of
Fresh and Salt Meat,
K I K S I I I S
From Lake Superior every week.
Try them smd be Pleased.
Uerchant Tailoring.
jr. W ytii,
MERCHANT TAJLOE,
Keeps constantly on hand a full line of
BlftGk Cloths, Doo Skins, Blue
And Medley Cloths, Genulno
Harris Casslmeres, Ac.
Also, an excellent stock of
SEITS FURNISHING GOODS
All of wldch he will dispose of at the
Lowest Living Profits.
83
i.
WYTH.
Ii*» Sulia.
UtKI,
it
=5 T, .5
a
E fc, a j'
a
•a'-
o
«s
.-=?ll.5S .2.RJ
I o'5~^ s o
1 **.= S S-3 Sjc:
tt
§1
SSa cts
F. IV. QIJLA^SETN
FRUIT BAZAAR
CBBAR PALLS. IOWIU
I I A O O
J. M. t. HOOCOON
B*a opened a
First Class Billiard Room
"tore of Rice A GoodfleQow,
ALL LOVE Its OF
99
THE OTJE
AfV fW|M9t#4Mir^''
Give
fltr
Call.
i.
flUvtagtielrlkknrfei
First Class Condition,
A Ad Full Operation, are Prepared
io supply the trade witliatt
Kinds of
Crackers and Cakes 1
AND
Fresh Bread.
AlsoaFnM Jsta+af
Groceries
OH HANl^
GIVE Ut A OA LL.
Next Door to T. HazlaU.
W P. SHERWOOD A CO.
TOWKSEMII
i uurr,
A N K E S
CBBAB VALU, WWA.
(MUMtihlM
Exohanga Bought and old on the
Principal Cltlas of ths United
V
Europe.
floaters in Cold and Cov
ernment Bonds.
{aOMTT A1TXN770X QIYMS TO OOlr
LEOTISO.
tXTlRBST ALLOWKD ON TIMS DZTOSITB
THE GAZETTE.
OEPAB FALLS DEC,
SB,
"ttOAE BUT SOT *OB«OTTEN.w
Ail Ambitions Youth In a Newspaper
Offlee*
Tbs sdllor of the Colorado Herald
Imd occasion to leave town for tbree
or four (!«•«, ami he comruitteil his
^aper during his absence to the
charge of a young man, a novice iu
journalism, whom he had just en
gaged as his assistant. Before leav
ing he instructed the ambitious
young editor not to permit any
Chance to so unimproved, to
force the paper and its very small
subscription price upon the attention
of the public.
"Always keep before your mind
Lho fact that the object of this paper
is to extend its circulation," he said,
"and whenever you see a chance to
insert a puff of the Herald in any
notice you can make, pile it in as
thick as you can. Keep the people
stirred up all tho time, you under-
^4*^ -"tend, bo that they will believe that
our paper is the greatest sheet in the
l/uited 8tates."
The parting tear vm shed, and
Hie editor left. The following night,
When he was far away from home,
bis wife died suddenly. Upon the
assistant devolved the unpleasant
duty of announcing the sad intelli
gence to the public. He did it
follows:
"GONB
c.«
BUT
•2
e
-2
.2
S-E1 3
J3
=9 5.
05 c~
NOT FeBaOTTKIf.M
"We are compelled this morning
to perform a duty which ie peculiary
painful to the able assistant illlor,
who has been engaged on this pa
at an enormous expense, in aceor
ance with our determination to make
the Herald a first-class journal. Last
night death suddenly and unexpect
edly snatched away from her domes
tic hearth (the best are advertised
under tho head of Stoves and Furn
aces, upon our first page) Agatha
Burns, wife of Kufus P. Burns, the
gentlemanly editor of the Herald.
Terms, three dollars per year, in
variably in advance. A Uiml mother
and an exemplary wife. Office over
Coleman's Grocery up two flights of
stairs. Knock hard. 'We
«Otice to that paper.
M. 8. noDGDOli
NEW ^BAKERY
W. B. Sherwood & Co.,
iu^r
ora-
Bhall
miss
thee, mother, we shall miss thee.'—
Job printing solicited. Funeral at
half past four, from the house just
across the street from the Herald
office. Gone to be an angel now.—
Advertisements inserted for ten cents
a square."
Well, the editor arrived at home
that day at noon. Slowly aud sad
ly he wab observed to fun himself
with a double barreled fowling piece,
into which he inserted about two
pounds and a half of bullets. He
marched over to the office, followed
by an immense crowd. The assist
ant editor was busy at the time print
ing a big placard to be tacked on
the hearse. It boro the legend "Buy
jour coffins at Himms', over the r
ald office." The assistant editor cast
his eye around and perceived his
ohief. Care was set upon that wan
rheek, aud thunder clothed his brow^.
Ho leveled his gun. The assistant
did not wait. Willi one wild and
awful yell he jumped from the sec
ond-story window, and struck out
for the golden shores of the Pacific.
But there is only one editor now,
and the clerk in the office has stand
ing orders to blow out the brains ef
any man who brings an obituary
A Story of Cross exanfCKtlea
An excellent illustration of the
truth that a lawyer may find uo
kind off knowledge 'amiss at some
tliue in bis practice is alforded by the
following anecdote related by the
daughtor of John Adolphus, the em
inent English advocate.
A very extraordinary ertminal
Gas y was entirely decided by the
knowledge my father had picked up
of nautical aflkiis in his early voyages
to and from the West Indie»«
Two Lascars were on trial for tfes
murder of the captain, and the evid
ence of the mate appeared conclusive.
In the couruo of the tentimony, how
ever, he said that at tho time of the
murder there was great confusion, as
the ship was in much peril, so that
it required all the attention of the
sailors to pruveut httr btrikiug on a
rock.
My father, who was for the de
fense, asked bo many questions as to
tbe number of the crew, where each
Wan was, and what engaged in doing
that at length the Judge whispered
"I suppose, Mr. Adolphus, these
questions are to tbe purpose. I own
1 do. not see it," thinking, no doubt,
(bat the time of the court was being
Waited.
After a few more questions as to
tbe particular duty each man was
performing, the witness had account
ed for every man on board, the cap
tain being below, and the two men
murdering him. My father fixed
his eyes steadily upon tbe witness,
and said iu a calm, yet in a search
lag and loud voice:
"Then who was at the helm7^
The mate was thunderstruck, ffc
grew deadly pale and then dropped
Is a fit. Upon coming to himself,
be confessed tbe murder. In his
false evidence he had given to each
man his pomtiou, aud had forgotten
the most material place, or rather,
left none to lili it.
Of Mr. Lincoln as a writer,
Cincinnati Commercial appropriate*
ly says: "People used to say that
He ward wrete Lincoln,
s mtwageB, or
Caleb Cusbing. Every one now,
who baa paid any attention to the
subject, and who is even an indiffer
ent observer ©f style, Is well con
vinced that uobody but Lincoln
wrote his messages, aud that nobody
else could have written them. Asa
writer, I think bis superior did not
live. For beauty, smoothness,
strength, comprehension, argument,
force and earnestness I do net think
his equal can be found. Everything
he wrote bore the same beauty and
finish, and every word appealed to
some emotion in one's nature. His
was a style that could not be imitat­
ed.
SV tffSCKAL ACHUUMJDtT. tM
It was peculiar, but conscienti
ous. It was the same whether in
message, speech, or private letter.—
Everything he wrote had a heart in
it. It was so gentle that a child
might have Inspired it, and yet so
strong, and just, and earnest that it
CEDAR FALLS, IOWA. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 29, 1871.
AFTER Aj^
How Mart VV,n TJi^M
llridci
1871.
A WoMan
How
wed
writst contributes te tMeoU
urans of the Chester (Pa.) Republic»
an an article en "Tommy Weller's
Widows," frost Which we extract the
following
Another very conrtable widow was
a young lady of Washington Penn
nylvania. She became engaged to a
young man named Robert in
184fi. Her father, however, objected
to thin match, with one of his clerks,
and when the young lady received
a tempting proposal fVom a wealthy
Ruitor, the parental influence soon
efTected a marriage, despite the prev
ious engagement. Iu less than three
months her husband was killed by a
kick from a horse. Robert was a
second time a suitor, but delayed
the important question until fifteen
months had eiapned, when to his
horror she told him nhe was engag
ed. In three months thereafter she
was married. Two years elapsed,
when the married couple removed
to Syracuse, where among the vict
ouia of tho cholera, when it swept
that city was the second husband.
Robert again sought her haud, and
when a year had elapsed, was on tbe
eve of a declaration, when lo I he
received an invitation to her wed
ding Her late husband's business
was found in such a itate that to
avoid immense losses ihe married
the surviving partner. Shortly after
she removed with her third husband
to Detroit Mich. A few years elaps
ed when herself and hushaud were
on a steamer that was wrecked near
Buffalo. The husband perished and
the wife escaped soley through the
exertions of a friend who was on
board. His gallantry inspired such
sentiments iu her breast that she
married her brave preserver a few
mouths after her third widowhood.
The happy pair removed to Pitsburgh
where the husband was engaged in
mercantile businons. Thitherl&obert,
still cherishiug his first love, foU
lowed them. One day as be was
passing the husband's store, he saw
a terribltfjcominotiou. Rushing In he
beheld tho mangled body of that yen
tleniau on the floor. A tieree of rice,
lu beiug hoisted to the upper story,
had fallen through the traps, killing
him :inatautly. Anxiously Robert
enquired if any ono had been sent
to inform his wife, and was told that
the book-keeper had just gone.—
Robert started for Allegheny City,
where tho diBceased had resided, at
the top of his speed. The book
keeper was tint ahead of him, and
from past experience, knowing the
virtue of prompt action, aad appre
hending that the clerk had dusigus
on the widow, he ran for dear life.—
(Side by side the race continued, until
they '.readied Hand street bridge,
when the clerk was obliged to slop
to pay his toll, while Robert a com
muter, passed over without stopping.
Reaching the house of the widow
first, Robert told the heart-rending
news, and in the samo I)renth made
a proposal of marriage. Ho was ac
cepted. hor§romlMf after a
jisar of mourning she became his
wife. As all her husbands had died
wealthy, lioburt was well fixed after
all. This case is a remarkable ex
ample of what pluck aud persever
ence will do for a man, while at the
same time it teaches a lessoaSS tne
danger of delay.
fmea
and four Children
to Death.
A letter iu the. St. Paul Pioneer,
from Mankato, Minn., December 11,
relates the freezing to death of a
woman and her four children Id
Noble oounty, that Bute, during tbe
absence of the drunken husband and
father, who left tbem destitute dur
ing tbe recent dreadful oold weather.
The letter says He left her out ou
the open prairie, in the dead of win
ter, with scarce a stick of wood, and
what is still more incredible, while
she was daily expecting confine
ment. The day after he left her
came (be fearful storm of the 2d, aud
when that was expended the poor
woman found herself without fuel.—
She knew that she could scarcely
expect her husband home for several
days, as it took that time generally
for him to recover from his sprees,
and the conviction came to her that
her family would soon freeze to death
unless succor could be had from the
neighbors, the nearest of whom was
three miles distant, go on Monday
this desparate woman, at that time
in so delicate coudition that she
might be confined to her bed, started
out In tbe fierce cold for help. At
least such Is the supposition, for the
next day some of the neighbors
found her body, together with a new
born babe, stark stiff, In a snow
bank, where shi had fallen faint aud
perished. Horrified they picked her
up and carried her home, and here,
horror upon horror, they found the
three little cnes also frozen to death.
The drunken brute of a husband and
father was hunted up, and friends in
this city telegraphed for, who at
once wect up and saw the bodies de
cently Interred.
AN Ewe! INKER
danger.
ey
OS*
STKAM.—Barney But*, of tbe Read
ing railroad, is said to be tbe oldest
locomotive engineer in tbe U.S. In
1837 he was running an engine from
Parry villa to Weatherly, tbe planes
being then iu oporation. Tbe cars
were drawn up tbe planes by a sta
tionary eagine, and were then drawn
into the Beaver Meadow mines by a
locomotive engine. One day his en
gine would not make steam well,
and he was likely to be over-taken
by a passenger train before be oould
reach the turnout. Seeing a good
sized porker beside tbe track, he
jumped from his engine—the train
was moving very slow—seized the
pig, cut his throat, and staffed
him into the furnace. The fat of
tbe pig was better than kindling
wood, aud in a very short time Bar-»
ney had steam up and was
RSRP
of
A gentleman, a few days since, on
receiving a new $1 greeuback from
the bank, marked it, with the design
of watching its course. He found
upon inquiring, that in less than for-
Sow a Barker Qot Even with Mark
Twain.
Those who read an art!e!o written
by Mark Twain on barbers, and
published in the Galaxy last sums
mer, will enjoy the following story
of the way tbe humorist was come
up to In Syracuse by one of the
slandered knighls of the brush and
lather. It appears, according to the
Courier of the Bait City, that on last
Wednesday afternoon Twain put in
an appearance there for the purpose
of filling an engagement that even*
lng to lecture, and lu order to make
himself presentable to a Syracuse
fashionable audience, he concluded
to patronize one of the class he had
slandered In the Galaxy article, and
stepping Into a sbop deliber
ately divested himself of a paper col
lar and cravat, and told the son of
lather to proceed, little dreaming
that he was known and appreciated.
Rut he was, and the way that bar
ber "weut for" Mark would have
astonished Bill Nye. Selecting the
dullest razor in the shop, he sharp*
ened it up a little, and then seizing
Twain by the nose with a gra^p that
would bringdown a bullock, he com
menced to lather him. He soaped
him from chin to eyebrows, and rush
ed tbe lather brush about an inch up
his nose and thenco into both ears.
Poor Twain In the meantime snort
ing aud sputtering like a steam-en
gine blowing off steam. In vain he
protested that he did not want his
eyebrows and forehead shaved.—
Keep still, said tho barber, I know
my business. After soaping him till
ho looked like an Albino, he laid on
tbe blade. The first stroke brought
tears to T«raln's eyes. The second
brought him to a sitting position
with an exclamation, "I say that
razor is too dull to shave me with."
"Lay down," said the knight of ths
razor, thrusting him down into the
chair again. "That razor will cut a
hair I know my business." Twain
groaned, and the barber pulled un
til the beard was off, and a good por
tion of the skin with It.
After shaving, he proceeded to
wash him up, selecting the dirtiest
towel iu the shop, one that was used
for wlt\ing off luilr dye, aud nua as
spotted ss Joseph's coats, He Boueed
the water in ills eyes and nostrils,
and then wiped him off. The spec
tators were by this time unable to
control their laughter, and burst out
in loud peals, in which he of the
lather heartily joined. Twain saw
the joke, but kept quiet. When ths
barber told him that his hair was
coming out, aud offered to sell him
a bottle of hair restorative, price
three dollars per.bottle, Twalu re*
plied, "Well, I rather want my hair
to fall out. Ifhave too much for com.
fort." He thon offered to «ell him
a bottle of "Bloom of Youth," tell
ing him that he was badly freckled.
"Am I said Mark "well, I rather
like that. If I was good looking and
fair to gaze upon tbe ladies would
all fall in love with me, end 'that
would make my wife uneasy. As it
is she allows me to roam about the
country without fear. She knows
my uglluess will protect me. Then
he of the lather aud brusli saw he
could not persecute Mark any farth
er, and after brushing him off in a
lusty and vigorous manner, said,
"Mr. Twain, how do you like your
shave?" "Oh said Mark, "this is
nothing new. Every barber iu tho
oountry goes for
me
the
in the samo
style. I am used to it and, in fact,
1 rather like It." "Call again," said
the now satisfied barber. "Not If I
can help It," replied Mark. "Uood
day." He politely bowed Mr.
Twain out of the shop.
SLEEPY.
A Goet Story of a Silver City BrMee
roost.
From
Nevada Territorial Knterpriae, Dec. 6:
A young couple residing not far
from Silver City, Nevada, determln*
ed to elope recently, and accordingly
provided a buggy and started for
Virginia late in the afternoon, and
In due time arrived at a certain hotal
in that city.lwhieh is. iudewd, the
puradise'of lovers. The two were
young and exceedingly rural, and
tln ir conduct soon convinced the in
niiiated attendants at the hotel that
they had been thwarted in their hy
meneal inclinations by hard-hearted
parents and guardians, opposed to
what is satirically termed the "de
crees of Heaven."
The emotions betrayed by the fu
gitives were various while modest
in the extreme, they were unabled to
conceal their fondness from the
guests in the drawing room, yet
mi ogled with tins modesty was a
sort of a look of triumph at their
success and fear lest they might be
overtaken, wbioh at once enlisted
the sympathy of all who observed
them.
At length the young mau weut to
the ofiloe and inquired for the pro
prietor alleging that he had some
private business which could be
transacted with no other parties.—
The clerk stated that he was not
within, but that he could aud would
attend to anvtbiug the rural might
unfeld. Of this the youug man
seemed skeptical, and commenced
pacing the floor exhibiting the great
est restlessness, and finally entered
the drawing room, from which hu
again issued after a short consulta
tion, aud approaching the clerk he
said:
"Sir, there is a lady in tbe room,
she wants to marry me, and I want
to marry h«r just as bad, can you do
anything for us
The clerk replied that everything
matrimonial should be arranged in a
short time, arid in less thau an hour
the Justice of tbe Peace arrived, the
cereinouy was performed, and tho
happy couple united by tbo firmest
tie the law recognizes.
Hooti after, the bridegroom aps
proached the desk of the clerk and
commenced looking over the regis
ter. The clerk inquired what he de
sired, aud received for reply that he
only wishod to see fiie arrival. His
manner betrayed the fact that his
mind was not easy but what his
troubles were no one could conjec
ture. After walkiug about the office
for about twenty minutes, he re
paired to the book again, and said to
the clerk in a low tone:
"Hadn't you better change the reg
ister and give us one room, now we're
married
"That is already changed," replied
the clerk. "You are marked for the
same room."
"Well," replied the gratified Neva
dlan, surprised at such thoughtful
ness, "Well, Just show me up, for
I'm awful sleepy."
It is needless to add tbsthla
complied with.
-The
ty eight hours it had passed through which they passed, are nearly off the
the hands of nearly thirty persons, i bands of the'physicians, but as the
thus paying t'ebts te the amount of sold weather approaches many who
ubout$30. In these times of close- escaped being bur nod, having suffer*
enforced conviction and commanded in the money market it is sur- ed severely by exposure are attacked
respect. Seward or Cushing might! prising bow much good a little mon
have furnished some briefs or
towaisrlaltt."
,, i- Iwltb fevers, snd it will be necessary
ideas,
does, and how much good is done to continue the hospital for some
when people pay tfcsir debts. jttaie, and perhsps all wlnt*.
Peshtlgo Eayle says the
burned patients, such as have sur
vived the terrible ordeal through
v s s u n s v s u
•"The eensus returns show
GAZETTE.
Generalities.
thenl*
neof farms in Missouri, $ WJ,W17,0U0
value of farm products, |lG8,03fl,000
value of live
Btock,
$34,285,000.
—The population of Washington
territory has doubled within the past
ten years, aud the territory has $11,
500,000 worth of taxable prcperty.
—Coal uow sells at Cedar Rapids at
$4 per ton and by tests made by the
School Board at that plaoe, one ton
of coal equals two cords of first-class
split, well seasoned wood.
—The Taylers Falls Reporter sayi»
that the pineries are swarming with
lumbermen and that, so far, there
has been but few accidents compared
with those oocurlng In former years.
—In Wisconsin, wltb a total popu
lation of 1,054,670, there are 866,000
foreign birth, 718,000 having one or
both parents of foreign birth, aud
671,000 foreign-born father and moth
er.
—Mrs. Colt revolver's widow, is
building a $60,000 school house in
which to cduoate the children of her
workmen. That is a very admirable
way, madam, to teach the young idea
how to shoot
—An Itemlzer fn the New York
Mail fainted after producing the fol
lowing: "A man who works for a
living should marry a woman taller
than himself,—the laborer Is worthy
of his higher 1"
—A new journal Is
announoed
in
England, having for its object sim
ply the rocordlng of births, ruarria
ges aud deaths. What wonderful
obituary poetry we may expect in a
paper with suoh an attractive spec
iallty.
—The
Gloucester
AdvmUmr
aaen-
Hons a married couple in that town
who have had twenty-seven chll
dren, all of whom are dead They
must look upon life through a per
petual black veil, like Father
Hooper.
—TheDetroit JVes Preu
annoanoes
the birth of "a pair of triplets" In
that city. It Is rarely seldom that
yr»u ftnvl triplets who ar#
ingprilnua
enough to be born Iu pairs without
leaving an odd baby somewhere in
the neighborhood.
—8enator Sumner has offered a joint
resolution providing for sn amend
ment to the constitution limiting the
President to one term. The resolu
tion has been laid over. The amend
ment will not go Into effect, if
adopted, until March 4th, 1873.
—The Mount Pleasant Journal ssys
that the good people of Marlon town
ship know how to do the handsome
thing. One day last week a number
gathered at the residence of Mrs.
i Anna Cloffenstlne, taking with them
several oords of wood, aud they
didn't leave until
It
was all chopped
and piled up ready for ueet. That's
religion.
—A young lady In Springfield,
Mass., a few nights ago, arose in her
slee'p, and went to the premises of a
neighbor, three doors away, where
she was discovered sitting very com
posedly in a chair on the porch, ar
rayed without any special reference
to tbe condition of tbe thermometer.
She was excessively frightened
when awakened, and says she will
be afraid to go to sleep again.
—A foppish young dandy, who has
just returned from arboad, appeared
at a New York ball, last week, ele
gantly attired in full dress suit, with
diamond studs and sleeve buttons,
point lace ueck-tle, three^buttonod
gleves, hair powdered with blond
powder, French heels-to his boots, a
strong suspicion of rouge on his
cheeks, aud a piece of court plaster
on biB forehead. Tbe girls made so
much fun of him that he retired be*
fore supper.
Uood Advice.
President
Porter, of Yale College,
gave the following advice to the stu
dents of that institution, the other
day "Young men you are the
architects of your own fortunes.—
Rely upon your own strength of
body and soul. Tsks for your stsr
self-reliance, faith, honesty, and In
dustry. 'Luck is a fool, pluck Is a
hero.' Don't take too much advice
—keep at your own helm and steer
your own ship, and remember that
the great art of commanding is to
take a fair share of the work. Don't
practice too much humanity. Think
well of yourself. Strike out. As
sume your own position. Put pota
toes in your cart, over a rough road,
and small ones go to tbe bottom.—
Rise above the envious snd Jealous.
Fire above the mark you intend to
hit. Energy, invincible determina
tion, with the right motive, are the
levers that move the world. Don't
diink. Don't ehew. Don't smoke.
Don't swear. Don't deceive. Don't
read novels. Don't marry until you
can support a wife. Be iu earnest.
Be self-reliant. Be generous. Be
civil. Read the papers. Advertise
your business. Make money, and do
good with It Love your Ood and
fellow men. Love truth and virtue.
Love your oountry, and obey Its
laws." If this advice is implicitly
followed by jthe young men of tbe
couutry, the mlllenlum Is near at
band.
Two mouths ago an aged wid
ow in Massachusetts received a tele
gram that her only sou was dying in
Lawrence, Kansas. Notwithstand
ing her extreme sge aud reeble
health she must see her sou. She
undertook tbe journey. Tbe train
was delayed. When she arrived at
Utica she was taken violently ill. A
young physician assisted ber to a
hotel and did every thing he eould
for her comfort. Her detention by
by sickness and moderate means
would not allow hsr to pursue her
journey, but for tbe kindness of tbe
attending stranger. He paid her
bills, assisted hsr to the oars, and ac
companied ber to Buffalo.
At parting she requested bis ad
dress. Tbe other day this stranger
was sested in his office at Albany.—
A stranger entered, and after some
conversation presented the doctor
with a Government bond fer $500, as
a reward for his kindness to tbe old
lady, saying: "She was my mother.
She died a few days after reaching
me, and I recovered. Had it not
been for your kindness she would
have died on tbe road. I am her son
who wss sick. I am a banker, but
money cau never repay tbe debt I
owe you for your kindness to my
dswr
good mother.
W^inlag the Baby*
WebaveJjtad
s weaning
over
rk,and
M»o«r
house, •^fcvely babo baa been rude
ly torn fioqnts mother, there hasn't
been an aleep in the neightMsrhood
for a wt
all tbe cats, dogs and
English sparrows have fled in dis
may. Pledsant dreams and ecstacies
of bliss have fled, and everything is
so blue that we can scrape Indigo off
tbo back fence. This weaning busi
ness has disturbed the peace and
quietness ef s quiet family wuss than
ten tons of bellyache. I'd rather
•wallow a toll knob, hitch the wire
to an engine house, and start a tele
graph alarm in my stomach, thau at
teud another season of weaning.—
Young 'uus don't like to bs weaned
they don't like to be separated from
the bosom of the family, not muchly.
It all came about thusly I live with
Mrs. Spifilns Mrs. Spifilns is the
majestic mother of a little Bpifilns
its father is old Spifilns, called Spif,
for short, just as little Splfflus is
called Bplffy for easy. There is a
dot litjtweeu my rootu and theSpif
fluses. The keyhole leaks, hence all
the trouble. A female woman,
mother of about a dozen children,
called on Spifilns, and told how It
was shameful to nuss that great big
boy it was drawing on her too
much, and care and anxiety put
white streaks on ber besd, like fst in
a hunk of roast beef. She told her
how if she didu't wean him from the
maternal fount in less than nix
months she could scrub clothes on
her forehead. Then she concluded
to wesn the little cuss, and it was the
worst season of perplexity and adul
terated distress I ever experienced.—
It was equal to agood spell of misery
and woe, without any sweeten lug.—
A man comee out of a season of
weaning looking wuss thsn a rooster
drowned in a swill barrel.
The first thing this pious ffcmlly
did was to lay in a barrel of super
sulphate of paregoric—they didn't
lay in it, but laid it In. They got six
dozen of Winslow's syrup, ten
pounds of morphine, twenty gum
dreps and eight pounds of alum, to
shrink his throat so he couldn't yell
then they bought two cows that gave
cow's milk, another cow timt pr«
condensed milk, and another cow
that gave cream for coffee then they
bought a cow that didn't give any
inilk, for company for the other
cows. I told them that If they kept
so many cows Sptffy would be a cow
ard but Mrs. Spifflns didn't appre
ciate the Joke. The dreadful night
came. Hpiffy had his rations cut
off he didn't like it, and I'll swear,
before long I found out I didn't like
it either, and I
Boon
wished his head
had been cut off too. The aavil
chorus wasn't nowhere it was worse
thau though my pillow had been
stuffed with live bu
11-frogs of all
the yells that ever brought suushine
to the fireside this was ths yell oh-est
—from 10:15 P. M. till 7 A. M. It was
one streak of shriek, with here and
there a knot in It, where he would
raise his voice a little. I laid awake
all night and murmured cusses. In
the next room things were kinder
mixed. Mrs. Spi/Tlna and 8plf got
to growling. Mrs, Hpifllus cried aud
old Splf swore. Mrs. Spifilns asked
Sp£? if these were the golden dreams
of her maidenhood. Spif said he
didn't care a continental for
her golden dreams, and asked her if
this was the peaceful manner In
which they were to glide down the
pathway of life together. Then she
told him if she had married Smith,
he wouldn't have treated her so.—
Spif told her be wished to thunder
she had, and old Smith had that
young'un to wean. Then Mrs. Splf
fins began to woep, and told Spif
how inach she bad suffered for him,
and she said her heart was breaking.
Then 1 think by the sound, old Spif
got up and took a hand In exercising
Spiffy, for I heard a heavy foot pac
ing the floor all night When I
beard the glasses jingle I knew that
little Spiffy was getting paregoric
squirted dewn his throat but Hpitry
kept up his yell. By Julius Ctesar, I
felt like cramming a live lobster
down bis tbrost. Three nights this
thing was kept up. I didn't sleep
one wink. I lost ten pounds of
flesh if I could hsvs got hold of
that little cuss, I'd lost another pound
I'd pounded his hide so he wouldn't
have no hide and seek in him when
he grew up. No more weaning
matinees for me. After the thing
was all did, they brought little Spif
fy down into the parlor. He laughed
and o-od, and I'll take my oath you
would think that he never cried io
his life. I'm blessed glad the job is
done, and if ever I have tbe job done
on my own account, you'll find this
youth leaving town for a week for
it is an awful job to wean a young'un,
.*» Golden Wordtfc
Boston Basar Gaaetta.
—Be humble.—T.
TTffKl
—Don't
smoke.—V.
-Mind
—Read
A
CM
bless
yon
A Qranfc
—Don't vleoelve.—.Aaron Munchau
wn.
—Lore
Davit.
your oountry.—J^ersen
yoar own
cozy,
—Don't md
JBroth*r$.
business.—Oato*
novels.—JTarper 4
Ws concur la tbe above.—I*. jr.
•feterton & Cb,
—Beware
Gen. Hall.
•i
Mis, Livermore.—
tbe
—Don't
Bemat GU4tt€.-Sb-
William Temple.
—Make monev
and do good
W. M. Tweed.
mtwfmm.
mm mm
i
NUMBER 39i
TarllT oo Babies.
Tbe great want of womt»
ent Is money money for tbeir per
sonal wants and money to carry oot
plans. I Buppose they consider It as
houorable to work for
mousy
as for
board, and I demand for them equal
pay for equal work. I demand that
the bearing and rearing of children
the most exacting of employments,
and involving the most terrible of
risks, shall be the best paid work in
tho world and that husbands shall
treat their wives with at leaat aa
much consideration and acknowledge
them entitled to as much money as
wet nurses.
The meaning of this is, that tbe
wives are about to strike for green
backs so much mouey for every
baby born. No greenbacks, no more
children. No greenbacks, no more
population no more boys to carry
on tho great enterprise of the age.—
The scale of prices for maternal du
ties are given as follows:
Girl babies, $100.
Boy babies, $200.
Twin babies, $300.
Twins iboth boys), $400.
Triplets, $000.
Triplets (all boys), $1,000.
Terms: C. O. O. No credit beyond
the first child, the motto being,
"Pay up or dry up."
Husbands who desirs to trauaait
their names to posterity will plesse
notice and take a new departure.—
Mrt. atmilon.
=3 ,,n..
Probably not one policyten t«
carefully read, and of the few that
are read, a very small proportion is
entirely understood,
Although a comparative small
amount of mouey is paid for a policy
it should be remembered that it cov
ers a covenant to pay, often many
thousands of dollars. The liability
of an insurance oompany. is suppos
ed to be as complete and as binding
as a bond or mortgage, and yet while
no one thinks of advancing his mou
sy on the latter without the most
thorough investigation, insurance
policies are paid for, and, often with
out unfolding or reading, are lightly
thrown aside to await the day of cal
amity, when£thelr respective eondi*
tloni becomes operative, aud then
sometimes to Isarn that they are so
defective In execution as to involve
no liability ou tbeoompauy issuing
th^m.
In this connection our attention
has, within a few days, been aalied to
a deceptive—we will not say dishon*
est—form of policy said to be iu use
by some Eastern and New York com
panies, iu which the good old fash
ioned words, "the receipt whereof is
hereby seknowledged," are omitted.
We are Informed by oim in the busi
ness that these insurance companies,
in their great desire for business, give
credit to their agents, and If tho
agsnt neglect to hand over the prem
ium beforo loss occurs, pay mon is
refused by the company on the plea
that the premium had never been
received. Such policies are not de
sirable under any circumstances to
hold, for no one in case of lows wishes
to be required te prove payment of
premium, or to stand responsible for
the integrity aud solveucy of tbe
agent. The custom, we are told, Is
for these companies to deliver the
policies as negotiated to the agents,
who, however, do not settle for them
until the end of the current month
hence, even in cases where ths busi
ness is honestly conducted a large
per centage of the polici«s*re Inse.
cure in all the interval between the
date of tbe policy, and the settling
days of the agents. At tbe best, t^e
parties thus Insured purchase the
chanee of a lawsuit, and in two in*
stances, at least, our Informant says
to his knowledge within the pastflve
years, suits arising from policies of
the kind here alluded to, have been
decided against the underwriter!,—
Everyone procuring a policy of Is*
surance, should carefully read Itt
A Nsw Orleans journal le
to
wltb It
marry until you can sup­
port a wife. (Nor then either.)—
Malthue,
—Wisdom Is better
than
—Let
yoar
soup.—
Daniel Webtter't Reply to General
Scott.
be
self
honesty,mottoIndustry-reiianoe,
and
&lth,
Flehjr,
.—Barnes
—I sttrybut mi success In life tolmi
devoebim
to
speilying.—Joeh
ingt.
JBiU-
—He that in the world would rise,
take the
papers
fuoim.
and advertise.—Ocm-
—An honest man gathers
no
moss.
rolling stone's the neblest
God.—Jr.V, Nu»by.
I"
work of
A Michigan correspondent Writes:
"We believe an actual eomputatiou
of the number of old clothes sent to
each male suffeler by the forest fires
in Michigan would give him about
two
hundred pairs
of old pants
one hundred old
and
boots
per capita."
inclined
be feoetiou* over the sudden de
mise of a worthy citizen of "Yellow
Jack's Paradise," whose sole offense
was that, unlike most inventor?, his
first experiment wss performed on
himself. Mr. Grey, so runs this
"o'er true tale." had discovered a
non-explosive illuminating fluid, and
to prove its quality he Invited a few
friends to his reom, whither he had
brought a barrel of this fluid, which
he at once proceeded to stir with a
red hot poker. As he went through
the roof of his house, accompanied
by his friends, bs endeavored to ex
plain to his neighbor that the partic*
ular fluid in the barrel had too much
benzine in it but the gentleman
said be had an engagement higher
up. Mr. Gray continued his ascent
until he met Mr. Jonee, who inform
ed him that there was ncf necessity
for blm to go higher as e%pry one was
coming down, so Mr. Gray started
ba«)k. His widow offers for sale the
secret of tbe msnufscture of tbe
non-exploeive fluid at a reduced rate,
as sbo wishes to purchase a sllvsr
handled coffin with a gilt plats. No
cards.
Paw people have an idea of Iks
amount of peusion money paid out
in Iowa. The annual sum is over
one million dollars. This shows
what Iowa did in tbe great rebellion.
On tbe list at Dee Moines is one W.
H. Brown, a youug man who carries
in his body twenty-seven rebel bul
lets. He is a wreck of humanity
but with iudomitable will aud pluek
he mauages to gain a living. He has
recently received an an order from
the Peusion Buresu to report for an
examination for an increase of
pen­
sion. Not one iu a thousand would
have survived the shots whJuU ha x«
oel ved.«—JSxchange.
We learn from Wa»hingUh that
Horace Capron, who is now in the
employ of the Japanese Government,
has already been the means of send
ing to this couutry an order for a
new steamer, a large amount of ma
chinery, and a full supply of live
stock for the use of Japan. The
steamer will be built In this city, and
when ready for sea, will take passen
gers and freight, and will «*k tho
rising sun by way of the Suez.Canal.
We are also informed that tbe Jau
panese minister iu Washington has
petitioned our government for per
mission to send six Japanese etodenta
to the West Point Academy.—New
York Evening Poet.
Tun lady who presented Mr. ttpttff
gsou with $100,000, some time ago,
fouud an orphanage for boys, has, it
Is said, offered that gentlemen anoth
er large sum of money to fous4 s
similar institution for girls.
It
i*
4/r» 4.

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