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Daily globe. [volume] (St. Paul, Minn.) 1878-1884, December 14, 1878, Image 5

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025287/1878-12-14/ed-1/seq-5/

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THE ICE KING.
BTIS GRASP UPON THE FATHER OF
WATERS.
Review of th Navigation Business of the
SeasonUnprecedented LengthIiOW Wa-
ter TroublesHandsome Increase of Busi-
nessThe Wing Dam System for Deepen-
ing: the ChannelOne Hundred Thousand
Dollars Expended.
Now that Jack Fro3t, by his icy embrace, has
really put an embargo upon the navigation of
the upper Mississippi river by covering its sur
face here and there with bridges of ice, the
GLO BE accepts the situation, and herewith
gives its annual review of the business of the
season, with the prominent characteristics con
nected therewith.
LENGTH OF SEASON.
The season of 1878 is unparalled in the lencsth
of time the river has been open and unob
structed by ice from the head of navigation at
St. Paul to the Gulf. Lake Pepin, always the
laBt remaining obstacle in the way of naviga
tion i the spring, opened this year the 6th
day of March, though i was not until the
20th of the month that the open passage thus
provided was taken advantage of, and the first
boat of the season, the steamer Arkansas, of
the Keokuk-Northern line, came through to St.
Paul, the unexpected early opening finding the
steamboat companies unprepared for business,
as the unusually late closing found th em with
nothing to do owing to the fact that, governed
by past experiences, their season contracts for
freights were made to close with the 15th of
November.
Counting from the 6th dayof March, the ac
tual date when the ice in Lake Pepin disap
peared, giving an unobstructed river, to the
morning of the 13th of December, the actual
date of the river's closing by iceand during
all of which time boats could have run with
out obstruction from iceand we have had
nine months and six days of open water from
the Gulf to St. Paul, or a total of 287 days, the
longest season by fifteen days in the nineteen
years of which a record has been kept, as will
be seen by the following table:
1KG0. 1801. 1802. 1803.
1804. 1805.
1806. 1867. 1808. 1869.
.241 ,232 .211
233
.211 .231
210
222
240
.216
1870.... 1871....
1872.... 1873....
1874....
1875..,. 1876
1877.... 1878....
240
225 266
200 204
206 229
227 287
The next longest season, as will be seen, was
in 1872, buteven that season, then considered a
remarkable one, falls behind the present by
fifteen days.
BUSINESS OF TDK SEASON.'
Notwithstanding the great length of the low
water seasonextending from early in July
until the very close of navigationand the
very low stage of water reached, the business
of the two steamboat lines plying to and from
St. Paul, show a most gratifying increase over
that of 1877. Commencing with the Arkansas,
March 2'). the first arrival, and the boats of the
Keokuk-Northern line arrived at and departed
from St. Paul 133 times against 91 times
for the year 1S77, while the boats of the
Diamond line arrived and departed 52 times
against 28 times for 1877. One wild boat also
made a trip to St. Paul, early in the season, the
Alice from Pittsburgh, bringing through a
largo iron and glass trip. This gives a total of
186 arrivals and departures from St. Paul of
boats of regular dawn river lines for the season
of 1878, against only 119 for 1877. Th move
ments of boats were as follows:
KEOKUK NORTHERN LINE.
Boats. No. arrivals.
Clinton 17
Red Wing 10
Dubuq ue 15
Northwestern 15
Belle of La Crosse. 14
Alex Mitchell.. 14
Minnesota 11
Minneapolis 7
Boats. No. arrivals.
Annie Charlie Cheever.... 5
Tidal Wave 5
Arkansas 4
Victory.
Savannah liob Koy
2 1 1
..133
Total
THK DIAMOND E LINE.
The arrivals of boats belonging to the Dia-
mond Joe line were as follows:
Boats. No. arrivals. I Boats. No. arrivals.
Diamond Joe 20 Imperial 3
Josie 19
Libbie Conger...... 10 Total 52
INDEPENDENT.
Alice, Pittsburgh 1
Grand total 186
While the exports and imports do not show a
corresponding increase to the arrivals and de
partures of boats,it in gratifying to know that,
notwithstanding the long anil serious low
water interruption, almost entirely suspend
ing exports during the last three months of
the season, and very largely curtailing imports
entirely so from way pointsthe actual
business of the lines show a very decided in
crease over the year 1877, and previous years,
sin-.e the completion of the several rail outlets
to the East we now possess, brought that, inter
est into active competition for the oarrying
trade of ourState, and the Northwest. Th
following tables of comparison show the busi
ness of the Keokuk-Northern line for the two
past years:
SEASON OF 1878.
Tons.
Up stream miscellaneous 9,270
Coal 5^000
Do wn stream miscellaneous 2,250
Total for season 16,524
SEASON OF 1877.
stream miscellaneous 9,127
Coal 2'000
Downstream miscellaneous.. 4,457
15,584
It will be seen that the up freights for 1878
exceeded those of 1877 by 3,152 tons. This ex
cess of tonnage for the present season is, how
ever large, lost on a falling off on the down
stream business of 2.207 tons, leaving the total
tonnage of the season in excess of that of 1877
of not quite 1,000 tons. We have not the fig
ures in detail of the business of the Diamond
Jo line, but understand that tne increase of
imports for 1878 is nearly or quite 50 per
cent.
These figures, when the condition of the
river is considered, shows that the commerce of
our great river is not going into decay as a re-
BUlt of the railroad development of tlie coun
try through which it flows. Bather, it demon
strates a growth encouraging to those engaged
in it, and full of promise for the future.
While the freight business of 1878 is thus
Been to be in excess of 1877, there was also a
very large increase in the passenger business.
Much of this increase was undoubtedly due to
the general flight of the paoplo of some of the
Southern States from before the ravages of the
deadly fever-, but it is observable that travel
by river has been steadily increasing for the
past few seasons, pleasure tourists visiting the
Northwest during the summer months very gen
erally choosing this mode of conveyance.
THE LOW WATER.
Owing to the long drouth in the fall of 1877,
and the light snow-fall of 1877-78, the spring
found all the sources of water supply of the
great river illy provided for the drain of the
hot season. Th ice moved out in the spring
with only a comparatively slight swell in the
volume of water. Owing to the same causes
the June risea regular thing in the good old
days steamboatmen delight to talk about
was a failure. A a natural consequence
the water declined rapidly, until July 7,
on which day the Belle of a Crosse, for St.
Paul, with a good freight and passenger list,
stuck fast on Franchman's bar. just below the
city. The water continuing to decline, July 11
the Cheever commenced transferring from
Prescott. Th latter part of July there was a
Blight rise, and July 31 the Mitchell came
through to St. Paul, and other boats of the line
followed until August 10, when the Cheever
again commenced transferring from Prescott.
Soon thereafter the water reached so low a
stage the Cheever had to be withdrawn, and
the transfer was made by rail from a Crosse.
This rail transfer was continued for the balance
of the season, though in the latter part of Oc
tober and first of November the steamers Annie
and Tidal Wave, two boats of-the largest ton
nage of the Keokuk-Northern line company,
but long and flat and of very light draft, did
succeed in making a few trips through to St.
Paul, bringing very good cargoes, the last
being the Anna, which left here on her last
trip, and the last down river departure of the
of the season, Nov. 3d. While it has been con
sidei ably over a mon th since this last depart
ure from St. Paul, it was only the past week
that the last boat running, of the upper river
Oration RT^M?TYl TJ M! Vu a IK
is on which our citizens,North with all the inhab
itants living along its course, have ever mani
fested great interest. The trouhlee in th.et past
JCOIC gieai interest ni trouble in the past
?l^^L
1?hal
k0
nter
WING DAM
system, by which it is sought to confine the
volume of water to a comparatively narrow
space, the theory being that the water being so
confined, will of itself wash out the sand bars
created at bends where the force of the current
is weakened and negatived by being spread out
over a great surface. This system wasfirstpu
in practice at the upper river, at Pig's Ey bar,
about three miles below the city, and five years
ago one of the worst points on the river be
tween La Crosse and St. Paul. Th original
expense was comparatively insignificant. The
practicability of the plan was demonstrated
the first season after the work had been com
menced by a perceptible deepeding of the chan
nel. The plan has been developed gradually
at this point during the intervening years, and
fully completed this season, at a total expense
of some 816,000, and the result was that when
there was at low water in former years only
some eighteen inches of water, there is now
from four to five feet.
The season just closed has witnessed a more
systematic development of the wing dam sys
tem than during any previous ye.ir. The work
has been in charge of Mr. Gillespie, of the
United States river and harbor service, under
whose direction about one hundred thousand
dollars has been spent in this direction be
tween a Crosse and St. Paul. Besides com
pleting the works at Pigs Eye, the following
has been done: Opposite Newport a wing and
a closing dam has been put in cost, $6,000. A
Hastings four wing dams were constructed,
costing $9,000. Opposite Prescott two dams,
89.000. At Crab Island two extensive dams,
820,000. At Beef Slough four dams, 822,000.
Dams were also put in at Betsey Slough,
Grenn's Bluff and Rolling Stone, while at the
point where the Chippewa empties into the
Mississippi a series ot jetties or fuclne wing
dams, confining the waters to one channel, and
costing about $16,000, was completed during
the season.
Already sufficient time has elapsed since the
completion of these improvements to demon
strate their feasibility in deepening the chan
nel, and the officers in charge of the work, and
experienced steamboatmen who have observed
the effect, have no doubt that the improve
ment thus secured will be permanent.
MISCELLANEOUS.
The little steamers Otter and Gophej plied
for a good part of the season between St. Paul
and poinis on the ^Minnesota, several trips
early in the Eeasoii ueing made as far up as
Redwood.
The steamer Aunt Betsy was kept buy
during the reason in running between St. Paul
and |ioints on the St. Croix and the Minnesota
rivers, carrying wood and brick, and accom
modating excursion narties. TheBetsy is now
on the ways undergoing extensive repairs. She
is to be materially lengthened, changed from a
side to a stern-wheeler, and made a new boat,
in fact.
Capt. John H. Reaney operated his St. Croix
line during the season with his usual energy,
though his business was greatly interfered with
by the very low water. Nothing daunted, how
ever, he is preparing to enter upon the season
of 1870, in better Bhape than ever before.
do this he is having the steamer Kent lengthen
ed out and generally remodeledin fact, made
a new boat, and in every waybetter adapted to
St. Croix navigation than ever before. The
Maggie Reaney, a new boat last season, is also
being lengthened out to lighten her draft. Th
work is being done at a Crosse.
During the winter the Keokuk-Northern line
boats will be generally overhauled and put in
first-class shape at their yards in a Crosse, for
the season of 1879, which the company expects
to make a lively one.
Busy as bees at Merrill's.
Perhaps They WiU Prove Murders.
Yesterday, in the municipal court, two cases
were called up, which may eventually develop
into murder cases. Th first was that of Wm
Proetz and Henry Werner, charged with an as
sault last Saturday, on the person of George
Werner, step-father and father of the de
fendants. Full particulars of the family row
were giv en at the time of the assault by the
GLOB E. From time to time the case has been
postponed when called, owing to the iuiuries
inflicted upon the elder Werner. Yesterday,
when the case was called, a certificate from Dr.
R. Stone was presented, setting forth that old
rnan Werner could not appear, and was in a
very dangerous condition, the result of the
brutal treatment inflicted by his sons. Th
ease was continued to the 231 inst., Proeta be
ing held in $1,000 bonds, and yonng Wcr-ier in
i$5l)0. Both were committed to jail in default
of bail.
The second case was that of Olef Roos.charg
erl with assaulting and throwing I. Ronnington
down an out-door stairway at Mrs. Peterson's
murderous den on the corner of Rosabel and
Fourth streets, a few nights aso "^.certificate
from Dr. Murphy set forth that Remington
was dangerously injured, and was unable to at
tend court. The case was put over until the
23d inst. the defendant, Roos, being held in
bonds of 8500. went to jail in default of
sureties.
Beautiful opera glasses at Merrill's.
A New Story but A Ol One.
The old story in the New fam ily, a misun
derstanding between wife and husband. Yes
terday a Mrs. New, residing on Pleasant avenue
near Ramsey street, was down about the police
headquaaters complaining that the old man
was acting like the old devil up at home. A
policeman was sent up to soothe the old
man, bu when he got there,
Old Newwas found as peaceful as a lamb. But
New took a new departure when he learned of
his wife's late movement. paid the police
headquarters a visit, and was going to raise
the old Ned because she had taken upon herself
to complain, when it was no such thing.
It seems that New has been absent fromhome
for some time without his wife's permission.
When he returned he was informed that his
room was better than his company. Th same
to you, Mrs. New, as the house is mine, etc.,
was given as a reply. Over this welcome home
the row arose. At nightfall i was supposed
that HO overt act of warlike demonstration
with shovel and tongs had been inaugurated.
Go 2 Merrill's by all means,
Don't Like It.
If it had been agood legitimate "stiff," hid
den there to conceal a diabolical crime, it
would have been all right. But being only a
doctor's plant, he is mad. Mr. Joseph Robert
sou has even worked himself up to a nausea
over the discovery that Dr. Murphy had soak
ed, for months, a subject in his drinking water.
Coffee has been steamed from that water
clothes washed in it, and since they learned of
the gplant, ffplant only, the Robertson family
do nothing but taste and smell funeral. Mr.
Robertson was in the city yesterday consulting
with the county and city attorney in regard to
making Dr. Murphy sick at law of his proprie
torship in the recently discovered lacustrine
bones.
Whether he went away as strong in stomach
as in resolution to prosecute Dr. Murphy, the
lawyers leave the public in doubt.
Note the Pact.
We take pride in having the largest and best
assortment to select from that can be found in
Minnesota, and the public may rest assured
that our goods are superior to the ordinary
class of ready made clothing, and every article
we sell is reliable in every respect. Boston
"One Price" Clothing House, 43 East Third
street, St Paul.
BOJ'B'and men's caps, only 25 cents each, at
Pannell's, 111 East Seventh street.
Venus Coral,
one of the most wonderful productions of na
ture, in form like the delicate skin of a snake,
together with a choice collection of beautiful
shells, for sale at the 99-Cent Store. sure
to examine them.
& a
church last evening.
S
^r-
tim
a
8tin
PP
ea
a
improvement of this erreat water ronte. n n. badlv smashed yesterday v a^,-
improvement of this great water route as in a
determination upon some specific plan for such
improvement which gave lair promise of both
economy in expenditure and permanency.
Such determination has been difficult to arrive
at from the multiplicity of projects advanced,
all with more or less promising features, and it
is even questioned whether the best and most
feasible system has been adopted for accom
plishes the object desired. But a plan has
been adopted, and is being carried out with
some system, and good results are being se
cured. This is the
fleet, was tied up at La Crosse, and then only
from the want of business and not from ice
obstruction.
THE BIVEB IMPROVEMENTS.
The matter of the adoption by the general
government of a systematic improvement of
government or a systematic improvement of xueWWebb-Wirtas nuu-nirr iraae wn comtehausp anoi accident eveningg, *uue, imea ana ana uniinea, tanned
CITY GLOBULES.
A very social sociable at the Jackson street
a
badly at Roc Spring
while coupling cars. came to the city and
had his wounds dressed by Dr. Murphy.
the Market hotel, opposite the market house on
i
d street an so
that street
The Ellen Wright entertainment brought out
a lar^e gathering of "True Helpers" last even
ing. The parlors of Unity church were com
pletely filled, and the audience expressed their
appreciation of the excellent performance by
frequent and hearty applause. Mi-=s Wright
was supported by the five Misses Sewall.
Thursday evening the friends of Constable
Linstead extended him a relief dance and
raffle at Armory Hall. Mr. Linstead was
recently crippled by a railroad accident.
Among the prizes was a sewing machine, which
was won by Mr. James Mullins, of the mu
nicipal court. is quite elated over his suc
cess, butno so mut-h so as his better-half.
Yesterday, Judge Nelson was engaged i
hearing the jury cas3 entitled Margaret Davy
vs. the Glens Falls insurance company. The
suit is brought to recover on the insurance
damage and loss occasioned by a fire. The de
fense !=cr
Yesterday at 5 o'clock the taking of testi
mony under the recent court order, in the mat
ter of Receiver Farley's application for the
issue of debentures to pay for the St. Vincent
and other extension lines of the St. Paul &
Pacific road, began before E Mann, master
in chancery. The new point involved is nar
rowed down to ascertaining whether the money
received for the work was actually expended
for the construction and completion of the ex
tension lines. The evidence of J. J. Hill was
taken, and completed in full.
Yesterday morning, at the St Paul & Pacific
depot, a Mrs. Pease en route to Breckenridge
became frantic over the loss of one of her chil
dren, a boy six years old. The police were
given notice, and finally the youngster was
found by Officer Murphy, and restored to the
arms of his joyful mother and embraces' of five
brothers and sisters. had walked up t'-.e
track as far as the Milwaukee & St. Paul freight
depot, and climed the stairs leading to Third
street. From thence he was working down
street, being found at the corner of Fourth and
St. Peter street.
THE COURTS.
United Stntcs Circuit Court.
|Before Judge Dillon.J
The court opened at 10 o'clock A. M.. and the
following cases disposed of, as follows:
85 and 86. City of Winona vs Alexander
Mitchell and Russell Sage. Demurrer
amended bill overruled, and defendant to plead
or answer by February.
3. Donald J. Cameron vs Chas. W. Thomp
son et al. Breach of contract. Continued.
4. W. W. Cargill vs Milwaukee & St. Paul
Railroad com? any. recover excessive
charges. Continued.
5. The same vs. same. Continued.
7. Josiah C. Mooar vs George W. Ne=bitt.
Trespass. Continued.
8. Newton Bradley, assignee, vs Merchants'
National Bank, of St. Paul. To recover prop
erty conveyed in fraud of bankrupt act. Con
tinued, andreference continued in force.
29. Charles Cooper, et al., vs. Farmers' Mill
Co., of Swede Grove. Disposed of by stipula
tion on file.
32. Ashbell H. Barney vs. Thomas McOuatt
ejectment. Continued.
39. Law Alexander Mitchell and Russell
Sage vs. the City of Winona suit on coupons.
Leave given to amend petition and add addi
tional coupons. Case continued.
R. C. Neitleton vs Benncville Mozier, al.
Demurrer to bill argued and submitted.
George W. Chapman, executor, etc., vs
George Snow, executor, etc. Motion for
new parties defendant, and tor judgment.
Argued and submitted.
JURY TRIAL.
I Before Judge Nelson.]
Margaret Davy, et al., vs. the Glen's Falls
Insurance Co suit to recover an insuranae
from damage and loss by fire.
The court adjourned to meet Monday at 10
o'clock A. u.
Municirml Court.
[Before Judge Flint.]
CRIMINAL.
appear asBOSS defendant, and Wirt as teamstenrer employed boccurred J.. O'Brielast
Th "bos trade will come up of States from the to the South,- prosecuting witness, on the chanre of conceal- r.foff __- _:__.!,._ 334 f-nmririiuion An
eratio of State from the Nort to the South prosecuting witness on the charge of conceal
is one in which our citizens, with all the inhabl ingg mortgagedTorses!, fou iumh e Lafayette avenue, was crossing th St. Paul &
in mortgaged horses four number.
A brakeman on th St Paul & Pacific rail-
"e
The council committee on public acconnts
was to have met last night, and a part of the
Ia
dignitaries did meet. But no business was STnd^I^*
transacted, oving to the absence of Aid. San
born, chairman, who h*d ail the papers in hiss born chairman who hid all the papers in hi
left breast coat pocket.
Wabashaw street. N damage. denn g. was not in a tate to tell how
The St. Paul & Pacific railroad company are
digging a wide ditch and putting in culverts to
drain the swamp lying between their road and
Yesterday, at 2:05 p. M., an alarm of fire was
turned in from box 7 at Seven Corners. Th
fire department turned out, and when the en
gines got on the ground, it was discovered that
the alarm was caused by a chimney blaze at the
residence of John Ward, on Fifth street near
Fort street. N damage.
Thir street preparatory to filling up. Th
city should-"no put a culvert undernorth Thirodf K""U|Im aiumuaaco an uress^a
up is that at the time of the destroc-
tion of the building by fire, it was unoccu
pied, and that the policy sets forth that recov
ery under such circumstances can not be ob
tained. Thecase will be resumed to-day.
TheRev. David R. Breed will deliver a lec
ture on the "Battle of Hastings its Causes and
Eifeets," before the Young Men's association of
the House of Hope church, on Tuesday even
ing next, at 8 o'clock, in the lecture room of
the church. Mr. Breed having devoted consid
erable thought to the subject, an a care in the
preparation of his lecture, it promises to be
both entertaining and instructive. The small
admission fee of 10 cents is eharged, merely to
pay the expenses to the association.
In the balmy month of June, he sighed and
she lent a willing ear. Now, as the winter is
coming on, she fears she is not equal to the re
sponsibility, and thinks Charles Fritz ought to
give as much, at least, as his name to the com
ing event. Elizabeth Johnson, a former do
mostic in Judge Flint's household, came into
court, yesterday, and wanted to know iust how
she could bring Fritz to time. Inquiry re
vealed that Fritz had been suddenly seized
with a desire to go ahunting, and he went.
vs. Wm. Proetz: assault with in
Continued to 23d inst. Defend-
The State
tent to kill.
ant committed to jail.
The State vs. John Werner, assault and bat
tery. Continued to 23d inst. and cefendant
committed to jail
The Stat
Charles Hartmanvs. August Peterson action
for conversion. Decision filed ordering judg
ment for the plaintiff for $10.40, with interest
and costs.
Another Failure.
The ti me was short, he seized his grip sack,
rushed for the train, failed to reach it, just
two minutes late, whistled, turned about, and,
like a sensible man, went to Scott's and quietly
enjoyed one of his 25 cent dinners. 'V/
The ladies of St. Paul are unanimous in the
opinion that the best place in the city to
get good stamping done is at Mrs. Donaldson's
113 East Seventh street, near Jackson,
For real bargains, go 2 Merrill's.
Rome'* Recruits.
Rev. C. A. Von Dormenden, pastor of a Lu
theran congregation at Meriden. Steele county,
was, last Sunday, received into the communion
of the Roman Catholic church, together with
his wife, at Owatonna. is a native of
Kempten, Bavaria made his philosophical and
theological studies at Munich, and came to
this country four and a half years ago
THE ST. PAUL DAILfr GLOBE, SATURDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 14, 1878.
RUN OYER.
Gravel Train Backs Into a Wagon and
Runs Over a Man.
Anothe accident occurred last evening
aerenaant aawiru teamste employed by O'Brie in grading
this great commercial water highway,at running i the municiparl court again to-day. This which may terminate fatally. John Green, a iofof be^^S*K^.*^
^SV^B&Str^lZ0u^0^F^e
Pacifi when
ittU
1 "t "d- wnen a gravel train was backineg up. Th ed Jack Burnettr, had his lef han train struck Green' wagon and threw imills,
the horses over the embankment, and toBsed
Green te feet into the air
The unfortunatrront
"sfa
out to the residence of the luckless man and
found hia bed by some twenty
an neighborstimes was evidentls sof
iatl ve
gled
drain the filth hole lying \"w'
f.
The Merchanis hotel has a steam elevator
with all the modern improvements, with rooms
graded from $2.50 to $ 3 00 per day. Th
following were among the arrivals yesterday:
W. Mendleson, Milwaukee W. Yale, Wi
nona W. Holm, Lake City J. C. McCheer,
Red Wing H. Barton, Hudson A. Bates,
Prescott F. E Alexander, W. P. Hopkins, St.
Louis E G. Halle, E Cohn, Milwaukee M.
B. Wood. Winnipeg E Jones, Winneconne,
Wis. B. R. Burroughe, Edwardsville
Drew, Owatonna Davis, J. Bryan, M.
Carpenter, Minneapolis Mrs. Teal, Eyota
E. Condeny, Rochester C. McGrath, White
Bear C. E Bortwick, Duluth W.
Tonne, New York C. Prior, Minneapolis
W. S. Johhson, Milwaukee Durwell,
Rock Island W. Myers, Pennsylvania A.
Davis. Chicago C. Michel, a Crosse Cur
tis, Stillwater E Condery, Rochester J. X.
Ormsby, Milwaukee L. Houde. Little Falls J.
M. Kittle, St. & S. E railway J. 8 Win
ston, Ft Stevenson Russell, Chippewa
Falls S. Merrill, J. C. Gault, Milwaukee C. E
Freeman, Hastings.
Probably
the best assortment of shirts, towels, napkins,
trunks, valises, satchels, pocket books, piper.,
pocket and table cutlery, glove boxes, work
boxes, dressing cases, toilet sets, vase?, fancy
soaps, perfumery, etc., will be found at the
99-Cent Store.
Gentlemen's neckwear and jewelry at Pan
nell's, 111 East Seventh street.
Ladie p.
For fine underwear, hose, collars and cuffs,
silk, linen and cambric handkerchiefs, neck
ties, nubias, kid gloves, hair switches, and a
general assortment of goods for ladies' wear
goto the 99-Cent Store.
Look in want column for auction sales by
T. Kavanagh.
The Public
should know that we have the largest variety
of holiday goods to be found in the city. N
trouble to show goods au give prices. Call
and examine before the best goods are selected
and laid aside. WHITE, STONE & Co.,
Book Store, 87 East Third street.
The Public
should know that we have the largest variety
of holiday goods to be found in the ity. N
trouble to show goods ami give prices. Call
and exami ne before the best goods are selected
and laid aside. WHITE. STONE '& Co.,
Book Store, 87 East Third street.
K, fauiu
ornaments, etc.
nrnimo
Defendant com
tery. Continued to 23idn inslt
mitted to jail
The State vs. John Kelly attempted larceny.
Held to the grand jury and committed to jail.
The Ci.y vs John Proctor vagrancy. Com
mitted to jail for thirty days.
CIVIL.
Twenty-one meal tickets, $3.50 single meals,
25 cents, at Williamson's, 67 Wabashaw street.
Fine Pocket Books,
Work Boxes,
Papeteres, etc., etc., at
JULIUS BUECHNER & SON
60 West Third street.
Best white dress shirts at 1.35 each, at Pan
nell's, 111 East Seventh street.
N
All persons buying a pocket book or work
bux amounting to onedollar can have their
name gilded on the same, free of charge, at
JULIUS BUECHNER & SON,
60 West Third street.
The Public
should know that we have the largest variety
.Sd fo^s"SSL" **i Soods. to be iound in the cityJ, N
trouble to show goods and give prices. Call
and examine before the best goods are selected
and laid aside. WHIT E. S N & Co.,
Book Store, 87 East Third street.
A Cheese Failure.
UTICA, N. Y., Dec 13.It is E Sage & Co.,
of Ne Eerlin, not Lull & Sage, as at first re
ported, who have failed in the butter and
cheese business. I is believed now that the
liabilities are not as extensive as were at first
supposed, and the prospect of meeting their
obligations is more encouraging.
DAILY WEATHER BULLETIN.
OFFICE O OBSERVATION, SIGN AL COBPS, TJ. S. A.
INGEBSOLL BLOCK, THIRD STREET,
PHI
tan
railroad track near the Cit
gravel train was backing up. Th
man fell across the
wheeI
ou
ni,neighbors. evidently sof
andat his mi nd wa wan--
dering the accident occurred. The injuries
of the man so far as ascertained,
are botm legs broken, the righst one has the
Bas &ed, and the other i terriblv man
thknee. reporter was told that the poo above8
the Callin on Dr
ou
Murphyr
who was promptlJ in attendance and dressed
iellow had received a severe shock to theUV.l?O.R
severe shock to l\e
system, from which the doctor fearehda the
He thought ifJh-survived^ the shock there was ______^__
amneut0aft/dC
0
ery- A
TO tworst.
amputated this morning if the man sufficient- Jj
ly rallies. The other leg the doctor hopes to
save. Th man, however, is greatly prostrated
and is suffering terribly.
The flag man says that he warned Green not
to cross and he does not know why he persist
ed, unless it was that he thought the train was
going the other way. The double track Beems
to confuse people greatly.
FUKSONAL.
Hon, Wm. Yale, Winona, at the Mer
chants.
Hon. Gordon E Cole, Faribault, at the Met
ropolitan.
S. DeLavirge, Esq., Milwakea, is at the
Clarendon.
Col. C. A. Lounsbury, late of the Bismarck
Tnbune, is visiting friends in St. Paul and
Minneapolis.
"Sut." Winston, sutler at Fort Stevenson and
mail contractor between Rismarck and Fort
Keogh, is domiciled at the Merchants. Every
body knows "Sut.," and of course his time is
fully occupied.
Hon. C. Gilfillan, who has been visiting
Eastern friends, has returned, and is now
busily engaged in reading the late issues of the
GLO BE to post himself in reference to the rail
road imbroglio.
Wm. M. Ferry, Chicago, vice president of the
Chicago & Northwestern railway, and E W.
Winters, Hudson, superintendent of the West
Wisconsin division of the same company, are
at the Metropolitan.
At the Clarendon: Sterling, Mil
waukee J. Anderson, Milwaukee" R.
Currie, Ne York Henry Evans, Red Wing
W. G. Wallace, Detroit M. V. Knight, Belknap
Mrs. J. C. Perry and family, St. Louis Maj.
G.M.Gage, City T. Hobart, Preston S.
Morgan, Milwaukee N. Searles, Hastings.
The following were among the arrivals at
the Metropolitan yesterday: W. Musson.
Buffalo C. S. Tappen, Rochester J. W. Allo
way, Winnipeg N. H. Jones, P. N. Skinner, W.
B. Cornell, Robert Warren, Wm H. Ferry, T.
F. Lewis. Cbicags Gordon E Cole, Faribault
John A. Bowman, Detroit Robert Lenox Bel
knap, Ne York E. W. Winter, Jas. F. Spen
cer, Hudson Geo. W. Flower, Watertown, N.
Y. S. Ii. Gault, city L. R. Fluke, F^armington.
ST. PAUL, ML\N.
Observations taken at the same moment of
time at all stations.
Meteorological Record, Dec 13. 1878, 9:56 p. M.
Bar. Ther. Wind. Weather'
Breckenridge..30.52 3 N
Duluth 30.44 12 NWCloudy.
Pembina 30.51 6 S
St. Paul 30.37 19 N
Yankton 30.52 17 NW
Cloudy.
Cloudy.
Cloudy.
Cloudy.
DAILY LOCAL MEANS.
Bar. Ther. Rel. Hum. Wind.
30.415 21. 5 77. 7 N
Weather
Cloudy.
UUJ
Amou nt of rainfall or melted snow, 00 max
imum thermometer, 29 minimum thermome
ter, 16.
"K^^-'SP &'>?W' ^f
?V J* LEWIS, I
Sergeant Signal Corps, U. S.
a
1
AUCTION SALES.
3O
PINE BLACK BUFFALO BOBES AT
AUCTIONI will sell at my salesroom, at
o'cl ock this moroiDg, a large lot of fins black buf
falo robes lined and and unlined tanne and un
tanned. These robes are conceded to be the finest
in gradin 'VT^TY^GST
K(\fi
AT
orrhi tn train
passed ove before the
rail i front of th train
anr
*J%fJ *o
P^f
1 "avenue
ae
ond
hn"
reslden c.
Farnn
nea
At 10 clock last night an alarmof fire was is badly injured. A GLO BE reporter hastened
turned in from box 13, at Engine house No. 1.
The big blaze which called the fire department ,surroundeedwa
out. belched forth from the foul chimneys of frelative^eatly,d
Th horses
were thrown one vn top of the other, and the
smashed-up wagon on top of both. On horse
ouiiwusu-up wagou un 01 DOLQ. vjne norse
Commissio Auctioneer.
OUNI)S ALL WOOL YAKN A
0\f\J TIONI wiii sell at my salesroom, at 10
o'clock th morning, about 500 pounds all wool
yarn, assorted colors.
P. T. KAVANAGH,
33 4 Commission Auctioneer.
TENTION- P. T. Kavanagh, commission auc
tioneer, sells athis salesroom, at10:33 this A. M.,
one very fine black walnut parlor suite, a lot of
second hand furniture, etc., etc., a large lot of winter
apples, also one span of good mules, several horses,
wagons, harnesses, etc., etc.
P. T. KAVANAGH,
334 Commission Auctioneer.
AUCTIONacres
SALE OF 2 LOTS on Dayton's Bluff,
and 10 near the city, in McLean township.
H. S. Fairchild will sell to the highest bidder, TO
DAY, at 11 A. M., lots 9 and 10, of Hock 33, of
Lyman Dayton's Addition, and 10 acres in section 3,
town 58, range 22,near the city. Sale at mv office,
opposite Merchants Hotel. Teims, one-third cash
balance in one and two years.
H. S. FAIRCHTLD.
333-334 Beal Estate Agent and Auctioneer.
FOR RENT.
|7lOR KENTA handsomely furnished room, cen
trally located, suitable for one or two gentle
uen KentE low Inquir at GLOB E office SAL-A good paying Xews and Stationery*y'27
FOE SALE.
business, now paying glOu PER MONTH PROFIT.*
Cash capital required, S700. Will consider no prop
osition from parties without the CASH. Satisfactory
reasons for gelling will be given. Address, BUSI-
NESS, P. 0 box, "N," St. Paul. 333-312
I
~\OIl SALETwo standard size Brunswick & Balke
Billiard Tables, in good condition. Call a
GRUBER'S HOTEL, Seven Corners. 313
FOR
SALESeveral pair of black, white and grey
rabbits, will be sold cheap. Apply to John Hof
fert, 221 Jackson street. 310*
WATCHES AND JEWELRY.
TT/-ATCHES AND JEW'ELltYBargains offered
in this line of goods to select from for the
Hobdays. Ladies' and Gents' Gold Watches, Beau
tiful Necklaces with .Medallions, Lockets,Crofcses, Etc.
Stone, Cameo and Diamond Rings.
Fine Watch Repairing do' and satisfaction guar
ant ed at MAX W1TTLESHOFER, Jeweler, 36
Jackson street, in Merchants II tel. 3-28-345
ESTRA.Y.
I/1
STRAYAn estray cow has broken intorayprem
I i ises, situated between the How and Harvester
Works. Owner cau have Ler by proving property
and paying cbargis. LEO E3CHBACH.
St. Paul, Dec. 11, 1S73. 3S2-4
PERSONAL.
HAVE
YOU WEAK OR SORE EYES, caused by
cutarrli or son:e poisonous disease of the blood?
If you have, lose ao time, but cleai.se your blood
with Dr.j. B. Haliiday's Blood Purifier use in con
nection the Catarrh Iuha.ant. It will positively cure
even the very worst cases ot catarrh the one acting
constitutionally and the other locally, being the only
rational and successful treatment of this disease
which it is generally conceded cannot be cured by
local applications alone, but must be reached through
the blood, which must be cleansed and purified In
Kidney and Uriuary disorders it not only affords a
speedy relief, but effects a certaiu cure. If you are
in need of a remedy for the cure of any disease of
the blond, give the Biood Purifier a trial and you will
be satisfied with the result if you ?.renot, the money
will be refunded. Ask your druggist for it if h,
does not keep it he will order it for you, if not, I will
send it to you free of express charges on receipt of
price. Keware of counterfeits. See that the name
of H. BLACKFORD is blown in the back part of
every bottle. If you reside in the city or vicinity
call ht my office and get a bottle of the Blood Purifier
If it does not benefit you it will cist you nothing
Call or address S. BLACKFORD, l-if, West Third
street, St. Paul. Noyei Bros. & Cutler, Wholesale
Agents, St. Paul. Crosman & Plummer, Sole Agents
for Minneapolis. lsatfcmtf
TAILORS.
aMtfon
TH
FINE MERCHANT TAILOR,
1 05 East Third Street
llr,- 24
F. PUSCH,
Fine Me rM Tailor ani Draper,
COR. ST. JPETEK & NINTH STS.
314
FURS.
Furs, Furs.
MERRELL RYDER,
55 Jackson Street,
Offers a full and complete assortment of SEAL
MINK, and all classes of Furs. Also a splendid line
of SILK WRAPS, at prices to meet any demand.
327-351
LAND SALE.
:PTJ:B:CIC SALE
OF
UD LAIS!
In Minnesota.
In compliance with an act of the Legislature ofthe
State of Minnesota, approved March 1st, 1877, en
titled "An act to provide for the completion of the
lines of railroad commonly known a* the Saint Paul
and Pacific Extension lines," I will sell at public
auction to the highest bidde-for cash, at my office,
in the Capitol building, in St. Paul, on Wednesday,
the 18th day of December, angovernmentto from day da-y
.f
I You are Going thereafter the whole shall have beeu offered,
to have a Christmas tree go to Booth's for vonr
^ud i1H78,
ue*of
a
0 0until
ac
legal sub
Stat Minnesota, through wh.ch county the rail
uvuiu io your division*, situated in the county of Morrison aud
road is completed aud in operation.
The^e lands are advantageously situated, con
venient to settlements, are generally well watered
aud gently undulating, and consist of choice hard
wood timber laud, pine land, prairie and meadow,
and are all within ten miles aud most of them within
Bix miles of the railroad track.
Maps are on file at the Executive office, showiDg
the relative situation of these lands, and descriptive
lists of tht can be obtained by application in person
or by letter to me. J. S. PILLSBTJKY,
Governor of Minnesota.
EXPCTJTIVE OFFICE, ST. PAU L, MINN., December
*H~J- 1
333.38
DISSOLUTION-
Dissolution of Co-farjersMii.
Notice is hereby given that the co-partnership here
tofore existing under the firm name of
LYON & BUCHANAN,
is this day dissolved by mutual consent.
December 10th, 1878.
L. W. LYON.
334-35 H. W. BUCHANAN.
Not.ee of Assignment.
To whom it may concern:
Take notice, that John Schulte and Zsigo Weiss,
partners as Schulte & Weiss, of fiaint Paul, Minne
sota, have this day made a general assignment to me
for the benefit of their creditors, audi have accepted
said trust, and shall execute the same according
to law.
Dated St. Paul, December 10,18.8.
333-335 E03EKT A. SMITH.
Notice to CreditorsHearing
Commissioners.
deceased.. o wgM oiguw uui|, 1 aeceasea novzS-Sw-fri i
Before
In the matter of the estate of Israel G. Lash, de
ceased: Notice is hereby given, that the undersigned have
beeu appointed by the Judge of the Probate Court of
the county of Ramsey, State of Minnesota, commis
sioners in the matter of said estate, to receive, ex
amine and adjust all claims and demands of all per
sons against said Israel G. Lash, late of the county
of Forsyth, North Carolina, deceased that six
months f.om November 4th, 187:*,have been limited
and allowed by said court to creditors to present
then- claims to UR as aforesaid and that we will, on
the second Tuesday of every month for the next
months, (beginning on Tuesday, the 10th day of De
cember, 1878, at the office of I. V. Heard, in
Warner's ock, in St. Paul, in said county, meetto
receive, examine and adjust claims and demands
against said deceased as aforesaid.
I. V. D. HEARD,
JOHN B. OLIVIER,
WILLIAM O'GORMAN,
Commissioners of the astate of Israel G. Lash,
nov 22-5w-fr
|WWP*% I 1 1 pupjH
AUC-Commencing
prioesf
il0le
ChUdren's'lhoer AlTGoodso
INCORPORATION NOTICE.
ARTICLES OF IHCORFORATiOIf
OF THE
ARTICLE 8ECOND.
The time of commencement of said corporation
is the 1st day of December, A. D. 1878, and uhall con
tinue for ninety-nine years.
ARTICLE THIRD.
PAWHBEOKEE'S SALE-
The amount of capital stock of said corporation is
Five Hundred Thousand ($500,000) Dollars, to be di
vided into shares of fifty (.850.00) dollars each, to be
subscribed from time to thce.as the Roard of Directors
may determine: provided, however, that said com
pany may commence business when the amount of
five thousand ($5,000.00) dollars shall be subscribed
that stock may be subscribed by and issued to towns,
counties, cities, or any municipality, voting or giving
aid iu bonds or. otherwise, for the construction of said
railroad, or any part thereof.
ARTICLE FOURTH.
The highest amount of indebtedness or liability
to which said corporation shall at any time be sub-
ject,' shall be two hundred thousand ($200,(X)fl)
dollars.
RTICLE FIFTH.
The names and places of residence of the persons
forming this association, are:
Canute Anderson, of Grantsburgh, "Wisconsin.
Frank H. Pratt, of Rush City, Minnesota.
W. H. Wynkoop, of Rush City, Minnesota.
H. P. fcobie, of Rush City, Minnesota.
Thos. Flynn, of Rush Citv, Minnesota.
P. H. Flynn, of Riwh City, Minnesota.
J. J. squires, of Rush City, Minnesota.
J. B. Martell, of Rush City, Minnesota.
M. T. Spooner, of Rush City, Minnesota.
E. A. Umland, of Rush Citv, Minnesota.
C. W. Smith, of Rush Citj% Minnesota.
S. C. Johnson, of Rush City, Minnesota.
Gustav Victor, of Rush City, Minnesota.
ARTICLE SIXTH.
The government of said corporation shall be vested
a board of seven (7) directors, to be elected an
nually, by the stockholders, on the first Tuesday of
December the first election by the stockholders to
be held in 187:1, unless otherwise provided by tho by
laws of the company. The names of the first board
of directors, who shall hold their offices as such until
their successors are elected, and enter upon their
duties as such, are:
Canute Anderson, Frank H. Pratt, W. H. Wynkoop,
J. B. Martell, J. J. Squires, H. Robie and Thos.
Flynn.
TO BE SOLD A.T JUJCTION!
Thursda
At No, 41 JacksonW Street. Opposite Mercians Hotel.
S
ARTICLE SEVEN.
The number and amount of the shares of stock of
said corporation is ten thousand (10,000) shares, of
fifty (50.00) dollars each.
In witness of all which, we have hereunto set our
hands and Beate, this 28th day of November, A.
D. 1878,
CANUTE ANDERSON, 5 shares.
FRANK H. PRATT, 5 shares.
W. H. WYNKOOP, 5 shares.
H. P. ROBIE, 2 shares.
THOMAS F. FLYNN, 2 shares.
P. H. FLYNN,
J. J. SQUIRES,
J. B. MARTELL,
M. T. SPOONER,
E. A.UMLAND, M. D., 1 share
CHARLES W. SMITH, 1 share
S. C. JOHNSON,
GUSTAV VIETOR,
exUbiUon
All Solid Leather Goods! Hew and Latest Stales! Only CompleteH Stock io the State!
LARGEST RETAIL SHOaE HOUSE IN THE CITT
STRICTLY OrTE- PRICE.
Gii Mi Ml Cit & Sait
ny.
ARTICLE FIRST.
The corporate .name oi'^ths Corporation hereby
created or formed, is "The Gratdsburgh, Rush City
aud St. Cloud Railroad Company." The general
nature of the buHiness of said corporation is the lo
cation, construction, operation, repair and maiutain
ance of a line of railroad within the State of Minne
sota, commencing at a point in the River St. Croix,
on the lint- between the State of Wisconsin and Min
nenota, at a point of junction with the line of railroad
of the St. Cloud, GrantsburBh aud Ashland Railroad
Company, now being constructed between Grants
buryh aud the St. Croix River, in the State of Wis
consin, ther.ee extending westwardly from said river
Chisago county to Rus-h City in said county, thf uce
through a portion of said couutv, by such feasible
route as may be adopted, to Cambridge, in Isanti
county, and thence in said last named county to
Princeton, in Mille Lacs county, and from Princeton
to come convenient point on the line of the St. Paul
and Pacific Railro.d, in the county of Benton, and
thence to the city of St. Cloud, in Stearns county
to construct and operate the same, or such parts and
sections thereof as said corporation may be enab.ed
to construct, and to charge reasonable tolls and fares
for the transportation of persons and property, and
legitimate railroad business connected therewith.
The principal office and place of business of this
corporation is Rush City, in said Chisago connty.
Ev'g, Dec. 12,ta
an be purchased
an
0
BOOTS & SHOES.
LAEGEST STOCK IN THE
307-37
Seal.'
"Seal.'1
Seal.' Seal.
Seal. Seal.
Seal.
'Seal.
Seal.
'Seal.
SeaL
.'Seal.'
Seal.
2 shares.
2 shares.
2 shares.
1 share.
2 shares.
2 shares.
STATE OF MINNESOTA,
COUNTY OF CHISAGO, -88
November 28th, 1878.
Before me, a notary public, within and for the
county of Chisago, this day personally came Canute
Anderson, Frank H. Pratt, H. P. Robie, Thos
Flyun, P. H. Flynn, J. J. Squires, J. B. Martell!
Chas. W. Smith, S, C. Johnson, Gustav Victor, E A.
Umland and M. T. Spooner, above named, aud ac
knowledged the above and foregoing instrument to
be then-voluntary act and deed for the purnoaea
therein expressed. W. H. WYNKOOP,
Notary Public, Chisago Co., Minn.
STATE or MINNESOTA,
COUNTY OT CHISAGO, gg
November 28th, 18.8.
Before me, a village justice, of the village of Rush
City, Chisago county, Minnesota, this day personally
came W. H. Wynkoop, above named, and acknowl
edged the above and foregoing instrument to be his
voluntary act and deed for the purposes therein ex
pressed. J. JJARTELL,
Village Justice, Rush City, Chisago Co., Minn.
331-336
WORSTEDS.
Mrs. 0. Herwegen.
Berlin and Paris Sillc
and "Worsted ICmtyroideries.
BERGMAN'S ZEPHYR WORSTEDS
Yarns, Canvas, Chenilles, SiRcu, Beads, Fringes,
Laces, Braids, and every article reouired for em
broidery work, stamping, &c. Agency of "Domestic"
Paper Patterns.
305,201
328-34
NOBTHWEST*'**M''9eidaL
Brt
Id
11S
i
8 i
ri 1
Mo. 59 East TMrd St., St. Paul.
HOLIDAY GOODS-
8
Gent8
fo
Shoe
GO 2 MEEEILL'S! I
PIANOS.
IMPEEIAL PIANOS!
Only $275 for Piaoo, Stool and Cover, on payments of $10 per month.
Best bargain Northwest. Hundreds sold! Every Piano Warranted
Five Years-
:(DYER & HOWARD, 69 E. Third St.
5
CROCKERY.
FINE
Crockery!
HOLIDAY GOODS,
Craig & Larkin,
Kasfc Third St., St. J?aul.
A -:ir
JEWELERS.
Holiday Goods.
nmnm JEWELER,
llllilol^ 57 East TMrfl Street
ST. TALTT
SHIRTS.
OOE & FRANCIS
fflRT and~
JS West
UNDERWEAR
Made TO Order.
Third Street, St. Paul.
309-51
r"
HATS AND CAPS-
THE
Ii HA I
Tho only exclusive
Hat Cap Estalslment in St. Paul.
NEW
Holiday Styles,
IX MEX'S, BOYS' AXD CHILDREN'S
Hats, Caps and Purs.
Lowes Price in tte City.
Opposite 3?ost Office.
BOOTS AND SHOES.
O. POLSON,
FASHIONABLE
Boot and Shoe Maker,
NO. O WEST T1ILHI) STREET,
Having purchased the entire business of Mr. J. A.
Hood, including all his measure boots and private
lasts, will spare uo pains to givb entire Hatihfaction to
his patrons, and respectfully solicits their orders.
304-: 5-4p
TEAS.
TEA S COFFEES!
Large assortment of
N EW GOODS
AT
GJ-x'eatly Reduced 3?rices.
Atlanti Pacific
Tea Company,
31 1-2 East Third Street, St. Paul.
Persons who desire can buy their Teas in 3, 5, 1
and 15 pound packages. 311-341
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS.
JUST EECEIVED!
A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF THOSE
ELEGANT
207
C. MUNGER'S
7 1 EAST THIRD STREET.
FUEL.
NORTHWESTERBJDEL COMPANY
iC0AL,C0KE&W00D
General Office, 112East Third Street, St Paul
28 WEST THIRD STREET, ST. PAUl Branch Office, 29 East Third 8treet. St Paul
0
te SSiS.iS&
Distributing Docks at Duluth and Milwaukw
1
ae
t
fi

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