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The Iowa plain dealer. [volume] (New Oregon, Howard County, Iowa) 1867-1895, September 01, 1881, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025167/1881-09-01/ed-1/seq-4/

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RAILROAD MONOPOLY.
Am tMerestlng aad IaftrneUfp Con
venatloa Between Citlse*
M* a Railroad Official."
ttftlfroad Official—*' Why slioiilit not n
ffcilruad company le let alone to manage
tta businefn in ita own way, the name a*
ft merchant manages hi* Innuueaa Io
Bot commercial rules apply in both
tittaea Is it not a question of nupply
and demand, and competition does not
tibe merchant sell a large quantity
Cheaper than he does a small quantity,
Had everybody get all they can
fierythe
Eir
1
V'
Gitizen—" There are the following ma
larial differences in the situation The
railroad corporation informs a public
ftinction—that of furnishing public high
Ways it exists and can only carry on its
business by the permission of the public
because it is for public use and Itenefit
it is allowed to take a citizen's property
at an appraised valuation, without his
consent, something that no private jer
aouor business can do, and, after the
capital invested in building a railroad
receives a fair compensation, the rest of
the advantages of steam roads belong to
the public, tlie natural owner of all high
wavs. In one sense, railroad charters are
to the nature of a partnership between
the State aud the corporations. The
corporations build and operate railroads
lor the sake of charging ccrtaiu tolls. In
the State of New York, and I lielieve in
Burnt other States, it was expressly
stipulated that these shall be 'reasona
ble
,' and based U|Kn the cost of the
rvice rendered the word 'reasonable*
Was dctined as follows When the rates
©barged yielded in excess of 10 per cent.
Set upon the actual cost of construc
tion, then rates might be lowered bv
law and the public receive their Inmetit
ill the partnership in the hlmpo of re
duced rates for trans}Kirtation. This
agreement has shamefully beeu evaded
by the railroads, and, through stock
Watering and other methods, the public
have In-en obliged to pay far more than
•ley ought for steam transportation on
land. Regarding competition, it does
Jot work to the same extent in railroad
transportation as it does in other lines
if business. Combinations take place
a railroad is a natural monopoly rail
loads cannot be multiplied indefinitely
citizen cannot put liis own car
pon railroad track, the same as he
Can his ship upon the ocean or his
raput
aiuboat
rivate enterprises, hence the necessity
restrictions upon railroad companies
Which are not required in private' busi
ness."
R. O.—" But prices forrailroad trans
portation have declined faster and are
#ow proportionately lower than many
either commodities, and rates in this
aountrv are lower than in most other
0OU11 tries. It does not look as if the
fHtblic interest has suffered very much.
C.—M True, in many places rates have
largely declined, but not nearly so much
-Oa they should have done. Reduced
fates for transportation have largely re
Multed from mechanical improvements
Which have beeu made, and also from
Increase of business, the result of in
creased population. For instanoe, steel
mils, lasting from three to six times as
long as iron rails, now cost but little
niore than iron locomotives haul from
So to 60 per cent, more than they did
ten years ago. Freight cars weighing
ten tons a few years ago only carried ten
ions, or a ton of paying freight for each
ton of dead weight in rolling stock.
Improvements in these curs liave been
niade until it is not uncommon for them
Id
now cany a ton and a half, aud some
limes two tons for each ton of rolling
•lock. Clever inventions have made
tbe supply of labor required in operat
fag a road to be greatly reduced, and in
many other ways improvements have
beeu effected which ought to inure to
•le benetit of the public. Rates for
railroad transportation in this country
should Ik? much less than in other coun
tries because of these improvements,
and the long hauls and cheaper con
struction here also the public aid in
bind (upward of 4»,000,00U acres), and
«mlseripti(ns which have been given.
R. O.—'"Why ho? I don't see tliat
Hie public lias any right to these im
fMTovements and advantages unless we
choose to give theia the ienetit."
C.—"There is where we differ again
the theory of our Patent law is that, after
Hie inventor has received a fair com
pensation for his trouble, expense and
Selong
enilis,
all
the rest of the advantage
to the public and the theory of
Our Huilroad law is that they aie only
«n titled to a toll or charge which will
flvestment,aaud
ield them fair return on the actual
this toil must be uni
form and impartial to all citizens."
R. O.—" Well, if that is the ground
*ou take, you won't find many men go
NUg into the railroad business."
C.—•"Won't we? What is the first
Incentive to the building of a railroad
In it not ver\ largely the desire of the
people of a certain section to have bet
ter outlets to market, and the desire of
owners of real estate to make their prop
erty more valuable by connecting with
Hie larger lines of communication
Through these motives have not State,
Oouuty and municipal interests largely
aided in the construction of these high
way*? Witness the millions of dollars
Which the peorle of the State of New
York, as well as other Stutes, have con
tributed for this purpose. Do you mean
fc) tell me that the Vauderbilts. Goulds
Mid other highway grabl»ers are entitled
ft) any consideration for the invention
and construction of these improved high
ways? They have simply gone into the
business liecause they saw that the l»eu
afits of Hteum rfnd electricity were so
fjnormous that they could steal most of
Hie advantages, and that the public
Would be satisfied with the rest. They
•aw that by consolidating and combin
ing small and often conijietiiig links of
railroad they could organize a machinery
tor taxing all production and commerce,
•ttcli as the world has never seen, audit
ia only after tliey have exercised this
Ebulous
wer
to at. extent which has given them
wealth, am' endeavored to j»er
petuute the system, aud rivet the fetters
0f a privileged class
U|mhithe
in
masses by
corrupting our electiona and legislation,
that the people are beginning to wake
ftp to a true appreciation of the facts.
Look at the history of the Har
lem road when Commodore Vanderbilt
cAjtained possession of that road he
doubled the rates of freight, and on the
principle of charging what the traffic
Would bear has drained the liou's share
Of the profit of production throughout
tiiat entire region, and, as far as circum
atances would jiermit, he has pursued
the s«uiie policy with all his lioad
Ventures. When he took possession of
tlie Harlem road, twenty years a.o, its
Sloek was quoted at ulKiiit*$75 |er share,
Mid the rate of freight at that time for
transporting milk to New York \»as HO
nta ier can it Wiis gradually raised
i» ttO, and only alter a great eoutest did
we people succeed in reducing it to it*
present price of 45 (as against an aver
age of 540 ceuts for similar service els
where). Notwithstanding the enormuys
general increase in )opulatiou and \al
Oc*. property in WesUhester comity
along the line ot that road, contiguous
as it is to the greatest market in the
-oouiitrv,
worth less to day than it was
wjien Mr. Yauderbilt's reign began. The
Ifasou may be found in the double rates
of fare fur coaimutem and the excessive
freight raWa above The'
capitalization of the rood is much above
what it could be duplicated lor to-day,
and yet dividends have been wrung from
the |eople of that section to make the
stock worth $180 per share at the preseut
time.
The Hudson River rood runs paral
lel with the Harlem, is operated by the
same management, and vet, having water
comiH'titiou, the average rites of freight
oil the latter road are only about half
those on the Harlem. No one doubts
that the rates on the Hudson River road
are sufficiently remunerative nor that
those on the Hailem are exorbitant. It
is a simple illustratiou that 'might
makes right,' and that a freebooter, if
he only understands the habits of the
American people, can rob them with
impunity. The instances I have cited
are but typos of our whole railroad sys
tem. ts it any wonder that railroad
men grow suddenlv rich, while the num
ber of tramps and WyirnrR increase?"
R. O.—"Now, my friend, you are get
ting a little excited Mr. Vanderbilt is
not charging the people along the line of
the Harlem road jus much us it cost them
before the railroad was built, and yet
vou call him a freebooter if you don't
like the rates we charge, why don't you
wagon your produce to market, or go to
the Legislature and gvt it to reduce the
rate of freight?"
C.—"Well, there is some freight wag
oned to market now, right alongside of
the greatest iuvention for carrying
freight cheaply aud quickly that 'has
ever l»een made, but I do not think it is
right that auy mutt or f-et of men should
le allowed to monopolize all the bene
fits of that invention, especially when
these lK'iiefits have been vouchsafed in
a greater degree to the jn-ople of other
sections, Whose produce is carried to tin
market at much cheaper rates, and with
which the jieople of Illy section have to
compete. I do not think it riyht that
Mr. Vanderbilt should abrogate the
natural advantages of the eoL||iguity of
Eigher
upon the river. The ruilroad
common carrier, but there the sim
flarity to the ship or steamtxiat ends.
The public interest is not protected by
•eonqietition ns it is on the ocean or in
roierty
to this market by charging me
proportionate rates of freight,
aud, indeed, lie has no business to charge
me or my ueigliltors upon any other
principle than the cost of service with a
fair profit added thereto, and when 1 say
fair profit, I mean not more than 10
per cent, upon the actual money Mr.
Vanderbilt originally put into that road,
and not upon watt red stoek, or stock is
aued to represent surplus earnings'
(which is really the people's money)
invested in extending or improving
the road. Such betterments should be
made with Mr. Vaudcrbilt's own money
or money actually subscribed lor that
purpose, and for which stock may legiti
mately be issued and, as regards the
second }M»rt of your Question, Why the
people do not go to the Legislature and
have rates lowered,' I want say toyou
that that is just what we intend to do.
I say this with the full kuowledge that
railroad men are sending money into
di'tricts all over the State (and'other
States as well) to influence nominations
or elections that the votes of individual
citizens are bought aud sold almost as
freely as other merchandise that you
send every memlwr of the Legislature,
before he takes his seat, a free pass, and
that many influential politicians, editors
aud clergymen receive the same 'atten
tions even Coroners and Tax Assessors
alougyourline Wing thus rememlier. d. I
aay this knowing that the most eloquent
advocates will appear at Albany to plead
your cause that men who are 'elected to
the Legislature in your interest, while
nominally representing that of the pub
lic, will secretly obstruct legislation and
trade their votes to serve you that
your advertising patronage will be x
erted upon uewspapers, and that sliip
lers will be provided with preferential
rates, to advocate a continuance of the
present system, which gives the favored
few an advantage over their neighbors
and that where all these fail you will re
sort to direct bribery to accomplish your
ends. The task is a great out, but in
time it will be accomplished. I believe
that laws defining the public rights will
be passed by the Legislature of every
State, and that the Congress of the
United States will pass the lleagan bill,
or some other honest bill for the regu
lation of inter-State commerce, and that
executive bodies will be appointed to
supervise the ojieration of put»lie high
ways, and see that these laws are exe
cuted. Either this, or the State will
annul existing charters, and reassume
her functions (which she has teni]M»rarily
delegated) of furnishing public high
ways."
R. O.—*' You would put polit ciaie:
to work running railroads, would you,
in the hopes of getting better' and
cheaper service than at present
C.—" No, that is not necessary the
State could own the railroads and lease
them, under proj»er restrictions, to as
sociations to ojierute, as the State of
Massachusetts has done, as the city of
Cincinnati has done, and as the Domin
ion of Canada and other Governine.its
have done, where the roads have bean
wholly or partly owned and the control
thus retaiued in the hands of the pub
lic."
R. O.—" Wouldn't you have a nice
centralization of j»ower iu the hands of
the Government
C.—"Not so very much more than at
present, and, in the words of a United
States Senate committee, 'It is more
dangerous to have a centralization of a
few men who recognize no responsibility
but to their stockholders, and no princi
ple of action but personal aud cor]m irate
aggrandisement, than in adding some
what to the power aud patronage of a
Government directly rcsjionsihlc to the
people and eutirely under their control.'
While 1 respect the opinions of all gtmd
citizens who believe that the functions
of Government should lie as few as jmm
silile, yet I lielieve it has come to a point
where we must choose the least of two
evils, that we must offset the jiouer of
the people emtralized iu their State and
national Government against a gnater
aud more dangerous centralization of
power in the hands of great corpora
tions. Our postal system might, per
haps, be lietter managed under private
control, but I doubt it, and the e\p» ri
mciit of the Government managing the
telegraphs in Great Britain has r«suited
in the public receiving far elu uper serv
ices. The ownership and ojieiation of
railways bv Govern me ut in many
of the English colonies, as well
as other countries, compare favora
bly with those iu private hands, and
in my ouinion the cry of Centralization
of power' is chietly raised by those who
seek to unduly tax the masses of the
people for what ought to be a public
service. At any rate the interest of the
individual citizen cries loudly for pro
tection from extortions by monopolies,
whether gas, water, railroad or telegraph
eorjjorations, and if relief can come only
through Government owucrdiip or rev
olution, it will sooner or later come. If
the Republican party will not give it.
lierhaps the Democratic party will. If
neither affords the relief, a party will
rise up that will afford it. The descend
ants of men who fought to establish free
institutions in this country, and tounded
a Government of the people, for the
people, by the people, are not goiug to
quietly submit to a Government of cor
porations, for cor|orations, by corpora
lions, wheu these institutions are the
creation of the jteoplc aud ckist by the
grace of the people. It won't take many
more years of stock wateriug aud dis
criminations, aud but a few nior Vau
derbilts, Goulds and Huntington*,
to wipe out all coronations uo matter
how beiielieeiit, or how well conducted.
Modern improvement are gtod things
iu their way, but, like tire, they umj l»e
good su vants ami bud masters. Cor
porations controlling
Hni lUllj
tricity are beneficent institutions so long
ah they remain servants of the people,
bu' Wlieu th"V seek to 1 jnusb 1 ,.i 1
decide not only what shute o( tiiepV.4
of prodwta commerce t)» public
shall receive but what individuals hIipII
receive It when vast wealth Is suddenly
acquired by such meaiu, and to perpet
uate their power they corrupt our elec
tions and legislation to an extent which
endangers both the moral and polit
ical welfare of the nation, it is time
that the people took measures to realize
the benefits of steam and electricity
without tin* intervention of corporations,
and unless the relations to the public of
railroad and otlcr great corjMirations are
nood readjusted upon a more euiutable
basis, the people will take such meas
ures, and don't you forget It."
Att Old Warn
inf.
Old Hickory wns not a showy Presi
dent. He carried into the White House
the plain, homely and blnut manners
that distinguished him in Tennessee.
Neither did lie affect scholarship, though
lie liail been a successful lawyer and a
Judge. His written conimurications
were notable for their directness and
clearness. Thcsitelling was often incor
rect, but there wa« no mistaking the
meaning. Of this charnctet* was a let
ter in which he defended his resolute
stand against the National Hank, In
that he said
If I had been ambitious, I should
have sought all alliance with that power
ful institution (the bank) which even
llow aspires to no divided empire. If I
had l»eeii venal, should have sold my
self to its designs. Hud I preferred per
sonal comfort and official ease to the per
fort^mccof my arduous duty, 1 should
have ceased to molest it. No the am
bition which leads me on is nil anxious
desire and a fixed determination to re
turn td the people, unimpaired, the
sacred trust they have confided to mv
charge—to lici^the wounds of the con
stitution and preserve it from further
violence to persuade my countrymen,
so far as 1 may, that it is not iu a splen
did Government, supported by )Hiwerful
monopolies and aristocratic establish
ments, that they will find happiness or
their liberties protected, but in n olain
system, Void of jHitnp—protecting all
and granting favors to none—dispensing
its blessings like the dews of heaven,
lim-eeii and unfelt, save in the freshness
and beauty they contribute to produce.
It is such a Government that the genius
of our people requires—such a one only
under which our States may remain for
ages to come, united, prosperous and
free."
The history of Jackson's battle with
the National Rank makes one of the
most interesting and exeitiug chapters
in American history, it should be care
full v studied bv cverv American citizen.
Mi »re pluck and jh istencc were re
quired than at New Orleans. Every in
fluence and agency that a gigantic mo
nopoly could wield was used first to per
suade and then to intimidate Old Hick
ory. Friends of long standing fell away
from the President, and it at •me time
lmiUed as if his administration and pub
lic life would eud iu discomfiture, defeat
and disgrace. But that iron will only
grew stronger under opposition, and
seemed sufficient in itcelf to sustain him
in any conflict. The result was that he
alone put au end to what was a great
monopoly, threatening uutoldevil to the
country. No one doubts but that Jack
son's action produced for tin* time com
mercial distress and financial disaster,
but it leveled to the dust an institution
which even then threatened to become
stronger than the Government and to
defy it. Had the old National Rank
continued unditurl»ed to this day, it
probably would have so thoroughly is
icned itself iqion the country as to have
liecome the ruling and dominant power
in it, controlling election*, and legisla
tion. Its minions and parasites would
have constituted all aristocracy, a plu
tocracy. most revolting to republicans
and inimical to democratic Government.
Just such another man as Jackson was
needed to uproot it. It is doubtful if
he could have done it hail it existed to
this day and he been President. He
clearly saw the evils it threatened, and.
undismayed, set himself to the huge task
of divorciug the bank and the Govern
ment.
What would the old hero say to day
could he see the growth of monopolies
in this country What would he think,
who pleaded o eloquently for a plain
Government, not supported by mou ip
olies and aristocratic establishments,"
if lie could lMk upon our advancement
toward the "spleudid" Government he
so much dreaded It begins to be evi
dent that the day is not far distant when
some statcsmau, with the will, foresight
and patriotism of Jackson, will be need
ed to save the republic from evils greater
than those which m* naced it from the
National liauk. This is the day of gi
gantic monoiHilic.H, with the arms of
Hriareus. They are of liessemer steel,
and reach from the Atlantic to the Pa
cific.
—In(Ha n(i]ftin Jotim at,
On. Sheridan's Hat.
It ia only natural that great Generals
who commanded thousands of meu in
the late war should frequently meet men
in different parts of the eouutry who
cherish some incident of war life with
which General aud private were closely
connected. It-is doubtful if Gen. Phil
Sheridau, whose famous twenty-mile ride
to Winchester has mode his uame famil
iar to every household, ever met a man
who brought up a pleasauter reminis
cence than a brown-faced, hardy miner
did in this city.
(.Jen. Sheridan was idly saunteriug up
aud down the lobby of the Windsor Ho
tel, deep iu thought and com place utly
puffing at his Havaua and blowing ftie
smoke into pretty little riugs. Sudden
ly a rough-looking man, with lace so
heavily bearded that one could see noth
ing but the twinkling black eyes, ap
proaching him and routing his llat with
awkward embarrassment, said:
Good moruiug, GeueraL"
The hero of Winchester returned the
greeting, touching his hat with military
politeness, aud theu, trying to peer
through the miner's heavy beard to get
a glimpse of his features, the General
added:
I'm afraid I've forgotten your face,
air."
The eves of the man from Gunnison
twinkled brighter than ever as ho re
marked
"It's not unlikely, General aeein's
we never met but once before, you
wouldn't be so apt to remcmljer me as
1 am you. It's seventeen years since I
saw you last. Things have changed
since theu. It was on the battle-field
of Cedar Creek. Don't you reuiemlier
the soldier that gave you his horse w hen
yours was shot from under you by a
shower
ut
cauister from the masked
battery on the brow of the hill aud
the old mau looked up with eager pride
into the General's face.
That 1 do," answered the General,
with pleased iuterest aud a bright flash
iu his eye, I remember it well."
I was that soldier," continued the
miner, proudly. I rcmemlier the cir
cumstance well, sir. When you put
your spurs to my horse aud gallojiedoff,
u left your hat behiud .vou, and I
called to you as loud as I could, but
you rcplitnl, Never mind the hat, my
Ikiv.' I've got that hat yet, Gcueral.
It's hanging iu my cabin in the mount
ain," and the rough old fellow's eves
glowed with pleasure.
Sheridan gr t-ped his hand Mid led
him to a seat, and for half an hour they
fought the battle of Cedar Creek over
attain.- thi-nr Tribune.
In thk Philadelphia Al(ii
elec­
a/ Time*
a case was reported of a voting man
wl lose mother aud live sinter* had died
of consumption r.nd who had himself
esctped a s.milar fate,
-thfi/
because
he "iias lived for the past seveu y« art
ia apai tm*mt* well stacked with thrifty
plaiiU,'
PLATFORM
Ok
thk
Nation*!.OiikesuiajH-Laihih Party
THE t'NITKI* HTATKS, AlMlITlIO AT Jltl«
.ICNK 1 MHO.
1 That tlie rijjlit to mi'.'' find inxti« money is
n mivcn lgll Iow he tilliillUilled liv the |hm
ple for the common heneilt. The di
of thic rltflit to corporation* in it hiii'Iilegation
niter of
the o nl.ral tiUrihnte of miven iKiity, vokl of
omiMtilntiouul won't inn, Coiifcituii upon a ntih
ordinate irie-jtoitHihle pmVer slid iiI .ho
IiIc,
mic do­
I
minion over indiMrv nu conim roe.
money, whether icet illic or paper,
mthe
IiIAll
ioii
be
I
lHHtti'd Mi iiK volume controlled hv uov
ernim nt. and not hv or through hankuii cor
porattiuiH, mill, whni mi issued, Nhould he n
full legal tender for all ill Itn, public and pri
vate.
2. That the l«ondn of the Untted Htat« n
should not lie refunded, bu! paid it* rapidly
pi iicMch
According to e infract. To enable
I lie (iov eminent to Hart thrrtf obligation*,
legal-tciidt cuirenry Nhoiild be Hiilmtlttili'd
for the notfH of the national bunlif, the na
tional-hanking system nboiMied, aud the un
limited coinage of silver, an well as gold, ch
talillnlH by law.
l. 'Hint labor hIioiiM he no protirted by
national and Nt ite authority a* to eimuli/e it'
burdi n*. mid insure a junt dncriluitlou of it
rcMiltn the eUht-Umr lau of Coiigrenn tdioiihl
lie enforced the initiirv condition of indus
trial eid hll*inncilt* placed under rigid mnol
the poinpi tition of eontrie.'t convict labor nl»'l
ished a hurt au of I Jior hlntinbclt cataMMied
fa toi ieH, mine* :md work^hopa iunpi•••ted:
the einplovnicut of chil.litn under 14 yeal* of
age torhiifd* n. and wage* mid in ca*h.
4. Slavery being simply ehe.ip labor, and
cheap labor licing fiinply i-lavciy, the importa
tion i»lid preHcii'*e of Chinese Herfri ncce«iaiily
tend* to brutalize and degrade American labor
therefore liiniK iliate htej n »h uld he taken to
ulnojMte the Uiulingaiiie treat v.
ft. Ilaiiroad land gr.tiiln forlercd by reiooti of
noii-t ulii]iiu-tit of contract n!mnld be immedi
ately nclumicu nv tin- (loverinuent, and hence
forth th public domain rcHeitcd enciilHivilv aa
honiCH for nettlal M'ttlera.
II. It ih the diiiv of CongrcKM to regulate iti
ter-Slatt I'onmurce. All Inn* of couiiniiuica
lion and ti n importation nhotild I"' brought un
der Much legislative control an nhall moiiiv mod
erate. lab and uniform r.itcn for pn*Kengcrand
fl'ei tit tl'Htik.
7. We denounce as destructive to pron|n ntv,
and dangerous to litarty, the actions ef the old
ponies iiMirng aud sust. iiiiug gigantic
land, rai'i'oad and nioiay corp rations nud imi
noiRihe*. invested with and exi lvii-ing |mw« i
belonging to the Government, and not spou-j
sMe to it tor the inaitin of Uie exerel e.
5. That the fourthutum. giving t'oiif reus the
power to toir iw money, todec! re war, to raise
aud Mtpju ri i runes, io lo\idc and maintain a
navy, never ml n led Umt tlie nu n who United
the money for nninti rest consub ration should
be jr-fdied to the hoUHt r.nd t-ail who
p« riled their lives aud Ki.cd tin it- blood on land
and Ken in defense of their eotiiiiri, and v.e
condemn the iruel class legislation of the lie
publieaii p.u ty which, while pit fecMhtr i r. at
gr'dtitudc to the soldi- r, has mo.-t unjustly «li—
ir mmu:ed against him aud in favor oi the
bondholder.
t'. All propelty nhould Ix ar its jutt jiropur
tion of ti xutioii, and we demand a graduated
income ix.
10. We denounce ns liiti dangerous the ef
fort^ i'vei ywhere manilest to restiiet the lights
of i-ult'iago.
11. We are opp-ned to an increase of the
standihg ariiy in time of (icacc, aud the in
sid ous s heme totshtblisii un eu irmous mi l
itary |xi.ver under the guise ot militia lawa.
12. We e'enmud ab.-o'utu deniiK-nitic rule*
fortlie government of Congr»ss, placing uh
representatives of I he |K.-ople upon au eipi .1
tooting, an I taking away fr.nn coiismiuees
a vetopowtr gnater than that of the Presi
del.t.
13. We demand a (kivciument of the jh ipie.
bv the |ieople aud for the people, instead of a
Government of the bondholders, by the lond
li ild. iv and for the houdliolders, *and*we de
nounce every attmipt to st up sectional htrife
as an effort to conceal luonstmus eiimts
against the people.
14. In the iiiiiuerance of tlie-e eiidu we ask
the co-o|ieratiou of all fair-nniided jnople.
We have no ipurrel with individuals, wage no
war upon cl.i»e*, bwl only against vi ions tn
st Unions. We are not content lo endure far
tier dis inline from our present actutl rubra,
who, having dominion ov money, over traus
portntion. ovir »u and land, and largely over
ilie press and the machinery of (iovvrnment.
wield unwarrantable povv. over our
tions and over our life ami ptojierty.
PLATFORM OF PRINCIPLES
Or thk
National
We denounce as most dangerous the re
strictions of the light of Mtffiage iu many Stales
audits almition the lisirict of Columbia,
and demand ttpial pih ieal ght for all nun
and wenieii.
!». eiievim that all questiou* affectiug the
public inter« st should lie deeidtnl ly the peop!e,
ue favot the sutinu-ion
(,f
stittilioiial Miiendiui nt tvi the popular vote.
10. We i! inand tie.t ah ballots iu this State
shall t« (if umtorni sue, color and matciul,
and that each party haviug a State oigntuza
tion shall have one m-mbr on the Etectiuu
ISoard of each township precinct.
11. Iu the imtheraniv of these ends, we ask
the co-o|ieratioii of all men and women with
out regard to previous party atliiialion or
I.aw and Practice.
Law—All meu are equal in regard to
natural rights.
Practice—Natural rights lndoug to
the few, who grunt privileges to the
miuiv.
La w -The just |owera of government
an* th nveil from the consent erf the gov
erned.
Practice—The just |M»wera of govern
ment U'lttng to the rich nud well-born
the governed have but to obey.
iw—The Government of the United
Stutes was ordained to eata'dish justice
al to promote fhe general welfare.
Practice The Government of the
I'nitcd States was ordained uk a temple
fume and glory for ambition, an ark
of safety for rings of robbery, nud a
fattetl cull for hungry plaee-liuntera mid
a 1
it ical d« -ilia}'" i^ut s.
Law—Taxation shall be uniform.
Practice- -Taxation shall be uniform
ly borne by labor, but those who toil
not, licithorspiu u«»r weave, but appro
priate all the wool, ahull aa uniformly
go scot free.
Law -All public otlic rs nre hervauts
of the |Mople.
Practice—All the people an aervauts
of iiiiblie fiiiictionaiies.
Law—-The jieopln are aovereigu and
Cotigresa ia their representative.
Practn-e—Capitalistic ni.»n«noly ia god
aud the Semite ia its prophet.
Law—The l*reaideut shall execute the
will of the people us expressed by their
repieseiitutivea.
Practice—The President shall execute
the will of Wall street and veto tliut of
the people, as expressed by their repre
seiitntiveh, when iu conflict.
i^uvv Industry shall stirreittler u por
tion of its properly a^ aUx to furnish
means for the protection of the re.^t.
Pr.tctice Indti try all all surrender a
pull of ita increase in annual taxes to en
able cltisH of corrupt ofliee ddori lo
lob tin-in of tip' balance.
Law--St cuiity in. the tin design
aud tid «'l goverumelit, it follow* that
tli.* iiin w ii.'h i« moat hkelv to iui»ui^
it, with the leant poasible expense, should
be adopted.
Praetiee—The spoils and plunder be
ing the true design and end of ofliee
holdet's, il follows that tin* legislation
and policies which will most likely insure
it, with the least danger of detection
and exposure, should be adopted,—
'hlcrtffo I '. i pri
"Hot Poy of Ml no."
One of the teachers iu the pubiie
schools actually received the other day
nnexetiso uiihpie ill il* way, and writte'u
iu behalf of a delinquent pupil by the
father. No teacher could hold tincli an
excuse not valid, even uuder the re
quirements of the new code of the
Hoard of Education. It runs in flats
wise:
Mr.
TEAcnnn: Dot poy of mino vos
absent de oiler day veil lie shtaid out.
He got vim big colt mit iu his neck vat
make him much drotiblo all de vile.
Please don't give him aoine lninishmeiit
veu he vaa late mit the morniug. He
voult got there shust in time every day,
but he isli not himself to bhuiie, he ish
got no mudder. She vrh ded ten years
ago. I am this poy's barcut, by his
tntlddef beforu she vos ded."—Nt:n
Expnu.
AT
't
heat-No.1WhiteTOLEDO. 1
Ko. a Bed. 1
ColtW......
tAT*.
W
York
THE MARKEI^.
SKW YOltK.
Rrcvaa §7
llon« I!
C'TION
Fi.oelt Huperlliu' S
WitKAr— No. a Hprlng 1
00 911 3%
50 A on
t«V. 1-^
2,1 fi (111
s
7 :w
44 \fi 1 4®
Kl IA. "J
au «r
No '1 tt.d.i I
4'oiin—tTti(riiri»i|
o ic—Mi*«d Wvstera.
PollK—MtSf. .............19
Lard
tilt \ua.
Ukktcs—Thoict-iiraili'il ateeis..... 4
*it
»7 (a
IB 7.1
11 .C 11
(It 6
40
un
(,t
l» 40
«t 7 05
7 00
n rt lift
i« :w
(n I 10
{it
(1'2
t* H7
(i#
1 (M
tn» '.a
in, l.V
(#18 00
C'ows an1 lldfrra 3
ftti'iUuiu to Fair 6
Hons ft
Ki.oi'B—Fancy White Wlnti«r F.*... 6
OiumI to Clioico Spring F.t. ft
Win
—Ko.
Hprlng 1
No. li Sprttftf 1
Cohn—NO, '2
tUis- No.
i
Itvi —No. 3.
i
tlAUl 'V—No. a 1
lit in a --ChoiceCreamery.........
Kiiit—Fresh
1'ona—Mr*# 17
Ltitn
WlJiWAtJKEK.
No.12
ats-
2
O
nvel
9S (i 1 33
SN1 (.A 1
Ml 01*
as a* ar
0H
WllKAT—N0.1 1
No. S 1
CollN—So.
I.vi- -No. 1
IUbi kv ^o. 1.
I'oltK—Momi ...17
Lakd
ax. Lorn*.
it
mkat—Na aUed.,... 1
l' un—Mixed
W
at—No. 'J
It VK 1
I'ohk—Mcafc. 18
LAUD
O
1 04
ui
87
7.V (n 18 00
ltfci4 IIH
37 a as
6.1 64
39 (4 40
ia i lit
7ft («19 00
11*1* 11*
(I I
67 (4 tfS
44 4.1
19
CINCINNATI.
WllKAT
CottN
'\T*
ItvK 1
1'onK—MeM .IP
Laiih.
at
1 14
U0 «1» W
"ft
86 1 37
87 C«1
«4 65
4i 4a
ftO 7
83 ia. :u
64 (nr. 63
89 yt 40
50
00 (ijltf Ml
38
DETBOIT.
Fi.oe»—Choice 6
hkat—No. 1 Whits 1
Coitx—No. 1
W
ats— Mi sett ..........
IUki KV cr cental* 1
1'ork—Mew 19
O
INDIANAPOLIS.
hkat—No. 3 Bed 1
ork—No.*
W
ats
O
(iiitKNini K l.Aimit p.utnr,
ADOITSD AT MAUSHAl.I.TtVV\. Jf.NE 2, 1&S1.
1. Tlie right to make aud issue tnouvy i a
sovereign constitutional powir to lie main
tained tiv the ptopie for the common tunefit.
We demand the a bid tiou of all bank* of ts.-utj
and the substitution "t full le.al-tender gieeu
biteks in heu of their notes.
2. We oppose the re Hindi ng of the national
dent or the is-tie of inteit st-beariu liou-taui'
Ide bonds upon iiuv preti xt. and deuinnt the
payment and destru tiou of those outstanding
at thi- earliest possible luonu ut.
3 We demand a gradual iu^iue tax uherr
bv capital shall bear a Jiibt sha»e of the it'nlic
burden.
4. We n»pard the act stibstitutlne a ra Iroad
connni-sion ir la vs governing freight rates iu
this State a fraud procured by the lailrogd
companies through a itcimhlicuu Legislature,
an demand its rept al. While we tawr 1 beta!
national appropiiatiuns for the creation and
improvement of water-wavs, wo demand laws
protecting the jieoplo of Iowa from discrimina
tion, pooling, wittering of stock, drawl a or
rebate-:, and all unjust charges on the part ot
railroads, until micu tuue as the people, who
bndt most of tin se loads with land grant',
taxes and subsidies, shall own and operate or
fully coutrol the in.
5. We d«man 1 a rev sion of our patent-light
laws, placing a lair limit upon the royal,let, I
invt ntors, aud protecting the jH-opic trout m
ju-tice.
t\ Wc demand that all hml grants forltited
ty reason of the nou-fultillment of eondi tons
bv ii.i road companies shall beat on-ere lainied
by the (iov.ri nicnt, and hencefoitti that the
public domain I e lvservt exclusively for hoiue
tteadcr* orac ual s«ttler«.
7. We demand absolutelv d«moi,rati rules
for the government of Congrtss and stale
14jgi-lattires, placing all r« preventatives of the
people upon an equal footing, and taking from
II e imiiitties a vtto power uiMiu proikosi-ti
legislation.
n
let.
(i
iUIivm aa above. .Wmliwi
A
1 37
to t4 66
43 ti 49
10 (Idlki
«0 {4 6
Si t« 4
to -.M
•4 4 «VI
East liberty, pa.
atile—Beet e
Fair ft
Cellllilou................. 4
Moon ft
NllW».
0i»
IBS.UDUL PINIHIM, OF UU, MISS,
LYDIA E. PINKHAM'S
VEGETABLE COMPOUND.
Ig a fooitlvi' Cnre
krril Ikiw PtliM r«a»lil*U W—knf«M«
Mrwna t«mr fl'Mlt' HHlall*11.
it will euro t-ntirrly llie worst form of i».
pUlnt.4, alt ovarian troulJcn, InflMnmatton and VI' *-ra
tion, Falllns and Pti|Ur*im nt». and the coitmiU'-nt
Spinal Woaknew, and iArticular]/ al«itad to th*
Change «f Ijfe.
It will (IImoW* and espel tmnora fr»m tlie wter.i* la
an
atayr of drTvlo)iiiirnt. Tlie ti udWh to tit-
rurljr
the provostd eon*
Cfrousliuniorntlurt'U i1«oU«h1 Ter3r»|**i1!lyby Itsuw.
It rt'moTen fuliitiir**, r.Atulfnoy, deatn \mdII i-ravtug
foratimulaiitii, and irlirT** w«akneaa of th«- siouu. li.
it curr* ltloatinir, Headaches, Nerruua Prostrati -n,
Oeiwral liability, gliqilmniw, Depreealun and ludl
gtatiot..
Tha: ."*11 of bc*rtnv down,
eMMrinf psin, wvi^ht
and WLnoho, laalway*
|s nn».i. ntlr ourrd byltauie.
It will at nil tlirn s nnJ umttr allcircuiuatancMact In
haruiotijr with tlit- lawa tliat cuwn tlu female
For Oil' cim of Klilm i\milatuta of wither mi thia
CoiniMiuiid I' un*ur|aiMHl.
LYDIA F- PINKIIAMU VEGETABLE
COM-
NtNDli im-pared at to and tSi Weatern Aveuue,
Lynn, Mas*. Price fl. Slihottleiifir$X fk-nt liv mail
la tin-form uf |iilK also Intlie fonu of l.iirticm, on
rect ipt of price, (1 |n boi lurrithrr Mm. rttikliaiu
fm-lj ausnt-is
'l Icttrra uf
lii)uiry.
Scud fur Jjaui^ih-
thit i\
3,0
«|*r.
No family rliould U without LY1UA K. MNKIIAM'S
UVKK riUA Tticjr cure courtlpation,
lad torpidity of (lie H»er. It cent* per lu*.
ir Held by *11 llrnaalMi.
week. 91) day at home eaally made, foully
Outfit tree. Adiraaa Tat a Oo Ancuata. Me.
la. 1
$72
""4,
S ou*
11
Nor. Illinois. I'n-i
THIS NEW AND CORRECT
l'rovt s Ix-yotid any rcaMHiabh' utii^tinii that the
nT
i*
CM I. WEBBER,
DF.ALEll IN--
Drugs, Medicines,
Oils, Faints,
VARNISHES, GLASS, &C.
1 MAKE A SPECIALTY Of
Paper-Hangings,
And have a large and splendid stock,
both of costly and cheap
patterns.
School Books, Stationery, Baby
Carriages, Toilet Articles,
Toys, Perfumery,
Notions,
KtO«f EtOaf CtOay
lattie greateat varMly,
•aTtnft tli* moat aernrat« Preaeiiption Ctoft I* 0e
0*anty, thii will be Ibe
Prescription Drug Store
OF CRESCOe
SMMIClplAOM fftHUfiWtliltlll Al (A ftOWl*
FRED MILLER,
Mauufacturer and Dealer la all ktailtf
Harnesses,
Saddles,
Collars,
Bridles,
Whips,
Lashes.
Boots and Shoes!
I-- *••»:, Lkat aud Cheapest Sunk in
CRE8CO,
Higu of the Itif Collar.
mtt I HKD BULLER.
SR tA «9n at hoina. Namplaa worth free
90 10 9&U Addraae A Co, Portland, Ma
FlorestonColo^n
Koct rnnul
CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN R'Y
ia Uc lHnit aud lmrt Lino, aud if hv all odds th.' U--t lluilroad for you to take when travel
in
in it!u-r direction In tuvon
Chicago tod til of the Principal Points in tho West, North tod Nerthvist.
rart'fully examine thin Map. Vuu »ill «i'' that the principal i iti« of the Northwent are atatiomt
ou the North W I'Mcrit It v At Council Mull* il cotiiiwtt in :i In ion Ilciiot with the overland
traiutiof ttu- I'nion 1'acil'n K'v At st. i'aul il connect* a tiion lit pot with till Ihc roadathut
run from that my towaid* tin-Noii!i, No:tli\M ami Wc-t. li-trains make close couueetloii*
«it li thi' trains of ail tlio railroad* it cro»si at it-tiiany jilln tiun pnint«.
S,\,
u
Ml/
yu* tej1 1 s T- v
i o
VLb,iE
I S
v
Mr y,,
,s w-v...
A
It forms the Mhi\vln_* Tr.ink 1 iim-:
"t'oaui il llliiffi-, lii'uvi-r & ('uliliiriiia lltiic."* H'jniiiiu, Miuncat'ta A t'cntriil llakoia l.lttc."
Hjotix t'ity, Nor. Ni lnafUa ds Vatiklow Line." ago, I'anl dc Miiim-a|.'li» Line
JUMI
Medical Surgical
INSTITUTE,
No. Ill A 113 N. Main St.,
BURLIWBTOW, IOWA, a
Dr.
Fishblatt,
Profeaaor
on#
M«laH'lurer
dli
Lato and
of
in
Who have tiecot,?* vletlma
an untinii'lv
alted Inti'iit and
dcia
jiernowi,
j.liNHHNIVpower,iier\i'U»
and
'.m.
CURE
h^nl and eara
the
IOWA.
Tr.uiE.lBf and Bepalrinf of all kiuda
rt
till r* •_
i'.a-ter.: i n»:r, ft Le»thfr and Finditiga
for f»h'*maWer»° u» o»n»ta!:t!v .-u hand.
H.« *t.k ta e\erth::i*' joruir, :nf to th* trade ta
SM ite, n»t-f.'». ti a* lo jiru-ea, material and
•Brkttj»ii»h:|' warrai.l.
•ppositr (oiirt Ileus*, Centennial Bl«ck,
pr
p.
of VMtaM
CxcMilsflly Otllcatt
Latitat.
Hi
£S cts.: Lar^e BclUea. 75 Cts-
s lit i«»l»n ia k Prrfvmmj. Hl|»alwi afHla
.% Co., N. Y., ea vitla.
PARKER'S BINIEI TONIC
The Mtdiein* for Every Family.
NEVER INTOXICATES.
Made from t.in^er, liuthu. Mandrake,
StUfinfla.
and other fthe best vcgeuhle remedies known,
I'ARKaa's Cisgfr
Tonic
has remarkably varied
curative power?, & isthe greatest Stomach Comet
or, Blood 1'untier and Liver Regulator
ever made &
The Best Medioine Yon o&n Use
for BestoringHealtli k Strength
It commence* to act from the Ant dose, tearchen
out the weak organa, and U warranted to cure or
help all dieuas of Um Bowah, Stomach, BKxhI.
Kidneys, Liver. VriMayOrfMU.aUCouiptaintsof
Women, Kervoutnen, Sleepleiiaeil, Kk«UII'
tin* and Dmktuni.
Try a bottle to-djy it mjy save your
life. soct.
and $i sires atalldniggisu. K\-ery genuine bottle
has our signature oa out^de wrapper, Hiacox &
Co., N. V. Lar|tia«iB( ia buying $i aia*
Pa rakers Hair Balsam
Jnat Wlukt to WaatwL
Everybody whose hair Is gray or faded baa ttt
the need of a Hair Restorer and dressing that la
cleanly, agreeably perfumed and kanaka. Par.
ker's Hair Ualtaie satisfies the moat fattidioos
im
these respects. Sold by druggists at s«c. and $1.
tRR ""k «n»««!««"wa. Twaaa and It Outflt
WV (i*a. AddreM li. Haixktt A Co, INtrUaml, Ma.
1M 1
y "h'
Spald^
pNi'// *i
I"/-
C^\ ipol
UM
II 1
CHICAGO At hiORTn-Wr.ST' RN HAllAVAYj
•NE CHICACO NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY,
QvWftll of iu |iiiiici|ial In.. -, r-111-1-:.. li «av daily from tun to t.• ur or tuure Fa»t KxpreaaTnini,
It i-lhe oidv load w of iiua_'i that i.w* iiic
PULLMAN HOT£l DINING CARS.
Itialtii oi.Jv i.iad that runi- H.- I'lillniati l'..!.ire stct'piutj.t'ar- «dtli«r way bt'tui i n Mm|
HI Paul liri'cn liay, Itorktorri, Wliioua, l.at*i-o*«', llctlrepor, MllwauktH'. and iiisny oilier {toiiita
in tin- North wi-M. Tin.* ma nav''Ui'iit of tUta road ojieralfa about
3,000 MH.t'.H QP It OA It.
Jt nulimiue I.im- Mtl«auUei', Uui u Itay A l.ako u|»*rior Utte
Tn k i- o -i Ihia road arc -old hy nil i oiiputt Th ki .\• t.t» in tin-1 tslt* Stat«-» ami auadaa.
livtui-iiih. to a*k fur 'i'lcki-t* v ia mU road tw s-ui- read over St. and lake lsonc other
N4KVJ8 Ul umix, iicu Cfolugo. W. U. UltSUlt, M«n i Agwt, CWiHfr
U*a
In
of
Oollegea
UnNed
al
In the
HUtaa
Burgleal
tha New York Medical and
Couaiilttng
carnal,ofEditor
In
and Operative Murgeon
Mew York Hna|dUd for
Obronlo lMt
eaai'R, riiyilclan-lii-etrtef of tha
Medical and Hurgleal In
atltute of New Yotk,
Ifaa frmnd It naaraaary to eatabllah a Madtaal aad
Rnrglcal lnatituta at Burllngtoa, Iowa,
r»r
trMtnaant al
MODS AND CMC
DISEASES.
Dr. rtabtilalt haa devoted 30 yearn to tke atadjr a
treatment
lloaiiltala in New
enre
the
world-wide.
weakneaa of tbe
n*
Chrotilo dneaena, and hia eaat
aapat
where be haa
York
cwHNfulljr treated 10,nM caaea
Chrome OHarrh,
of
Her- fullina
dtaeaaca,
dtaeaaea
the UenltoUrt-
and
of
tr^aua, haa given him
nary
rejiutatlon wliloh
a
ia
Dr. FISHBLATT
Ilae dlacoveeed
ft re*
teat
d«bUltT,nervoualaufpior,-fordla,worldhearttliedlaaaaea,thaoftanga,arlatagfromliverInvoluntarytbethaIn
the
cure
Uack
Umb,
aud
charMen, tnipnteney,
general
coiifiiKlon
etomach
tfam-
of of
liiltig,
of or gtddlneee,
throat,dimiieaaldeaaatghtlpltatlou
n«M or
akin,affaeBmidtaordara
of
and bowula
terrlWa
aotltary
|ractlcea more fatal to their
amitf*
of th«'alrena lo tho
tha
bllffliflinf
luarlnea
lr nioMt
reMbrtag
radiant lioi or antlol|atloaa,thanDlraaeaUnaletofv
maniage lni|oeelhle.ea
tlii
YOUNC MKN
vice,that
upon hia
df«a*-
of eolltary
ful aud deatructfif?
habit which annually awaana
Kave
tlumaanda
of young men of aa-to
brtlllant intellect, who might
wise Uavi cnlraiKH-d llHteninf
other­
thun-
Benataa with the
their eloquence, or wakad
of
lyrcrmay cull wttli full
to eoetaay tha living
coufldenea.
MARRIACK.
or men contemplating nxar-
jilc«yotuiR
Married
rtaiie,aware of
weaknaaa
ic)iiallfli'atlon,
htmaelt under thecareof 1I
tv
conftde
(lo^ioforprocreatlva
ical
Snwer*.iniixitencj),ftervoua.flahlilaM
debtlltle*,
any other
a|ieedlly relieved. He who |ilaOM
reUgtou*
may
in liia honor
j{etitleman,
and oouft-
aa a
Mnliy i»lj
nkill
phyakiaa.
aa a
ORGANIC WCAKNCM
Imnirdlatoly
fliction
luip'incitile
fill
cured and fnll vigor reetored. Tlita af­
--which reiulrie
lmrdeii
life a
pnijK-r lndiil«etiee.
coiiitnit
aud marriage
-i« tbe jienalt* paid
lm-
by the victim
Youhk
pereotia
*ceiwe
are t-oof
apt
to
lielug
cnitai'i|uene»
e
from not
^fd-
aware of the dr
thtit
etimie.
a
may
uii'V'r »timil« thiK eulijeet
lo^l hi oner I
Mow who that
will deny that procreation
y tl:* e
IiiIIiiik
la
into
•ban to the prndeiit? lle«
improper habita
IcIiik
idea
the '»a"inv
"f In
deprived of
oflKprlnK,
liuwt
nlthy
the
ItlXI'HI (TIVK ayiuptouw
and
I ai !--. TUc
aerlrma
of l*th inlnd
I
.Hteiii
ta-comea
deranged,
uinl n ental fuucUniia weakened,
conauuiptlou,»-dpal^ieiiala,-tliaproloaaof
I'li'ntiie Irritntiii !,
dye
ii lutliii t.ie heart, m.litti'alioii, eouetltuuoiial
otlHy, wa-tin« of the
frame,
decay
A
ixui^'h,
and death.
WARRANTED.
ruined In health ty uu'varned pi^'teudera,
who kft-j- tiiflitiK nionth alter nionth taking
|K)i»nou« a lid tn)nriou« tompouuila, ahould apply
lmnied.alely.
DR. FISHBLATT,
mte of one of the mnet eiiiineut o»lle«a of the
ha* effected noitu of the uiowt BHtoniambg cUree
tfat wcree\cr known: tiiauy troubled with ringtrg
in
w
a»ieep, great nvrvoouieaa,
when
S'ln^t alanm-d at certaiu eoiiuda, with frrijueut
lilnhtn»r. attended aonietiniea with derangement of
tht witml, weie I'uii at o«k*%
TAKE PARTICULAR NOTICE.
I)r. K. aihlrewe* ail tlcae who have Injured thern
eaiveit bv mtptni'er tlidilltfi'iieea and aolltap habil,
which rum li'tti mitid and tmly, unft ting tlH'm for
lm«liie-», atttdy, aiviety or marriage. Thaae are eoina
(f
the *HI unii inehiticholy ellect* prodiued by the
early liaMt* id M'litli, via.: Weiikiicen iu the bat'k and
llinba, Jia li In the lh.nl. .Iiihiukk of alght, trwa of
mu^ii ar |i w. r. u.i!pit»ilon of the heart, dyepepaia,
nenou* i»tit.iM ity, ih'ruutieineiit of the digeative
functioiiH. delniity, coniiiiu}itloii, ho.
s.—All con'Mpoudauca
receiva
will
attention. Addreea
»:. k. i i^HBi..«i*r.
pranpt
m.
Mnrtlcatl aad Nediral iNailtwt*,
39m« MiaiilMktua, law*.
kmm
vnr
SASSLT
lusriafa
xcoNomcAL is mik
AND GUARANTEED TO
Bin Meet SaMctin
BUT
&HAKMQ&E
HADE ONLY BT
Msior lailCa,
BT. LOUI8, MO.
IXPOBTXBS AMD OBAUBM JM
TIN-PLATE, WIRBf
STIBT CUM OF «00M USD OK
TIN AM STOVE DEALERS.
SEND FOB PRICE LISTS*
Ft hi sti,i: uy
LOMAI MOI., Creseo. lows.
KIMBALL & F1BNSV0BT3
BANKER8,
omsoo, IOWA.
Exchange, Gold, Stiver
A*»~
Government Bonds
Bought aad Sold.
cltteettMi Made u Prtwcdi
Proaipily Bealtled,
prtnatyal
Drafts drawa
Ml
all tbe
ef Lurope
aitiaa
ia
auua to
Inn
atUt.
Real Estate Bought and Sold on
Oommiision.
+AltKa PAID FOR NON-MXtUDXNTIk
faaaaga
TiekaU by tha Uaa.
tuchor Line,
Uutaa Una at
radaoetf
IL
raUa.Allan
onnvoNTiinii
AM Tart-Oilman,
Qa
Boa
fti
tcago—
Umon Natluail Uaina.
Milwaukee—
CRESCO
DRUG STORE!
A Pioneer 1 Institution.
Or. J. J. Clemmer,
PUBS DfiUGS, CHODCALS,
aaiaiMMB
Patent Mediclnea.
GiM ul 80nr Waldo,
Silverware,
Solld.Qold 1 Silver Jewelry
Lamps, Zantenu,
Shades Globes Ohlimieifc
S O O O O K S
WA.3LX, PAPERS^
Churtaini
In Emy 8tjle,
DKCORATION PAPKM
L«azarus9 Morris A Och
Pmcrlvtini
Ink,
Milwaukee National
MeQragee -rirat Nallottal
Bank.
ytmmm tiauu. inn rwieaaea
KEWIHKI MWUTItlM MtHTK
ihnui mm. a.
a.rmtMiutm
NKW HAVKN, CONN.
•. r. Bias tia.
NEW YORK
tin. r. aowru. a»«. iimtaift
a. a. rarianbtu. a t». ". iu aaim
PHILADELPHIA
a. tt. a ttt a no*. a nnukiuiiia
a
raatINaCINCINNATI
». «. rataaaaa a aaoa.
MIV
CHICACO
ntaa.1. iiLua tt». «. t.itm»tm
LOUIS
NBLBOV CneSMAM i. CO
i ia on Ale i o ibeeeAfenctea. Ad
i eertiaere deahuf witb ihaai ea
NrfMtMU
sjitiitiK ul En-oiisa
OmimM1b
llw WtrMa
PERFECT RELIEF FROM HERIM
Jobm*Taatilated A^jutablt
Truss and Supporter
Ifealal
Tha Bert Pocket Cafta*
•namat Paint,
Pure (brand White Lead,
OILS aad VARNISHED
Fancy Goods aid Met ArticlfS.
Ciniomici
CirIUIt
RBMBMB3SR.
•aateafafeaa
Tli# UrfHt I
took,
snd
Tho Boot,
Tht
Cho«i|M«|
9 TIM-

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