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The Butte inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, May 03, 1901, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025294/1901-05-03/ed-1/seq-1/

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PANIC PRICES FOR CORN
J4J4.£
TO-DAY'S NEWS TO-DAY
' WHISKY FAMINE
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.JC JCJC JCJCJC
itEATENED \
The Butte Inter Mount (in.
VOL. XXL NO. 38
Cloudy Tonight
BUTTE. MONTANA, FRIDAY EVENING, MAY 3. 1901.
Threaten n ; Tomorrow
PRICE FIVE CENTS
S.xî/^is •xî^. -'S'.'îvî: «
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I
PATRICK MUST STAND TRIAL FOR
TUE MURDER OF MILLIONAIRE RICE
f (Ry Associated Press.)
New York, May 3.—Albert T. Patrick, David L- Short and Morri3
Meyers were arraigned before Recorder Goff today to plead to in
d ctments for forgery and Patrick to the murder of the late Texas mil
lionaire Wm. M. Rice. The defendants pleaded not guilty pending the
arguments of demurrers against the indictments. The demurrers will
b* argued next week.
Robert M. Moore, counsel for the defendants then made a motion
to dismiss the forgery indictments, declaring that the indictments
stated that the crime was committed in September, 1901, a date which
has not yet arrived and that this made the papers faulty.
Assistant District Attorney Garvin said that the grand jury had
remedied that defect yesterday by filing superceding indictments in all
four instances. The recorder thereupon refused to dismiss the in
dictments. 1
A WILD PANIC IN CHICAGO CORN PIT
PLUNGER PHILLIPS SCOOPING IN THE DOLLARS OF THE LUCK
LESS LITTLE SHORTS-RECORD PRICE FOR THE
GOLDEN GRAIN - A RED LETTER DAY AMONG
THE GRAIN SPECULATORS.
(By Associated Press.)
Chicago, May 3.—A panic, the first real
one since Phillips cornered the matket,
occurred among shorts In May corn on
the board of trade to-day. Price fluctu
ations were the most violent in years.
Having seen their losses grow heavier
and heavier with each succeeding day for
some time, tracers who had guaranteed
to deliver May corn to Phillips made
frantic efforts to get it. The price went
from 5!> to 58 cents. 4% cents higher than
yesterday's close in a few minutes after
the session began. Shorts surrounded
the bull leader and almost begged for
corn. He was repeatedly called from the
pit liy men who wanted to settle pri
vately, but he told them they had dis
regarded his offer to sell to them at 48
cents and now they would have to bid
in the open market to him. When re
minded that he himself and the "open
LONDON ACADEMY PICTURES
American Fainter, Sargent, the Leader
of the Year—Redeem Exhibit
From Mediocrity.
(By Associated Press.)
London, May 3.—A dispatch to the Tri
bune from London says:
The royal aeadeimy contains two great
and six minor Sargents and a job lot of
1,815 miscellaneous works, including wa
ter colors and architectural drawings. It
is not a great academy, but Mr. Sargent
redeems it from the reproach of medioc
rity. His most important work is the
portrait of the daughters of Mr. Weithe
mer, in which the two portraits are
thrown into the foreground while the air
space in the room behind them is indicat
ed with marvelous technique.
A WHISKY FAMINE
PRICES FOR BOURBON WILL GO
INTO THE AIR.
ALL CORNERED BY A PLUNGER
Ironclad Agreement of Manufacturers
ffe to Production Makes the Scarcity
—Chance of a Lifetime for Moon
shiners-VlO,000,000 Gallons Held
by the Speculators for a Rise.
(By Associated Press.)
New York, May 3.—There is a pending
whiskey famine, wholesale dealers say,
One large distillery and warehouse com
pany in this city has practically cor
nered the market. AVith millions of gal
lons in its cellars, a combination of pro
ducers is buying every available barrel
remaining in the market. Since the
present production is limited by an iron
bound agreement, the prevailing scarcity
may advance prices without limit.
Trust Officers .— It.
A conversation is reported between C.
H. J. M. Cardesa, president of the Stand
ard Distilling and Distributing Co., and
Edson Bradley, president of the Ken
tucky Distillers and Warehouse Co.
Mr. Cardesa accused Mr. Bradley of
having bought up in the last month
every whiskey holding in the market.
-This Bradley denied, referring to several
lots of 50 and 100 barrels each. Mr. Car
desa said they were merely a drop in the
bucket compared to the million gallons
Mr. Bradley is said to control.
PUT THEIR TRUST IN SPADES
Grave Diggers and Miners Will Be
Mulcted by the New Tool
Combination.
(By Associated Press.)
New York, May 3.—The Journal of
Commerce says: Plans are now under
discussion for a consolidation of the lead
ing manufacturers of shovels and spades.
There has been a very compact competi
tion in this trade for a long time, but
now actual merging of interests is pro
posed.
The new company may be known as
the American Shovel and Tool Co. It was
reported that options have been secured
on plants representing over ninety per
cent of the business.
market" were synonymous, Phillips
smiled.
A Sop for the Shorts.
For an hour shoits hid 58-or close to
it. Then Phillips let out 600,000 bushels
at prices ranging between 57 and 58
cents. He said it was only a drop in the
bucket compared with the quantity » till
held by him, hut it netted him a pi'ofit
of about $100,000, or approximately 17
cents per bushel. This action created in
tense excitement. It was thought for
a moment that the chief was about to
unload and the market broke at 53 with
out a cheek. The drop disposed of a
number of scalping longs who had been
clinging to Phillips' speculative coat tail.
Under 57 cents, however, Phillips sold
nothing. In consequence prices* reacted
sharply to 56% when traders realized
that the end of the corner was hy no
means at hand.
PRINCE GETS BIS JEWELRY
Cheap Shawis and Snuff Boxes of a
Belgian Royal Visitor—Not
Worta the Revenue.
(By Associated Press.)
New York, May 3.—The customs effi
cials have returned to Prince Henri de
Croy of Belgium, a part of the jewelry
found in his possession when he landed
at Hoboken from the steamship Potsdam
last Sunday. The prince called at the
custom house in company with a repre
sentative of the Belgian consul general in
this city. He explained to Deputy Col
lector Phelps how he came to have the
jewelry with him, saying that the brace
let as well as the diamonds and emerald
ring were family heirlooms and that he
took them with him in his travels because
of their associations. The prince denied
that he had been subjected to any indig
nities by the customs officers or that he
had tried in any way to secret the jew
elry,
A Lot of Cheap Stuff.
As for the snuffboxes and shawls found
by the inspectors, the prince declaimed
that the snuffboxes were worth about a
dollar each, and that the shawls had
been in his possession over three years,
and that their value was less than five
dollars.
The customs officials were impressed
with the truth of the story and surrend
ered a ring, but because of certain tech
nicalities held back a bracelet and other
effects. Prince Henri intimated that he
would write to the secretary of the treas
ury asking for the release of the other
things.
LAUGHAT MORGAN
GREAT SHIP COMPANIES SAT HE
WILL FAIL.
WILL NOT SELL THEIR LINES
The American Shipping Trust May
Not Have Money or Influence
Enough to Swing the Great Com
bine—Europeans Not Ready to Sell
Their Profitable Properties.
(By Associated Pi'ess.)
New York, May 3.—Steamship inter
ests at this port are actively discussing
the purchase of the Leyland steamers by
J. Pierpont Morgan. There is a very gen
eral feeling that Mr. Morgan would not
enter into a transaction involving only
one line, but no definite information has
been received in this city, so far as could
be developed by a thorough canvass of
the other lines, which Mr. Morgan has
in view. It seems an accepted fact, how
ever, that the Atlantic Transport will be
included. There seems also a growing be
lief that the International Navigation
Co., will be included, though Mr. James
Wright, vice-president of the company,
still denies any knowledge of negotia
tions.
Say That Morgan Will Fail.
Mr. John Lee, manager of the White
Star line, when questioned, said his line
had not been sold and was not likely to
be. Mr. Baker, president of the Atlantic
Transport line, is in England now and
is reported to have give Mr. Morgan con
i^44>^4'4>^4>4<
I0WANS TURN OUT TO WELCOME
MINISTER GONGER ON HIS WAY EAST
(Ry Associated Press.)
Des Moines, la., May 3.— A public reception was tendered to Min
ister Conger to-day in the Auditorium in this city, under the auspices
of the G. A. II. of Des Moines. Fully three thousand people crowd
ed into the building to listen to the addresses and tiie response
of the ?;ue3t of honor, who for an hour detailed his experiences dur
ing the s'ege of Pekin. Mr. Conger will leave on Monday for Wash
ington to consult with the state department with regard to his
duties.
This morning he made the statement that he would give out
before leaving, a written statement with regard to the talk that he
is a candidate for the republican nomination for governor.
Mr. Conger is a great favorlfe in his native state, and can have
the nomination for governor for the asking. Had he been able to
come home and begin his duties last winter, he could have had
the appointment for senator on the death of the late Senator Gear.
Congressman J. P. Dolliver was selected, however, because of
availability.
THE FIGURES WERE TOO LOW
Powers Demand $330,000,000 Indem
nity From China—Bleed the
Natives.
(By Associated Press.)
Paris, May 3.—The French foreign of
fice corrects the figures of the indemnity
to be demanded from China as cabled
to the foreign office by M. Plchon, the
French minister at Pekin, purporting to
be taken fi'om the report of the com
mittee on indemnity and telegraphed to
the Associated Press May 1. It was
then announced that the amount China
is to pay was fixed at 1,365,000,300 francs.
The foreign office now announces that
the amount should have been 1,635,000.
000 francs. However this amount may
yet be reduced. 8hese figures provide
for expenses up to July 1.
The foreign office is anxious that the
United States support Germany's pro
posal to increase the Chinese customs
duties, and wishes it to be pointed out
that it will be proved to the best guar- i
antee of the "open door." As no sat- I
isfactory alternative is suggested which
will produce the necessary sum, a dis
agreement of the powers may result in
the occupation of portions of Chinese ter
ritory by individual powers as a guar
antee for their respective claims. Re
garding the issue of a Chinese loan
France and Russia favor the collective
guarantee of the powers.
trol of that line and Mr.Morgan is reach
ing out in all directions.
"It has been Mr. Baker's pet scheme,"
said Mr. Lee, "for years to amalgamate
and consolidate all of the North Atlantic
lines, and this is the beginning. : But he
cannot accomplish it, nor can Mr. Mor
gan."
There was some disposition among
shipping interests to argue that the ac
quirements of the Leyland steamers
meant the introduction at the next ses
sion of congress of a shipping subsidy
bill on entirely new lines.
Xept Out Canadian Line.
The Morgan purchase includes the
various Leyland services, except that be
tween Liverpool and the St. Lawrence. A
private cable says that for five days the
Leyland line held off for the Canadian
business, insisting that they should be
permitted to run their steamers to Port
land, Maine, if not to Boston, during the
time that navigation on the St. Lawrence
Is closed by ice. A compromise was ef
fected, whereby Portlad was omitted
and the demand for a Canadian route
granted. This means that for eight
months of the year the Leylands will
maintain a passenger and freight service
between Liverpool and Montreal.
Hamburg-American officials say their
line is not for sale.
Representatives of the North German
Lloyd also state that their line is not to
be purchased.
At the offices of the Ounard line noth
ing was known of Mr. Morgan's attempt
to purchase that liAr.
At J. Pierpont MorganNs office it was
said that o new word had been received
from Mr. Morgan.
GAS FOR THE^CITY OF MEXICO
American Company Will Light and
Heat the Famous Capitol of the
Montezumas.
New York, May 3.—The Mexico City
Light, Heat and Power company, lim
ited, which was incorporated some time
ago with $5.000,000 American capital foe
the purpose of acquiring franchises with
a view to the supplying of gas for light
ing purposes in the city of Mexico, has
had the time originally set for the erec
tion of its plant extended, final agree
ments just being concluded with the
principal authorities of the Mexican capi
tal for the immediate construction of
large gas works in that part of '.he
world.
The company, in which Wesley 9.
Block, late of the Welsbach company,
now located in this city, is one of the
leading spirits, is now placing contracts
for the construction .and equipment of
the projected plant.
The total cost of the new gas works
will, it is said, be fully $1,500,000. One
istem alone requisitions for fifty miles
of cast iron mains. This piping will be
of sixteen inch diameter and will mean
the employment of some 1,700 tons ot
piping, estimated to cost over $350,000.
The plant, which will be the first of its
kind in the City of Mexico, is to be
in operation inside of twelve month.
Memorial Temple to Ingersoll.
(By Associated Press.)
Chicago, May 3.—The building in Chi
cago of a $100,000 temple to the memory
of Robert G. Ingersoll, in which the
teachings of the orator and atheist shall
be perpetuated, is the Ingersoll Memorial
Association, incorporated at Springfield
today. The projectors are Edward C.
Reichwald, Secretary of the American
Secular Union and Free Thought Federa
tion; Frederick Dahlstrom and Samuel
Roberta.
i
i
I
FIGHT OYER CHEAPER RATES
Western Lines Determine to Accom
modate the Traveling Public—*
Easterners Hold Them Up.
(By Associated Press.)
New York, May 3.—The joint commit
tee has held a stormy meeting in this
city, at which an attempt was made to
settle the rate war.
,The trouble arose over the announce
ment of the Chicago & Alton and othet
western lines entering Kansas City that
they would apply the differential rates
used by the Wabash railway and other
members of the western passenger asso
ciation over the differential lines from
Chicago eastward to the tickets reading
over the standard lines.
The rate from Kansas City to New
York via any of the differential lines,
such as the Lakawana, is $39.05, while
i the rates via the New York Central is
$31.
Resolutions were adopted asking the
lines of .the western passenger associa
tion to send representatives to a con.
ference which the joint passenger com
mittee will attend in a body. The meet
ing will be held at as early a date as
possible.
PUBLIC WAS ANXIOUS TO BUY
Great Engine Combine Stock Largely
Over Subscribed by Rush of
Eager Buyers.
(By Associated Press.)
New York, April 3-—It is authoritative
ly stated by a reresentative of the syn
dic rpte which is underwriting the Allifi
Chalmer company that the new securi
ties offered have been largely oversub
scribed. The syndicate was Hoated for
thp sum of $11,900,000, #nd the subscrip
tions afe several millions in excess of that
figure. The new company will be incor
porated within a few days with $50,000,
000 authorized capital. The valuations
on the properties to be consolidated into
the new company are reported to have
been fixed by expert appraisers as fol
lows: „
E. P. Alis company, $5,120.000; Fraser &
Chalmers, $3,205,000; Gates Iron Works,
$4Ht.000; Dickson Mfg. Co., $1,200,000. To
tal *9,935,000.
The underwriting syndicate is for the
sum of $11,900.000, to purchase $8,400,000
of preferred and $13,000,000 of common
stock. The syndicate will be under the
control of Vermelyea & Co..
Workmen Must Fay Their Shot.
(By Associated Press.)
London, May 3.—Replying to a depu
tation from the Workingmen's Anti
Sugar Tax association to-day the chan
cellor of the exchequer. Sir Michael
Hicks-Beaeh, declined to consider the
withdrawal of the sugar tax.
He said it was the most important part
of the present budget, and he did not
believe that workingmen who had ap
proved of the war in South Africa ob
jected to pay something towards the
cost.
Chicago Machinists' Strike.
(By Associated Press.)
Chicago, May 3.—The hopes of the
machinists that they would effect a set
tlement of their differences with the
Illinois Central railway company with
oui a strike have been dissipated hy '.be
Hi •m attitude of the company regarding
the question of hours. It is stated that
a strike may be called before next Tues
day. Machinists employed in all divis
ions of the system held a meeting last
night and it is said all have declared in
fa"or of a strike.
Carrie Nation's Work.
(By Associated Press.)
Kansas City. Mo.. May 3.—As a direct
result of Mrs. Carrie Nation's agitation
of I lie question in Kansas City, Mayor
Reed has issued a positive order that .ti:
saleons must be closed tight on Sundays.
Yesterday afternoon the police commis
sioners refused the demand of a special
committee of the Law and Order League
to enforce the Sunday closing.
(By Associated Press.)
Board to Settle With Labor.
Sun Francisco, May 3.—The newly
foi med Steamship Masters association
every line running into thi3 port, has its
boird of directors. The object of the as
sociation is to entertain and dispose of
all demands for shorter hours, increased
pa;.-, etc., that may be made upon tin
various steamship companies by the
teamsters, longshoremen, freight clerks
and other labor unions.
Father's Body Found.
(By Associated Press.)
St. Paul. Minn., May 3.—The body o?
William Rosenfield who disappeared
last week with his four children was
found in the river today near where the
be ly of his oldest boy was taken out
yesterday. The search for the bodies
of the other three children continues.
-•-5
FIRE IN ARMOUR S CHICAGO PLANT
THROWS 500 MEN OUT OF WORK
(By Associated Press.)
Chicago, May 3.—Armo
buildings at the stock yard
ing and was damaged by 11
On the fourth iloor, awaitin
tie, which were rescued with
tained 4,600 carcasses.
The fire made such rap
s.ent in, and after an hour a
succeeded in conquering th
direction of Chief Sweeney
floors when a large ammoni
arose drove the men from t
half blinded by the gas and
The destruction of the b
of employment. The plant
story brick and extends ne
ur & Co's, beef housp, one of the largest
s, caught fire at 6:30 o'clock this morn
ames and water to the extent of $100,000.
g slaughter, were 1,600 head of live cat
great difficulty. The building also con
id headway that a general alarm was
nd a half of desperate work the firemen
e flames. One hundred men under the
were at work on the third and fourth
a pipe burst and the stifling odor which
heir posts to the open air. Many were
escaped with difficulty,
uilding throws 500 men temporarily out
will be rebuilt. The building is a five
arlv a block.
CARBON COUNTY COAL HAINES CLOSE
OUTSIDE AGITATORS MAKE TROUBLE AT RED LODGE-NEW PAY
SCHEDULE THE CAUSE OF STRIKE AT BRIDGER— MANY
HUNDRED MEN LYING IDLE WAITING P0R A
CHANCE TO RETURN TO WORK.
(Special to Inter Mountain.)
Billings, May 3-—News has been re
ceived here of the shutting down of the
mines of Red Lodge and Bridger, and it
was not long until all kinds of reports
were out as to the cause.
The information that comes to your
correspondent is to the effect that the
agitation of strike talk is the cause of the
trouble at Red Lodge, while a change in
the arrangement of pay at Bridger is the
other cause.
One report from Red Lodge is to the
effect that the mines shut down Tuesday
night, but that it was not caused by any
trouble or differences, as none exist be
tween the miners and the company, nor
did the eight hour law have anything to
do with it.
This authority stated it was generally
believed that Ihe shut down was the re
sult of agitation and talk of a strike,
which was supposed would have occurred
had the mines paid May 1 under the new
law, when it was expected the hours and
wages alike would be cut down. It is
believed that the company took this
means to protect Itself. The agitation
was not among the miners, for they were
satisfied with conditions and were work
ing harmoniously with the company, but
it is believed that the trouble was caus
ed by outsiders who gave impetus to idle
talk.
The local manager of the company, D.
J. O'Shea, is quoted as saying that he ex
pects to receive instructions from B. F.
Bush, at Rosslyn, Washington, general
manager of the Northern Pacific Coal
company, which owns the Red Lodge
PENNSYLVANIA IS NOT IN IT
Not Buying Atchison Stock for Pur
pose of Forming Strong West
ern Combine.
(By Associated Press.)
Philadelphia, Pa., May 3.— T. De Witt
Cuyler, a director of the Pennsylvania
railroad, to-day emphatically denied
that the Pennsylvania company has se
cured or is trying to secure a represen
tation In the affairs of the Atchison, To
peka and Santa Fe railroad. Mr. Cuyler
said':
"There is absolutely no truth in those
reports. They are without the slightest
foundation. The Pennsylvania company
is not buying any of the Atchison's
stock.'
WILDEST CANADA
A MILLION SQUARE MILES OF UN
EXPLORED WILDERNESS.
NEVER SEEN BY WHITE MEN
One-third of the Dominion Is as a
Sealed Book—Labrador Peninsula
Almost Totally Unknown—Railways
to Be Built to Open Up Vast Min
eral and Timber Resources.
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, May 3.—The director of
the geological survey of Canada in his
report makes tlie amazing statement that
practically nothing is know of one-third
of the Dominion. So states United
States Consul Seyfert at Stratford, in
a report to the state department.
It is b'ïro'wn that more than a million
and a quarter square miles of Canadian
territory Is yet explored. This, includes
the inhospitable d taclo-d Arctic portioi a
but, aside from these, fully 934,000 square
miles are for all practical purposes en
tirely unknown.
The easterly era contains the greatest
extent of the unexplored territory. It
comprises almost the entire interior of
the Labrador peninsula. The indications
are, he says, that during the next live
years at least 5,000 miles of new railroad
will be completed throughout the Domin
ion, most of which will run through the
unexplored wilderness, as it is recogniz
ed that railroads are essential to the
opening up of this va.st territory.
The mineral wealth of this region is
said to lie undoubtedly immense, wine
the dense forests of hardwood are ex
pected to become g source - of large prof
it.
j
!
mines, to post notices under what condi
tions the mines will be re-opened, if the
miners are satisfied with these conditions
then the mines will reopen- It is learn
ed that these conditions in all probability
will be fair to the miners.
Mr. O'Shea has made public the fol
lowing announcement over his signature:
"We have nothing to say, but that wa
have had instructions to stp work for the
present. We have had no difference, or
discussion or contention with the men.
The relations between this company and
its employees have been of the most
pleasant nature. The company is satis
fied with its employees, and It always
aims to treat them fairly and justly.
"1 do not know for how long we may
he shut down.
(Signed) "D. O'Shea."
Another report from Red Lodge states
that the closing down id' the mines was
caused by the company men who work by
the day demanding ten hours' pay for
eight hours work. The closing of the
mines throws over five hundred meç out
of work, and as Red Lodge is kept up
principally by th*. m, it is a matter of
much concern to the merchants as well as
others of that town.
In Bridger, the coal company inaugur
ated a new scale under which the loaders
were to go lo work Wednesday morning,
but the miners refused to accept it. anti
as a result the mines are shut down.
Heretofore the loaders have been receiv
ing $1 a ton, but the new scale cuts them
down to 75 cents.
Only about one hundred men are effect
ed by this shut down.
PATS THE LIQUOR TRADE ON ITS
BROAu BACK.
LEAVES HIS CLERICAL ROBES
Throws Away His Reverend Title and
Sails in for Free Drinks—Advises
the Public to Study the Business,
Its Profits and Its Joys, Before
Passing Condemnation.
(By Associated Press.)
Baltimore, May 3.—"I left my rev
erend title and my church coat hanging
together on the back of a chair at my
home," declared Rev. A. F. Sterger of
Trinity Evangelical Lutheran church,
when he stepped upon the platform to
deliver an address on "Temperance," to
the Retail Liquor Dealers' Beneficial
Association.
Rev. Mr. Sterger spoke in part as fol
lows:
"I have brought with me only a sym
pathetic heart of man for his friends.
I do not like to see you trodden down.
I have spent many hours with saloon
j people listening to their troubles and I
! know that their lives are hard.
I "When i go into a saloon and stay
j there for an hour and mayne take a
I glas.s of beer or wine, I corne out as good
i a man us I was when I went in.
I "I will not subscribe to temperance, for
1 1 like a glass of wine or beer myself.
•'1 would, if 1 could, go to the people
! who are against your business and tell
I tin in to go and see it before they con
demn it. It is as good and honorable
Î as any oth^r business and the day wilt
! yet rulin' when people will respect it."
HOST OF AM ERICAN CARDINALS
of Roman Catholicism in This
of RomanCatholicism in This
Country.
fflv Associated Press.)
New York. May 3.—Right Rev. James
K. Quigl V. bishop of tile Roman Catho
lic dimes of westers New York, is
'quote I in n Buffalo special to the Trib
une as saying that he expects that wi'.h
! in 25 yea s there will be at 1 ast half a
j dozen more cardinals in the United
I Spl teS.
"At pr :
5
laid th
»» Irish*»
p. "it does
not seem
net- s*
sa ry f i
*r an
American
prelate ti
* tvach
this d
isUm-tii
mi. hut the
rapid gi u
w tli .»r
this ce
•untry '
w ill chang*
that s.u'i
i. Wit
hin 23
years
1 ato con
tident hi
shall
see t
•arriina
1s in such
cities as
X« vv V
elk. C
hicagn.
St. Louis,
Now tul
ans,
■ill Fra
an.-is co
and Pitts
, burg.-

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