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Daily globe. [volume] (St. Paul, Minn.) 1878-1884, July 05, 1883, Image 5

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025287/1883-07-05/ed-1/seq-5/

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A GREAT F Ami.
A'aphtfr and Solving from 40,000 Acres.
[From the Agricultural Review.]
The largest farm in the world is Mr.
Hiram Sibley's 40,000-acre Burr Oaks
farm. It is situated in Eastern Illinois,
nl »out sixteen miles east of the Chicago
ana Alton railroad, one of the best or
ganized and equipped lines in the State,
and about 100 miles south of Chicago.
It is what was formerly known as the
Sullivant farm, and has the most ex
'■■■ oded reputation of any in the country
Its original proprietor, Mr. M. L. Sulli
v:mt, removed from Columbus, Ohio, to
Champaign county, HI., about 18G0, and
there started the Broadlands farm of
25.000 acres. In 1861, having previous
ly located a quantity of land in Ford
•county, that State, where Burr Oaks is
mainly situated, he sold the Broadlands
farm to John T. Alexander, who subse
quently failed, and, removing thither,
established himself in a small hut and
commenced operations. He added to
the tract, by purchase, until he had se
cured over 40,000 acres. Some of the
original land was bought as low as 50
cents and 61.50 an acre.
Mr. Sullivant had conceived the idea
that he could produce corn at a cost of
12 cents per bushel, and he devoted all
hi-< energies to its realization. He be
gan at once to break up the land, em
ploying a large force of men and teams,
and -.-'anting it as fast as men and j
means could do it, until he had at one
time 18,000 acres in corn. One crop,
that of 1871 aggregated 000,000 bushels
aud required 2,000 cars to carry it to
market. The work on the farm was all
done by hired labor, as many as 400 i
men being employed at a time, all of
whom were lodged and fed on the !
premises in buildings put up for that
purpose. His ambition was to be the
largest grower of corn in the world, as
well as the greatest farmer, and ho
would allow no settlement on the place
nor ire out any of the land. The
policy was a mistaken one; no man
could farm on each a scale successfully
by hired labor. His interest account
on borrowed capital was enormous : the
breaking up of the land, draining and
erecting buildings required large ex
penditures, and increased the original
cost greatly, while land bought later,
costing from $15 to $25 an acre, togeth
er with the improvements, made a still
higher interest account, so that the
largest results from the land were nec
essary. His system only interested
himself. Manufacturing and many
branches of industry may be conducted
by a single mind where the principal
instruments are machinery, but in fann
ing there is more necessity for intelli
•gent thought, and only a small quantity
of land can be properly managed with
one man's brains.
These influences, together with three
successive bad crops, caused Mr. Sulli
vant's failure in 1877. The estate was
•carried on two years by his assignee,
and then Mr. Sibley, who had for many
years supplied Mr. Sullivant with
money to improve the farm, became the
owner. He had advanced over $500,
--'.)(»<>. and before the -assignment of
fered to throw off $100,000 of the
amount and back interest if Mr. Sulli
vant would pay the remainder, but ho
could not. Mr. Sullivant died in 1879,
and Mr. Sib:>;.- made an arrangement
by which his widow was able to retain
3,000 acres, although the estate was
bankrupt. He practically gave her
$10,000 by releasing his second mort
gage on her land, and made her com
fortable for life.
About three years ago Mr. Sibley be
came the proprietor of the farm from
circumstances beyond his control.
Instead of hiring all the labor, Mr.
Sibley adopted the plan of interesting
as many as possible in the working of
the farm by apportioning off parts of it
into tracts of eighty to 350 acres, erect
ing a house and barn on each, locating
good men with their families on them
and giving them a share of the crops for
their labor, he furnishing the land,
buildings and seeds and directing the
method of cultivation. One hundred
and forty-six farmers are thus engaged,
and 134 houses and barns have already
been erected for their use.
A CHAPTER or ACCIDENTS.
The circumstances were these : A
large firm on a prominent business
street proposed to have its store thor
oughly washed, and so sent its janitor
to get some soap. Something induced
him to invest in a keg of soft soap, and
lie started to roll it to the office. The
keg was something larger than a beer
keg and not half so substantial, but the
old man got along very well with it
until he came to a crossing. He was
rolling it along and got to the horse-car
track, when a dray wheel hit the cask,
and in a minute the soap was flowing in
every direction. The old janitor gave
a whoop of despair, and, while he gazed
at the scene of ruin, along came a
neatly-dressed drummer. He didn't
observe the soap till he stepped in it.
You know how slippery soft .soap is.
The drummer's feet shot from under
him, and he never slid two rods on his
back so quickly before in his life. He
scooped up about a pint of soap with
each trousers leg and each sleeve.
When he tried to get up he went down
again, and a policeman who ran to his
assistance went down, too. "When they
finally got on their feet each was a
sight," and the drummer said he ex
pected to throw away every rag he had
on and take two Turkish baths to get
clean. The officer was mad, and said
somebody ought to be run in, and for
want of a better person he was going
to take the drummer, out was aisiractea
by seeing a fat man come along and
let his feet fly into the air while his
head hit a paving stone so hard it was
driven an inch into the earth. Then a
man with a basket of peanuts struck
the flood and a scene of wild excite
ment ensued, the boys who jumped in
to get the nuts being piled up in all
ways. Finally a horse-car came along,
and when it struck the soap-besmeared
spot the horses went down so quick it
made the driver's head swim. He fran
tically leaped off the car and at once
went down himself, face first, and, gasp
ing, got so much of the soap and filth
in his mouth that it produced nausea,
and all the money he could afford for
| beer didn't get the taste out of his
i mouth for a week. The horses, in their
attempts to rise, broke the harness, and
there was particular perdition to pay
till the street- cleaning brigade came
along and cleaned up the soap. The
: 'janitor, seeing trouble ahead, had fled
during the early part of the proceed-
I ings. — Chicago Herald.
~ X.OOKIXG INTO A MUSKET.
Ex-Gov. Wise, who had been iap.de a
Brigadier General by President Davis,
arrived at this time inStanntonj en route
fertile Kanawha valley. Hi:, jurival
was the remote cans* oi a ludicrous inci
dent which came vtry near opeiiiag bur
campaign with an unpleasWi bv^. . Jy.
Lieut. CoL Crens-haw, who I ad gone
with me to pay out respects to Gov.
Wise on the evening of his arrival, in
vited his stall" surgeon, Dr. P«iterL>oiw,
to accompany us to cur carup, with a
promise of sardines; cig.ir.-i v.vaX other
comforts, with which :■• v.us provided;
We reached camp aN: ;ii 9 o'clock, au i
were hailed by tin '....- 1 sentinel we ap
proached, who ordered one of us tv si.l
vance and give the countersign. Unfort
unately, although having th( envelope
containing the countersign'; which Lad
been handed us by the Adjutant,' we had
not opened it, and it was too dark to read
it. We replied: "Commanding officer j
without the countersign; call the set- ;
geant of the guard." *.' That won't do, ' :
.said the sentinel. "How, mark dine!
Them's my orders." We remonstrated
against the indignity to which he con
templated subjecting his fielj officers in
the presence of a strauger, as well as
against the exercise involved in the exe
cution of his command on a hot summer
night; but he was inflexible. " Mark
time!"' he replied, "or I will certainly
shoot you," and, suiting the action to the
word, cocked his musket and leveled it
at us. We tried threats, but he was not
to be intimidated reason, but he was
unreasonable; he knew nothing, and
would neither permit us to advance or
retire, and insisted upon "doing his
duty," which was to shoot us if we di
not mark time. " He was master of the
situation, and, as we looked down the
musket barrel, we "marked time" until
the perspiration rolled from our fore
heads. We were relieved by the sergeant
of the guard, who relieved the sentinel.but
not until we had whetted oar appetite
for the expected repast by abundant ex
ercise. I supposed the man was a luna
tic, and sent for his company officers to
make inquiries. It turned out that he
had been instructed at Camp Lee by ca
dets of the Military Institute, who re
quired all who failed to have the coun
tersign to " mark time" for their amuse
ment until the guard officer appeared.
He was very much alarmed when told of
the deception which had been practiced
upon him by his youthful instructors. —
Gen. Taliaferro.
BULLS A\l) BEAKS.
The etymology of the term " bear"' is
believed to be this : When a dealer in
stocks, or for that matter in merchan
dise, had sold more than he was capable
of delivering he was naturally baro of
the article, and it was naturally his in
terest that prices should fall in order
that he should cover his engagements
and be no longer bare. From the ad
jective, the transition to the substantive
of the same sound (bear) was easy. The
growing bear being thus embodied, his
antitype, the bull, was not long making
an appearance, it is somewhat curious
to find in the popular mind a diffused
notion that bulls are the more virtuous
creatures. This is sometimes a fallacy.
The bull is usually a speculator who
proposes to gain merely by market fluc
tuation, and to fi3h in troubled waters.
The real investor, for instance, is often
a bear in spirit because he awaits an op
portunity to buy cheaply. The cotton
manufacturer who contracts to sell cloth
is in spirit a bear of yarn and other ma
terials, which he requires to buy cheap
ly — that is, unless he has already bought
too much of such materials, in which
case he has over-traded. Some amount
of speculation is no doubt good, whole
some and necessary in business. It is
only when the one party is much over
powered by the opposing party that
mischief results. — London News.
The authorized manufactory of play
ing cards in St. Petersburg is stated to
produce 24,000 packs per day. Estimat
ing the working days of the year at 300,
this gives a total of 7,200,000 packs as
the annual consumption of this article
in Russia, *
The gentleman who went off on a
vacation for rest and recreation, and to
recuperate from the toils of the year,
lias returned, and expects in about a
week to be sufficiently recovered to
work with some vigor. — Boston Post.
It is announced that science has pro
duced a new silkworm, superior to the
old brand. If the new worm will pro
duce a silk that costs no more than
calico it will fill a long-felt want. — Nor
ris town Herald.
THE ST. PAUL DAILY GLOBE. THLKSD AY MORXING, JULY 5,1883.
A NEW LEX I COX.
A Dictionary About Four Ti:::rn ns /.i. : 7
as Webster's.
There is new 3 from England vhxc]
ought more to interest and entertain :
world than any wranglings ov^r t ■•
Eastern question, shooting of crowne
heads, or the construction of tunn.
through mountains or under sens. 1 c
more than ever probable — so pr-I^..
A3 to be almost an assured fact -'..
this language we speak will possess i
the lifetime of most men now jiv:;: «
dictionary worthy of its literature ;■
its renown. A quarter of a centnrj h
the English Philological (Society uu
took to prepare such a work, pot v. .
into it, then lost its leader i a Herb?.]
Coleridge, tried again to revive thi ti.
dertaking, but failed successfully to ••
thip until 1876-9, when Dr. Munay. ;
editor, found himself possessed of n*ur
two tons of material that hid b« v *
lected before him, and the Clareuoi
Press, of Oxford, had undertaken i
publish the dictionary-. The new.«
now have is of the work that h:i
far been accomplished, and of pro<
that in ten years it will all be fin
with the actual publication this \
year of the first part, seme 460 p-< •
containing the letter "A."' The ■
began first in 1859 to make apj ■•
readers — that is, persons to read
and make quotations — and several b
dred volunteers were soon enh'sl
the cause. Other appeals hay« , ii<
time to time, been ma
until these two tons of material are i
result. Late readers have Buppli
Murray with more than 360,0
from one reader alone he got 19,
slips, and from another 10. t <';>. !
in all 2,500,000 quotations, repr<
more than a thousand readers. ] I
built in his garden an iron bui
where this material i 3 classified in ovi
a thousand pigeon-holes, and mi .
of safe keeping. Americans bave aw ■
him substantially; he finds in them "hi
ideal love for the English LiDgua; •• rs .
glorious heritage, and a pride in .
intimate with its grand memori
as one does find sometimes in a c'a
scholar in regard to Greek.'.' A
example of how great t: f ihi
dictionary will be is seen in a stat<
he makes that he finds writers conit.i !
ly engaged in laborious elu-.i,;,. i
points "of which the full explaj
lies ready at hand in our pigeon i . .
waiting to be edited and published. 1
Should the work be printed in unif ■ i
accordance with the portions now roadi
for printing, the dictionary would tiii
twelve quarto volumes of 2,000 p .-.
each; but many reductions could I ..
made in the length of quotations, re
ducing the work to about lour volume:?,
which would leave it four times the size
of Webster, and about one md one-hali
the size of Littre. Unlike most other
dictionaries, it •will thus be the work ol
many hands, instead of one; so that from
this fact, as well as from the advance
ment made in scholarship, Dr. Murray
will find it quite unnecessary to write a
preface, like Dr. Johnson's, admitting
that "a few wild blunders and visible
absurdities might for a time furnish folly
with laughter and harden ignorance into
content." — New York Time*.
SLA.CKSXITHING IX GERMAXY.
In the interior towns and villages in
Germany it has been the custom for
many years for the farmer to purchase
the iron for his tires and horseshoes,
and in some instances, when having a
new wagon built, to purchase all the iron
entering into the same, the lengths of
every piece being furnished him by the
smith. One part of the contract is that
the smith shall not return to the farmer
all ends and cuttings from the iron, and
it frequently occurs that the farmer re
mains at the shop until the iron is all
cut up, in order that the smith shall not
indulge in too much cabbage. Each
smith shop has what is termed "the
hell," and in cutting off a set of tires, if
the farmer be not present, the largest
half of the end cut off linds its way to
" the hell," the duty of putting it there
devolving upon the youngest apprentice.
From this always-plentiful store the
emitli furnishes his material for the
manufacture of bolts, horseshoes, etc.,
for trapsient customers. The horse
shoeing part is also a feature ; the farm
er will bring with him the end of some
piece of iron or tire with which to make
the shoes, or perhaps a dcz3n or more
old horseshoes to be converted into new
ones. The farmer must blow the bel
lows until the work is forged or the shoes
all made, and must then hold up the
horse's foot while tht> shoes are beiu"
driven on or taken off, and invariably
carries the old shoes home with him,
unless he prefers to give the old shoes
in payment for the apprentice's services
in holding up the feet.
Owixa to the great increase of manu
factories and the abandonment of polit
ical agitation, Poland is now called "the
Belgium of Russia."
Sergeant Oakf.i, the winner ot a
champion belt for iine-shootin^, at
tributes his accuracy of aim and < xeeu
tion to the fact that be never drinks li
quor or uses tobacco. He says : "If;,
man tries to -win the belt he must not
take anything that will make him ner
vous. He must be temperate in eating
and everything else.'"
It is said that the Anglican clergy
draw large sums yearly from taxes on
tombstones. The Vicar of Cioydon
receives $5 for every headstone erected
in the parish church.
The aesthetic lawyer spoke ironically
of his opponent n& an astute gentleman,
whereupon the opponent retorted that
he entertained a aimil^r opinion of the
other, regarding him astute, too.
CITY NOTICE.
City Treasurer's Sale.
Office of the City TnEAsrRER, )
St. Paul, Minn., June 30, 1883. )
Notice is hereby given that under and by vir
tue of a judgment entered on May 17, 1883, in
the District Court, s.kjob.l judicial district, Ram
eey County, State of Minnesota, against the
hereinafter described real estate, situate, lying
ard being in eaid rlqp and count}', on an assisi
ment warrant for
Grading the Alley through Block
31 St. Paul Proper from Robert
Street to Jackson Street,
In eaid city of St. Paul, the under
signed will on July 18, KB3, at 10 o'clock in the
forenoon, at the City Treasurer's office in the
city of St. Paul, county of Ramsey, offer for
sale at public auction as provide] by law, to the
best bidder for cash, the following described
real estate, to-wit:
Supposed owner and Arn't of
description. Judgm't.
Wm. Dbwschl. Commencing on the north
line of the alley opened through block
31 by the Board of Public Works, in
1879, at a point 100 feet west of west
lire of so-called St. Charles street;
thence northerly parallel with said St.
Charles street 2l) feet, raore or less, to a
line coiDcidipg with south line of the
so-called "Sibley Stone building,"
thenco easterly along mi 1 last men
tioned liv* 33 feet, more or leas, to
Bouthwe*t corner of land conveyed by
H. H. Sibley, March 15, 1865 ("«. G."
Deeds, page 495 J to John Nash: thence
southerly ;it rifc'ht angles with alley 20
feet, more or less to north line of said
alley; thence westerly along said north
!: • of said alley 30 fed, nwre or !• s,
to {dace of beginning, being part of lot
I, block 3 , St. Paul IV .per in the city
of S; . Paul, Minnesota $94 73
Wm. Dawson. Commencing ai southwest
comer of land deeded l>y E. 8. Oood
rirhto 11. H. Sibley, Nor. 25, 1857;
thence northerly parallel v.ith so-called
fest. Charles street 54 feet; thence west
erly parallel with Third Mreet 55 feet;
thenc<- southeasterly in direct line to
place of beginning, (except part taken
for alloy I l:ring in lot 1, block 31, St.
Paul. Proper, in thn city of Bt. Pau),
Minnesota, excepting therefrom that
part thereof deeded by said Dawson to
Adam Decker 239 87
Ectalo of Alex. Paul. Westerly 25 feet of
lot 2, blook 81, St. Paul P;oper, in the
city of St. Paul, Minnesota 72 40
Same. All thai jurt of lot 4, Mock 81, St.
Paul Proper, tying northerly of aJ'ey in
said block and easterly of the westerly
22 78-100 feet of said "lot 100 82
Mary Paul. The westerly 22 78-100 feet
of lot 4, block 3 , St . Paul Proper lyiug
northerly of alley *. . . . 66 31
All in the city of St. Paul, county of Ramsey.
aid State <.f Minnesota. GEORGE REIS,
181-184 City Treasurer.
city notice.
City Treasurer's Sale.
Office of the City Treasures, )
St. Paul, Minn., June 30, 1883. \
N< ' 3 ifl hereby given that under aud by vir
tue o" a judgement entered oe May 17, 1883, in
the IT ,;i xt Court, second judicial district, Ram-
Bey County, Slate of Minnesota, against the
hereinafter described real estate, situate, lying
and beii'.g in said city tnd county, on an assess
ment warrant for
Opening and Extending Cayuga
Street, from the end of Cayuga
Street in Ed. Rice's Second
Addition, to Mississippi Street,
In said city of St. Paul, the ondenigacd will on
July 18, 1888, at 10 o'clock hi the forenoon, at
the Ciir Trrrtisurer's office in t!:<? cHy of St.
Paul, county of llamsey, offer f«.r t lie Xt public
auction as provided by law, to Die Lost bidder
for cash, the following described real estate,
to wit:
Supposed owner and Amount of
Description. Judgment.
Joseph Nadeau . Commencing at the SW
cornei of Hennesf-v's land, thence N'lv
30 ft, thence Ely 510 ft, to be
ginning, thence Ely 40 ft, thence
N'ly parallel with V»'ly line of
said Hen', essy's land to point of inter
section with N'ly line of said Lur!,
thence W'ly aloiig north line of
said land 40.2 ft, thence southerly
parallel with W'ly line to begin
ning f66 14
Thf Pi one r Real Estate and Building
Society. All the following described
land, except part taken for Cayuga
street; to-wit: < ommenoing at SW
corner of llotneesy'e land, thence
Ely along 8 line of said land 108 ft,
thence Sly pjuallel to first line, 172 ft
to Ed Ri'-e's Stcond addition, thence
Wto SW corr.tr of Hughes' land,
thenco N'lv along faid live to begin
ring. l)-'iiii 103 ft by about 172 ft 7 09
Thos. MeNamaiß. All the following
described land, except part taken for
Cayuga street, 10-wit: Commencing at
NE corner of lbiid of the Pioneer Real
Estate and Bui'dirg Society, tkence
Sly 172 ft to Ed Rice's Second Addi
tion, theree Ely 45 ft, thence N'ly 172
ft, thence W ? ly 45 ft to beginning 394
All in the city of St. Paul, Conntyof Ramsey,
p.nd Ptnte of Minnesota.
181-84 GEGRGE REIS,
City Treasurer.
CITY NOTICE.
City Treasurer's Sale.
Office of the City Treasurer, )
St. Paul. Minn., June 33, 1883. >
Notice is hereb}' give" that under and by vir
tne of a judgment entered on June 1, 1883, in
the District Court, spcor.d ju;licial district, Ram
sey county, State of Minnesota, against the here
inafter described real estate, situate, lying and
being in sa'ui city and county, on an assessment
warrant for
Opening. Widening and Extend
ing Kittering Street, from Fen
ton Street, in Kittering & Con
stans' Addition to Third Street
in Arabs' Addition in the Sixth
Ward,
In said city of St. Paul, the undersigned will, on
t July 18, 1883, at 10 o'clock in the forenoon, at
the City Treasurer's office in the city of St. Paul,
county of Ramsey, offer for sale at public auc
tion as provided by law, to the best bidder, for
cash, the following described real estate, to wit:
Supposed owner and Am't of
description. Judgm't.
Nancy Spencer and M L Olivier, that part
of the W 30 acres of lot 5, sec 5, town
28, raDge 22, which lies 8 of Dunwell &
Spencer's addition to Brooklynd, ex
• cept that part taken for Kittering
street $6 43
E Langevin, lot 8, eec 5, town 28, range
22. except prut* thereof covered by Dun
well «!: Spencer's addition to Brooklynd,
and by Kittering & Constans' addition to
. West Bt . Paul, and except part taken
for Kittering street $6 43
Same, that part of NE %of SW % of
sec 5, town 28, range 22, which lies S of
Dunwell & Spencer's addition to Brook
lynd, and E of Eittering and Constans
addition to West St. Paul, except that
part taken for Kittering street ....... $6 43
All in the city of St. Paul, county of Ramsey,
and state of Minnesota. GEORGE RFIS,
181-184 Ci+vTrefescrer.
CITY NOTICE.
City Treasurer's gale.
Office of the City Tbeasttres, )
St. Paul, Minn., June £0 Ibß3. )*
Notice is hereby given that uuder and by vir
tue of a judgment entered on June 26, 1*33 in
the District court, Mcond judicial district. Ram
sey county, State of Minnesota, against the hers
inafter described real estate situate, lying and
be ng in said city ard county, on an assessment
warrant for
Grading Ellen Street from, Hice
Street to Dale Street,
In Bald c' y o2 St P^.7 1 , tie un
dersigrc 1 wHlcn hi'y 78S I, at 10 o'clock in
the forenoon, ai lhe< lily 'Jtaasnrei *s office in 1 1 c
city of Paul, county of Ramsey, offer for sale
at public auction as provided by low, I > the best
bidder for cash, the following d3E<;rib?d re:d es
tate to-wit :
Magoffin &Breekenridge's Addition.
Supposed owner and Am't of
description Lot Block Jngm't
J B Beck, trustee 17 3 $25 59
Sa-re 18 8 25 51)
Same 19 3 25 59
Barbara Smith 26 3 25 59
Robertson &, Van Etten's Addition
Supposed owner and Am't of
description Lot Block Jnd fa
Ada L., Hairy H.. and
Mary A Maytill.. 8 20 i?2o 59
Same 12 2'J 25 5S
Warren & Rice's Addition.
Supposed owner and Am't of
description Lot Block Judg'mt
Sam'l 11 Writali 3 24 (26 59
Estate of J. A Whitall 6 25 25 59
Same 7 25 25 59
Smith's Sub-division cf 'itinson's Division.
Supposed owner and Am't of
description Lot Block Judgm't
Victor Done 21 16 $20 79
Same 28 16 20 79
J. W. Bass 85 16 iO 79
Same 30 16 20 79
Same 87 16 20 79
Same 38 10 SO 79
Same 39 16 20 70
Same 40 16 ViO 79
Mary E. Davison 43 10 20 79
Julius Kingsley 27 15 20 79
John Peterson 29 15 20 71!
R. F. Donaldson 82 15 20 79
Same S3 15 -20 7!!
Same 84 15 20 79
Wm. Seckils 43 15 20 7!)
All in the City of St. Paul, County of Ramsey
and State of iJinr.esota. GEORGE REIS *
181-184 ( Sty Treasurer.
CITY NOTICE.
City Treasurer's Sale.
Office of tee City Teeasu^f.r, )
St. Paul, Minn.. June 30, 1883. )
No ice is hereby given that under and by vir
tue or a judgment entered on June 26, 1883, in
the District Court, second judicial district,
Ramsey county, state of Minnesota, agains: the
hereinafter described real estate, Eituate, lying
and being in said city and county, on ax* ai
ment warrant for
Opening, Widening and Estend-
ing Bedford Street from Deca
tur Street to Minnehaha Street,
In Bad city of St. Paul, the undersigned will on
'u'y 18, 188:5, at 10 o'clock in the forenoon, at
the • t>ly Treasurer's office in (he ( i(y of Si. Paul,
county of Ramsey, offer for sale at publrc auc
tion as provided by law, to t.'io best bidder for
cash, ;he fol'owing described real estate to-wit:
Supposed ostler and Ain't of
description. Judgm'U
Jas. M. PbiHips and estate of J. B. Phii
lij . deceased, that misee'laneous piece
of lind desciibed as follows: Commenc
ing etNE corner of Irvine's addition of
out lot* to St. Paul, thence E 8 chains,
thence 8 7 50-100 chains, thence W 8
chain •>, thence N 7 51-100 chains to be
ginning, except part taken for Bed"ord
street 116 50
Same, thatmiscellaneous piece of land de
scribed as follows, to-wit: Commencing
< n E line of Bedford (formerly Main I
street, 7 50-190 chains S of N E corner
of Irvine's addition of out lots to St.
Paul, thence E 6 87-100 chains, thence
S £0 degrees W 4 15-100 chains, thence
W 3 70-100 chains t E line of said Bed
ford street, thence N 2 50-100 chains to
beginning, except Decatur street and
part taken for Bedford street C 40
E. Langevin, that miscellaneous piece of
land described as follows, to-wit: Com
mencing at a point on the E line of Bed
ford (formerly Main) street at the S W
corner of land now or lately owned by
Jas. M. Phillips and estate of John B.
Phillips, deceased, thence S 165 feet,
thence E 165 feet,- thence N 25
degrees, E 177 feet to the S E
corner of land owned by said Phil
lips as aforesaid, thence W 242 feet to
beginning, except Decatur street and
part taken for Bedford street 6 40
All in the city of St. Paul, county of Ramsey
and State of Minnesota. *
GEORGE REIS,
181-184. City Treasurer.
CITY NOTICE.
City Treasurer's Sale.
Office or the City Treasueeb, )
St. Paul, Minn., June 80, 1883. J
Not : is here! given that under and by vir
tue of a judgment entered on June 26, 1883, in
the D" tr. ; ct < »ur!, second judicial district, Ram
say County, State o" Minnesota, against the here
inafter described real estate, situate, lying and
being in said city and county, on an assessment
warrant for
Opening, Widening and Extend
ing Victoria Street from Uni
versity Avenue North to right
of way of St. Paul, Minneapolis
& Manitoba E. H. Co.,
In said city of St. PauL, th<» un
dersigned will on July 18, 1883, at 10 o'clock in
the forenoon, at the City Treasurer's ' office in
the city of St. Paul, county of Ramsey, offer
for sale at public auction as provided by law, to
the best bidder for cash, the following described
real estate, to-wit: Jv"*. •■ ,*' " -*- ■',
Supposed owner and Am't of
description. Judgm't.
Alex Ramsey, E}{ of E }iof N E H of N
W %of section 85, town 29, range 23,
excepts parts thereof taken for Minne
■ haha, Thomas and Victoria streets 21 55
Same, commencing at 8 E corner of S E
J£of W\i of section 35, town 29,.
range 23, thence west 163 9-10 fret, ;V.\
thence N 1,320 feet, thence E 163 5-10
feet, thence S 1,320 feet to beginning,
except University avenue and parts
taken for Victorin aad Thomas streets. 21 55
M. A. Van Doren, the 8 E % of S E 3.4 of .
S W ii of section 26, town 29, range 23,
except parts thereof taken for Minne
haha and Victoria streets 11 45
Same, the W 188 feet of the S 283 feet of
W X of W X of 8 E )i of section 26,
town 29, range 23, except parts thereof
taken for Minnehaha and Victoria streets 3 87
All in the city of St. Paul, county of Ramsey,
and state of Minnesota.
GEORGE REIS,
181-184 City Treasurer.
CITY NOTICE.
City Treasurer's Sale.
Office of tee City Treasurer, )
St. Paul, Minn., June 30, 1683. )
Notice is hereby given that under and by
virtue of a judgment entered on June 26, 1883,
in the District court, second judicial district,
Ramsey County, State of Minnesota, against the
hereinafter described real estate, situate, lying
an being in said city and county, on an assess
ment warrant for
Opening, Widening and Extend
ing Forest Street From Seventh
Street to 35T Line of SW U, Sec
tion 28, Town 29, Range 22,
In said city of St. Paul, the un
dersigned will on July 18, 1883, at
10 o'clock in the forenjon, at the city Treasur
er's office in the City of St. Paul, county of
Ramsey, offer for sale st public auction as pro
vidi d by law. to the best bidder for cash, the
following descrlded real estate, to-wit:
Supposed owner and Am't of
description, Judgm't.
John Weber. Commencing en W line of
E Hof S W M Bee 28, T 29, R 22.
dv ant *cct S from Nllneor said
E'i'of S W 3.,'; thence 8 £0 feet:
thence E JGO feet to Greenwood avenue;
thence N 5'J feet; thence W ICO feet to
beginning, except part taken for Forest
street £g 40
Choosey P. Mill- Commencing on W
line ofE , £c?B W }£ of 28.' T 29
R 22, dklai , 7! 0 feet S a-oua N line of
said E3 ' fS W }, ', thence S 230 feet;
thence E 160 feet to Greenwood avenue
thence N 2OO feet, hence W IGO feel to
beginning, exespt part taken for Forest
street 21 55
Edith A Price. Commencing on W line
of E}£of S \\ T \i of Sec 38, T.2D.R. 22,
distant 700 feet S from N line of said
E }i of S W X; thence S 50 feet; thence
E 160 feet to Greenwood avenue; thence
N 50 feet; thence W 160 feet to begin
ning, except j)art taken for Forest
street 6 40
Amelia A Miller. Commencing on W
line of E >£ of S W J£ of Sec 28, T. 29,
B 22, distant 600 feet S from N line of
said E )4 of S W Ji; thence SSO feet:
thence E 160 feet to Greenwood avenue;
thence N 50 feet; thenco W 160 feet to
beginning, except part taken for Forest
street 6 40
C W Chfirie. Commencing on W lire of E
%c: S \V >„ Bee 28. Town 29, T^angt
-22, ('" . ;t4o:tfcetS from N line of
eldEy. of S W i 4, thence S 200 feet,
thence E ICO feet to Greenwood avenue,
thence N 200 feet, thenco W 160 feet to
beginning, except nart taken for Forest
street . 21 55
Robt Patterson. Commencing on W line
ofEXofSW^, Sec. 28, Town 29,
Range 22, distant 250 feet S from N line
of said E]4of S W }\, thence S IOO feet,
thence 13 160 feet to Greenwood avenue,
thence N 00 feet", thence W 160 feet to
beginning, except part tnken for Forest
street H 45
Susan Patterson. Commencing at a blake
200 feet S from N W corner of W 3 ,' of
E Mof «W )i of Sec 28, Town 29.
Range 22, thence S 50 feet, thence E 160
feet to W line of Greenwood avenue,
thence NSO feet, thence W 160 feet to
beginning, except part taken for Forest
street 6 40
John Weber. Commencing pt the iuterv
section of the N and W Tines of E}£ of
SW ] Cof Sec. 28, T. 29, K. 22: thence S
on W line of said E%of 8W % I'M
feet; thence E 160 feet to Greenwood
avenue; thence N 150 feet to said N line
of E3^ of SW )i aforesaid; thence W
■ 160 feet to beginning, except part taken
for Forest street 1G 50
All in the City of St. Paul, county of Ramsey
and State of Minnesota.
181-184 , GEORGE REIS,
City Treasurer.
CITY NOTICE.
City Treasurer's Sale.
Office of the City Treasurer, 1
St. Paul, Minnesota, June 30, 1883. )
Notice is hereby given that under and by vir
tue of a judgment entered on May 17, 1883, in
the District Court, second judicial district,
Ramsey County, State of Minnesota, against the
hereinafter described real estate, situate, lying
and being in said city and county, oa an assess
ment warrant for,
Construction of a Sewer on Ron
do Street from, the end of the so
called Rice Street Sewer at a
0
point about 200 feet W of Rice
street to a point about 425 feet
"W of Louis Street,
In said city of St. Paul, the undersigned
will on July 18, 1883, at 10 o'clock in the
forenoon, at the City Treasurer's office in the
city of St. Paul, county of Ramsey, offer for
sale at public auction a? provided by law, to
the best bidder for cash, the following described
reas estate, to wit:
Rondo's Addition .
Supposed owner and Am't of
description Lot" Block, Judgm't
Girard Life Ins. &
Trust Co., 10 3 $279 60
Nininger's Addition .
Supposed owner and Am't of
description Let. Block. Judg'm't
RA Smith 28 8 $69 44
Lawrence MeG rath 29 8 69 44
All in the City of St. Paul, County of Ramsey,
and !?tate of Minnesota.
181-34. GEORGE REIS,
City Treasurer.
CITY NOTICE.
City Treasurer's! Sale.

Office of the City Treasurer, )
St. Paul.. Minn., June 30, 1883. )
Notice is hereby given that under and by virtue
of a judgment entered on June 26, 1883, in the
District court, second judicial district, Ramsey
county, State of Minnesota, against the herein
after described real estate, situate, lying and
being m said city and county, on an assessment
warrant for
Construction of a Sewer on
Fourth Street from Minnesota
Street to Robert Street,
In said city of St . Paul, the undersigned will on
July 18, 1883, at 10 o'clock in the forenoon, at
the City Treasurer's office in the city of St. Paul,
county of Ramsey, offer for sale at public auc
tion as provided by law, to the best bidder for
cash, the following described real estate to-wit:
St. Paul Proper.
Supposed owner and Am't of
description. Lot. Block. Judgm't.
Sam'l C . Tatum.. 4 25 $89 72
Frank E. Clark 6 25 54 37
Estate of Thos. Shearen,
deceased, (bal.) 12 18' 39 22
All in the said city of St. Paul, county of
Ramsey and State of Minnesota.
181-184 GEORGE REIS,
City Treasurer.
liiiliißiiiiiii
Of
st. Paul - . JMiATW.
ATTORNEYS AMD COUNSELLORS AT LAW
THOMAS G. EATON, Room 50, Olln!!an Block
St. Paul. Minn. *
ZZZZZZIIA^MiTECTir^
E. P. BASSf ORD, 6e men Am*?. Br..^ itaiiaum"
H. S. TREHERNE, 0. E., 79 G'lfi-'an Block
A. D. HIS SD ALE, Presley E?oek.
A. M. RAEQLIFF, Mannlie'' rer Bock.
J. WATiTEB ETEVENS, Davidson Block, Ko'itl
25 and 26.
ABTIBTS' MATEBIALB.
SH££«UOD £ OC6H. Coj.\ Third eui Wa^a**
SIEYEM3 & EOEERISON, 15 East TfcJrJ iir*«t
St. ran). ■
BOOKS Li AliOlN >T: v
SHERWOOD HOUGH, Cor. Third and Wat«rii»*.
ST. PAUL BOOK & BTATIOKSRX 00, $7 Xm|
Third street.
~ CABSIAGEB AKD SLEIQE^ "
A. hLtTOI.'J corner Seventh and S*tii] ftrc«4i
CARPETB A.YD WALL PAFSB
JOHN Iff ATHEIS, 11 Best I'iiit J Btraet. "
W. L. AXDERSOX, £6 East Third "lr; :t
DBY GOODS— T7holeaale.
AUERBAOH, FIN'OH 4 VAN SX-yOtC, Hibla?
treet, between Fourth and Fifth.
DBY QOODS-Betail.
LINDEKE, LAPP & PP., 9 East Thirl st: »-«.
FBATHEBS AMD QIKi jtyu"
A . C. E a •i. "if , 10 Ja-.-<sf :>n Btiec* !
•~
FUKM7 (TELE, K^^g_f7fe___^ '~H
BTEES BEOS., 51 East Third street. Establish**
IV.O.
OKOCSBIgS =: Tyholegalc~ _____
P. H. KELLY & CO., U'l to 148 Ka*-. Tltirg etieet
HARD\7AEE AND TOOLsT
F. G. DRAPER it CO.. 85 East Third gtr?el
JLW£IIE3 ASP WA'iv:H» LZ.^Z- '
XRIIIj GEIST, 57 East Third etreet.
LCOKINOOLA!^- '
STEVEN3 k ROBERTSON, V> East T--'-fJ rtrMb
Et. Pr.nl.
P^VEK. '\ """ ___
V. S. WHITE STATIC CO., Kc. 7i Has"
LilH-1 t;-i-_2\
r> y-> b ariFsTAiiorTiit^. ~
T. 8. WHITE & CO., No. 71 East TMrd Btrosl
PICIOBEB AKJT?asa"i£.
STEVENS & ROBERTSON*, 10 East Third tinni
St. Pan!.
~ li!£ATToJ}£ifeV7~~ "
T. 8. WHITE STATIONERY CO., No. ji H««
Thir. J f treet. x
TBUMk"MLAi£At
CRIPPEN & UPSON, 74 East Thiro eU aoi
W. H. GARLAND. 41 East Third Bteee
~WINEB AND LiaUOBS-Wnoloaal-', ~
E. LuHLSCC, Wholesale Dealers in Llqncit
and W^>es, 194 East Third street, St. Pan).
WHOLESALE 01 * "
I EU'KOB, Wi XX& '.. i ABBOa J , t
F- ■. i .i-d st' eet. '
I WHOLESALE "HAjO-w
STRONG, HACKETT & CO., 213 to 219 K. it.l St
TRAVELERS' GUIDE.
fit.Paw Railway Time Tables
Chicago, St. Paul, Miimeanoiis
AND OMAHA RAILWAY,
"TEE EOYAL ROUTIJ."
ig^-Tbe ory luole iuudli>s' ealid trains from
Minneapolis ard £;. Fanl wK'i rcMirfm raoWat
room sleepers en ell trains to Chicago.
|2ir*Thß only line 1 auuing solid trains from BY
Paul to Council Bluf:n with l eeplog care throcgb
: to St. Joseph and Kansas City.
Le. Mums > Leuv3 a,,
DEPLETING TKAINIO. Spoils. Pilr.l
Dcs Moines fast Express.. . . , t6K)S a m 3 :30 a m
Chicago Day Express fl2:00 m i]'J.4» k . a.
Chicago & Milwaukee Ex ... '7:00 p m »7:45 p m
Sioux City & Sioux Falls. .. 48:48 a m 8:05 a m
Shakopee and Merriam Jet. *7:30 a m 8.2 1 p to.
Omaha and Kansas City.... '4:45 pm *4:05 v m
Green Bay and Apple ton ... 5:(K"i » in
Shakopee and Merriam Jet. *3:30 p m *4:05 p m
North Wisconsin & Superior t7:3u nre tS:J.O na*
River Falls f4:40 pm tSM p »
1 Ine tia'n '°.R\ivg W-ri>rn«ipolJßet 7 '!<> ) ir v.4
Bt. Peel ft 7:45 p. m, for Milwaukee and Chicago
Ist! -» ce'ebtf '•".:! fls*n«tir
Arrive iU. Ar
AssrviNa trains. Paul. BpO'Jl,
Chicago & Milwaukee Ex. . . ;6 15 m 17*0 ■at
Merriam Jet and Shakopee.. *11:55 a m *l:00 m
Chicago Night Express h:2spm *3:li' v t*,
Sioux City & Sioux Falls. .. 17:10 p m 16:40 p w
Omaha and Kansas City.... *liai) a m •11:20 am
North Wisconsin & Superior t3 55 p m H:"is p m
Merriam Jet and Shakopee.. j *7:25 p m *is 6pm
Green Bay & Appleton jl f*:10 p m +8:55 p m
i Biver Falls !\ 9:25 am tlOWm
Dcs Moines Fast Express.. . . | tll:05 p m 11^:33 p m
Lake Elmo and Still water Trains.
LEAVE HIINNEAPOLIH.
t7:80 am, 18:30 am,H9.GO a n?, 112:00 m, 11:30 pm
T4-Sop ■ 'l;Uopm,
LEAVE BT. PACJL.
t6r3o am +8:10 n m, 19:15 am, 10:15 a in, f12:45 am,
*2 i 5 » <• T«:05 p a and 7:15 pm.
T.XAVX 81XLX.WATEB FOB ST. PAUL. i, MINVftUOIIS
753 am fS: 0 am, fl2:00 m, '1:13 pm, t3:00 p m,
3:45 p m, ff:tß p m.
• Daily, t Except Sundays, t Except Mondays.
Sf-Tickets, Sleeping Car Accommodation* and
all information can be secured at
No. 13 Nicollet House Block, Minneapolis
J. CHARBONNEAtr, Ticket Agent
Minneapolis depot.corner Washington and Fourth
avenue north. W. P. IVES, Ticket Agent.
Corner Third Bad Jackson streets, St. Paul,
CHAB. H. PETSOH, City Ticket Ago&t
New Union Depot, foot of Sibley street,
KNEBEL & BROWN, Ticket AgeaU.
H. E. HAYDEN, Ticket Agent, Stillwatw.
(Uncap. Hlwattce^SL Panl Railway.
Corrected up to July 1, 1883.
Arrival and departure of through paasengor tralm
~~CSvvi» j i/ccv.»
D^PAHTIKG teatss. Mk> e"p'l! St. I £."?.
Elver Division.
La Crossc, Dubuque, Rock!
Island & St. Louis Exp. . C 4:50 am C 5:25 a m
Milwaukee & Chicago tLx .. 0 12:00 mlO 13:45 m
Milwaukee & Chicago Ex .. > A 7:00 p'm A 7:45 pm
Wabashaw Accom C 3:00 jp mC 3:35^p m
lowa & JTiiju. Division. I
South'n Minn. & lowa Ex. . 0 8:00 a m 0 8:10 a m
Calmar Accom 0 4:30 p m 0 4:30 p m
Mason City,gouth & west,ex E 6:00 pin E 7:10 p'm
Hastings & Dakota Div. |
Aberdeen & Dakota Ex .... 0 7:40 a mO 7:00 • m
Shakopee & Prior Lake ex. C 3:30 pm C 3:00 m,
Aberdeen lz Dakota express' A 7:35 ola A 7:»<; v m
j Arrive Arrive
ABBTvnra tsaine. I bi. Paul. Minneaj>'li3
River Division.
Chicago & Milwaukee Ex.. A 6:15 am A 7:00 m
Chicago & Milwaukee Ex. . 0 2:25 pa 0 8:10 pin
Webaeha Accom 0 9:53 am C 10:30 am
La Qrosße, Dubuque, Rock
Island A: St. Louis Exp.. C 10:20 p m C 11:00 pm
lowa & Minn. Division.
Mason City,south & west.ex P 7;45 a m F 8:30 a m
CalmarAccom. C 10:28 a » 0 10:36 am
Sootli'n Minn. & lowa Ex.. 0 6:56 pm 0 7:09 p m
Hastings & Dakota Div.
Aberdeen & Dakota express. A 7:80 a m & 630■ *n
; Shakopee & Prior Lake ex. C 11:30 a in 0 10:50 a m
1 Aberdeen & Dakota Ex.. ..10 7:80 pm ! 0 <; 25 p m
A, means daily. 0, except Sunday. E, except
Saturday. F, except Monday.
1 Additional trains between St. Paul and Minneapo
lis, via "Short Line," leave both cities hour'". For
particulars see Short Line time-table.
St. Paul— Chas. Thompson. City Ticket Agent, 183
E. Third street. Brows & Enebel, Ticket Agenta,
Union Depot.
Minneapolis— O. L. Scott, City Ticket Agent, No.
7, Nicollet House. A. B. Ohamberlia, Tloktt
Agent, Depot,
GAS FIXTURES.
KENNEY & HUDNER;
103 and 105 West Third Strwt,
Opposite Metropolitan Hotel
3

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