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The daily Gate City. [volume] (Keokuk, Iowa) 1855-1916, October 15, 1908, Image 3

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tSDAY,
I
OCT.
Peoria.
p-
15, 1908.
10 Will
flSIT CARTHAGE
Suite a Number of Waraaw People to
Attend the Dedication of the
Hancock County Court
House.
.iflCi
PflJpSS PLACE THE 20TH
p'ES-v.
I
uew Lumber Yard
Warsaw—Interest In the Star
Entertainment Course—
Art -Exhibit.
lIrs
James
(siting
M. Crane of tola. Wis are
Fred Davis and wife of Washing-
on
D. C., arrived Tuesday and are
^siting relatives.
Mrs. H. W. Rabe left Tuesday even
for Detroit, where she will visit
[relatives.
Th3 art exhibit Tuesday evening
ffas
well attended. It was the finest
[exhibition of pictures ever seen in
•Warsaw.
The youth of the city were
nuch interested.
Jof the $145,000 court house at Car
Ithage on the 20th.
To those who have not secured sea-
Iron tickets for tne Star Entertainment
Icourse, the management is offering!
fi.iv balance or
comprising five first-class 's 'n }h*
A
The new
lis making improvements in his proper
ty to the advantage and comfort of the
ai8o.
On
Wednesday evening. October 14,
it 7:30 o'clock, Frank Ernst, eldest ^nd,8pe^
w't.h
er Werc
found in his pocket.
PERSONAL
George Heinz left this morning for
Cantrll, Milton and Mount Sterling,
where he will finish road advertising
for the merchants' association of this
city.
Patrick Mehin- of Cuba, 111., was in
the city yesterday on business.
D. Ryan and daughter, Miss Lula,
left this morning for Qulncy.
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Hughes left
for the south this morning.
Mr. and Mrs. John Middletoil of
Bonaparte returned to their home in
Bonaparte this morning after a visit
in the city.
Jno.
s.
Talked of For
jon.of Mr. arid Mrt. tanlel Ernest, ^He aUfiwUng Keokuk Medical col
land Miss Mary Fairfax, eldest daugh
ter of Professor and Mrs. Lionel Fair-
fax. were united in marriage at the
residence of the bride's parents in
East Warsaw, Rev. H. W. Raze, pastor
I harness business in the shop of his
of the Lutheran church, officiating. ™e of Keokuk arrived Thursday
Only the immediate relatives of the morning and will vis with Dr. Pahl
contracting parties were present atj^
contracting parties were present
the ceremony, after which a sumptu- *Ir- I^ewenstein is just recovering
ous supper was served. The bride re-jfrom
father, whose valued assistant he Is.
partner. He has handsomely furnish-!
"more to follow" before Thanksgiving. Dallas, South Dakota, to register for
Best of it is they will all live in War
ww and nearly all are Warsaw young
people.
G00DE DENIES h:
ALLEGED BLACKMAIL
Publisher of the American Farmer
Wanted Money for Suppressing
an Article, Says Hitchcock.
INDIANAPOLIS, Oct. 15.—Solon L.
Goode, publisher of the American
Parmer, charged by Hitchcock with
endeavoring to blackmail the national
committee, today signed an affidavit
accusing Hitchcock of lying and deny
ing the charges. Hitchcock charged
Goode was trying to extort $1,500 for
tile suppression of an article ln the
September issue of the magazine at-
Psign. Goode declares he will make
Hitchcock appear In court and endeav
or to prove the statement.
'4
Des Moines
Iowa
ICURES
lUQUOfi, DB'ja
IAND
wcrr
Moore left this morning for
Ashton, Mo., on a business trip.
O. W. Andrew of Kahoka was in the
city yesterday on business.
J. J. Datin of Fort Madisoii was in
the city yesterday on business.
Mr. and Mrs. J.
w.
r,i IK u. ami' C. Daniels of Blandinsv—e
WARSAW, 111.. Oct 15. Mr.
and
vl]lei
the family cf^ ^Charle^^ B.
Crare, as also is Mrs. Sarah Crane of
kuk yesterday
Dickinson were
in the city yesterday on a visit.
C. N. Eastman, a large "lumber deal
er of Keosauqua, was In the city yes
terday looking after business inter
ests.
Miss Prances McClellan of Nash-
Geo. W. Hemmings of Donnellson is
in the city on business,
Chas. Coleman of Fort Madison was
in the city yesterday.
Mertin Ketchans and T. J. Mooney
of LaHarpe were registered at the
Royal.
J. D. Hennessy has returned to his
home in Keokuk after a business trip
to this city.
C. F. Sullivan, an Ottuinwa under
taker, accompanied by Mrs. A. A.
ceresiea. „„„„1o|Sullivan and Miss Cora Sullivan, of
Quite a ,nu™bper J* 111., arrived in the city to
Ltomplate attending the dedication
day where Sull,van wl)1 be
placed in St.
treatment.
Jaclc
concerts and Kay Lee, Ireland, is in the city for a
The new owner of the Adams house
The Guest comply have opened aj™an's JJe company representative
|music store on Main street. |°'?,PHMexiC0
A new lumber yard is talked of.
hartv from St. Louis. New hotel build-1 J. N Dickinson returned to the
L~
All on the strength of the fltyJhiTs
raW power dam soon to be built, 2? ..
This is no
ffitjb'ut saying nothing.
t$'&ream.
Josephs hospital for
August Miller of Fort Madison is in
the to
Dr Wm B]ender Qf Carthage
clt', oday
m-
business.
Connell, an Irish poet from
F. A. Quirot of Hermosille, Mexico,
is in the city for a few days in the
"Yssistant"postmaster H. R. Miller j'ntere,8t°f Scott Manufacturing
lot
Keokuk and wife were Warsaw vls-j£0- of this city. Mr Quirot who Is a
its by trolley Wednesday.
a Ple&S UDS
and South Amerlcan
m°raiDg
Sbticen are here every day, look- M- Sturdivant of Bonaparte is in
the city today on business.
Cantrll New Era: Jess Saar ar
rived Saturday morning from Keokuk
from a
business trip
T,
_*
Wth,
a
weck
was an interested guest Frank was1 Humeston New Era: Mr. and Mrs.
born ln Warsaw, and has learned thej
hls
lege Dr. Carpenter and wife re
turned Saturday morning from Keo
kuk where they visited relatives and
bration Chris Loewensteln
wife of Keokuk arrived Thursday
sie^
celved many handsome and useful: Memphis Reveille: Mrs. O. Boyd
gifts from loving friends. Mrs. Shain!°f Keokuk spent several days this
Lf LaHarpe, grandmother of the bride
of typhoid and malaria,
'n this city, the guest of friends,
c- L-
Hart
went to Keokuk last Fri-
vlsit
Mr-
and
Ml"s\ Bel't
son and take in the celebration. They
I He is a worthy young man, held in wiU also visit at Quincy and with Bears the
high esteem by his friends who con- ^rs- Hart's slsiter, Mrs. R. O. Brown, gignaturs of
gratulate him on his choice of a life-'
at
happiness that has befallen her. The from Chicago. They were ln attend
best wishes of "all of Warsaw" fol-: ance at the Cub-Detroit series witness
low this popular couple. Who'll be! ing the games Sunday and Monday.
the next Dame Rumor says there is] T. .1. and Will McGrath lhave gone to
LaBelle, Mo., before their return.
Mrs-
John E. Craig and cousin, Miss
ed a pleasant flat, where they will at Laura Collins left this afternoon for
once begin housekeeping. The bride, Pittsburg and Carnegie, Pa., for a few
daughter of Superintendent of Schools! weeks visit with relatives.
Fairfax, is well known and loved by Leon Rollins, Roy King and Frank «s»rr^tarv of Anriruiture
I hosts of friends who rejoice at the Connable returned home this morning °PIn^n
the land drawings.
TOBACCO
LHABITS
Write NOW tor
FOURTH «T. Our
Free Boekie-
for the Illinois Central with headquar
ters ln St. Louis was a Keokuk visi
tor today.
McLean Minor, traveling freight
agent for the Wabash Tran-it Co., and
Charles H. Hollrodge, general manager
for the American Refrigerator Tran
sit Co., with headquarters in St. Louis
were visiting local railroad offices to- __
day.
LAST MAN ALIVE
TO TELL THE STORY
Seventy-Eight Years Ago this Morn
ing John S. Ferguson Sounded
His Bugle.
1 tacking Taft's religion. He also The following anniversary item,
charged Goode asked ten thousanl for I comes from tho venerable and well with him for violation oi the state
Seventy-eight
years ago I landed in Keokuk. Keo-
LINCOLN, Neb., Oct. 15.—Clarence kuk was but a small village then.
Broad, age 20, a mail carrier, was I Went to Muscatine and have lived
hound over to the federal jury today! and near this corner of Iowa ,ev^r
hy United States commissioner, charg- since.
eJ
pilfering thp mail for several! JOHN S. FERGcoON.
*eeks. It is alleged letters containing! P. S. I am asked how 1 know it wsa
remittances to Bryan's Common- between 4 and 5 o'clock. 1 am -ho
rmiv one living who was there.
Bryan an Honorary Member.
LINCOLN, Neb., Oct. 15.—Unlver
slty Chapter Phi Afpha Tau, an ora
torlcal fraternity, announced today
that Bravn had accepted an honorary
membership. He will deliver his in
ltatory address here after the elec
tion.
Advertise in The Gate City.
'Vt'
WHOLE HILLSIDE
WHS ON FIRE
Second Blaze That Has Occurred
in
This Same Vicinity Within
the Last Few
Weeks.
IS THE SEVENTH FIRE
Today's Fire Made the Seventh One
Which Has Been
Answered
Since
Last Satur.
day.
A run was made by the fire depart
ment this noon at 12:45 to Second and
Carroll streets where the whole hill
side, above the railroad yards had
caught fire and endangered a dozen
or more residences in that vicinity.
A shed in the rear of the F. L.
Buck residence at that place had
caught fire and a fence adjoining the
shed had, also caught from the blaze
on the hillside. Several matresses
which were in the yard at the time
became ignited and were burning
when the firemen arrived. Several
men and boys of the neighborhood
did good work in keeping the flames
from property in the vicinity of the
fire by forming themselves into a
bucket brigade and putting out the
blaze that had caught the barn.
The department made hose connec
tions at Second and Palean with the
large hose and the blaze was exting
uished on the fence. The water was
then turned onto the hillside where
the fire was getting dangerously near
to some freight cars filled with mer
chandise. The chemical returned im
mediately to the station as it was not
needed and the large hose was kept
playing on the fire for some time un
til under control/Jig
Second Fire.
This is the second hillside fire in
this vicinity in the last few weeks
and neighbors are ever on the alert
in this vicinity as switch engines in
the yards below the hill are generally
the cause by throwing sparks which
catches the dry weeds and burns
fiercely.
This is the seventh fire since Satur
day and the department has been do
ing good work in the last few days
in coping with the flames. This Is the
1 fifth hillside fire within the month and
attended the Keokuk Free Fall Cele- .. ..
and
as these flres are
exceeding difficult
to get at and dangerous to neighbor-
[ng roperty the department
g00(J WQrk
fires of this nature.
for Infants and Children.
the Kind You Have Always Bought
TAFT WILL
CARRY NEBRASKA
of
®"r To^P 2 Kanias
Nebraska and Iowa.
CHICAGO, Oct. 15—Secretary
lt
the use of the paper during the cam- known J. S. Ferguson: banking law. The sentences are inde-1 Hogs-19,000, 10c higher, light
Wilson returned here last: Corn
snoa1Hn„
The Daily Gate City
CITY NEWS
Don't miss the Saturday matinee at
the Grand. "Meadow Brook Farm."
Mike Doyle was up before Justice
Burrows today, charged with having
been drunk and disorderly. He was
given five days in the county jail.
An information was filed this after
noon in the court of Justice James S.
Burrows against John Anderson vrho is
charged by Wllllain' Wardlow with as
sault and battery, by hitting him on
the shoulder with a shovel. The rum
pus is said to have occurred yester
day afternoon at Twelfth and Ex
change streets where the trundation is
being put in for, the new church.
The following is a clipping from to
day's Chicago Tribune and the young
lady in the question was recently a
clerk at the clgar stand ln the Hotel
Keokuk: DES MOINES, la., Oct. 14.
COLONEL TUCKER
has done
'considerliig that no prop-
destroyed during any of the
CASTOR IA
tm.r which Oats
carried him through Kansas, Nebraska
and Iowa. The secretary declared
that while iaft would carry all these
I states, the usual republican pluralties
will be reduced. Wilson said the farm
era do not believe that Bryan, if elect
ed, will be able to carry out Roose
veit's policies, for railroad and corpor
ation regulation.
DENIED NEW TRIAL.
Former Member of Superior Bench
Has Petition Refused.
CHICAGO, Oct. 15— Abner M. Smith
formerly a prominent member of the
Superior bench here today, was denied
the petition for a new trial in connec-1
tion with the trial of Smith and Gus-'
years, ago this morn-! terminate. The man was convicted of! [email protected] heavy, [email protected] pigs
Ing between 4 and 5 o'clock. I sound- wrecking the bank of America ,and $3.00®5.10.
ed my bugle in Beaver, Pa. Sixty has been under bond.
Gas Explosion is Fatal.
GREI5LY, N«ebOct. 15.—County
Glerk-WHHam Toohey, aged 30, is
iiS&k*
Does not Color th
—Randolph Marshall, scion of one of
the most aristocratic families in Des
Moines and Miss Frances Wood, a
clerk at a local hotel cigar stand,
eloped early this morning. Young
Marshall, who had been out of town,
wired his fiancee to meet him at 1 this ... ..
morning. When his train arrived Mar-
shall was met by a reporter, who was '»f
whipped for questioning him. Then
Marshall dodged throug'i alleys, enter
ed the back door of Miss Wood's board
ing house, and escaped with her to a
cab. T-iey took a west bound train
and have not been heard from since.
Secure seats this evening for "Mead
ow Brook Farm."
|pf||§f
MORRISSEY HAD
NOTHING TO SAY
Refused to Deny or Confirm State
ment that Keefe Offered Him
*-4 Federal
-Vt
Position.
CLEVELAND, Oct. 15.—P. A. Mor
rissey, grand master of the Brother
hood of Railway Trainmen arrived to-
day. He refused to deny or confirm
the statement that Daniel J. Keefe,
president of the Ixmg Shoremen's un
ion offered him a federal position if
he would support Taft. Morrissey
said that Roosevelt and Keefe both de
nied that the offer had been made,
and that this ought to be sufficient, he
thought.
BRYAN NOT INDORSED
BY FEDERATION
Resolutions Committee of Ohio Fed
eration of Labor, In Convention,
Failed to Indorse Nebraskan.
REACHES HOT SPRINGS
Is Accompanied Only by His Valvet
and is Looking Very Weak
and III. 'w
HOT SPRINGS, ArK., Oct.
CHICAGO, 111., Oct. 15.—
Qpen. High. Low. Close,
of! Wheat 100% 101*4 99% 99%
63% G3% 63 G3%
night after speaking on a tour which Oats 48% 48% 48,/& 48,*
tav F. Swallow, who was convicted steady beeves, [email protected] stockers,
New York Produce.
NEW YORK, Oct. 15.—Dressed and
live poultry unchanged.
Butter—Creamery, extra, [email protected]%c.
Eggs—Neaby white fancy, [email protected]
Fresh firsts, [email protected]
Cheese—Unchanged.
Kansas Qlty Live Stock.
KANSAS CITY, Oct. 15.—Cattle, 10,
000 steady steers, [email protected]
stockers, [email protected]
Hogs—13,000 5c higher bulk,
[email protected])90 pigs, [email protected]
Sheep—10,000 strong muttons,
[email protected] lambs. [email protected]
.Chicago Live Stock.
CHICAGO, Oct. 15.—Cattle, 7,0/d
?"[email protected]°-
Sheep—13,000 steady, natives, r,.,, v..,
$,2.75®4.60 lambs. [email protected]
New York Stocks.
AYER'S HAIR VIGOR
HANS WAGNER
KIND HITTER
He Finishes the Season With a Big
Lead Over Mike Donlin
m^Hof the New York
Giants.
v* ./v
COBB LEADS IN AMERICAN
Has a Mark of .326 in American
League With Tomas, His Team,
Mate, a Close Sec­
DAYTON, Ohio, Oct. 15.—No flat
footed endorsement of Bryan will be
made by the Ohio federation of labor Gessler, Boston 310
convention here. The time for re-
ond.
Ha"3 Wagnf
Crawford( Detroit
ceiving measures by the resolutions Delahanty, Washington 303
committee expired today, without a RUSh Detroit 303
plain endorsement of Bryan being of-
Rush
^ere^' I Rossman, Detroit 299
___ Goode, Cleveland 293
15._
Colonel Tucker arrived uere today Bnmsfield, Philadelphia
immierman
from. St. Louis. He was taken imme-. ""merman, Chicago
diately to the Army and Navy hospital.'
His only attendant is the man regis-
D°yle-
New
tered as his valet. Interviews were' Cincinnati
denied by Tucker and his party at the Philadelphia
station. He looked weak and 111, and: Philadelphia
was hardly able to stand.
TODAY'S MARKETS
Chicago Grain Market.
SWSilStiKiS
8
k,ng: A"
honors
t0 the great
the
York
Evers,
National—
NEW YORK, Oct. 15.~-Th^ stock Jones, Chicago
market ruled generally quiet through Milan, Washington
'afettd, nhd"his w'lfe was probably fatal- the first hour with a firm undertone.. xiles. New York-Boston
ly burned in 'an explosion of acety- Union Pacific was heavy for a time, National—
line gas, which wrecked their home
1
but recovered. Bond trading was the Wagner, Pittsburg
today. feature. The Balkan situation is re-1 Murray, St. Louis
garded as satisfactory by foreign bank- Lobert, Cincinnati
Read The Daily Gate City, 1C cents! ing interests. Government bonds un- Magee, Philadelphia
per week. I changed. Other bonds steady. Evers, Chicago
\V agner, Pittsburg ...
Tenney, New York ...
Leach, Pittsburg
Clarke, Pittsburg
Evers, Chicago
Magee, Philadelphia
Titus, Philadelphia ..
Lobert, Chicago
Donlin, New York ...
Beaumont, Boston ...
Doyle, New York
Huggins, Cincinnati ..
past several years held the leadership,
this time with an increased average! trusts sprang up it enacted a law
over his last two seasons' marks.
was 61 last year, and this year only
48.
In the American circuit, Cobb will
aSain
1
In 1906 the big fellow ran up a rec
ord of .339, and last year quit the
season with a mark of .350. Unoffi
cially he has exceded this rating, his
average for the season Which closed
last Wednesday so far as the Pitts
burg club is concern, being .353. Wag
ner also passed his record of last year manlike manner. It Is progressive when
in run-getting, his mark then stand- progressivermss means upbuilding. It
Ing at 98, while this year it is 99. In- Is conservative when conservatism
stolen bases, however, he does not] means the maintenance of peace, order
come up to his former record, which! and prosperity. It has been prompt
without undue haste. I'eace and pros
perity at home—honor and respect
ahroad has been. Is now, and always
will lie its motto.—Republican Nution'al
head the list, and by all rights
of fair play Gessler of Boston ought to
stand second. He is nominally topped,
however, by Thomas of Detroit andj
Criss of St. Louis, neither one of
whom has had a place as a regular
player with his team this season.
Thomas, for instance, has played as
a regular In 24 games out of the 38
In which he has participated. Criss
In 7 out of the 59 In which he had a
part. Gessler has played ln 128
games, and is therefore entitled to
rank ahead of the "occaslonals."
Dozen Leading Hitters.
American— Average
Cobb, Detroit .326!
Thomas, Detroit 316 thy
Criss, St. Louis 314
307
Detroit .302
I Mclntyre, Detroit 291
Hemphill, New York 290
Lajoie, Cleveland 283
National—
Wagner, Pittsburg
Donlin, New York 333
Stem, Boston
313
312
.295
294
Cuicago 293
289
285
282
McCormlck, New York 275
Graham, Boston 274
Dozen Leading Run Getters.
American.
Mclntyre, Boston
Crawford, Detroit
Scliaefer, Detroit
Jones, Chicago
Stone. St. Louis
Cobb, Detroit
Lajoie. Cleveland
Hartsel, Philadelphia
McConnell, Boston ...
J. B. Clark, Cleveland
Dougherty, Chicago ..
Hamphill, New York
Runs.:
101
99
98
90
88
80
74
73
70
68
66
62
Runs,
99
95
14
82
78
76
72
71
711
6H
fin
61!
Dozen Leading Base Runners.
American— Stolen Bases
Dougherty, Chicago 43
Hemphill, New York
Cobb, Detroit
Schaefer, Detroit
J. B. Clarke. Cleveland
McConnell, Boston
YnrU.
Ganley, Washington ....
St.ahl, Boston
Advertise in The Gate City.
•tlllili!
4U
39
38
32
31
2 7
27
25
24
21
Stolen Bases
4S
40
39
Bransfleld. Philadelphia
Titus, Philadelphia
Donlin, New York
Chance, Chicago
Huggins, Cincinnati ...
Kane, Cincinnati
Tinker, Chicago
31
30
29
28
27
27
PARTY OF PERFORMACE.
Republican Organization Fosters All
Folicios Tending to Make the
Country Great and
Prosperous.
The Repul)lican is a party of action.
It rests upon what It has done, and
not upon what it possibly may do in
the future It has fostered everything
that has tended to uinke the country
great and prosperous, It hns moved
with the people. It has kept abreast
of the times It has ever stood ready
to modify an old policy or to adopt a
new one when the business interests ol
the country have needed the modifica
tion or the change. It has protected
American industries It has protected
American labor by stringent immigra
tion laws It protected the credit and
business stability of the country by
prompt declaring In favor of a goljf
standard, and writing it in the stat.
utes When the time come it prompt
ly seized upon the time and the op
portunity to begin the speedy construc
tion of the
great
bat"
of the major leagues go
German'
who tas for
the^
Platform
isthmian canal. It
has n^ver hesitated to assume re
sponsibility When tlii' cruelties In
Culia threatened the interests of Amer
ica the Itepuhlican party resolved tt
put an end to those cruelties When
tn
curb and control those trusts. When
commeree was at the mercy of thn
railroads. It provided for a commission
to regulate thein When shippers were
oppressed by transportation companies
it promptly enacted a rate law. It has
met every emergency in war or peace,
met it In a wise, prudent and states-
CAMPAIGN EXPENDITURES.
Democratic Party Cannot Claim Un
sullied Virtue as to Source of Its
Revenues.
(From Gov. Hughes' Toungstown
Speech
"Mr. Mryan also has much to sny
with regard to corrupt practices anil
campaign expenditures. Hut he omits
^to give due credit to the Republican
party for what it has Accomplished
with regard to these important reforms,
an
accomplishment the more notewor-
ln
ated
the light of Mr Bryan's reiter-
criticisms of contributions to Re
publican campaign funds. In the State
of New York a Republican Legislature
in 1900, passed a statute prohibiting
corporations from making nny political
contributions directly or indirectly, ami
providing that officers, directors or
stockholders participating tn or con
sentlng to the violation of the law
should be guilty of a criminal offense
And I know of no more drastic statute
Average, in this country with regard to the pul
.353 llclty of campaign contributions and
for the prevention of corrupt practice?
than that passed in New York under
Republican auspices. These were not
promises of an opposition party seek
ing power, but enactments by a party
in power securing genuine reforms
Proper recognition must, of course, be
given to the patriotic Democrats who
supported these reforms, but they were
enacted by a Republican administra
tion. Congress lias also legislated
against political contributions by cor
porations. Purity of elections and free
opportunity for the uncorrupted expres
sion of the popular will lie at the foun
dation of every reform and cannot be
too carefully safeguarded. And there
should be federal legislation securing
proper publicity of and accounting for
campaign contributions In connection
with federal elections. But It must
fairly b£ recognized that the skirts of
neither party have been clean. If we
search .Mr. Bryan's following we shall
And not a few who have sinned, and
also those who, if we may Judge from
their local activities, are still unrepent
ant. The Democratic party cannot
claim unsullied virtue either with re
gard to the source of Its revenues or
its readiness to receive tlieni."
LABOR IN DEMOCRATIC STATES.
Coal Miners in Alabama Subjugated
Into Cringing Dependencies.
That there's a "rift within the lute"
of the Gompers proposition to deliver
the labor rote of the country to Dem
ocracy is becoming more apparent.
While Mr. Bryan and Mr. Gompers are
making special appeals to labor, neither
refers to the deplorable condition of
labor In the Democratic South Mr
John P. White, for six years president
of the Iowa I'nited Mine Workers, and
now one of the national officers of the
United Mine Workers' Asocintlon. who
investigated mining labor conditions i:i
the South, is not so reticent. In a re
cent address to Local Union No. 07 of
Albia. Iowa, he told of persecutions of
labor in Alabama where a coal minors'
strike was in progress. He is reported
as saying: "The miners of Alabama
have been subjugated until a majority
have become cringing dependencies. Al
most dally some of the laboring men of
that State were mercilessly shot down
for daring to assert their rights as
American citizens. Ninety-one members
of the Mine Workers' Association were
thrown into jail without having com
mitted any crime other than becoming
28 members of the organization." Ala
bama is a State absolutely under con
I trol of Bryan Democracy.
•A".
PAGE THREE
Actual Operation of Postal Savingi
lii-.
Banks in Philippines., v'"*
Two Years' Experiment Indicates
the Plan la Successful.
LuuS'j *,
r—t -Vs "K
The only postal savings bank sys
tem ln operation under the Arfierican
flag is that in the Philippines, where,
after two years of experiment, thn
Institution has been declared a great
success in the report of the Philip
pine commission, just published, th#
postal savings bank Is discussed brief
ly, Ju part us follows:
"The postal saviugs bank was flrsl
opened In Manila on Oct 1, 15)00.
The law provides for three classes,
with limitations as to the amount*
that can be received at any one tlm»
In each class. Following the opening
of the Muni la office, other postal sav
ings bank offices were opened In vari
ous cities, of different classes until
at the close of the year UlSfi had been
opened, of which 9 were first, 8(1 were
aecoud und 140 were third class
Filipino* Alopllac SrMem. s!is|
"At first the Filipinos did not to
any great extent avail themselves of
the opportunity of depositing a portion
of their receipts In the postal saving*
bank,und a great bulk of the depositors
were Americans and of other nation
alities. As the advantages of this sys
tem have been disseminated through
means of schools, government bureaus,
private agencies and others, the pro
portion of Filipinos is continually In
creasing, and gives very good promise
that the Filipinos will learn to trust
•their money to the care of the govern
ment, and welcome the opportunity.
"The accounts opened up to tho
close of the fiscal year numbered
2,670, of which 347 were closed, leav
ing '2,329 still open. The deposits
reached the total sum of 780,301,03 pe
sos—nn uverage of 108 21 pesos. With
drawals reached the total amount of
280,400.21 pesos, leaving a net deposit
of pesos at the end of the
fiscal year—or tho first nine months
of the operation of the postal savings
bank—but by no means the first nine
months of operation of the average
number of otlices, the smaller ones
having been opened Trom time to time
during the year, so thnt many bad
not been opened more than a month or
two at the time these figures were
taken.
Enettnraging Small Account).
The device of issuing postal sav
ings bank stamps has met with some
response. The stamps are simply a
method by which small amounts can
be deposited without the expense of
Issuing a book, figuring Interest, and
opening an account.
"On the whole, the reception accord
ed the postal savings bank has been
gratifying, and gives good promise.
The investment of the funds is in tho
hands of a postal savings bank invest
ment board, which carries a certain
amount of the funds on deposit, and
has limited power of Investment. Tim
law provides that 2." per cent of the
money held on deposit may bo loaned
on first-class real estate, under limita
tions carefully drawn to protect the.:
depositors, nml 10 per cent on agricul
tural lands under still more rigi^. limi
tations
AS ROOSEVELT SEES BRYAN.
"You say that you have advo
cated more radical measures
against private monopolies than
either I or my party associates
have heen willing to undertake.
You have, indeed, advocated
measures that sound more radi
cal, but they have the prime de
fect that In practice they would
not work. I should not in tins
letter to you discuss your -ittl
tude oil this question if you inf
not yourself bring it up. but as
you have brought lt up. aiiHver
you that in my judgment the
measures you advocate would be
wholly Ineffective In curing a
single evil, and so far as Ihev
had any effect at 11, would mere
ly throw the entire business of
the country into hopeless and nt
ter confusion I put .Mr Tail's
deeds against your words. I ask
that you lie judged ho'.h bv tin
words yon wish roincin!i"ied ami
by the words that seemingly you
and your party now desire to
have forg:itten. ... I Inid it
entirely natural for any great,
law-defying corporation to \vi»h
to see you placed in the Presi
at an jr
plans to put a stop to the abuses
of these corporations ar» wholly
chimerical, Theodore Roose
velt.
If it is true that Roosevelt is going
to take to the stump Bryan will intv*
to take to the woods Philadelphia
Press
Mr Bryan no longer refers to Mr.
RooSevelt as his imitator, counterpart
and understudy.—St. Louis Giobe-Dem
ocrat.
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