OCR Interpretation


The Montana post. (Virginia City, Montana Territory [i.e. Mont.]) 1864-1869, September 21, 1867, Image 3

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025293/1867-09-21/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 3

Wni in paris--Sunlight and Gaslght.
P! posT : Only a month in this great
. glorious city, and during that time
v hour has b.-en devoted to "sight
eg 'havling visited the Exposition
..' three days out of the thirty-and
ith .no'tl~' work marked out of the
e nature to occupy me another
Sof a city offering these attrac
,I write when I speak of-Paris.
ne a ,i where, with a resident
-a!t :a f ,ver 1 .!)0,000 inhabitants,
r -r lng:" the census of 1862), and
: o.,, strangers, everything is
.. ..- r,.ularly .nd with as little
. :n,1 where person, property
:,-,s sf, and as well guarded
s,. s::!.st village of ah eastern
an instance of the style of
" hn: re is a law of the Empe
I- i.- it is providedl that, " Any
. . et- to shore a drowning
v,. twenty-five france. it
. . and fifteen francs in case
v-:,ry provis;nn has been
:..ivrnm'int here to make
.Leautitul. best governed
. v in the world, and ow
n-;: as urel, t the nature
, ha wi-ll succeeded.
: ,.:,-ý.t- in Paris I have only
S -v ,- good will shown by
- .:,,e towards one another
.,,:r- rangers; and in no case
.-!:~an attempted the petty
, i, I had dreaded so much.
-,unts of strangers who had
, r,. and thought themselves
:. i.n in real:ty they were
-:n charges which the customs
,: r ,enianded alike of French
1.* w ith wise and beneficent
: tihe time of Napoleon I, the
'-t:, , government seems to
, n ,, irproive and beautify the
As the result, there are one
, an twenty three beautiful
Ln different parts of the city,
:,:;, :::·.:_r ,ticent parks. a hundred miles
-uri'assing Broadway; nuse
.:. s. zaleries of art and science.
:::a arc'his. gardens, squares. tow
7 ..:o. .chools. benevolent insti
S:--- rything the best and most
. its kind. It is really a mar
.- .1'. and well deserves its title
• . -: .. a1 utiful city in the world."
hi "i. city itself the great Exposi
- ..n : ,'c.in~,r of attraction is made
a r:. -: ;nexiai ibl, in richness and
I hatm a delightful trip from
! :'a, , Paris. Leaving Fort Benton
1.: I at we glidcd swiftly and pleas
:,n:' },, n the river, meeting with
:her ldian, nor accidents-reaching
- i . n ih" 17th-twi dlays to New
,rk-e.lr!: .ay., and eighteen hours on
,,,,an-- a da from Hlavre-and Paris
.u ai'C ,mplislhed point.
i, r v, ,a;ti a-ros,- the ocean was par
• - rlililhtful. ,,~owingl to tine weath
San. i: vral,le winds, a splendid yes
-,:.i un indtefatigalle captain. .We
:. , :L lnikcst voyage across upon
Sr, 1fuily one .halt of the' passengers
n liarlT our steamer (the Persia of the
I, '.ii:n escaped sea-sickness. Al
1, , ;,} I was among the most fortunate.
\: 1c.riencing the slightest indisposi
tr,,. I arn very much inclined to place
-,a - :-Kness in the same class with In
.ar I --u-lch moire dreade(l than telt.
In : .-ry v-seven days after leaving Mon.
:>n a 1i,.ro)n can be in the tower of
.\, ' t.;tIe in I'aris.
A4'm.ricans and English seem to be
.,i,., iinant among the strangers here
a" rr,.cent. I meet themnl everywhere
:. .ar l"nsr. parks and palaces': on the
:, r, te s. towers and arches, and
:, I r roind in thecrvpts and cat
:,, - rvwher. in churches, stum
i ::n=_ ,,.r tie penitent with guide took
i: i ::.:. in hand; at the French cate.
:.' .: rtd to the French language,
., ,.w i ,arbarous English. puzzling
:" ' n aiters with gestures and motions;
a "n .w mnibus top; among the work
,::, . ,:u,)king cigars in defiance of writ
S, rhiiit ions, (which they cannot
a wi 'h teet upon chairs, tables and
winda, +exploring every hidden nook
I 'ar.--they are everywhere.
T:.e -xlpo,,sition is a mammoth affair.
1 !at. a friend who has attended itdai
t :. : ..,, weeks, and who still asures
. :!.at lie never looks at the same
St, :\ic. Many persons employ small
,.;·:r·:,t in which they are hauled
,,. :,,ditltrent avenues by porters
':, :i~ve been licensed by the govern
lL.rn:· r the "business. The only
part. ,f it that I have examined at all
.ire "i.,. ,rtions devoted to oil paintings
and the I'nited States department. Al
tii,,.ugh thte United States are but poorly
r.lere-..nted in many respects, they have
S'en a. arded many of the highest pre
nifolritU Among the pictures on exhibi
:,:n ar. Bie.rstadt's " Rocky Mountains"
and Church's "Niagara." They are
btll t;inel exeeuted, and attract a great
,ial of attention. Our pianos, sewing
Imal'lhin. and an enormous steam rail
r ald e.ngine from Patterson, New Jersey,
art, gCreat ,"'ntres of attraction, the latter
eIpeciallv. which is of superior work
nlanu.hiIp and beautifully finished, took
the grand gold medal for machinery.
Francet i-. finely represented, occupying
about one halt of the entire exhibition.
In all matters pertaining to comfort and
luxury lshe is far ahead of all others. A
w ek ago I visited a place outsideof the
city-a sort of ante-room to the Expoel
tion--tellancourt. Among the speci
mens were 600 dogs, from the shaggy
Ne-wtoundland to the delicate lap dog.
Colorado took the premium for mineral
iptciruens. Montana not being represen
td. Tlhey have an enormous quantity
if rock, almost a boat load.
Of course I went to the Louvre. I
have spent three days there thus far. It
is marvelous, the quantity of paintings
which are here collected, some of enor
mous value. One especially, "The Im
maculate Conception of the Virgin," by
Murillo, only eight feet high and six
wide, on canvus, costing $1I,060 (618,
80oo. One gallery alme. (mnd thin. ae
five or six) is three quarters of a alle
long, the walls beiag eovmd oa eitLe
side with paintings from two to Ier
hundred years ola, the works of the
great masters. In this g ry are piae
twenty-two large paintin.sby Reabeas,
1389 feet, executed by command of Ma
rie de Medicis, the famous Queen Of
Henry IV.
The Garden of the Tailleries and Pal
ace, Place la Concorde, Arch of Triumph,
Bois de Boulogne, Tomb of Napoleon,and
a hundred other places are all beautiful
almost beyond description, unmatched
in the whole world, (so the guide books
sav). The Arch of Triumph is amag
nificent monument, by far the largest
work of the kind in the world. It took
thirty years and $2,100,000 to construct
it. It is 137 feet wide, 68 feet deep and
152 feet high ; situated upon a hill, it
towers above all the rest of Paris. From
the top a beautiful view is had, it form
ing the center of a radius of streets that
have been cut by Napoleon through
each quarter of the city-beautiful
streets, covered with a preparation of
cement which is as hard as rock,as smooth
and clean as the efforts of thousands of
laborers can make them, with double
rows of trees on either side, and beauti
ful stone buildings. Sometimes, as in
the case of the avenue of the Grand
Army, which extends in a straight line
nearly two miles from the Arch, being
wide enough to contain three roads and
four sidewalks, each being lined with
trees upon either side. This part of
Paris is by far the finest. By gaslight,
at midnight, when all Paris is in the
streets, it is magnificent. I have driven
in a carriage at that hour from the end
of the avenue of the Grand Army to the
Arch of Triumph, and from there to the
Place La ('oncorde, a distance of almost
four miles. The roads are like floors,
so smooth that the carriage rolls along
with hardly any noise. Every twenty
feet a gas light along each side of the
road-thousands of carriages passing
and repassing each other and filling up
the street in the distance with lights of
different colors, red, white, blue, green
and yellow-.-making a beautif ul contrast
to the row of street lamps that form
two lines of light, seemingly without
end. Tall, grand, magnificent trees
stand in such quantities on either side
of the street as to seem almost like one
continuous grove. Passing hundreds of
cafes, dancing gardens and concerts, it
was as beautiful as a fairy city, and in
one evening I was amply repaid for
coming so far to see the old world. I
attended the Black Crook in St. Louis
and New York. In Paris they have a
similar spectacle play. In everything
they far exceed the American plays.
The scenery, dancing, acting and co
tumes are gorgeous. At the French
Opera I heard L'Africaine. It was very
fine, with one hundred and fifty musi
cians in the orchestra. I also attended
a grand Euro!,ean concert of military
music. Between 400 and 500 instru
mentalists were present, representing
Austria, Prussia, Russia, Belgium, Ger
many. Spain, France and Italy. The
concert was held in the Palais de L'In
dustrie. used for the exhibition of 1855
SAbout 10,000 persons were present, the
immense building being densely packed
The concert lasted from one until seven
o'clock p. in., Austria, Prussia and Franc:
taking tlih grand prizes of 5,000f each
The Austrian and Prussian bands exe
cuted most beautiful music, especiall,
the former. which elicited round afte
round of applause which almost seeme<
to make the earth tremble, for 10,0C:
people cran make a noise it they try.
Among the characteristics of Paris-
a very peculiar feature is the dancing
gardens. They are the favorite resort of
the demi monde. Here the student and
1 the lorette, each gay, dissolute and light
hearted, neither giving a thought to pro
priety or custom, strive to out-do each
other in every extravagant action or
gesture that can possibly be set to the
tune of a quadrille, polka or waltz. A
lo(,ker-on is sometimes relieved of his
cherished beaver by the most charming
little " femme." who striking it with her
foot throws it high in the air. Before
lie can recover from his surprise and
consternation, her partner who has dex
terously caught it in its descent, hands
him the beaver undamaged. Every
*thing is fitted up in gorgeous style,
splendid music, magnificent promenades
amid flowers, trees, running waters,
thousands of gas jets among the foliage,
and along the grass plats-they are as
beautiful hells as can be produced by
money, taste and nature.
(Great preparations are being made
throughout the city to celebrate the
birth day of the Emperor with more than
usual magnificence. The 15th of Au
gust is the date. The streets are being
prepared with gas lights from the Tuil
leries to the Bois des Bologne.
I have visited their cemeteries here,
among the rest La Pere La Chaise, where
twenty-five million of dollars have been
expended in monuments. It is not to
be compared to (treenwood.
A notice of the death by drowning, at
Fort Benton. of General Meagher was
pointed out to me by an American friend.
I have heard many persons express their
sorrow at the occurrence. It was a sad
end to a great genius.
I will remain in Paris about a month
longer, when I expect to go to Switzer
land, and from there to Italy ; thence by
Spain and Portugal back to England,
Ireland and Scotland.
Truly yours, J. S. 0.
IT is not a little significant that those
precincts in Tennessee that gave the
Brownlow ticket the finest majorities
were the same as sent the largest num
ber if men to the Union army in the
war. For instance, Jefferson sent about
2,000 men into the Union army, and
gives Brownlow about 2,000 majority.
Knox sent about 1,500 men into the
Union army, and gives Brownalow 1,900
majority. Greene sent 000 men into the
Union army, and gives Brownlow 700
majority. In brief, East Tennessee sent
about 20,000 men into the Union army,
and gives Brownlow about 28,000 maw
jority. Butler's district voted 8,672 ma
jority against separation in 1861, and
gives Browlow a msjority of about 10,
000. Maynard's district gave 9,018
against separation in 1861, sad bives
Brownlow about 10,000 majority. The
Union sentiment ot 1811 sad the
Republican sentiment of 1887 are idea
tial; the men who foauht for the Uis.e
voted for Brownlow, BItler, Maynard,
mokeL THimble, sad their am ates,
---ce:-
Whole a DEA-L .
IN
Groceries,
Dry Goods,
Clothing,
Boots and Shoes,
Hardware,
Farminag
Imnplements,
Liquors and
Cigar'.
Money advaneed on merehaudise, sad goods stored
in a fire-proof wareouse.
w194 KING &L GIJETT.
IWarren Hussey, Frank Palmer, I C. L Dabler.
Salt Lake City. , Denver. IVirginia City
WARREN HUASEY & CO.,
Denver and Central C.ty, Colorado Ter.,
HUSSEY, DAHLER & CO.,
SBait Lake C(ty, Utah,
-And
Virginia City and Selena, M. T.,
AND DEALERS IN
GOLD DUST,
COIN AND
CURRENCY
DRAW RXCHANSO ON
SSan Fr anciseo.
Salt Lake,
Denver,
St. Louts,
e New York,
n -And
On All Parts of Europe.
1 Collections promptly attended to.
Virginia City, July 4th. 1866. 123"
ASSAY OFFICE
OF
BOHM & MOLITOR,
SALT LAKE CITY.
RECEIVE GOLD & SILVER BULLION
F'or
Melting and Assaying
Subject to order for reshipment Gold itraeted
from black sand. Particular attention paid to
Mineral Assys. Returns made fom six to
twelve hour after receiviog.
Our Assays we Guarantee
We Refer, with Permission, to
Messrs. Holiday Halsey, Bankers, . L City.
SNounan & Orr, "
" John . Krr & Co. " "
" Walker Bros., merants, ' "
S. Content, " Va. City, M. T.
bank of Californa, San FraIes,, Cal.
Messrs. Parott & Co. Lankers, " " "
" Sathee & Co. " " "
London & San Franelsee Bank, "
Messrs. Donahue, Kelley & Co. "
" J. Setlman & Co.,mere:eats "
" J. & Seligman, Bankrs,l ew Trk"
ASSAY OFFICE.
mr.Au LurED. ITnI TWM T IN 1862.
CHARLES RUMLEY,
ASSAYER,
56 Bridge St, Hee, M. T.
W. T. PlabrtSa, L W. Teh.
Pembertoe & Teele,
A TTORNE TB-A T-LA W
. tA. - - - - U TAEA i Ty.
r` . s"e a ae w8c3 .h' am
CALIFORNIA BAAERt,
DeerL odge City, C. T.
.EIT wES.,. - - - - Verir,
A h .. ..,m eb a s bstry, mae -
iati a ase mat to sd o
tsem. I sm alwa Is bs re *ip Mmea
wh Ure uW ahs .Me e e msmeantis, a
weli as me us tdies g
simwa now MOrEL,
Ne !.
9rpeaggrmama as v
. . mtr,
Wholesale and Retail
Nevada City, M. T.
(The old haers' Stma)
DEALER IN FLOUR,
Cos, Sagar, Bacon, Teas, Syrups,
Liquors, Tobacco, Cigars,
Etc., Etc., Etc.
s A Large and Well A.sorted Stock of Family
and
Constantly on hand, and sold at lowest make
rates.
Smanll Profits
and
QUICK RETURNS!
The "W ]nern' Store," Yet
Remember the Place !
d 141-166*
WESTERN HOTEL,
MAIN ST., HELENA,
M. IUSSIER, PROPRIETOR.
OUSE OPEN TO GUESTS
At all Hours of Dlay or NIght.
142tf
PLANTER'S HOUSE,
Gerner of Idaho and Jackson Streets,
VIRGINIA CITY, M. T.,
J. .. CHAPIN, - - - Proprietor.
TilllS well-known Hotel has been thoroughly
repaired and renovated in all its departments.
A FIRST-CLASS TABLE
will be maintained, regardless of expense, and wil
be tarnished with the choicest viands the market
affords The comfort and convenience of boarders
and visitors will be carefully attended to. Careful
and trustworthy waiters in constant attendance on
the guests. 1T7
Forman's Express!
(Successor to T. J. Cowan,)
WILL LEAVE VIRGINIA CITY EVERY
MONDAY MORNING, FOR
Sterling, Willow Creek, Gallatin City,
Morse's Store, Parsons' Ranch, Middle
Creek, Boseman City, and Elk Grove.
Will, after June lst, carry passengers and bag
gage, Ac., and after July 1st, the U. S. Mail.
By close attention to business, the proprie
tor hopes to merit the confidence and patron
age of the public.
JW-Office at J. M. Knight's. Wallace Et.
JAMES F. FORMAN, Pro's
Mar 8. 1867. 142tf
May 8, 1867. 142tf
JTO. S. SLATER,
ATTORNEY
COUNSELLOR AT LAW,
aul NOTARY PUBLIC.
Will attend promptly to all business of a lega
nature, take depositions, administer oaths, etc.. etc
"lmmediate attention given to the oollectini
of all claims against the United States. especialli
such as may arise under the recent act of Congree
equalizing bounties. Office over the store of Get
L. Shoup. corner Wallace and Jackson streets
Virginia city, M. T. 136'
Proposals.
COMMISSARY OGIwURAL'S OrrICU,
VraliA CITYrr, l.. T., Aug. 31, 1867.
S ALED proposals will be received at thi
oece until Thursday, September 4th, 1"
m., for the following Commissary stores, vli
Fifty-four thousand (54,000)pounds of flou
Thirty thousand (30,000) pounds of bacon
Seven thousand two hundred (7,200) pound
of beans.
Four thousand eight hundre4 (4,800) pound
ef cofee.
d Seven thousand two hundred (7,200) pound
of sugar.
One thousand nine huudred and twenty (1,
920) pounds of soap.
Six hundred (600) pounds of candles.
Four hnndred and eighty (480) gallons a
vinegar.
Thirty (30) bushels of salt.
Bids will be received for any or all of th
above articles. The Commissary Gener
reserves the right to reject any or all of th
bids. . J. HULL,
us------ v-"·
Uommiseary UeDeral, nOncfnS Vel.
TO FARMERS.
05 0 B(JHBELS seed winter wheat and one
5Ulhundred bOsbels winter rye for sale. Two of
the oholeest varieties of wheat known, the "White
Vietoria" and premium Red Bearded Mediteranesa,
introdooed here in 164,direetly by the oudersigned,
and now thorughly accelimated. The las erop
yielded over (0 busbels per are, the greatest yield
ever obtained east doft Roky Mountains. Neither
the grashoppers or wheat worm have ever inajoured
it, and the crep has never beea irrigated. Will
be ready for ale esly ina eptember. May be
ews last of October. Price, 5 to6 peýr bushel,
at my granary. May be had of D. C. FarwellVir
glna citty; MePhemon & Hall,Heleon: Jao Henrys,
Crow Creek Crossing, where east of freight and
sacks will be added. armers ea club teth
and semd teams to my plae* and save feigt.
White spring wet.No. 1, sand Amerem stoa
cash pri takoen in exchangee at my lanh, three
miles below Baseman, East Ualatin Rvoer.
L. B. LYMAN.
Angt Ias, 18t. wvlZi-t
LEA. F. WMARSTON,
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER
ar. of Jes 4 WIlees 1s.. Firgini Ci, M T.
C ONSTANTLY keeps on hand, and akes.o or
der, re Native Gold, all the latest styles of
Jewelry.
'Parcoolar atetleon pad to repairing Watakes.
130
STAR IRESTAUIRANT,
as. lloott, Isroprietor,
Blackitoe City, esutam.
BOAR tday or week. The sabosiaways
awe ith deheaeik ort as sme.
W. W. In LACY,
C OU=TY =SUZY OR-4.e: a* Me tete. s -
ro res., aL er te Is . i1embL sr
U as will be s.eady at an ti .
m- IdteP1m, * asaI d make
at.Mte mm.. lS e - i_
****1L -ne " -ar -nae s
cig & Co.'
BOOTS!
- AND -
SHSOES!
:NEW STORE
NEW GOODS
New Prices!
HAVING REMOVED to the large Store, three
J doors below Content's Corner. we have open
ed out an immense stock of Gurney & Co.'s well
knows
BOOTS AND SHOES !
and made
Large Reductions!
in prices of our own make of goods; atd have the
following :
Kip Minlng Boots at - $8.00
Kip Mining Boots at - 7.00
Leag Leg Grain Boots at 6.0O
Double Sole Calf Boots at 7.00
Double Sole Kip Boots at 6.00
The ldi ,
Childrens' and Misses'
Depar1men1
Is supplied with a stock unequalled is the mean
tains icr quality and variety.
Hayward's Double Sole Rubber Boots
Leather and Findings I
r D. H. WESTON.
Virginia City, M. T., July. 18?7. (iy231)
- Virginia City, . T., Jnuly, 17 (ly Sp
gD , CLARKSON CO
.l
0.
" (Olinehouse & Co.'s Old Stand.)
0.
commission Me'tel
2,
s:
r.
n.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
ds
be
p -
UD DALER S13
'Wines
AND
Nhwea. WashdJa.t sW
pia~ !k, Etaw
myl:Sw~tf
Jno. How' Colruna
JOHN HOW,
muw .1 IbMA 0" Am.a aw
Vrginia City, M. T.,
WHOLESALE DEALER
I
Mozrchandisel
U.m.pemd is quarty a, d vauO*
IN THE TERRITORY,
DRY G OOD s,
CLOTHING,
Hats and Cans.
BOOTS AND 8IOI.ES,
* Ladies' Furnishing Goods,
Gents' Furnishing Goods,
SADDLERY, LEATHER,
SHOEMAKERS' FINDINGS,
GROCERIES
CASE GOODS.
QUEENSWARE,
WILLOW WARE.
WOODEN WARE,
HARDWARE
QUARTZ MILL TOOLS,
BELTING,
_IYDRAULIC HO0..
IRON AND ST.EEL,
(All sizes
Agricultural Implements,
And something never before brought
into a Montana market, viz :
Oak and Ash Lumber,
OF
Any size Wanted,
jW-CALL AN]) ERXAMINE
OUR STOCK OF GOODS
Arnh mybthg yes whh b n, usee .uim
QCLJLd INiOR IT.
OUR PERFECVIL
F/REPROOF WAIRE/IOUSE
4t.. .scuilty to
cONSIGNEIB ON 0011OOnE8M
I4bw 6esai .WW1 b* W4I
136 wc6- £b iwss~m &

xml | txt