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Minneapolis spokesman. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1934-2000, December 26, 1963, Image 8

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SPORTS
Chicago (ANP) —There is an old axiom in baseball that you can’t
tell how good a trade is until after it’s made. But most baseball
men will tell you today that the Cleveland Indians got by far the best
of the deal in which the Tribe acquired Leon Wagner from the Los An
geles Angels in exchange for a righthanded pitcher, Barry Latman.
“Daddy Wags," as the power-hitting Wagner is affectionately
known, might be just what the doctor ordered for the ailing Indians.
The prescription calls for a home run hitter. In three seasons in the
American League, Wagner has belted 91 homers while playing 81 games
a year in spacious Chavez Ravine a park not conducive to a prolific
home run output.
In fact, his inability to smash home runs consistently in their home
park probably persuaded the Angels front office chiefs to trade the 29-
year-old, one-time Tuskegee student. Last season he belted 26 home
runs, but only two went out in L.A.
Yet, it must be concluded that a Wagner-Latman trade never fig
ured, even though the Indians must surrender a player before spring
training. Angels’ manager Bill Rigney once declared he’d never give up
his long-bell hitting outfielder.
In fact, Gabe Paul, the Cleveland general manager, was being
called a thief in San Diego last week after the deal was announced at
the meeting of the minor leagues. But Manager Birdie Tebbetts was
happy about the whole thing.
“Any time you get a chance to pick up a hitter like Wagner you
don't Stop to ask if he’s left-handed or righthanded. You just hope he
shows up in Tucson ready to play.”
Wagner, Who operates a haberdashery in Los Angeles, took the
deal in stride.
“This trade makes me happy,” he said. “Those Indians are real
pennant contenders and I’ve got lots of friends on that club.
“I think I can help that dub. I’ve always killed them and when a
fellow kills a team that’s when they try to get him on their side.”
By killing the Indians he was referring to the 12 home runs he hit
against the Indians last year. Some experts are predicting that he will
hit 40 home runs next year by playing 81 games in the huge Municipal
Stadium Whose foul lines are more chummy than those in Chavez
Ravine.
The Indians also Strengthen the dub, in the eyes of this observer,
by getting Al Smith, the veteran outfielder, from Baltimore for Willie
Kirkland, a failure most of hsi three seasons with the Tribe. Kirkland,
also an outfielder, never provided the consistent punch the Indians ex
pected after he was traded by the San Francisco Giants. Smity, by the
Way. was one of the sparks of the Indians’ last pennant-winning team
in 1954.
Speaking of the Giants, the National League runnerups traded
Felipe Alou, regular outfielder for three seasons, to the Milwaukee
Braves in a seven player transaction. The Braves needed outfield
strength, which the Giants could afford to yield, and so they sacrificed
pitching.
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Charlie Sifford, Lee Elder
Finish Among Money
Winners In Golf Tourney
Los Angeles (ANP) Golf pro
Chartie Sifford placed fifth and
Lee Elder, sixth in the recent
Tommy Jacobs Open tournament
at the Montebello Municipal
Course. Sifford carded 69-69-73-
211 to win S4OO of the SB,OOO
purse.
Tommy Jacobs scored 70-66-67
to win the tournament. He netted
$1,500.
George Bayer won the second
prize of SI,OOO, Nils Semeleng,
with a score of 71-68-70, pocketed
$750.
Elder and Bud Holsdher won
$362.50 each, with individual scores
of 67-73-71.
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Pro Teams Held
Mad Scramble
For Tan Players
By Bill Brower
Chicago (ANP) There was
the usual frantic bidding for tan
talent in the football drafts con
ducted by the National Football
and the American Football leagues
last week. Some of the outstanding
prospects were quickly signed.
Cart Eller, the 240-pound All-
American tackle from Minnesota,
was named first draft choice by
the Minnesota Vikings in the NFL
and by Buffalo in the AFL. The
Vikings almost immediately ob
tained Eller’s signature. He is from
Winston-Salem, N.C.
Other first draft selections in
the NFL included Paul Warfield,
the Ohio State star from Warren,
Ohio, picked by the Cleveland
Browns; Bob Brown, Nebraska's
270-pound All - American guard
from Cleveland, picked by the
Philadelphia Eagles; Charles Tay
lor, 190-pound unheralded half
back from Arizona State tapped by
the Washington Redskins; and
Marv Woodson, halfback from Hat
tiesburg, Miss., who starred, until
forced out by injuries, for Indiana,
named by the Baltimore Colts.
Matt Snell, Ohio State fullback
from Locust Valley, N.Y., choice
of the New York Jets; Brown,
tabbed by the Denver Broncos, and
Eller were first draft choices in
the AFL.
Snell also was picked by the
New York team the Giants
in the NFL being its third selec
tion. Warfield, his teammate, ap
peared likely to sign with the
Browns over Buffalo, Which grab
bed him in the fourth round.
Brown is not likely to make a
decision until after the Orange
Bowl game in which the Comhusk
ers face Auburn. But Woodson,
Who has fully recovered from a
knee Injury suffered in the third
game in the 1963 season, signed
with the Colts. He had been named
by Denver in the third round of
the AFL draft.
Choices of other tan players in
the NFL by teams, included:
Cleveland Leroy Kelly, Mor
gan State back; Ed Mitchell,
tackle, and Sid Williams, end,
Southern University, and Sherman
Lewis, co-captain of Michigan
& M, back, (future chioce).
State, back.
San Francisco Rudy Johnson.
Nebraska, back: Bob Brown, Ark
ansas A & M, tackle; James Grif
fin, Grambiing, end, and Cornell
Gordon, North Carolina A & T,
back (future choice).
Philadelphia Alfred Denson
Florida A & M, end, and Israel
Lang, Tennessee A & I, back.
Dallas Mel Renfro, Oregon,
back, and Bob Hayes, Florida A
Washington Jim Snowden,
Notre Dame, back (future choice);
Gene Donaldson, Purdue, back, and
Ozzie Clay, lowa State back.
Minnesota —Carlton Oates, Flor
ida A & M, end, and Charles Rob
erson, Prairie View (Tex.), tackle.
New York George Seals, Miss
ouri, end; Roger Anderson, Vir
ginia Union tackle;; Bill Harris,
Colorado, back, and Jim Garrett,
Grambling, back.
Green Bay John Baker, Vir
ginia State, end.
Chicago Jim Jones, Wiscon
sin, end (future choice); Mike
Brown, Delaware, back; Cl yd
Webb, end; and Bob Batts, Texas
Southern, back.
Detroit Matt Snorton, Michi
gan State, end; and Warren Wells,
Texas Southern, end.
Los Angeles Willie Brown,
Southern California, back; Herman
Johnson, Michigan State, back
(future choice), and Bob Cherry,
Wittenberg (Springfield, Ohio),
end.
Pittsburgh—Ben McGhee, Jack
son State (Miss.), tackle; Bob Cur
rington, North Carolina College
back, and Oliver Dobbins, Morgan
State, back.
St. Louis Bob Johnson, Wis
consin, end; Willie Ross, Nebraska,
back; and Tony Lawrence, Bowl
ing Green (Ohio), tackle (future
choice).
Snorton was third choice of Den
ver in the AFL and signed with
the Broncos. Other choices and
their teams in the AFL included:
Houston Taylor and Ezel)
Seals back, and Cane Robinson,
tackle, Prairie View.
Denver Denson, Hayes, Cher
ry and Odell Barry, Findlay (Ohio)
back.
New York McGhee, Lewis,
Rudy Johnson and Herman John
son.
San Diego Anderson, Willie
Brown, Mitchell and Seals.
Buffalo Earl Lattimer, Michi
gan State, guard; Webb and Ross.
Boston Garrett and Pete Ped
ro, West Texas State.
Kansas City Snowden.
Oakland Renfro.
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WEST COAST SPORTLIGHT
Los Angeles While the Los Angeles Rams were beating the
Baltimore Colts 17-16 recently, I couldn't help thinking about
John Fitzgerald Kennedy . . . How he gave his life for what he be
lieved in the dignity of all races .. . and the right of every Negro to
do what he wanted to do—so long as he had the ability to do it .. .
The President loved sports ... I think he was a competitor, as all
will agree. But more than that, he saw sports as the epitome of all that
good sportsmanship can assure a man. He foresaw athletes as a good
will messenger, particularly in the nation's most troubled area—the
deep South . . . Liston and Floyd Patterson will tell you that JFK had
given them inspiration ... I think Kennedy admired Jackie Robinson
because sports gave Jackie a chance to show what he was made of.
Of the players on offense in the game against Baltimore Dick Bass
was most outstanding . . . Carrying the ball 19 times, he made 124
yards . . . But more than that he was able to make first downs When
they were really needed.
Chuck Cowan was cited by the game announcer for his outstanding
play on offense ... I think he is underrated for offense play; the
coaches know it too, because they play him consistently on offense . . .
Deacon Jones, Lamar Lundy, Rosey Grier, Bobby Smith, Carver Shan
non played their usual fine defensive game . . . Smith covered Ray
Berry as well as anyone could.
ANGELS DID WAGNER A FAVOR BY
TRADING HIM TO CLEVELAND INDIANS
By Charles J. Livingston
Chicago (ANP) There comes
a time in the life of many a ball
player when he yearns to be trad
ed to another dub. The reasons
may be different, but the desire is
just as compelling. I believe Leon
Wagner of the Los Angeles enter
tained such a hope last season. He
wanted to be put on the auction
block.
Therefore, the announcement
last week that the Angels had
peddled him to Cleveland in ex
change for pitcher Barry Batman
and a player to be delivered later,
must have been welcomed news to
him. I have several reasons for
sensing Wagner's elation over the
trade.
First of all. It relieved him of
a terrible burden. Secondly, he
was moving to a more congenial
atmosphere, as far as fans sup
port Is concerned. And finally, at
Cleveland he will have several
plus-factors in his favor.
Since making his major league
debut with the then fledging An
gels in 1961, Wagner has virtually
carried the ball Club on his back.
An alumnus of the Giants organiz
ation, where the accent is on pow
er, Leon came to Los Angeles with
a high reputation as a slugger. He
has lived up to that reputation in
every way until last season, when
he fell victim to the huge dimen
sions of Chavez Ravine, the Dodg
er-owned, Angel-leased home park.
With opposing pitchers concentrat
ing on Wagner, his homerun bat
was practically silenced in the big
park into which the Angels had
moved. But neither he nor his sup
porters could explain this to the
satisfaction of the homer loving
home fans.
To them, it made little differ
ence that Wagner was hitting lust
ily on the road. They wanted home
run action at home. As a result,
Wagner became sensitive to the
unjust criticisms. He must have
developed the feeling that the
home fans did not appreciate him.
Ask any ballplayer and he will
tell you that the one thing he
strives for, almost above all else,
is the support of local fans. He
hates almost fears antag
onism of the rail birds who rode
Wagner unmercifully.
Soon Wagner began dropping
little hints that he yearned for
friendlier surroundings. He talked
about the size of the Chavez park
and began rationalizing that he
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was doing more than his share for
the club. He didn't say these things
outright. Few ballplayers do. But
he kept dropping hints. Apparent
ly, the Angels brass finally got the
message, although they no doubt
were influenced by other factors in
letting Wagner go. Yet it's hard to
see the prudence of letting Leon
go for the wavering Latman and
an unknown package.
Though his slugging percentage
fell last year from the 1962 sea
son, Wagner still hit 26 homers,
drove in 90 runs and batted .291.
How many major league players
can boast of such a record? And,
moreover, he compiled it with the
Angeles, who were just feeling
their strength last year. Latman,
by comparison, had an unimpres
sive 7-12 record with a high 4.95
earned run average.
But I won’t quarrel with the
Angels brass and I am sure
Leon won’t, either for trading
him. They actually did Wagner a
favor. He will be playing with a
team that will offer him more op
portunities. He’ll also have more
help at the plate and in the field.
When the pressure mounts, for in
stance, he can count on such hit
ters as Woody Held and Willie
Kirkland to help take the pressure
Off him.
Also, Wagner will find the fans
in Cleveland more understandable
and less hostile. After all, pennant
winning teams are not new to
Clevelanders. And Leon won't have
to hit tape measure homers in
Cleveland Stadium.
These are the plus-factors in his
favor.
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Visit our recreation room,
with new billiard tables
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nesiee State Tigerbelles
Dominate AUU'S All-
America Track Team
San Diego, Caldf. (ANP)
Tennessee State university, the
school that produced the great
Wilma Rudolph, recently placed
three girls on the Amateur Athle
tic Union's AH-America women's
trade team.
The three Tigerbelles are Edith
McGuire, who won two spots on
the team; Joann Terry, who will
compete in the 80-meter hurdles,
and Wyomia Tyus, who will run
in the 100-ya rd dash in the 14-17
division. Miss McGuire, already na
tionally famous, will compete in
the 100-yard dash and broad jump.
Also named to the 22-member
team were Eleanor Montgomery.
Cleveland, Ohio, high jump, and
Tamara Davis, Frederick, Md., 50-
yard hurdles.
Hawks' Zelmo Beaty Injured;
To Be Sidelined
For Three Weeks
St. Louis (ANP) The St.
Louis Hawks professional basket
ball team will be without the serv
ice of star center Zelmo Beaty for
an estimated two more weeks as a
result of an injury he suffered in a
game against the Philadelphia
76ers recently.
Beaty's injury added to the
Hawks woes. He joins the ailing
Cliff Hagan, currently nursing an
injured ankle, and John Barnhill,
former Tennessee State university
star, who was plagued with the flu
last week.
RABBIT HUNTING NO
PLACE FOR WOMEN
St. John, Wis. (ANP) Ever
heard of a man shooting his wife
While aiming at a rabbit? Stanley
Horton did. Horton spotted a rab
bit while he was driving along U.S.
41 at Indiana 8. Pulling over to the
side of the road, he lowered his
window, drew out a .45 calibre pis
tol and aimed at the animal.
His wife, Carie, threw her arm
toward the weapon, just as her
husband fired. Instead of the rab
bit biting the dust, Carrie hit the
hospital bed, with a bullet hole in
her elbow.
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Thursday, December 26, 1963, Minneapolis
LAKERS* GENE WILEY GAINING
REPUTATION AS PAINTER; SOFIA
LOREN AMONG HIS SUBJECTS
Dos Angeles (ANP) —Gene Wiley, the sophomore pivotman for the
Dos Angeles Dakers in the National Basketball Association is known
as a "rebound artist." This is testimony to his skill in bringing errant
shots off the backboard and feeding the ball quickly to teammates,
such as Elgin Baylor and Dick Barnett.
Of this recognition, Wiley is naturally pleased. But he is also proud
of the recognition he is receiving for his oanvas artistry. He is quite a
canvas painter.
Wiley, who majored in commercial art at Wichita university, is
making rapid strides in oil painting and before the basketball season
is over probably will have a one-man show in Dos Angeles.
His latest masterpiece is an oil portrait of Jim Murray, columnist
for the Los Angeles daily. Murray is considered a great friend to Negro
athletes.
Gene has also painted teammate Baylor s wife and children of
some of his Dakar teammates. George Berrard, a leading D.A. oil paint
er, has encouraged Wiley to continue in oils and pen and ink illustra
tions. The 6-9 jumping star, who is something of a genius on defense,
has dabbled in representational and semiabstract painting, but now is
concentrating in his oils.
The top figure Wiley has been paid for one of his oils is $250 from
his wife of a doctor in Wichita. She had admired Wiley's oil of Sofia
Doren in her film role in ".Two Women." Wiley also has completed 30
other oil canvases in a variety of fields, which have sold for lesser
prices.
Wiley has been approached by a sports magazine to prepare some
artwork for covers to be used by the publisher for next fall and winter
Issue.
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