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The Iowa plain dealer. [volume] (New Oregon, Howard County, Iowa) 1867-1895, November 22, 1883, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025167/1883-11-22/ed-1/seq-1/

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PLAIN DEALER.
ESTABLISHED 1859.
IS
PUBLISHED THURSDAYS AT
CRESCO,
THE COUNTY SEAT OF HOWARD
JJ A. OOOi»HJ (J H,
fiiruitlictl,
iacth
II
II fibrils.
COUNTY.<p></p>JTMEAD,
W. R. &"F7
Publishers »nl Proprietors.
OFFICE IW~C7EWTEWTNTAL BLOCK
TERMS OP SI BSt'ltlI'TION.
One copy one year
One eopv six motr lis
On ov Mire,- mnttth*..
all
flJW
75
.40
ATTORNEYS.
Attorney tt LMV:
CBE3CO, IOWA.
OPtoa NMMd OA tofli of the Otty JUwj.
*. C. MrCARTlT. ton* McCooa
JJ 0. McCARTEY k 00.,
Attorneys and Counselors at Law,
CKKSCO, IOWA.
Will practlr*
In
all
loans,
SNEL
the Court* of the Statu, mak*
attend to buying and
•ud FPCUIITI'*.
Dthc- TI' (VNT'-NNUL
(telling real estate
Block.UP-ntalrt,
j^RANE HATH*,
§6TF
Attorney and Counselor at Lpw,
CKE900, IOW*.
•fill practise in
the Ceu.tsof th*
State.
Otto*
•RW ZaindelowiU'a STARE, eaal »iV \1 K »treat. 24tf
"W. K. BAUKEU. JEREMIAH CARKKB.
Barker Bros.,
Attorneys and Counselors at Law,
Cresco, Iowa.
"WW practicc la
all State aad Fedefrf Uwirts.
Y.'VI
e. a. MAUI.
a. i.
I^EED MAHHL
Attorneys and Counselors at Lawv
CUBSco, IOWA.
Particular attention (riven to rollaetloaa and IM
#STTO suits, Ottee ovtr Kimball
sank.
JOHN T. CLARK,
AlTORNhY mid COUNSELOR AT LAW,
CIIKSCO, IOWA.
Ottie- .-o ith side o,' Market street, tvo dotes
«ist of PheNn's Store. Li Cases at well
as Collect! ms attended to thor.ugi:ly.
\y COSJIOLLY, X.
Physician and Surgedfi|.
'RKSCO, IOWA.
Office orcr Kelt w'S store. Office hours,1to 3
p.
in. 21-21
ET
J.
& C. F. BENNETT,
1 lomoopat hie*
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS,
CRESCO, •_ IOWA
TI OFTLC
fir-T
door mirth of the City liakery,
©I en ata.L hour*.
A. FCLTUI, *U
U.y
Phyeiclan and Surgeon,
CRESCO, IOWA.
Oflee Honrs,\ I Offlr*
Jto3p. ni. \K»-il.w't
CUESCO, IOWA.
been thoroughly refitted and MWL?
and will
BE nu U» a
ftvmu
it» trims.
J^ASWUi no USB
to (he full MU*
VO-JL
(Formerly DILWORTH MOUSE),
CRE8CO. IOWA.
Thoroughly refitted throughout, and will give
giicits the best of cue ADd attention to their
Villi ts. S'Jtf
FRED. MARTIN
lias .rain assumed lull eoiitroi ut
CENTENNIAL MEAT MARKET,
Which will, til nil times, bo fully
«u|»I»liHl with the host the countr.v
Our tcrnu will continue to be
cash in bu.viii? or soiling. We
tsike pleasure in rpfprriiig to the
1
MItrous of this market, and assure
tliem that we shall keep a ftill stock
of
Fresh and
Salt Meats!
rrTOIXTRY la its season. FRESH
FISII, HAMS and BACON.
MTCasli paid for Fat Cattle, 8be9|
and Calves suitable for the market.
CENTENNIAL BLOCK,
IU.HCO. IOWA,
CMS. J. WEBBER,
PKA1.KH IK
Drugs,
Medicines,
Oils, Paints,
VARNISHES, GLASS, K
1 MAKE A SPECIALTY OF
Paper-Hangings,
Art I
aire hntetirt splendid stack,
1)0th of cosily and cheap
patterns.
Books, Stationery, Baby
Carriages, Toilet Articles,
fyys, Perfumery,
School
Notions,
|to»i itoM fto.,
Ill th*gnal—T v
••Tins Um movt accurate Prescription Oark la th*
touut) thi. wiU be the
Prescription
Store
Drug
OF CRESCO.
VNMrtfttWf fvuritol iuiu ouud«l|l «B lM
Better than gold Is a thinking mind,
That in the renlm of books can tind
A tt mure Huriiassinu: Australian oro.
And live with the great and good of yore,
The sage's lore and the poet's lay,
'.I he glories of empiresjas-eil away
Tiie world's gnat dreani will thus itnfold
And yield a pleasure better than gold.
Better than gold is a peaceful homo
Where all the lire-lde characters come,
Tiie slirin of love, the heaven of Ht^
Billowed by mother, i sister, or wii
However humble the home may be,
Or tried with sorrow by heaven's deinwo,
fnd
SAVED,
1
VOL XXV. XO. 7.
BATTER THAN GOLD.
BY FATHER BY A!*.
f«lian
letter than grandeur, bettor thp.n GOLD,
rank and title* a thousand fold,
a licalthv body and a mlhd at «:«hi'
And initio iln-ur« tha' always )lMft
A he:trt that nm led for another's w.ie,
*itli .«ym|iaUilfs lar«o enough to cut'old
All men as brothi-rn. Is hotter than tiold.
Bftter tlinn cold I* a conwlenec clear,
riiotigh toillnu for hn-nd In an humbli sphere,
Ponbly ItU-s with content and hMilth,
J'ntiicil by the lu«t« anil care* of wealth,
Lowly llvlnu ,in.l lofty thought
Adorn and ennobl" a poor man's cot,
For mind and morals in nature'a plan
Are the genuine tists of a gentleman.
Better than gold Is the pweet rione
Of the notis of toil when the labors cloie.
lletter than gold is the poor man's sleep.
And the balm tha' drops on his slumbers* deep
Jirin^ flleei Ing dianghts on the downy bud.
where luxury pillows Its nehinir head,
The toiler simple opiate deems
A shorter route to the land of drcamA
he blessings that never were bought ©r sold
center here are Letter than gold.
OR OST?
tt
LttY M. CUBBY.
ITftil lie cvurinod mo, must still liavo
lovotl liini! I said this ovor and over
to myself, that awful night, as I run on
in the tlarknosg and tho rain, skiniinmg
heaj) and hollow alike in mv race with
death. It cannot hurt mo to think of
it now. or to write it all down as I sit
waiting for them to come and take me
ftway to a certain sufe retreat, of which
they have spoken, where I may, l»v and
I»y, forget completely the scor«-hinpr tire
Of the lurid eye and the thunder dance
r»f the monster, which seemed to shake
the world from under my feet forever.
Shriek? I thought I was past crying
out.
And yet, ran onward in the dark
and the rain, hoping and praying aloud
to Heaven to give mo strength and
upeed and bring me there iu time —in
time to rescue the innocent in time to
Snatch
his
orar
aStom
I»i(l'iic« ea ingh SwUt nearly opposite the
VcM« House.
HOlfcLft.
YY'EBSTL U 1101'SK,
J. Mason, Proprietor,
soul from tho clutch of the
demon. Murder!
I felt, ns 1 ran, the sudden conviction
that I had long known him unworthy
that mv father had lightly warned tue
*-my patient, slow-judging father.
Still, granting this knowledge, there
lia 1 been no hour past, there would be
Uo hour future, when I could renounce
lum.
I had felt tenderness for him—for
Claude—from the beginning, when he
had come to us, a wanderer, aijd father
had more than willingly accepted his
offer to work for a home— just to work
ft little in the green-house. For this
Hvas father's occupation, to keep a
iiurserv and winter-garden, just up
from tiie villago whence he forwarded
all to the city, a live-hour's journey.
Claude was truly welcome. He had
a bright glance, and always could think
of a merrv story, laughing himself in
wholesome, boyish fashion, and leading
us also to laugh. He said he was niix
jous to settle down and to tramp the
country no longt r. If his mother had
|i\ d. lie said, his own mother -if his
father had not married a young woman
W!K hated her husbandVsou, it would
never have been thus.
Wlun he said this I wont away quick
ly out of the room. My ey s were blind
with sympathy, though my father had
not taken a second wife.
In this way Claude had euine to tis—
young, perha] s 0 (and I wa* 17
comely, cheerful when he had rested
and stipp» d—cheerful, with snatches of
song or whistled tune, and tales of the
city, whither we never went. Not
stranger-like, but as son and brother,
who had come home.
I would not have him go for anything
—anything on earth, I said, as I fell
asleep that night. He had brought
hunshine and music to our poor abode.
He must remain he should and would.
Ah! you would not smile if you
knew the dull, dead life I led—the
stagnant village below, the barren hills
above and about, with little to do but
read my few old books i father's week
ly paper, and listen longingly to th
shriek and hum of the railroad trains
that passed on the farther side of the
town—passed and repassed on high
trestle-work, or alo.ig narrow euts.with
a foot's space between the rail and tin
edge of the embankment, with gullevs
and ravines just below. Night after
night, to the West and the Kast day
after day, to the Kast and the West
so went the through express, stopping
tonly on signal at the village station.
It was early iu the spring when
Claude had come to lis, and now
the summer had gone. Father had
been Imsv, as usual, freezing his
roses at the "dog-days" with ice, pur
posely stored the winter previous, that
they might bloom again for the holi
days—those luscious roses, crimson
and golden, for which the city dealer*
paid us so little!
And I! I had been happy! Happy
with wild throbbings of my heart and
wakeful hours at night! ot happy
constantly, for there was that which
counterbalanced joy. Claude had failed
to help with the work, as he had prom
ised, and father was sorelv disappoint
ed. Y es, it had come to lw» the excep
tion when Claude went into the green
house instead of sauntering off to th
village and there remaining all day.
By-and-by, he spent only the nights at
home still, father was very patient.
Perhaps he, too, had grown to love the
bov, and felt something of the heart
ache that I knew at the hour when
Claude, on finishing his breukfaat,
would glance about for his cap.
Were I to live a thousand years I
should never forget that slow pang as
he rose from tho tablo each morning
and went or the longing, the anxiety
for the well-knowu step at night when
tea awated him. For many days 1
rose an hour ealier than usual and
worked at what father must surely see,
and fancy Claude had done. I hoped
thus to keep father patient and satis
fied.
lint the autumu was advancing, and
he was extra busy and one morning,
when he remonstrated with Claude,
Claude grew very angry (I knew this
was wrong) he grew so angry that he
packed his few things and went away
forever. As ho opened the door to go,
1 thought my heart would burst. I
followed him down the path to the
gate I think my face must have shown
iny suffering.
"CLiiule, Claude!" I cried, "Are you
going away? What sliall I do, if you
go? How cau I liveV"
I'nwoiuuuly? I'erhtips it was. My
Looks would say so, but my heart
did uot. lieaidea, why should I pre
end looked half startled then he
xniled.
"I guess I'd better go, John"—he
ilwavs called mo John, though my
Dame was Eflie—Eflie Dix. A mo
ment later he spoke seriously: "John,
you've always been my friend, and I
hate to be cut oJV from seeing you but
I can't come here any more. Don't you
know any friend's house in the village
where we could see each other once in
A while?"
That was the way I came to meet
him, unknown to my father, day after
day, day after day, ofteucst at a certain
hour toward dusk, bv the great tree at
the lirst turn of the road. How little
it seemed! I would have gone miles to
ice his face.
I cannot tell when it was that we first
fell into each other's arms, with love
Words and kisses, tender, passionate,
et Trial kisses, that burn iu spirit now
»pon my brow and lips. Will I ever
forget
As the weeks passed, I lived only for
these stolen moments. I went about
mv work in a feverish way, fearing to
hear father speak, as he did occa
sionally, with regret and disapproval,
Of Claude. I could not hear my lover
condemned or even criticise it seemed
to me I must defend him fiercely at any
cost: Yet, father was never unreasona
ble he had been stung by an ingrati
tude for which there was no excuse.
This I acknowledged, but, to me, the
•ins of my lover were not sins.
It was late in October, when I
Hondered for the first time how Claude
would spend the winter, and at what he
was working, for I knew he had little,
if any, money.
I spoke of it one evening, with my
face resting on his shoulder spoke
earnestly, and sought a sober reply.
Hut ho bade me not to worry lie had a
scheme at hand, which would call him
to the city very soon, he hoped—a good
scheme, with money in it.
"To the city!'' I cried sharply "away
from me?''
His kisses hushed tho
0tj,
Then I knew some one had seen us
together, and prated ot it.
There were two weeks more to come
—weeks of pain aiul passion—ere the
end. But this I could not know.
In the course of those weeks a change
had come over my lover—a serious
change. Wo met less often, because
he was busy. He was worried too. and
irritable, even with m'. He said, ah
lleaven! He said and did careless,
cruel things. Twice I watched for
him at the old place, shivering in the
bleakest wind he did not come,
only loved him more wildly. He spoke,
too, so indefinitely about our going away.
Still I waited. Ah! I wonder if I
can write of that last night? Hitherto
w hen I have recalled it, my brain has
become as a seething whirlpool, and
all 1 I ave known has been blackness
and the rain beating on my bare head,
and the distant thunder of the mon
ster with lurid eye and the scorching
heat close upon lit*—and so, do you
w onder—I have ended in shriek and
swoon
It was raining raining slowly, with
a rising wind, when I crept from the
house and down the «ud to the turn,
and the great tree, where he was wait
ing. My heart swelled gratefully that
he should have come so far in the rain.
But his first words chilled me through
and through.
"1 can't stay but a moment, John,
I'm going away to-night, only for a day
or two, to Jouesville (twenty miles off).
If I'm detaiued longer, I'll .write you.
So good-by, for I have to catch the
train."
"But," I stammered, "but tho train
is not due for three hours."
"Well, I have to see the station
master and put up the signal."
His impatience cut me cruelly still
I was quiet enough.
"Claude," 1 said, please—if you
have a pencil and sciap of paper
please write me an address at Joues
ville. Then, if you you are too busy
to write, I can do so. it—it will help
pass the time." I would not hide tho
sob that came into mv breast. 1 want
ed him to know I loved him fondly and
forever—down to eternity.
He drew some loose papers from his
pocket and scribbled on one, as well as
lie could in the darkness, his name
"Claude Harrison"—and the town,
have the card yet it lies next my heart
it is all I have left.
"Now, good-by," he said, thrusting
the other papers carelessly into hi* Lip
pocket and, after one long, kiss,
lie strode away rapidly, more rapidly
than I had ever seen him.
1 tried to watch him but it was al
most night, and the rain fell steadily.
When at length I, too, turned to leave
the place, I caught sight of something
he must have dropped from among his
papers lying at my very feet. 1 picked
it up and slipped it into my pocket with
the address he had written. 1 would
have run alter him, but that he walked
so last he was now far beyond call.
So 1 went home, and, entering softly
through the wood-shed, prepared tin
tea.
I was more uneasy and feverish than
ever but tried to listen patiently wliih
father described a new rose he was
growing as au experiment. Occasion
ally 1 comforted myself with s luee/ing
my pocket to find the precious address
safvly hidden there,
Presently father took up his weekly
paper, and 1 carried the teat iing-i iut
the kitchen, where 1 halted for rellee
tion. It occurred to me thai the letter
he had dropped might be of import
aneo to him while at Joues\ille, ami
if so 1 must tseml it to him at once,
took it out to see. It was a queer let
ter I could n find the postmark. 1
did not like the huudwritting but I
opened and lead it.
S wm% weJJ dweribt how itiuuge
CRESFO, IOWA.
*1'(W will
come with me," he said.
He would know shortly, and I must
be ready at any moment. I was not
certain whether he meant an attempt at
reconciliation with father, or whether
he meant an elopement. Little I cared
crazed with love.
I went home with my head on lire,
and father said, half-chidinglv, that I
was a foolish girl to race about till my
face was wind-burnt. I laughed in
reply, "it makes me liappy."
Father had been to the village that
morning, and spoke at tea of having
seen Claude.
"I am afraid," lie said, "that the boy
is going steadilv downward."
"Why, fa her."
My heart was choking IM,but I kept
mv voice controlled.
"He was in bad company to-day bad
looking at least. Idle, vagai»ondish
fellow s. Eflie, have you seen him since
he left?"
I started, but auswered Blowly.
"Yes," I said, for I could not lie.
"Eflie, I know yon thought a good
deal of him—so did I," sighing. ""But I
wouldn't go about with him, if I were
VoU."
HirnsDAY,
elt as I reafl slowly down the first
page and turned the sheet to continue.
Such feelings are indescribable. Af
nearly as I remember, it was, at first, a
dull stupidity which seemed to envelop
my mind so thoroughly that I needed
to rea tho opening sentence a half
dozen times or more ero comprehend
ing. After this came a strong, cold
shudder of mortal fear and agony,
which lasted many moments then
quiet, absolute quiet in every nerve and
fiber except the heart, which beat with
clear regularity, like a calm voice de
vising and arranging.
I knew what my lover was involved
in, what he purposed, and where he
had gone to-night. I knew that my
fat her had judged Claude's companions
correctly—that they were vagabonds,
villains, who had planned to wreck the
night-express at the great curve, before
it could have reached the village.
At the great curve! Oh, (lod! I
could picture the f**ene. The heavy
logs laid closo across the track, the
swift rush, the crash, the overturning
coaches pitching and piling into the
ravine—the shrieks, perhaps tho flame
the awful doom of the innocent and
helpless!
And what madness to think that
vengeance would not quickly fall upon
such deeds. No doubt, no doubt they
had made hin:—Claude—the merest
tool, ami would manage their own
escape in some way, leaving him to the
hands of village justice. Ours was
a quiet town, but what place would not
rouse at this fiendish work. Mobs,
ropes, tree-limbs—oh, e mld I do noth
ing? "Uod in Heaven," I moaned,
"Aid me, give me strength!"
I ran to the clock. It wa long past
7, and the train should reach the
village before S, if on time. I prayed
it might be late, for I had miles and
miles to go in the night and the storm,
I glanced into the sitting-room father
was asleep in his chair—he often dozed
thus through the entire evening. I
trusted his sleep wotlld last, or he
would think I had gone up to my bed
room, if lie wakened.
I caught a little jacket from the wall
and slipped it on no hat or Imnnet,
though -the less burdened the better.
I thrust some matches in my pocket,
and found the lantern hanging in the
woodshed. I shook it and knew there
was oil enough.
Then I started.
I tried to run steadily, with lips
tight shut, to waste no breath. I did
not light the lantern, for I myst not be
seen. Nor did I fear running bliadlv
onward since I knew the road—on this
side the village at least. Sometimes I
almost flow sometimes I stumbled into
puddles, and felt the water soaking
through my shoes.
If only I could reach there in time!
I chose the darkest street of the vil
lage, when at length thai far, slacken
ing speed until out again upon the road
beyond.
It would not have served me to rouse
the station-master, for telegraphing
wotlld not avail, since the train would
have left the nearest station where there
was an operator. Beside, could I trust
any one with this secret? Nay I must
manage with my own strength and
prayers.
Still on madly, wildly! There was a
sharp pain in mv chest, but it slionld
not check me. (lod would surely help
me on He would not let me die till I
had accomplished this task.
At last 1 struck the railroad at a road
crossing, and thenceforth followed it,
running as best I could between the
tracks.
I rememler the wet cinders cringing
under my feet the rank weeds, un
liarvcsted by frost, and the burrs that
gathered oil my skirts,
I remember feeding that I must lie
near the awful spot, where lay the
ileuth-line of low-piled logs.
But, oh, (rod be thanked if I Jiad
come in time!
.1 ust for a second I stooped and tried
to push the obstacles from the track
The strength of two men was needed,
and I—was breathless.
I openeif the lantern and struck
match. The wind blew it out! I.struck
another anil shielded the blaze. The
lantern burned brightly, and, now,
even now I fancied, began the faintest
tremor of the rails. I iHissed the curve
aud ran desperately forward, trembling
as I ran, to see theneaellight burst from
behind another, a lesser curve and
woods, a half mile down.
Was it coming? Could it stop in
time? I flewou.
But, what was this? Another step
besides my own, following, overtaking
me, a grasp of my arm, a terrible grip
that nuule me moan with pain—* wice
that hissed into my very brain:
"How came you here?"
1 liftetl my lantern and stood faeo to
face with Claude.
Even then, at that awful moment,
when my life was a trifle to undo what
he had done—I loved him. At that
awful moment wheu his glance was
hatred—hared and vengeance com
mingled.
Had ho crucified me, it mmt still
*iave been the same.
I raised the lantern higher.
"Thank Uod if I have saved you!" I
tried, shrilly.
Then the* headlight burst from lie
hind the lower curve and grew a ter
rible glare.
I started ahead, waviug the lantern
from side to aide and shrieking
hoarsely.
"Danger, danger! Stop, for (Joel's
•ake! Danger, danger!"
How the shrieks clove to my numb
mouth and tongue! He»w he held nw
back! Need he have feared? Could
he not trust me
How I battled to swing the lantern
free from his grasp!
I was strong—strong for the moment
as a tiger ami, though he tried to hin
der me, I swung the light and shrieked
ag.iiust the thunder-dance and the
lurid eye that shook and scorched
both.
Theu ah, Heaven! I do not know
how or why it happened, ami therein
lies my madness if I ln truly mad.
But he, too, must have been mad. else
he had not slipped or tumbled or
whirled away into the path of the iron
monster, and danced aud whirled aud
kept ou whirling up in the night au
whirling elown in the night and whirl
ing forever and evermore.
Had they not lifted me up when the
dance was ended aud the train stood
quiet, three yards from the curve 1h'
hind which Death was crouching ha I
they not lifte»d me up and borne me tt)
shelter, from which I was at lengtl
carried home, I should still be lying
there lying there in silence,face down
ward, on the wet cind- rs and
(draggling weeds. For why should I
»ise? Why, though 1 had saved the hun
dreds"of juueK-ents, aud snatched
vulwtto imtQtvmi
IOWA PLAIN DEALER.
EDUCATIONAL MATTERS.
Interesting FIGURES from Report «I fhe
CoinmMoncr of Education.
The Status of Education In the
Northwest.
»-iru'iit:S MOM THE COMMISSIOSRH'S UKPOHT.
THE report of tho Coin nls»!oner of Educa
tion for IHSL, embraccH the followln/, as
70 |Hr cent o!
and the average aitundaucv wan
of the
enrollment.
Wisconsin has nn increased school
to
1
he condition of education In N«.r hwe»terii
States:
Illinois shows an fticrea.»' In r.- E'.pti", ex
p'-ndituroH AND
rati- of teat hers' wagi
«, and A
CREASE
in
ENROLLMENT and afendanc".
Yet
t!IO school youth vr
enrolled,
tlO.7
-roeut
Ind itnn hMs lust IK avlly in eniollin -nt and
dali
y
attendance, but still is in good educa
tional co.ellt on. Progress has been made ns
regards school-houses, graded schools, and
receipts a»ul expenditure.
Michigan
School
id nearly per cent, of her
IXIPU'A'ion
enrolled ill the public
schools, an IIN tease for the year of 12,0*.:! in
school population and of
H.LST
Bchool enrollment, W
in public
itli
TI
tl
more in private
schools. There WERE 17." ntoie public school
houses, school
property valued at
Slt)it,8.'»7
inore, and lT,sii| MORE volumes in public
school lit raries. There WAS an incn A o in
the number OL' teachers employed and in ihe
number attending State institutes. The
permanent school fund WAS ?l.'I*T,_41 more,
and MORE were ex|K»nded on public
schools, although theavorage'payof teachers
decreased slightly and Ihe average term was
four days longer.
tion, a slightly increased enrollment, and
decreas -d
Iowa had 7"I per cent, of its school popula
tion ."»»•,7:W) under instruction, and has ad
vtineed
in all
was a day longer. More teachers were EIN
ployed at a slight advance In average pay,
82,71S more were expended for public-school
pur|oscs, and
the
Mcedsgrowingnear by. Ford returned
the tire, but being unable to see his assailants
did not succctel in hitting them, and they
made good their escape,
'lheie are muny
rumors as to
who the parties
Ford has STATED that he foared some such
an
attack, as his life has B£N threatened
frequently, and that he lust rated a plan
to
kill him
or his brother at I'eoria by a mem­
ber of the trou|ie with which he was perform
ing.
who Intel.substituted powder and ball
for
blank e*atridges.
Charlie Fe rd1i'ft here for
KANSAS City to
secure the aid of oiliccrs in searching for his
brother Itob, WHO has mysteriously disap
peared. and whom Charlie thiuks has been
foully dealt with.
THE CORN CROP.
Final IT*port from Washington, Showing
Falling oil'
OR 40,000,000 ltUNhcla.
The November report of the National De
partment of Agriculture gives the local yield
per acre. In the October Anal reports, the
condition of corn, which averaged seveuty
eight, was interpreted to MCAU a product of
close to l,ti00,0HMHKl bushels. The average
yield per acre appears to be wenty-three and
one-tenth bushels—one and one-half bushe
lower than the yield of lsS".\ This gives a re»
sult practically identical with that ot October.
Ou the acreage- re|»oi ted iu July of
A
bushels short of the prvvious
crop, notwithstanding the increase' e are1
The potato crop is large*, uuiouutiug
175,OTK).tKhi bushels.
loth have earnestly uiged him to make a
clean breast of
tl:E
whole
i s c.
transaction and
make his |caco with heaven, but thus lar
no pur|M
lie toatinues
o
have pains i n
the head'' whenever the matter is broached
to him. He is very outs|okcn on one
X0YT'M1?EK 22, 1W3. WITOT.L- XI'MRL-NI 12(!3.
WIND AND WATER,
A
Season of Great Disaster on the North*
ern Lakes.
(From the Chicago Times.!
The northwesterly gale which has prevailed
almost
steadily
sixty-eight,
if
popula»
a
daily attendance. There was im­
provement in the quality and length of
schools, and in the annual expenditure and
liermancut
funds for them. Other facts fur
ther ind
'cute a steady and healthful advance
ment.
Minnesota is imperfectly reported. A small
decrease In enrollment and a heavy gain in
school property are Indicated by the statistics
given.
matters except average attend-
AIUH.
Nebraska has advanced in nearly all re
sjieets. There were 10,476 more youth of tho
ScheNtl age, S.II7 more enrolled in 'public
seheiols, aud more IN average daily at
tendance. With an Increase of LIRTH iu school
districts, there were ."17 more having school
six
months and over, while fewer reported no
schools, and the average term for the
permanent tftate Softool
fund increased by $l,so3,34i«.
THE FORD BROTHERS.
Attempt te Assassinate Charlie
at
His
Father's Home In Missouri—
Disappearance of LLOH.
flilchmond Mo.) Telegram.J
News has reached this city of the attempted
assassination of hatlie Ford, one of the no
torious Ford brothers,
at his
almut
lather's hoiue,
three miles from this city.
AS nearly
as can lie learnesl the oircumstances are
ou the chain of great laket
since Sunday last is tho most disastrous tc
life and property that has occurred In anj
one gale since 1H67. The total nutnlier ol
wrecks tire forty, which Includes vessels go
ing ashore, as well as those which went tc
pieces, and the total number of lives
so far
city, resides an old bachelor
S ion
as
threw him
WI re. but noth­
ing is really known as to their identity
Pome say it was nei^rhtors of Ford's
father, who had forbidden both
Charlie and itotiort Ford to come into tho
vicinity. The rei ort of the attempted assas
sination created much excitement. A mover
w ho was camped near by stated that the shots
were tired so closely together that tluIy
seemed to have be-en all tlted at ONE* and
there is a strong lielief that the party was
Coiu|Hsesloi seven men who made their eseapo
ou horseback,the horse-s being in the timber
adjoining.
to
Kelliug, the Indiana Batcher.
recent dispatch from tafnyette,
says: Jacob Nelling, the brute who killed
Ada Atkinson, ce
ntinue s to hold his pcae-E* in
regard to the details of that horrible tragedy
He jiositively refuses to make any further
admissions than have alre ady been priuted.
The Coroner of itcutou county. Paul
llit/ie, has visited
him several times, as
has also the itev.
|Mint
however, uud th U is an intention to -uiand
venue from llcntou COWTT^.
POLITICAL M0KSEL&
A M'MUEH of dettd Presidential eandldates
are lying atiout In different parts of the coun
try.
IT leaks out by way of Baltimore that
Grandfather Samuel Tilden is responsible for
t'nele Hcnjatnfn llutler's defeat.
CIIAI.MI:its U
as thoroughly defeated
sissippi, obtaining a majority iu oue county
only e seventy in that large State
SKNATOM
Tilt:
Com: says that when Thurtuan
Conk ing, aud lll.iinc Ictt the Senate they
took
away 'ST per
ccut.
of the brains of that
bexly.
Haltlmore
Sun
fl.'.'Oti a dav during the last canipa-gn by
printing spe-eehes of
excited
with
to be worth
Uiviats and ha: or
BEST and
i
It
soul from the clutch of the deinoi
murder? Why, iudced, when Claude
HAVING sccured
Mayor I*ow'S re*-clection, ills inttucme is
I aid
10,000
bills will
CITI/.eus,descr\lug
RESECT and fair troatracnt
every one."
lost was
as known. Beside these,
there are some vessels missing, or, rather,
have not been heard from since the terrible
gale began to blow.
It is
these will turn
up,
TIL
such a way
as
to
to leave port
rlcanes. Such
the same mistake be ore the ureal gale
Oct lis,
Issit.
Then followed the terrible
disasters to the Alpena, Wells Hurt, aad,
lastly, the Akely.
FRANK'S (JKEAT TROT.
Eclipsing All Previous Records—A
Mile in 2:8 1-2.
The little bay gelding Frank licat the rec
ord in a race at Prospect park, New York,
with a running mate again-t H. H. Wiiishif
and mate. The purse was for $2,000, and
F.'IOO extra
te the horse beating
'00
s|«'ct itors were
2:10 '4. About
-esent,
says a New York
dispatch, and the track was iu excellent eon
dition. In the first heat Frank !e 1 slightly t«
the quarter pole, when Wiushlp pas-ed and
took the
pole, keeping
1
till just e!o e reach
ing ilie three-quarter. Then Murphy S|«H]
his team, and. gtcnimg rapidly, lap)ed the
:dhe.-
team and
State
sh ahead. On
stretch both teams
the home
weic running.
In the second heat throe false star
as
follows: Ford had been notified anonymously
uot to come into the neighborhood,
but he disregarded the notice, and Monday
night alter supiar, while walking
out, seven SHPTS were tired at hlui
iu rapid succession, but none of them took
etfeet. although one passed through his coat.
TL»e shooting
was done by persons cone-ealesl
in tall
to the
WHIPPED, BURNED AND ROBBED.
The Terrible Torture which Robbers IN
flicted t'pon a Farmer.
[Denver (Ce lo.) Te'e^rani.L
At Petersburg (irovc, seven miles from
farmer nanioti
Peter Olsen, who usually kept small sums ol
money abeiut his premises. At night foul
disguised men went to the house and knocked.
The farmer asked the visitors te
tin the
floor, and
to toll
a large tire iu the back yard and carried hire
out, and prt»cecdt1 to execute their threat tc
burn him alive. They placed his feet in th*
tire, and literally roasted them.
TPortland (OREGON* Dispatch.]
The
bill striking out the word
lit
olympia, ttwlay. by a
will be at
tS.:HTT|.00I^
the exact figures would be 1.V.7 omi.OOU
bushel*. In tlu revision ol' the season's
returns this result will not be materially
changed. The product will therefore lie
about
40.000,000
will
L^iWe
Michigan and
Tuit't.
ITT N I T:u's
votes in the city.
|o-c AU car-
faithful i lend in the* withdraw at of
Congressman Hobinson, whom th Massa
chusetts
UcpubUcaiis have just made Gov
ernor.
I'IIK llaunibal (MI.) neprocn have "je
solved" to
"disarm Prejudice and the ma
I'gnity of
the power tor evil" by redoubling
tbeir cnerg E to bccomo intelligent,Indus
ti
urns and law-abiding
of
at thu bands of
HAITN OI-Kixs. 100 years old, voted for
IB'ttdly for tiovernor
eiee'ion. Cousius cast his first \eite for
'J homas Jefferson LA
isOi. and from that
year
to this fall has not tailed to ulteml any gen
tr il I iectti U and has voted lor an unbroken
rciiodof
seventy-nine
)EARS au unscratehee)
^uyyi ftttc iWtgH^.
HI TI.KK will
of Ohio at the recent
r-lht*n.
Dutch
IfW
THE SPEAKERSHIP.
Congressman Carlisle's Estimate
of His Own Strength.
[Washington Telegram.]
Tho following table showing the votoi
claimed by Carlisle lor Sp-a'iorshlp, and the
votes allowed
by him to
ltandall, is
said to be
correct by Congressman
Floild
as they may lie safely
shelter" in harbors atiout the lakes. Shak
ing in this eonueetlon.
it
Phil
IS the confidential friend Of
I .........
probable that al!
Oeorgia
lUin LIS .........
Indiana
Iowa
Kentucky ......
IiOlli-iHUA
Mai viand
MASSACHUSETTS.,
Micicga i
Mississippi
may be of interest
to know that the season, us a whole1, hat
been the most disastrous to ship
ping and insurance men alike than
was e ver known L» tore in the history ol
navigation on the lakes. The whole season
has been marked by disasters terrible in tlieii
nature and entailing heavy loss II|MM insur
ance companies. This was partlj due
Ohio
iitip-I, on
I an
unpropitious and stormy sen-on. but largely
to the inexcusable mistakes of the siirntil ser
vice. They have missed every gal of wind
eue'our.txe vessel master!
O:T tho vor*E
of veritable iiur-
was the c.ise
2 J'- nnsylvania.., 9 ii
iiKouth t'arolin t. 4 1
1 'IYunes-tec 0
O i
'l'exas 9 1
S-Vbgima 3
4 W. st Virginia.. I
2 A\ isc tisin ..4 1
u| Total 110 80
that Cox will get nb tut
votes in the first, and, per-
It is admitted
thiity-tlv.'oi thes
the second ballot, but the table
WHEN
LAS' Sunday, and
also last May. To go further back, they
MAD''
surrender of v ital power.
COME in. At
all were inside they seized Olsen.
tlemandi tc
know where his money was. He replied thai
he had mint*. After thoroughly searching
the house to no purp «SE, Olsen still refusing
where the tumicy 'was hidden,
the robbers got willow switches anO
whippt-d their victim oil the bare feet
and legs until they were covered with
blood, olsen still
•^FUSING them,
they built
F.ven thi
terrible treatment tli 1 not induce' him to giv
up his hidden treasure. He was then e*e m
JK-JIT TL
to w alk back
te» the house, where 8
scuttle ensued, during which the stove
overturne-d.
wai
disch sing a box containing StiOO.
which the robbers tt-ok and decamped. Then
is no clew to their identity. Oteen will prob
ably recover.
FEMALE SUFFRAGE.
A Great Victory
for
the Women OF Wash
Inglon Territory.
"male" from
all the election laws passed the council of th(
Washington Territory Legislature, in session
vote of
passed the House several weeks
7 to 5. It
ago by 15
7. tiov. Newell has expressed his intention
to sign the bill, and tlteie is no doubt it will
become law in regular time1—sixty da s. The
first
opjiortunity
the women will have to vote
the general election next Novem­
ber. An enthusiastic meeting
of women suf­
fragists is in session to-night. Mrs.Abigai
Scott Duntway, the
reeognlzed leader in
the
equal rights movement, being the centra'
figure.
LAME REGION LUJHT-II01SKS.
Washington Telegram.]
The report
of the Light-bouse
and
II. S. Iluchtcl, and
board eayi
the Eleventh Light-house district (uppei
liike region* cvutaius 117 separate light sta
tious
and embraces 2,500 statute miles of lak
coast. The district has lieeotne so large THA:
it has la-come unwieldy. No Inspector car
perform his other duties and visit each of in
117 light stations once
each thrve months, at
require-d by the regulations for the inspec
tion tif the lights and the payment of the
kee|iers, as the stations are too numerou
and too far apart, 'L'he completion of the
Northern Pacitlc railroad has gtvcu a stimu
lus to the navigation
e the upper
it is evident that us the
tlu upp-r lakes
lakes
commerce? ol
increases additioua
lights aud more- buoys
be required. It is
therefore recommended that tho Light-house
district which embraces the upper lakes
be
divided: that the portion which embrace*
tlreen
Hay be set otf
and
called the Sevcnti onth Light-house district
with
headquarters at Milwaukee, and that
the |KirtiAJ which embraces Lake Huron aud
lake Su|« rior be set off, retaining tho eilel
Same, with headquarters at hctroit. The in
OK
asc in the aids to navigation over tho until
tier iu I8."C\ when the district was const ituu»d,
and the pres|iective increase in the near fu
ture makes tticdh isiou quite uectVssary.
ALL ABOt'T BOLD BUS.
THE Widow Duller has got tho mitten,—
tvtiiKiix it}/
iu Mis­
7'IIIK-S.
T'Tiit: "solid ticket IS tho nation' hope
old lien is gone up.—Spriuafbid(IU.)s!uister.
lit TI.Kit's boom for the Presidency is stove
iu.—CJuvfumJ
IltmUl.
TUK hero
of
is hims If.
is said to have made
candidate*
AT
advertising nit 's.
i K v
W \ITU LIKM'HKU is credited by hi#
llio "klyn admirers
Tewksbitry now knows how
Hurlntytim Htiuh yt
GKN. LLTN.NT
Journal.
has simply met w ith his oat
Ural aud INEVITABLE reward.—ATTIIUW* CIFT
AUMIRAI. lltTi.KU steers the
t'agshlpas
itallty is
the
S|H-ctrttl squadron sails up Salt liver.—I'hila
d..//nii
'lime*.
HEX llt ri.KII cau console himself with Vic
tor Hugo's
remark, that Uod and one make
majority.—0»/IJ.IHS/T AOFT#I«ESHTW.
HI:N
Iti TI.KII has
a yavlit of his own. Now
Is the time for him
to take a sea voyage of
Is in­
tended to represent the Strength of Carlisle
and ltandall after Cox drops out.
Inlluenee is said T•» lie for
TheTildon
ltandall and the
Tammany for Cox, ilt it is understood that
Cox drops out of tie-light John Kelly
will not favor or op|IE-O either of the other
men. The few
Handitll
i t--tt
here ridicule the
extravagant claims of Carlisle, and say
hirities,so one e»f his nei
is wen
ad I efore the horses got off, with Frank al
the pole. Wiushlp passed him at the quartei
and 1 1 two lengths
three-quarter
Where Frank picked up, but did not hold hit
ground. Winship shooting ahead and tnins
under fhe wire a winner by a length and
half. Time—First quarter, 3:T'- half, L:0L'4
three-quarters, L::W. mile, -:10'I.
At
thll
that
in Tennessee and (ietirgia, f.U- instance, the
figures will be exactly reversed. ltandall
Is
expected to be here Thursday, and then his
claims in detail, which have NO* yet ap|»eared,
will probably be made known.
SAW HIS OWN LIFE'S LIMIT.
K Maine Man Departs in Peace ea UM
Iky
Predicted by Himselt
A recent dispatch from Lewiston, Me., re
|K rts the
following singular occurrence:
La­
fayette Cook, a resident of South Auburn, 56
ye»ars old, declared two weeks ago that he
would tiie on Sunday, the lltli Inst. He arose
on Sunday morning In his
usual gtwd health,
but remarked at the table that
it was
he should ever eat. Alter the meal
Hut
Murphy brought his horses down, and they
p.is»ed .under tl e wire
in vood shti|M,
«inninj.
by half a neck. Th time WAS as follows
First quarter, half, L:0 P4 three-quar
ters, mile. 2:0S'I.
the last
lie shaved
carefully and arrayed himself clean
I lothes,
in which he requester! he might Le» buried.
He was so eccentric that )-eop!C did not pay
much attention to his talk. One
of
his pecul
."IIIMII-S
4 o'clock he
say. was that
he prepared his own meal-, and never ate the
food his wife did.
He
was an excellent
man. however, and respected by all who
knew him. Sunday morning lie was ap
parently in his usual health. Ho walked out
with his grundt-hildrcn a short distance.
went into the
himself, lit- put otic hand down by his side,
bent the other arm so that he placed the hand
under his head and
close-d his
eyes. So far
as anybody knows, he
position and never
0'IH)N\ELL A KITKEYE.
The Slayer of Informer Carey
Citizen of Ohio.
(Telegram from Ironton,
Ohio.]
On the records of the Probate ewnt of
I.awrene-e county, Ohio, -arhig date of NOT.
0, ls70, ap|* ars this very interesting ree'ord:
And m,w e unes 1'at: ick o'Donnell, a native
of Ireland, and makes his application to be
naturalized, and—the court being ?atistled
from tho declaration of said Patrick O'lkm
nell tiled herein, ami the oath tit' Michael
Mctiarvey. that said applicant has in all
things complied with the law in relation to
naturali/.ution, and 1 e hut ing taken the oath
of allegiance prescribed by law —it is ordered
that a e-ertitle.ite of citizenship be- i-sued to
said applicant in due form tit law.
tii.oin.e. W. Tiiomi-son, Probate Judge
Judge Thompson has received an order
from the Acting Secretary of State* at Wash
ington to forward at once a duly authenticat
ed copy tif the above record. The proofs, it
is supposed, are wanted iu Fngland in the
trial td' Patrick o'Doniioll, th-- slayer of
James Carey, at Cape Town, Africa. o'Don
ueil was a resident of lituitoti, and has rela
tives hcie: tiesides, rnauy people live I ere
who reuneuiber lum.
A NORTH CAROLINA TRAGEDY.
A Weddiug Festival Turned Into a
Mar*
tlt-rtiut Com
but.
[Dispatch from Nowlierne, N. C.l
At a wedding at Currituck. Hyde county,
N. (\, a fatal tight occurred. Charles Credle,
a young cotton-planter, was being married to
Miss Klla Crcble. a lov cly belie of that section.
The house was richly decorated in honor of
the occasion, and crowds of guests were pres
ent. The ceremony took place- at o'clock,
after which the company sat down to a superb
banquet. Champagne flowed like water, and
senile of the young men imrtttok too liberally
and a quarrel anise as to whether tho
ge-rman or cotillion should be tlaneed afte-r
supper. Hot language ensued unit a general
light followcel. the infuriated young men pay
ing no heed to the shrieks eif the- veiling
ladies. Keveilvers were drawn and shots
tired, and for a short time tiie se-cn'e was a
terrible one. Charles Haliune-e, the groom's
be-st man, w as killed, ami Theunas S. Kdan
another e»f the groomsmen, was mortally
wounded. The sight eif the dead man
brought the" revelers to their senses. The
tight ing c.o-cd and every effort was made to
save tin- life tf the wounded young man. No
phvsician was nearer than twenty-live miles
and several of the partie-ipuuts iu the' affray
at oiu-e started for him. The newly-married
couple sat up up all night by the wounded
man's benlside. The dead boely of ilallanco
w as laid out iu the pat lor until the Coroner
could investigate the matter.
GLEANINGS.
low v has $7,000,000 iu her savings banks.
F'Uts are $1.50 per deutMt in some parts
A KltiM*DtlU
not asily exhausted,
and his impiiilctu'e is incapable of IC IIIT
aba.-hed.—AM'
A
month's duration.—,Y(IE L'oifi o/,'./.
STAND up. Commodore Tilden, aud eleiiy, II
FI.U can, thut you are man who suwet
Admiral Hutler'S boat
-I'tuiiiiiiljthm I'ixm,
need to be extremely agile
tc
overleap the mighty chasm that now SCIA
rates
him from the White
House.- S».
SOMKBOIIV baile-i
t\IU
the
water out of
GAP cuuai. That is
all that is tli
matter with LIEN JJuUer.—iimiiinad
Xtu*
ot
Montana.
FX-SKNATOU FKKIIY, of Michigan, will
main abroad another ,iear.
A ION farm, stockcel with over 1,000 fowls,
is to started in Thomasville, Ga.
I'IIK mill optatives at Manchester, Jf, H.,
have $5,000,oeni in the savings banks.
AN ear of ceirn containing 1.1*0 well ma
tin eel grains was grown in the Urosse Tete,
La
TUKV «lo uot allow a fellow to whistle white
going through the1 sausage narkct iu St
LOUIS.
oxv evening, near Selma, Ala,, a party of
two in two hours' shoeiting killed titty-four
bull bats.
TIIK unit her of twenty-eight children
WiU living in Atlanta, (iu though twenty*
three ot lie-r offspring lire ele ud.
A WIIITK deer lias IKH-U frequently S*en e»f
late in the vicinity of lilue cumui, Neyad t.
It is not a clear white, ticing more eif a e-r- am
color.
crcctcd Opposite where
last spil e was driven
PLAIN DEALER.
EVERYTHING IN THE LIN2 Of
JOB WORK,
Bill-Heads, Cards, Posters, Circular^
ET0, ETC., ET0
(&TSfA0R3V w mnrm nowwwa
fSI» OUllllfTM®.
arOIYE US A TRIAL BEFORK ORDF.RIH®
KLHKWIIF.RK.-**
IOWA STATU NKWS.
A CATHOLICchun is being built t.t Mi»
son.
WIUOHT county farmers totupltd-i of the
bad 6nlltioa of th corn.
THK
Thompson, Who
Carlisle:
Car- llan- Car- Han
lisle. dull. lisle, dull.
Alabama...
Arkansas
'aliiornla
'onilectlcttt....
JK stofllen at Waconesta, Hutnt»o!dt
county, has boen dlsonCituo 1.
Tm: low water and shortage of logs wll'
probably coni|iel many of the sa^-mllls el in]
the Mississippi river to clorc early this sea
PO'L.
TIIK
4 Mis onrl........b' 4
1 Nevada I o
8 New Jersey..... a
8 New York 18
1 North Carolina, "1
1
Pimurr
pleads for nn tip ra-lious fo?
Ida drove, nnl suggests that a meet Iter of
itl/.en* be held to take Initial slu** to supply
the want.
CIIAUI.KA R. !ix, cas'i'er of a iav ags
ank at Council Muffs, wl:o »5utTcred rribly
for years from dyspej sta, kllle 1 hittifclf with
a revolver.
I.vits oi.fiox, living a'»out a mile ccs' of
Fore City, win blast lug a rock, when the
last exploded prematurely, driving the
chisel through his hand, inflict!ng a revere
wound.
As A warning to young ladies who the
eaUng ft cltuici rojloties, it Is understood
that a Mason ci:y young woman, at n recent
hiircli le tival, took to many oysters that
she hud to I o eairied tuur.o on a :hult'r.
FHOM a' ttble compiled by the State SuiK-r
intendent, it appears that fifty-fcven county
Superintendent* were re-elected at tho lata
e'ectiou. Tlio same table shows that tifli
lti«Jics were elected to that office, live of whoai
are married and five single.
tvni i.f. Mr. (. Mi es, of Wright bounty,was
clot Jig the store of Owen & Mjer, abo.it 9
o'c tick at ni/ht, he v»t fired upon by twe
ma-ki tl men, with the evident intention ef
ro! bing him. Five bullets pierced his Iwidf,
o«»e entering the lungs and another lodging
in Ills thigh. Two others broke both
As
A
house. He
carefully shaved and washed himself, put on a
clean shirt, and then said he would like to
have a spread thrown upon the lounge.
was given a quilt, or something of the
stretched himself on the
He
sort,
Itititue, and covered
l.d not stir from this
alterward
spoke, but
con­
tinued iu A sort »D a stupor until an early
hour Monday morning, when the lust vital
spark
lett
his laxly. Cook was a dead
man
Within the time set for his
D-inise. Those
who watche'd hint say they witn^ssitl a slight
movement
ol the
chest, but
n-
other sign
of
animation, after he lay elown. He took
POISON or drug
of any
no
sort. It was a simple
hit
arms. There is seimc talk of summary pun
ishment if the murderer are caught.
ONK night recently four masked n we
at
to the jail at Centervil'.e and eeitti|ieHe#
William Lane, who w as in charge, to dclivtf
to theui om- Whitfield (colored), the eonfedt#*
ate of Hanks, the highway robber who
tacked Mr. Volmer. They handcuffed him
and proceeded to the north part of the eitf,
where they hung him souie three or fo«r
times to l'orCv.' a eonfoslon fro'n him, wilfe
what result no oue knows. He was then m»
turnenl to the Jail and locked up.
farmer waseiriving through the bull
ness sir tion of Fast Des Moines, having Ml
his wauon a couple of large-, tat, live t.o
which he was taking to market, his tcaai
U'came frighteued aud Uie down street at a
fearful rate. Th" farmer lost his balance
and fell backward among the lu gs and
came so badly inlxe I up with them that whim
the team tan plump into a tree and came to
a
dcadsttip.it was several minut s 1 efore he
uhi tell whether he was one of the hogs or
the driver.
Mas. DR. AOSRW, of Wi'tm, had a sad e*.
l»erieucco.i 11 alio A e'en, while ?lu- wassLtiaf
alone at home, 1 er hlre-1 girl being out, Miiae
girl acquaintance.* of the help e-aine to the
licuse and rang the bell violently, and then
leiu no res|tiuse marched around to the
kitchen door and stalke-d into the room la
Hallowe'en fashion, and, c-outiuuing the
search for their friend, found Mrs. Agnew
'ylug prostrate on th- Hour iu an uuconscioas
condition. Kest' itives wer applied and the
taily recovered, but is s'ili a suffeicr. She it
subject to heart troubles, which wt-ro
install 1/ made uctive by the fright caused bjr
the intrusion of h-r Hallowe'en visittHk
Stock at Ihe State Fair.
The Des Mkiiues
Htjirter
publishes a list Of
the stock ut the State fair, which, it says,
will deuioustrute that it is fur superior te
n unifiers, aiul we have every reason to lie*
Hove in t,uality over any other State fair.
As an evidence of the Utter. Iowa stex'k has
lie-en exhibited at the other State fairs, and
in nearly all cases have made a most thorough
sweep of the premiums in the
classes iu which
they e-omiiebtl:""
BSTUIES OF STOCK
AT
stanelard
TBS tOWA STATE f'AOt
or mm.
No. Road.
bred
trotters
pstakes—Devons..
-ei stakes—Ayrshire.
Total
the
tin
tile Northern Pueitlo
railroad bears the following: "l-aWe Superior
|,1!S miles l'uget sound, s47 miles.
It is stated that the poi-^'iiing of the ele
phant at the* im|M-rial menagerie at SclntU
briinn was effected by 1 lit- use of 05U grains
of prussie acid. He died in eight minutes.
A NKST of gray squiitvls was found iu
tree live miles oust of Fulton. N. Y., by Or
Villi- Johnson. Ho tmik the squi: n-Is hour
and gave them to the e.ire of a cat having
kitieus. The cat adopted the'm, quite to tho
exclusion of licr own kind.
Two U.MTTT K.T luis-relicfs, ascribed
Michael Angclo, have lately been discovered
In Havre. One ol them represents tin- stoi in
ing of a fortress, the other Faint-, crown n*
one ot the Duke,-* of tiuise. It is supp i
that these two work adorned tin- rave of
the tli st Duke ol that family in tin- Castle of i
Joiuville, which w us wicked during the i-|etioh
rwutuUou.
Total
TOTAL
It
Thoren-jUbred horses 3
iie-a rs
*t
Cleveland bays IS
Horses of *11 work Si
taip ut a id native nre bird Pwherrm,
1Noiiu.UI, Hel^ian and other French drait
(I.reels
InuorNd aud nat.ve pure Cl\ elosdale, Kn
lish taid C.-nada vlrslt br.e Is SA
Drift breed grade*
Hweepstakcs *tand rd bred trotters a
tfotep-tul —Thoroughbreds 1
Swee^st ike.—- Koa I -1- rs» a
Sweepst .k-—i lcve'and lmys 1
Hwi-e-ps akes -liu.s,s -f all work 9
Swc -psL-ikes —Imp-ne-el and native pnro bred
Jvieiieroiis aud Normans, itclgtana and
ot Iu Fr* neii dra't br.vds S
8w -epstaVes-Imported aad native Clydei-
LIES .. 3
Km eel slakes Pratt breed aad grodo a
Farm taams SO
e'arri.ige aud bug-jy teams
SUt.tla uvl I-ouic*
Jacks and Jennata....
Mafaia....
a
an
emu.
SHI RT-T: ms
it Crete! ....
lvil'.l Augua....,
Red Tolled
Holsteius
Jerseys and Guernseys
llevous
Avrsh.r s
i.*iliowHvcattle..,.,
tirade cuttle
Fat catrle
liee-f bre.tls
lU-ct an I dairy herd c-iuibiued
Herd prcuiiuji Holsteius, Jvraeya or Uaerm
sevs 4
Devon and Ayislures 14
Short-horu herd premiums ....... 4
Short-ho tis *.t one family I
Short-hoin bulls ....... S
t»» ep'takes—Short-horns S9
ttwe-epstake's Here.ords ....
Sweeps'nke«.—IV lied AUCUS. 21
ttwcepetakcs—Holstei-is
Kvv.t p-takts -Jerseys or Guernseys 30
9
47
an
:IA
.....
A
.... is
IS
...est
•oua.
11-rkshires
Polaud Chinas......
Chester Whites
K-scX
Duro*" or Jersey red
Large I n-huh Che-shire, Yorkshire, Suffolk,
ii
Short -faoeei l.atica^dre and small York
shire 4
II t-rd Premiums tt
Hweepstake-s -Herkshires If
Bwtt pstakes- I't land-l'ainas iil
Kweei stake-—Che-t -r Whit s IS
Sni ej
stakes Kski-s
«weei-ukc» Di:roc or Jeist-y ReJ ti
Sweepstake a -Large English, sic 4
Total
Pnr.- Merino.
pure l'iiel I.- n.' Weo', tots wold and Lincoln
an 1 Ltiivster ftl
rutc Hreel Mithlie Weoia,HiMlthdown. etc 4T
Mive.l lti etls
I ollg Wool ll'-l lis....
FllieWi.. 1 he.ds
Merino lioeks
Long woul tloeks
Middle wo. 1 rtoek*
Hweei i-t ike---- Merino
Hweepstakes Lt nj Woe I, eitswohi, i
|u eepstakes—Mieidle Wool, etc.......
IF
4
3
5
4
'a
I-otiruY,
mv.
A i»tic
Do king PoBUaitjue, etc
SnanM'
ll :iuburg,
I'TIII-I.
T.rcncU.
I..HU
It.iutam-t
WISE, iUneoua
Guineas
Turkeys
IrevSt
Ducks
Rah) its and FerrrUi.
Poultry and bird oolisctions
14
41
14
14
15
4
4
31
11
n
44

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