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The daily Gate City. [volume] (Keokuk, Iowa) 1855-1916, October 16, 1911, Image 1

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THE PAPEE THAT /a
BOOSTS KEOKUK
!and
ALL THE TIME
VOL. 113. NO. 91.
Clash of Trains Brings
Death and Injury
KILLED SEVEN
Collision of Pa«ttnfl«r and Freight
Train* Proves Fatal to Three
Women and Four
Men.
TWENTY-TWO INJURED
One Coach Was Splintered and Those
Inside Were Cut and Bruised
ay The Accl
dent.
OMAHA. Neb., Oct. 16—Seven peo
ple were killed and twenty-two Injur
ed, four of them seriously, In a col
lision between Missouri Pacific pas
senger train No. 106, north bound en
route for this city, and a fast freight
train, near Fort Crook, at 10 clock
Sunday morning. Fort Crook is ten
miles south of this city.
A passenger train due to leave this
city for the south about the time of
the accident was converted into a re
lief train and sent to the scene of the
accident. Dr. Kllck, local surgeon for
the Missouri Pacific road, and the
staff of Union Pacific surgeons were
on board this train.
Shortly before noon the relief train
returned to Omaha with the uninjured
several of those who wero slight
ly injured. Of these all were sent on
theft way. The more seriously in
jured are being cared for at the army
hospital at Fort Crook.
The Dead.
F. W. PETRING, merchant, Neoras
ka City.
O. W. KEELER, passenger brake
man, Atchison, Kan.
MRS. FRED W. ROWTMANN, Ne
braska City.
WISTERIAN ROWTMANN, 8 years
old, daughter oi Mrs. Rowtmann.
A. W. SPRAGUE, electrician, St.
Joseph, Mo.
MISS FRANCES LILLIAN KANKA,
Washington, Kan.
•. UNKNOWN colored woman.
The Injured.
Fred W. Rowtmann, banker, Nebras
ka City wife among the killed scalp
wound, leg crushed, back hurt.
Emms Harvey, colored, Kansas
City both legs broken, hand cut.
W. G. Richards, Maynard, Neb.
Internal injuries, leg broken.
John Scott, passenger engineer, in
ternal Injuries, lacerated head and
face.
Herman Barber, Auburn, Neb. con
cussion.
W. S. West, Kansas cilty, mall
clerk leg fractured.
Vernon M. Andrews, Kansas City,
mall olerk back badly Injured, arm
bruised.
Henry Krafe, Nevada, Mo. lacerat
ed about leg.
Charles F. Nichols, Murray, Neb.
railroad man scalp hurt, leg bruised.
Miss Hope Conway, Alameda, Cal.
flesh wound on leg.
Edward Collins, Bellevue, Neb.
two .ribs fractured, ankle broken.
V. J. Weatherla, Bethel, Kan. arm
bruised, leg lacerated.
T. M. Russell, Bethel, Kan. scalp
wounds.
J. E. Darby, Bethel, Kan. collar
bone broken, shoulder hurt.
John Sieger, Kansas City hip and
back bruised.
Miss Jean Conway, Alameda,. Gal.
ankle sprained, hands cut.
Flo Conway, Alameda, Cal cut
about face.
John J. Wetherla, Bethel, Kan.
three ribs fractured.
Andrew F. Piatt, Deep River, Iowa,
aged 78 back sprained.
Clement C. Buck, Kansas City leg
sprained, finger torn oft right hand.
R. E. Horan, Bethel, Kan.
BCalp
wound, knee hurt.
R. R. Wilson, passenger fireman,
Omaha ankle broken.
rp- Freight Crew Blamed.
An official statement as to the cause
of the wreck says:
"The freight train was made up of
nineteen loads and three empties, and
was In charge of Conductor Gross,
Crawford being the engineer. It was
an extra without right against the pas
senger train. These two men, both of
whom have a number of years In the
service of the Missouri Pacific rail
way, seem to have been responsible
frfr the wreck.
"There Is a train register maintain
ed at South Omaha, anfl it is the rule
of every railroad that train crews
must check these registers wherever
they are maintained. Not only did
this crew have access to this train
register, but as an extra precaution
Train Dispatcher Lane gave Gross at
South Omaha a message reading:
'No. 106, with no signals, reach Gll
more Junction at 8:60 a. m.'
"For some unaooountable reason
these men apparently forgot all about
passenger train No. 105, despite the
fact that they were handed this tele
gram notifying them of the time' it
was due.
"The point at which the accident
occurred is not qult6 a mllo and a half
from Fort Crook, lying between It
and Gilmore Junction. The track is
straight at point of meeting, and
there is an unobstructed view for one
half mile."
Passenger Coach Splintered?
Engineer Crawford of the freight
says that when he caught sight of
No. 105, which was coming at high
speed, he whistled and slackened
speed. When the passenger did n-t
answer he concluded that It was a
train on the adjoining Burlington
tracks.
When within a few car lengths of
each other both crews realized the
danger and reversed their engines.
The momentum of the passenger,
however, was so great that in a mo
ment it was piled high upon the
freight engine, which had almost
stopped. The crew of both engines
Jumped and were not seriously in
jured.
The impact derailed both engines
and telescoped the mall cars onto
the passenger coach, In which about
forty people were riding.
Shrieks and groans, mingled with
the hiss of steam and the crackling
of the cars brought the passengers in
the Pullman rushing to the front of
the train. They found the coach a
mass of wreckage at the forward end
and the dead and dying were caught
In every position from the top of the
car down. The interior of the coach
was literally Spllnte're'd:
Gov. Gilchrist of Florida acted the
part of hero when for more than an
hour he worked among the dead and
Injured. AlSiiough badly shaken up
and bruised, the governor refused to
aocept aid for himself until all the
Injured were made comfortable. He
then accepted the hospitality of the
general in command at Fort Crook
and was driven to that officer's quar
ters, later coming Into Omaha.
Gov. Gilchrist came to Omaha to
attend the American Prison congress
at Fort Crook.
The governor was one of the first
to reach the chair oar in which the
fatalities occurred. For an hour he
worked with the trainmen and the
hospital corps from Fort Crook. With
his own hands he assisted In rescuing
soveral Injured from the- wreckage.
10
No Demonstration Against Foreign
ers In China so Far But Warn
ing Has Been
Issued.
BANK RUNS STARTED
Government Is Rapidly Becoming
Panic Stricken at the Rapid
.Growth of the Revo
lutlon.
PEKIN, Oct. 16.—Rioting has bro
ken out in several parts of this city,
principally caused by the sensational
runs which have been made on the
banks. Bank offlcials are being guard
ed by special details of police and
clashes between the police and the
mobs are becoming general. Govern
ment bank notes have fallen below
par anj the best quotations today
was a discount of 20 per cent.
The Chinese government today is
sued an order warning all foreigners
to leave the revolutionary district
The government is rapidly becoming
panic stricken. A strict consorshlp
like that establiFh id in Italy has been
fVl„
1
AMERICAN INVASION
AT LINCOLNSHIRE
Millionaires Have Bought Old Fire
places Which Will be Taken
Away.
LONDON, Oct. 16.—The country or
Lincolnshire Is up In arms to repell
the latest "American Invasion." Four
years ago the late' Lord Fortesque
sold his Lincolnshire estate, Including
Tattershall Castle, to a syndicate,
which, failing to dispose of the castle
entire, Is selling It piecemeal.
Among the castle's treasures are a
number of beautiful fireplaces which
tell the history of-England ln herald
ry. These fireplaces, according to
Captain A. W. Cragg, of the Lincoln
shire Archaeological society, have
been sold to American millionaires
and will be removed to New York
and Chicago to be set up ln Fifth
Avenue and Michigan Avenue homes
of "vulgar rich." Other treasures,
historically priceless, are to be sold
to the highest bidders. The society
has formally protested to the prime
minister, and is also raising a fund
to buy the castle ln order that it may
be preserved for future generations.
EARTHQUAKE KILLS
1 TWO IN SICILY
Several Houses Collapsed and One
Church Was Demolished1
by 8hock.
CATANIA, Oct. 16.—An earthquaks
of brief duration occurred In Sicily
Sunday. The strongest shocks were
felt at Glarre, at the east base of
Mount Etna, Macchla, Guaiffia,
Ro.udlnella and Santa Verenia.
At Guardla and Santa Verenia sever
al houses collapsed and two persons
were killed. At Macchla a church was
demolished. Considerable damage was
done at Roudlnella.
will desert to the rebels. I with respect to this side of the
Flood* and famine are adding to
the horrors of pilla„e and massacre
revolution Is at Its height, is cut ofT. TVoftino
It is not considered possible that the 99
wires have heen^cu^ throughout these
six provinces. Until lately the revo
lutlonaries, having free use of the
wires, received and disseminated ln-
formation concerning the progress
of
their plans ln all quarters.
The government refuses to reveal
the number or the destination of the
troops who are being sent southward.
Beginning today, only a single first
class train will be run dally between
Pekln and Tlen-Tsing-Fu, about seven
ty miles to the southeast of the cap
ital. This Is due to the heavy troop
traffic and to prevent any large num
I ber of rebels from entering Pekln.
Passengers- and freight traffic
been entirely suspended between Pe
kin and Hankow.
I
the government will reconsider this 1
1
refusal should the Imperialists meet
with Initial success.
The last dispatch received from
Hankow said that the revolutionaries!
Invitation was accepted provisionally. 1
I urges the Japanese government to take
advantage of the present situation ln
China to "enforce the far-reaching!
policy which is the long established
1 MINNEAPOLIS, Oct,
today Hugh Robinson,
I1,ft
Iowa Postal Savings Banks.
WASHINGTON, D. C., Oct. 16
Postal savings banks will be establish
ed Nov. 10 at Bonaparte, Eldon, Green
field Lennox and Monroe,
KEOKUK, IOWA, MONDAY OCT. 16, 1911
Spent Today In Lot Angeles and Mc
Namara Trial Takes Second
Place In Public
Interest.
STARTS EAST TOMORROW
at
j"
.. .. .. ,, uvei.
the revolutionary district Is reported,
to be from 100 to 200 per day.
The Chinese government has placed,
lines evidently for the purpose of pre-,
HIs
ln
for
-."V-
A busy day confronted President
Taft. An automobile ride through
with as little delay as possible. Al-' the streets, a speech at the auditor
though there has been no demonstra- ium, an address to thousands of
tion against foreigners as yet, it Is school children, a visit to the college
thought best to warn all white people
to get into safe territory as soon as
they can.
and a banquet tonight, completes the
program.
Tomorrow he will start back east,
making a 44 hour jump to Butte,
Mont.
put into effect and it 1b impossible to ecutive completely overshadowed the
discover what movement the govern- McNamara trial and little interest
ment is making to put down the re-,
The visit of the nation's chief ex-
waB
volt. room. The morning session was de
Twenty thousand troops left here voted to Involved legal argument re
thls morning for the interior but thier garding the competency of opinion
destination. Is unknown. The govern- ated veniremen to serve on the jury,
ment fears that all the Imperial army The defense completed Its argument
evinced in it outside of the court
several restr ctions on the telegraph tire question of whether the defense |necessary pressure to bear to bring,
can get a
not
Sze-Chuan, Kwel-
Hunan, Kiang-Sl,
Chow and Yunan.
On this account Hankow, where the!
A N I a O 1 6 or
,, train injo. was Killed on© mile east r.au*e
of Cantrl, He wafl gQing Qver ROme
coal cars and fell between them !\nd
was cut to pieces. He was not missed
t*le
train reaclled
nrtrtn wa haa a a am ...
body was sent to Lancaster, Mo
THE WEATHER.
For Keokuk and Vicinity:
tonight,
So far the government has refused storms
to permit correspondents to accomp-! geuerally
any the army, but It Is believed that'
For
n'gbt
vance
Dispatches from Tokio say the ln- temperature, with rain between the
fiuentlal Hochl Shirphun guardedly ^"ssour'
ate'y
aim of Japan."' Japan ie rushing to
the Yangtze two additional war ships, ^'B
the Tatsu and Makigumo.
ROBINSON IS
NOT PROGRESSIVE
Delayed Again and Has Not Yet Start
ed on Trip Down
the River.
16.-
-At noon
aviator,
the
weather conditions wero given as the a stage of near ten feet at Keokuk
reason for again delaying the start 1
and Robinson said that the moment
the weather permitted, be .would com
mence his flight. 1^-1-
.iSebern Killed In Fall.
GLIDDEN, la. Oct. 16.—George Se
bern of this place, while at work on
a windmill north of Carroll, fell six
ty-five feet to the ground and died
without regaining consciousness.
has been attended by rising
r'ver
and
si!,p'
0001
Political Circles Agree Tht a "Pro
gressive" Will be Appointed
To Fill The Va
•~jfA oancy.
Opinionated Veniremen Is Main Argu-! Fuenral is to be Held Tomorrow With
ment of the Day In Trial of Al
leged Dyna
.miters.
lit
LOS ANGELES, Oct. 16.—Guarded
by an extra large force of secret ser
vice men, President Taft today ar
rived at the scene of the McNamara
murder case and the most acute la
bor troubles of the west. In prepara
tion for his coming the entire city
has been combed of suspicious char
acters and everyone who could not
give a good account of himself has
been locked up until the president
leaves.
-J1,
BRANDEIS IS MENTIONED
8ervicea at the House and
Also at The
Church.
preme court as honorary pallbearers,
this time. Taft's personal dislike of
Branafels following the later's expos­
caseTrawler
JUQS° DO™,tu
pected
rioon and JudgL- iS-dwc-n iB ex' believed by man would prevent! "?ldfB
18 ex
throughout China. The death rate In! the day is over est tip today was that I.ehmann would
decision will be the most vital be appointed. He Is a life long fr end „,t
the entire case. Attorney Darrow of Senator Cummins of Iowa and it.Is
the defense claims that "the en-1 thought he will be able to brinR the
fair jury of men who are the appointment
prejudiced against the Mc-1 A number ot other names
rebals. The telegraph administration Namaras depends upon his ruling. mentioned but these two appear to be
refuses to transmit messages either The McNamara brothers spent the the logical candidates. j|^|H
to or from the provinces of Hu-Peh, day quietly in their oells.
Brakeman Killed.
GLACIER TRUST
s"ldlcate
and "Tuesd"ay, "except*"' showers"" and not kicking, as the
night. Cooler tonight with frost
the Upper Missis-
Valley, is attended by moder
weather ln
section
St. Paul 14
La Crosse 12
Dubuque 18
Galland 8
Keokuk 16
St. Louis 30
Rlver Forecast.
Local Observations.
Oct.4! Bar. Ther. Wind W'th'r
15 7 p. 29.76 69 E Cl'dy
16 7 a. 29.66 66 SE
Moan temperature, 61.
Highest temperature, 74.
Lowest temperature, 48.
Lowest temperature last night, 66.
FRED Z. GOSEWISCH,
•i Observer.
18
ha8i the west portion. the rest of the country, particularly in
and Tuesday. Cooler
For Illinois: Unsettled and cooler! villages that don't have glaciers
tonight.
and in the east portion Tuesday.
£4 Weather Conditions.
Saturday's area of low pressure
and had Invited the cooperation of! eastward, and marked depression is
the American Episcopal mission. This
centra'
had organized a Red Cross Society thf Mountain Region Is moving Pays Visit to Texas City and Rides hl^hoWo yesSaj^
'n I°wa this morning. Its ad-
Chopping It up
town. The threatened with a new form of monop-
1
Showers
Into
anH
Rhinninn
the lce
GENEVA, Oct 16.—Switzerland Is
olistlc peril—the Glacier trust. A
bunch of Swiss Guggenhelms and
Morgans has grabbed a large section of trouble getting a shoe on.
of the Upper Glacier near Grindelwald
and is slicing it up for export to Ger-!
and thunderstorms, with cooler to- many, France, Italy and other coun-'
night. Tuesday generally fair. tries.
For Iowa: Generally fair tonight] The townfolks of Grindelwald are sensation In my
new"Industry
thunderstorms in the east portion to-, them lucrative empoyment. But Mr. Reynolds states that at
in
Horn in Man's Foot Caused all Klnc*
of Trouble Until Operation Wat
Performed to Re
move it.
LIKE PIECE OF FLINT
Don't Kick a Four Foot Fish In the
Head Before It is Dead Un
less You Are Inviting
v,i ao
A?
Trouble.
WASHINGTON, Oct. 16.—With the CEDAR RAPIDS, Oot. 16.—After
seat of the late Justice Harlan heav- carrying the horn of a catfish in his
ily draped in black, the supreme foot for eighteen months Lou Rey
court met In brief session at noon to-
day. The death of Justice Harlan was
announced and adjournment was then
taken.
nolds
great howl has gone up throughout ™e he managed to get a piece of!
CHAMP CLARK
BEHIND MULES
Around With Pair of
Jacks.
FORT WORTH, Tex., Oct. 16.—
When Speaker Champ Clark arrived
here today he was given a ride
Conditions indicate showers and speaker had said he would ride be-'
thunderstorms, with cooler weather hind in his first trip up Pennsylvania
tonight, and general-
ly fair, cool weather Tuesday.
Dally River Bulletin.
Stage Height Change
W'th'r
Rain
Rain
3.4
8.2
-0.1
-0.9
x2.6
x0.3
x0.8
-0.2
12.4
3.3
6.8
12.7
Cl'dy
had it removed by Dr. Spencer
at St. Luke's hospital.
It was a vicious looking piece of
bone which Dr. Spencer found after
The funeral is to be held tomorrow operating on Mr. Reynold's foot. It roads for carrying the malls and pro
afternoon with the justices of the su-!
was an
and
ian church and) the burial which will foot
take place in Rockwood cemetery, 'ar
will be private.
Associate Justice Harlan and that to ^est
argued"that his appointment would" be
the strongest possible blow that Taft
could deliver at the progressives at
w,th
After a brief private service at the needles. The little trouble maker had
house a public ceremony will be held '°dged between the third joint of the
in the New York Avenue Presbyter-
m|ddle
Political circles agreed today that! ^'r- Reynolds Is a member of the
President Taft will select a "progres-1leara TexUna and Reynolds, who
slve" as the successor to the late
have
too and the long bone of the
and
sl®ZB
was In just the one partlcu-
p'a®e
B*lows
meet the political situation he will! ^ve played in vaudeville and have
choose the most progressive man that
he can find.
One report was that Louis Brandeis
of Boston might be chosen as It was
at
Efeat
ll,ck
and
draft exonerating Ballinger,]pl™k8
welKhts-
He
f«n°w
boIle ollt
In
the eastern around the city behind a pair of genu-! ,,
ine Missouri mules, such as the
Avenue in Washington If ne was
elected speaker.
Representative Clark will speak
here tonight and a large crowd is ex
pected to turn out to hear him.
Boy Banker Guilty.
PEORIA, 111., Oct. 16—Earl W. But-
Cl'dy ler, of Chicago, the "boy banker,"
Clear
was
stated that he would not start his from Davenport southward during the years. Butler was also fined $2,800. "unfounded and mythical" the reports
Mississippi river flight today. Adverse remainder of the week, and will reach was alleged that he received a de- from Europe that Russia and the Unit-
The river will continue to rise Elllsville. The ptnaltv is one to three partment officials today denounced as
Sultana Survivor Is Dead.
EVANSVILI.E, Ind., Oct. 16.—Wil-
Cl'dy iliam McFarland, former captain of
the Evansville police force and a sur
vivor of the Sultana' disaster on the
cau&ht
about
ure of the p|r dated report and the 'f1™ «°PP»"g
mak1"g
b„rne(i
°ne
f°ur
„ke
dB
„Never
THE WEATHER
Showers Tonight—Cooler.
bl*
feet
a
ave/^
a
u, .• m. his foot and the oWTellow took octfa-! leges it might have, or that It shq»M
to rule on the subject before Brandeis appointment. The strong-,. -hove his horn in Mr R«v hie unfalrlv taved for a sneclal inters
n,B norn ln
1
mind was. I suffered all the torments
gives drove me frantic at times lie for mall
him to the hospital where, with
cases in my practice" said Dr. Sppn
cer. in speaking of it. The peculiar
shape of the prong and the barbs on
it caused it to travel from the place
where it entered on the side of
foot t0 where fina,ly
t'le
found guilty of embezzlement by
a jury at Lewistown In connection «But
iwith the suspension of his bank at WASHINGTON. Oct. 16.—State de-:th)g
'odged
t,le 150110 1( wo,lld
under
bone. Had not 'odged against
tlirt linim it avMiln nrnlinh navo naac.
probably have pass-
1 ed entirely through the foot and iu
caused nearly so much trouble."
NEUTRALITY IS
BEING PRESERVED
United States Will Take No Part In
Trymg to Repress
Rebellion.
ed States were taking steps to inter-
bank was Insolvent. fere in Chinese affairs and to assist
Mi sippi river at the close of the bureaus of the state department in the
civil war, died here, aged 65. He was disturbed regions are those directed appropriations and congress must
prominent in republican politics and toward securing the safety of Amerl-j
served in the union army. can residents, (Concluded on page six.)
EIGHT PAGE&
Postmaster General Hitchcock Wants
Experiment Made Next Year on
Some Rural Delivery
Routes.
ADJUSTING MAIL RATE
Trying to Furnish the Best Postal*
Service Possible Without in
creasing the Preaent
Rates..
WASHINGTON. Oct. 16.—If Posfci
master General Hitchcock succeds In
convincing congress of the Justice oil
his position he will get legislation at'
the coming session affecting second*'
class postage rates, making a changi.
In the method of compensating rail-
inch long, hard as flint, vidlng for the establishment of an e»
barbs that were sharp as perlmental parcel post on rural route®
where it would cause the
most discomfort.
Played "wlth
aI1 the
sreat wild
on this
continent. They
here
*n
their short shooting act.
Mr. Reynolds states that a year ago
last May he was fishing off the pier
and In cities.
Mr. Hitchcock wants It clearly un
derstood he is not seeking to Injurs
the publishers, white Insisting on a
readjustment of second-class postage
rates.
"We have heard some hard things
said of the department about the seo
ond-class mall question," said the
postmaster general. "There has been
much said In the way of misrepresen
tation, due, let us believe, to selfish
Interest or to misinformation.
"We are not trying to Increase th«
rates of postage and we are not try-
Myers, Florida. He was having lug to run the department at a prof-
catching cat fish of *11 it. We are not trying to roll up a big
I surplus
lon*-
fc h,
und |n did
remember of
have
been
WW
IN SWITZERLAND
,lnlaclng
the ghoe Qff and gaw the Moofl al
for
He
ar°'lnd
Personal aggrandizement,
yank-! What we are trying to do Is to fur
ed him out with a pull and the big nish the best postal service possible
on the, at no greater cost.
great fuss. Mr. Rey- We don believe it right that
klc*
with general public should be denied privl-
Ke
ll".a x®
nold'a foot. est. We are not unmindful of the in-
a need, Bnid dispensabIe
the
advantages of the press
,ho
hoe of{ er than dfd do not Urne Ua8 come
C01Intry for
educational and
take their other purposes, but we do think the
,or
!t. After tj climinatlon.
rpost fainted. The pain was terrible., c.lal commission, the personnel oi
I danced and waved my shoe around, which cannot be questioned, will be
The catfish was still flopping about. prepared to submit Its report upon
As though In a dream I just beat and this troublesome question. Aside from
pounded Mm over the head with that! the question of postage rates, it is the
shoe. I laugh now to think of it.
a
reasonable dls-
-.Dec.eulber .the president's spe-
purpose to submit to congress a rec-
"I could not sit still. It was just oimnendation for the revision of the
one fearful, nerve racking pain after statutes, especially those affecting
another ln the foot. 1 have had tooth- second-class mail matter.
aches and headaches but nothing that! "Our experience In a limited way in
ever approached that pain in volume the d'.spatch of magazines by fast
and strength. freight has taught that the estimated
"There was a little blood, not much oost of former years for the trans
though. That night 1 hud a groat deal: portation of second class mail matter
of trouble getting a shoe on. From1 uiust. be reduced. We do not want a
(bat. day I never knew VlTat peace of
hlS'»
,0
of the damned. I would wake up in! seeding.
tiie night with that burning, itching! "Our main object is to readjust th«
foot that
almost
rate of poRtag«, hut. wo do want
reduce expenses—and we are sue-
rates so as
not
may
but not nil of it. lie paid a 'ess an cor
visit to doctors all over the country! anxious to redact, the tost of postage
the]
to tax the whole pub-1
th,l,
one a 1
^S1^aSg|
,, .'1 ,-arricS at
have its mail matter carnc* at
of computing the pay of railroads for^
assistance of Dr. Jarvts it was re- carrying the mail is unscientific and
moved after an operation that split I unreliable. For years there has been
Mr. Reynold's foot almost in
two
"It was one of the most, remarkable
comment reflecting upon
ths
depart-
ment's dealings with railroads in the:
matter Of mail transportation. We|
have given the subject the most care-is
ful consideration and are convinced
the only just and scientific way to es
timate the compensation is to pay for'
the car space actually used for that?
his! purpose."
Discussing the parcels post, Mr.
Hitchcock, said: "We have success-^
fully inaugurated a postal savings
system, and its operation is admir-':
able, in the same way we can lnaugu»J
rate a parcels post system. To at
tempt to take over the express buslf?
ness of the country at one bound?
would be disastrous. It would close
the malls and Inflict irreparable In
jury upon the business Interests,,
which must above all things be guar
anteed a safe and certain service of
unwavering regularity.
we can
outset to
prepare to take over
servlce. We
can confine it at the
iocai
man oniy
Jteg
mands and then
committees
on those
Qraduallv. we can equip and
organize\he
service to meet the de-
extend it. In the
game way we can
begin such a ser-
vice vn the free delivery cities.
"Last year a recommendation was
sent to congress providing for an ap
propriation for experimental service
the Pekln government to suppress the
present rebellion. It was stated em
phatically that this government is.
preserving the most strict neutrality
and will continue such a policy. The" Vlnd. It never got out of the
only activities permitted the consular
to which It was referred.
year w8
have asked for special

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