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The daily Gate City. [volume] (Keokuk, Iowa) 1855-1916, February 11, 1910, Image 7

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isey
ned
FRIDAY, FEB. 11,1910.
THE "LAST DEAL,"
'-j
A Bibgraph Story Teaching Whole
some Le«eon*—A Powerfu' Moral
Is Presented on the
Screen.
BETTER THAN A SERMON
-.-mm
Management of Dodges Must be Con
gratulated Upon Receivng
This Beautiful Film—Vill
be Shown Tonight. .*
In this Blograph subject a most
powerful moral Is presented against
all forms of gambling, and it is in
deed a convincing lesson to those
given to such -follies, for although the
hero was rescued from his despera
tion by means of the game, still the
ordeal he passed through was so ter
^rible that he swore never to tempt
fate again in the game of chance. At
the solicitation of a friend, who
paints his possibilities in brilliant
hues, he uses hi$ employer's money
in stock gambling. His is the exper
ience of so many others—he loses and
of course takes more in the vain
The story is an interesting one and
is extremely convincing in detail and
action, while the photography is of
exceptional high class*.
This great picture will be shown at
Dodges theatre tonight.
hope of recouping. It is the old story, jlla—inflammation, ulceration, dis
He finds his neck in the noose of des
Iteration, particularly as he learns
LaGrippe pains that pervade the en
tire system, LaGrippe coughs that rack
and strain, are quickly cured by Fo
ley's Honey and Tar. Is mildly iaxa
tive, safe and.certain In results. Wil
kinson & Co.
cient it is altogether too much.— IMrs-
When a person finds himself suffer
!n& from chronic indigestion, there is
Just one of two things to do: Discon
tinue the use of food almost entirely
J* obtain something that will digest
food for you until your stomach
wuscles are in working order again.
Wnf Possible to, obtain a remedy that
£J'' olgeat food even when the ritomaeh
inn-::
and
-ould
led
iche.
tb«r
I cer
ds
»d.
p».
oc
to
Free Sample Digests
What Stomach Couldn't
can obtain the word of
reputable
people to prove It.
•rnS® Indigestion is usually complicated
1' i1 constipation and liver trouble It
•'neceasary. t° get a remedy that has
axative as well as digestive properties,
0,1 at tlle
same time contains
thkv®ntB that will tone and strengthen
a Pacfr
and
3? .t0r
bowel muscles. Such
according to the testimony of
a
Quarter of a century, Is
ui" Caldwell's Syrup Pepsin, which can
„n,®'Gained of any druggist at fifty
in wSr
one
dollar a bottle, as it comes
h». "tees. But If you are one who
"®ver used this grand remedy, and
b$LT'0i?,dJ11«s make a test of It
pJwi buying of your druggist, then
p.,3 your name and address to Dr.
^•aidwell and he will gladly send vou
tree sample bottle for trial. In this
OF MIDDLE
I
**.••••/:'
Need
am now
pros'
that his books a.re to be examined by
the expert accountant. Discovery is
inevitable so he confesses to. his em
ployer who grants him one day to
make up the deficit. It seems hoping
against hope, but he goes home and
tells his wife of his troubles and she
allows him to take her jewelry on tt a xttvt vc
which to raise a portion of the! «AJN.I/,UJ5o
amount, but he declares he. can bor
row the balance. Pawning the jew
elry, be takes the proceeds to a gamb
ling parlor, with the virtual impres
sion of at least doubling them. So
he enters the game. Meanwhile, his
wife at home is praying that he may
be successful in obtaining the amount
of his indebtedness, of course not
"knowing the method he has adopted.
"While she is thus employed, her
brother from the west, whom she has
not seen in years, and who has never
seen her husband, arrives. He no
tices her uneasiness and when he
learns tbe cause, and the short time
there is to make good, pulls out his
roll of ready cash, but finds it far too
short of the required amount. At u^e stockyards from that road during
length an idea strikes him. He is an the year just closed, while in 1908-09
expert gambler and will go to tbe
parlor and try his luck. He enters
the game, just as his brotber-in-law,
whom he does not know, is enjoying a
Streak of good fortune. He has hard
ly started before things begin to come
his way, and at last the game is be
tween him and his brother-in-law, the
others having drawn out. Being an
experienced gambler, never losing his
nerve, he has the best of it. It is a
desperate battle, ending with the
westerner in possession of all the
chips. The poor husband staggers
home, and driven to the wall, is about
to finish it all in the conventional way,
when the westerner enters. Bach
row sees who his vis-a-vis was, and
,the young man is able to make resti
tution, but he loses his position, for
he has lost the reputation of trust
worthiness. The westerner however,
i? prosperous and promises to assist
iiim, at the same time impressing hiri
with the criminal folly of gambling.
AGE
Lydia E. Pinkham's
Vegetable Compound
Brookfield, Mo.—"Two years ago I
was unable to do any kind of work and
only weighed 118 pounds. My trouble
dates back to the
time that women
may expect nature
to bring on them
the Change of Life.
I got a bottle of
Lydia E. Pinkham's
vegetable Com
pound and it made
me feel much better,
and I have contin
ued its use. I am
very grateful to you
for the good health
—Mrs. SARAH
ivingston Street,
LOTTSIGNONT, 414 S
Brookfield, Mo.
The Change of Life is the most criti
cal period of a woman's existence, and
neglect of health at this time myites
disease and pain.
Women everywhere Bhould remem
ber that there is no other remedy
known to medicine that will so suc
cessfully carry women through this
trying period as Lydia E. Pinkham's
Vegetable Compound, made from na
tive roots and herbs.
For 80 years it has been curing wo
men from the worst forms of female
If you would like special advice
about your case write a confiden
tial letter to Mrs. Pinkharo, at
Lynn, Mass* Her advice is free,
and always helpful.
MOST CATTLE
At,Comparative Statement of Auditor
Chace of the Union Stock Yard
Company of Chicago ia Issued
WAS PROMINENT
IN ARGYLE
flfrhe Union Stock Yard and Transit iservlce for his country should entitle
company of Chicago has published a'bim
comparative statement of all the im
portant railroads of the country, snow
ing the cattle receipts for the years
ending January 31, 1909, and January
31, 1910- The shipments of these
-twenty-five, roads, for the those two
years, are also given in the statement.
The C., B. & Q. road leads all of these
in the shipment of cattle, In the num
ber of head, 66,449 being handled by
the number was a' little over 51,000.
The road nearest the in the colmun
of figures is the. Chicago and North
western, in cattle, receipts. In the
number of cars, the C., B. & Q. is first,
having used a total number of 5,105
cars during the year just clased-
An attack of the grip is often fol
lowed by a persistent cough, which to
many proves a great annoyance.
Chamberlain's Cough Remedy has
been extensively used and with good
success for the relief and our© of this
cough. Many cases have been cured
after all other remedies had failed.
Sold by Wilkinson & Co., and J. F.
Kiedaisch & Son.
Washington Newberry, Son of the
Late James W. Newberry, Died
Early This Morning.
Washington Newberry, son of the
late James W. Newberry, an honored
pioneer of Des Moines township and
a big land owner, died at his home in
Argyle, at 5:15 o'clock this morning,
following a second stroke of paralysis.
He was sixty-one years old.
Mr. Newberry was one of the most
respected residents in this part of the
country and was a man widely known.
He leaves an aged mother, Mrs. James
Unearned Increment. jW. Newberry his wife sons, Dr.
A word to the wise is not only suffi-1F-
D-
Newberry of Argyle sisters,
M- c'
Life. gent daughter, Mrs. Amiantha
Mathews.
Nelson and Mrs. O- Sar-
way thousands of people have been
brought to use It.
You cannot obtain a better or more
reliable remedy for general family use
as It is very curative in constipation
of the most stubborn kind, in indiges
tion. liver trouble, sour stomach, sick
headache and other troubles caused by
disorders of the stomach, liver or bow
els. Thousands of families like that of
Mr. Frank Connor of 108 State street,
Madison, Wis., and Mrs. Virginia Cun
ningham of Weir, Miss., no longer use
the ordinary "dyspepsia cures" for in
digestion, nor cathartic pills or salts
for constipation, but they get Dr. Cold
well's Syrup Pepsin, which is truer and
more genuine, milder and more pleas-
Try
will
ant, and yet thoroughly effective,
it and see the good results you
obtain.
Dr. Caldwell personally will be
pleased to give you any medical advlc»
you may desire for yourself or family
pertaining to the stomach, liver or
bowels absolutely free of charge. Ex
plain your case in a letter and he will
reply to you in detail. For the free
sample simply send your name and ad
dress on a postal card or otherwise.
For either request the doctor's address
is Dr. W. B. Caldwell. R.BOB Caldwell
building, Montlcello. 111.
FUNERAL OF THE
HELD
Remains of the Late J. N. Whetstone
Taken to Oakland Cemetery
After Services at the
House.
VETERAN OP CIVIL WAR
Home Loving Citizen Served Over
Four Years in the Defense of
the Flag of His
Country.
This afternoon, at 2:30 o'clock, at
the family home, No. 1020 High street,
brief funeral services were held over
the late J. N. Whetstone, who passed
away on Wednesday morning. The
services were attended by a host of
frieuds of the deceased and family
and were conducted by Rev- Harry
Foster, pastor of the United Presby
terian church. One room was devoted
to the floral offerings from friends and
the service whs impressive and ap
propriate. Th pall bearers were E.
Layton, D. Dunkle, W. S. Sample,
L. A- Hamill, H- R. Jacobs and M.
Lourie The burial was private, jnly
immediate friends and relatives joing
to Oakland, where the casket was
placed in the vault for interment lat
er.
Mrs. Minerva Davidson of Athens,
Mo., the only sister of the deceased,
was unable to come to the funera', on
account of her feeble condition, she
being in her eigflty-seeond year.
Although a veteran of the civil war
Mr. Whetstone did not aesire that tli'
G. A- R. should conduct his funeral
He was at one time a member of Keo
kuk lodge of the Odd Fellows and of
the G. A. R., but was not given to
lodge matters, and although he fought
for and honored the flag of his coun
try, yet he did not believe that his
to a
mllitary
funeral.
He was born November 17, 1838, in
Alleghany comity, 'Pa., and enlisted
with his brother Frank at the begin
ning of the war, in company G, Twen
ty-First Missouri. After a service of
foui- years and four months, he. was
mustered out of the service at Athens,
Mo., with the rank of lieutenant-
On September 10, 1866, Jasper New
ton Whetstone was married to Miss
Odelia Miller and he took up farming
at Hoosier Green, near Argyle, in Lee
county, where their first child, J. A.
Whetstone, was bom. In 1873 he
moved to near Boonville, Mo., where a
second child, now decoased, was born.
From there the family went to Louisi
ana, living there for several years, and
where the third child, Miss Mae, was
born. •/.
Kansas rnd Nebraska but did not lo
cate thore, returning to the old farm
in Iowa, now known as the Beckett
farm in Des Moines township, follow
ing farming until the spring of 1885,
when he came to Keokuk, engaging in
the broom business for a short time
and then entering the grocery busi
ness, near the location of the present
store.
How»a Thls7
We offer One Hundred Dollars Reward
'or any case of catarrh that cannot be
cured by Hall's Catarrh Cure.
F. J. CHENEY & CO.. Toledo. O.
the undersigned, have known F.
J. Cheney for the last 15 years and be
lieve him perfectly honorable In all busi
ness trans.-. ..ons and financially aoie to
carry out any obligations made by his
WALDING,
KINNAN ft MARVIN,
lesaie Druggists, Toledo. O.
"?at"rhupon
Cure
taken .ntornally,
acting directly the blood and mu
cous surfaces ofthe system. Testimon
*hS Jfen
ceBts ptr
sold by all Druggists.
lion!
a,r"
bottle,
PHI* tor coru/.ipi-
SUMMITVILLE.
The dance which was given the lat
ter part of last week was largely at
tended. A very pleasant time was
had by all. The dance took place in
the city hall.
Mr. and Mrs. Pat Hancock and
their two children came out from
1
Keokuk Friday to visit relatives, also
to attend the dance.
Mrs. Bessie Steaven of fteokuk re
turned home Friday after visiting at
ber sister, Mrs. H. Phillip.
Mr. and Mrs. Waldermer Testman,
living west of Spmm.tville have a
baby which is reported a« being a- girl.
Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Carrick, form
erly Miss Gladys Struther, have a
baby boy, which came to gladen their
home Sunday, their first child being a
girl.
Mra. Will Younkin of Montrose,
formerly known as Miss Mary Car
rick, is reported as being a mother of
a little stranger, which came to their
home Saturday.
Andrew M. Keethler is the father of
a fine baby boy.
The stork was talking to your scribe
in which he made the remark that he
was going to make just one more call
in our vicinity, then he was going to
take a vacation, so goodbye to the
game bird.
Otto Hawkins, the oldest son of
Sam Hawkins of this village, was
married at high noon Wednesdav, Feb.
2, to Miss Mary VanAusdall of Bel-
THE DAILY GATE OITYi
Pure in the
baking.
mont. Their many friends wish them
much joy and a happy married life.
Miss Maymie D. Hardy was a Keo
kuk caller Thursday and Friday.
H. S. Brown went to Keokuk Mon
day.
Harvey Hanson passed through our
village Friday.
The many friends of Miss Rosie Cav
anaugh are sorry to learn that the
report is, she i6 very poorly at her
home in Keokuk.
Miss Hazel Hart departed Saturday
of last week for a visit in Springfield,
Illinois.
Barl Stic© has returned to his
home in Monmouth, 111., after spend
ing several weeks at the home of his
sister, Mrs. John Meginnis.
Mrs. P. P. Brown will be hostess
to the U. P. Aid society on Wednesday
of this week.
Charlie Fowler made a business trip
to Keokuk Saturday.
Grandpa and Grandma Hancock
visited in our village Sunday.
Miss Flossie Brown was a passen
ger from Keokuk Friday on the train.
•U For a Cold.*
Owing to the feeling of the southern dreds of thousands of dollars Jii der
people against .the north,/he went into jnouncing- trades-unionism.
AB a result of Post's activities the
If one has a severe cold in the
head, rub the bridge of the nose thor
oughly with vaseline at night. This
simple remedy works like a charm.
Another effective method ia to snuff
warm salt water.
Pays to Get the Best.
"When buying fruit trees, shrubs or
vines it is always safest to get first
grade stock. There is not much dif
ference in price, but a big difference
In quality of first and second grade
stock:
THE STORY OF THE PEANUT
SHELLS
As everyone knows, C. W. Post of
Battle Creek, Michigan, is not only a
maker of breakfast foods, but he is a
strong individualist who believes that
the trades-unions ar© a menace to the
liberty of the country.
Believing this, and being a "natural
born" scrapper for the right, as he
sees it, Post, for several years past,
has been engaged In a ceaseless war
fare against "The Labor Trust," as he
likes to call it.
Not being able to secure free and
untrammeled expression of his opin
ions on this subject through the reg
ular reading pages of the newspapers
he has bought advertising space for
this purpose, just as he is accustomed
to for the telling of his Postum
story," and he has thus spent hun-
He employs no union labor, so they
can not call out his men, and he de
fies their effort at boycotting his prod
ucts. The latest mieans of "getting"
Post is the widespread publication of
the story that a car which was recent
ly wrecked in transmission was found
to be loaded with empty peanut shells,
which were being shipped from the
south to Post's establishment at Bat
tle Creek.
This canard probably originated
with President John Fitzgerald of the
Chicago Federation of Labor, who, it
is said, stated it publicly, as truth.
Post comes back and gives Fitzger
ald the He direct. He denounces Fitz
gerald's statement as a deliberate
falsehood, an underhand and cowardly
attempt to injure his business, having
not the slightest basis in fact. As such
an effort it must be regarded. It is
significant that this utatement about
"the peanut shells" is being given
wide newspaper publiaity. In the
"patent inside" of an eastern country
paper I find it, and the inference nat-
urally is that labor*ntonites are in
sidiously spreading this lie.
An institution (or a man) which will
resort to moral intimidation and to
physical force, that will destroy ma-|
chinery and bum buildings, that will
maim and kill if necessary to effect its
We admire Post, while we have
no enmity toward labor unions, so long
as they are conducted in an honest,
"live-and-let-live" kind of way, we
have had enough of the tarred end of
the stick to sympathize thoroughly
with what he is trying to do. He de
serves support. A man like Post can
not be, killed, even with lies. They are
a boomerang, every time. Again we
know, for he hasn't this weapon, every
weapon that could be thought of, been
used (and not simply by labor unions)
to put us out of business too?
I am going to drink two cups of Post
um every morning from this time, on,
and put myself on a diet of Grape
Nuts. Bully for Post!—Editorial in
The American Journal of Clinical
Medicine.
/f=
people now know a whole lot-about
these organizations how they are
honeycombed with graft, how they ob
struct the development of legitimate ruary 12, Lincoln's birthday"
business, curtail labor's output, hold
up manufacturers, graft upon their
own membership, and rob the public.
Naturally Post is hated by the trades
unionists, and intensely.
1
ends, naturally would not hesitate to!
spread falsehood for the same pur
poses.
Thc
CHICAGO, Feb. 11.—Wheat—Weath
er conditions generally seasonable
favorable to marketing and move
ment. Argentine shipments more lib
eral than expected, 3,136,000. Austral
ian shipments 3,288,000, making the
prospect for heavy worlds shipments
Monday. The response of Liverpool
to American firmness and the falling
off of terminal receipts are encourag
ing features to the bull. We are still
bullish on wheat, believing the local
and domestic situation a strong one.
Comparison with outside markets
show Chicago May wheat relatively
the cheapest trading future. With
cash wheat at a good premium and
strongly held the opportunities of the
May wheat bull will undoubtedly be
many.
Cora—Receipts 440, only two mak
ing the contract grade. Argentine
shipments small, weather conditions
still favorable for marketing and
movement. Many sections report
farmers Indisposed to accept current
prices. Railroads are rapidly clean
ing up accumulations and if farmers
deliveries fall off receipts will be
lighter and the most important bear
influence will be lost. Corn has had a
fairly good reaction from the recent
low point and there will doubtless be
some over holiday profit taking. We
would take advantage of dips to in
vest.
Oats—Moderate receipts and a fair
ly good cash demand continue to re
duce local stocks. With a short hay
crop, a high price and a big discount
under other grains oats look cheap,
the deferred futures particularly so.
We believe oats can be safely bought
around the present level or on any
breaks.
There will be no session of the Chi
cago board of trade, Saturday, Feb-
Daily Range of Prices.
CHICAGO. Feb. 11—
Open. High. Low. Close.
WHEAT— Feb.11 Feb.
10
May ...111% 111% 110% 110% 111%
July ...102% 102% 101% 101% 1024
Sept. .. 97% 97% 97% 97% 97%
CORN—
May ... 66% 67% 66% 66%
July ... 67 67% 66% 66%
Sept. ..66% 67% 66% 66%
OATS—
May ... 47 47 46% 46%
July ... 44 44 43% 43%
Sept. .. 41 41 40% 40%
PORK—
66%
66%
66%
46%
43%
40%
May ...22.85 22.85 22.72 22.80 22.62
July ...22.50 22.60 22.42 22.60 20.37
LARD—
May ...12.40 12.45 12.35 12.40 12.27
July ...12.35 12.37 12.27 12.35 12.22
RIBS—
May ...12.00 12.07 11.97 12.07 11.87
July ...12.00 12.05 11.97 12.05 11.87
Chicago Car Lots.
Today.
Wheat 25
Corn .... 440
Oats 155
Northwest Receipts:
Today. Last Year.
Minneapolis 260 Hi-
''56
Primary Receipts and Shipments.
Today. Last Year
WHEAT—
Receipts 447,000 Holiday
Shipments .. 239,000 Holiday
CORN—
Receipts 896,000 Holiday
Shipments .. 691,000 Holiday
OATS—
Receipts ,¥W 524,000 Holiday
Shipments .. 459,000 Holiday
Chicago Cash Grain Market.
CHICAGO, Feb. 11.—Wheat—No. 2
red, [email protected] No. 3 red, $1.16®
1.22 No. 2 hard winter, $1.13%@
1.14 No. 3 hard winter, $1,[email protected]
No. 1 northern spring, [email protected]%
No. 2 northern spring, $1.1401.14%
No. 3 ppring, [email protected]%.
Corn—No. 2, 05^0 No. 2 white,
66J4c No. 2 yellow, C»[email protected] No. 3
G2%@63',4c No. 3 white, 63c No. 3
liwuiT^w jam* •WWMWWiiWiK swbbwkbmw wtm
and Steady
J?(S^? Lamp
A bright and steady light depends upon the
construction of the lamp.
The best skill has put forth its best effort in
perfecting the Rayo Lamp.
As the air is fed to the flame—so does the light
burn. The easy-flowing current of air through
the air-tube of the Rayo Lamp secures a uniform
light, with never a flicker or flare.
The ideal family lamp. Made of brass through
out and beautifully nickeled.
The Rayo is a low-priced lamp, but you cannot
get a better lamp at any price.
Once a Rayo
user,
THE WORLD'S MARKETS
Furnished by James E. Bennett & Co., Members Chicago Board
oi Trade and St. Louis Merchants' Exchange
local OFFICE—ROOM S, GATE CITY BUILDING
MISS. VALLEY PHONE MM. BELL PHONE SOS
Daily Grain Letter.
always one
-Every Dealer Eyerjrwhere. If Not at Yours. Write lor
Descriptive Circular to the Nearest Agency or the
CONTINENTAL OIL COMPANY
(Incorporated)
PRIVATE WIRE
yellow, 62%@63%c No. 4 veliow, 67
@60c No. 4, [email protected]
Oats No. 2, 47%@48c No. 2 white,
[email protected]%c No. 3, [email protected]%c No. 3
white, 47%@48%c No. 4 white, 4C%
@47%C Standard, 48%@48%c.
Estimated Receipts Tomorrow.
Wheat, 32 corn, 472 oats, 145
hogs, 17,000.
Peoria Cash Grain Mark.*.
PEORIA, 111., Feb. 11.—Corn, No 3
yellow, 61%c No. 4 yellow, 59%c No.
3 mixed, 61%c No. 4 mixed, 59%c
no grade, [email protected]
Oats—Standard, 47%c No. 3 white,
47c.
Receipts.
Corn, 68 oats, 9.
Total Clearances.
Wheat and flour, 58,000 corn. 81,
000 oats, 1,400,
St. Louis Grain.
ST. LOUIS, Feb. 11.—Cash wheat—
Steady receipts, 38,300 shipments,
52,500 No. 2 red, $1.27%@1.29%
No. 3, $1.22%@1.27% No. 4, $1.05®
1.20 No. 2 hard, $1.11%@1.16 No
3, $1.10%@1.11 No. 4, [email protected]
Cash corn—Steady receipts, 63,800
shipments, 87,000 No. 2 mixed. 64c
No. 3, [email protected]%C No. 4, C0%@61c
No. 2 white, 66c No. 3, 63%@64%c
No. 2 yellow, 64c No. 3, 63%@C4c
Cash oats—Steady receipts, 87,000
shipments, 72,200 No. 2 mixed, 47c
No. 3, 46%c No. 4, 46c No. 3 white,
47%@48c No. 4, 46%@47%c."
Grain Futures.
Wheat—May, open, $1.11%: close,
$1.11% July, open, $1.01 close,
$1.00%@1.00%.
Corn—May, open, 67%c close,
66% July, 67%c close, 66%@66%c.
Chicago Live Stock.
CHICAGO. 111., Feb. 11.—Hog re
ceipts 22,000 estimated tomorrow
17,000 left over 4,700 market 10c
higher quality good clearance good
mixed [email protected] heavy [email protected]
rough [email protected]$8.60 light [email protected]
bulk [email protected] pigs [email protected]
Cattle receipts 4,000 market st'dy
beeves [email protected] cows and heifers
$2.25 @6.15 stockers and feeders
[email protected] calves [email protected]
Texans [email protected] 40
Sheep receipts ,6.000 market
strong native and mixed [email protected]
lambs [email protected] 00
Hogs,
3,000.
Last Year.
Holiday
Holiday
p* Holiday
1
j»h
i'
Estimated Receipts Saturday.
Hogs, 17,000 cattle, 300 sheep,
Kansas City.
5,000 cattle,... 1,0.00
sheep,
O a a
Hogs 5,000 cattle, 2,000 sheep,
3,000. r, s-jefs." t-sjft,* Afcf "i i-t'
St. Louis Live Stock.
NATIONAL STOCK YARDS, 111.,
Feb. 11.—Hog receipts 5,500 market
steady, strong mixed [email protected]
heavy [email protected] „rough [email protected]
light [email protected] bulk $8.65(g8.80
pigs [email protected]
Cattle receipts 3,000 including 800
Texans market native steady beeves
[email protected] cows and heifers $3.50
@6.25 stockers and feeders [email protected]
5.25 Texan market steady steers
[email protected] cows and heifers [email protected]
4.50 calves [email protected]
Sheep receipts 300 market steady
native and mixed $4.75(^6.90 lambs
[email protected]
Local Grain Market.
KEOKUK, Feb. 11.—Today's local
marktes furnished by th^ O. A. Talbott
company:
No. 2 wheat,'red ........ $1.10.
No. 3 wheat, red $1.07
No. 2 wheat, hard
White oats
Mixed oats
Rye
Corn ....v
.99
41%
.41
.65
57%
Local Produce.
KEOKUK, Feb. 11.—The following
local produce market la furnished to-
PAGE SEVEN
PHYSICIANS.
DRS. OCHILTREE & BROWN
DR. V. B. OCHILTREE.
General 'Practice.
Hours':"" 11:30 a. m. to 12:30 p. m.
4:30 to 6:30 and 8:00 to 9:30 p. m.
DR. \V. FRANK BROWN
Surgery, Genito-Urinary and Skin Dla
eases. •_
Hours 10 to 11 a. ui. 2:30 to 4
and 7:45 to 9 p. m.
Offices over Cl$y Drug store.
DR. O. T. CLARK.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Office—Y. M. C. A. building.
Office hours—9:00-10:30 a. m. 3:30
to 6:30 and 7:00 an,l 8:00 p. m.
Phones—Office, Iowa 305-R Hub.
157. Residence, Iowa, 5293 Hub. 2092.
DR. CORAL R. ARMSTROUT
Physician and Surgeon.
Office—Y. M. C. A. building. Resi
dence 912 Fulton street. Office hours:
10 to 12 m. 2 to 4 p. m., evening
hours by appointment. Iowa phone,
529-Y and Hub. phone, 2092, office
phone. Residence phone, Iowa, 12-M
Hub. 3515.
DR. W. P. SHERLOCK.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Office and residence, No. 18 North
Fifth street in Howell building.
Office hours: 10 to 12 a. m. 2 to 4
p.m. Eveuing 7 to 8.
Phones: Iowa 781-R'J Mississippi
Valley, 1319.
DR- J. EATON JOHNSTON.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
The only physician practicing Oste
Pathy in the county. The Smith
sonian truss fitted and guaranteed,
the only truss that holds. Office
North side of Main street, third door
above Fifth. Phone 93 Residence.
Ninth and WebBter. Phone 484. P.
O. Lock Box 41. Warsaw, 111.
INSURANCE.
Only reliable companies of large
assets represented.
H. B. BLOOD,
12 South Sixth Street
CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS.
John W. Young, Builder, Superin
tendent and Contractor for all kinds of
construction. Also general repair
work. Prompt and careful
atten­
tion given to plans and estimates.
Your patronage solicited. Office 50«
Blondeau, Iowa phone, office, 2143
Residence, 3342.
CHICHESTER S PIUS
TIIK 1MAMONB BUSB A
1 I1U in Kcrl and 4tol4 metaltis^p)
knowuas Best. Safest. Always Reliibl.
SOLO BY D8UGGISTS EVERYWHERE
Des Moinies]
Iowa
(CURES
juQuoh. anv»
Iano
tobacco
(hai»i rs
*rl'« VOW tar I
rOB WEST 10USTH ST. Our
frte
E. R. HAWKKfc
UNDERTAKER AND
LICENSED EMBALMER
728 Main. Both Phonea.
Red Cross Ambulance.
CR!hiMIN8 A CHASE
UNDERTAKING
—apd—
I EMBALMING
723 Main Street Phones
I. 8. ACKLEV.
I UNDERTAKING#
and EMBALMING 1
100Z. Blondeau Street. 7
iowa 'phone, 456-M. Home, 3435
day by the S. p. Pond Co.:
Butter—Shippers pay 21c: cream
eries, 29c butter fat, 26c.
Eggs—19c.
Poultry—Shippers pay, henrj,'"i2%e
smooth springs, 13%c stags, 11c
cocks, 6c turkeys, young toms and
hens, 18c old toma, 16c ducks, 10c
geese, 5c.
Looa! Live Sto^k.
KEOKUK, Feb. 11.—The following
live stock market Is ti!nishd today
by Joseph Haubert:
Hog»—Good butchers, [email protected]
Sheep Butchers,[email protected]
lambs, [email protected]
Calves—$5.50(g)6.00.
Mr. E. A. Kelley, Belvldere, 111.,
writes us: "I am an ex-engineer with
22 years active service to my credit.
About three years ago my kidneys
were affected so that I had to give up
my engine. First I was troubled with
severe, aching pain over the hips
Then followed inflammation of the
bladder, and specks appeared before
my eyes. A sample of Foley's Kidney
Pills that I tried, so benefited me that
I bought more. I continued to take
them until now I can safely, testify
they have made me a sound and well
man." Wilkinson & Co,

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