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The Butte inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, May 06, 1901, Image 8

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SPORTING NEWS
Happenings of the Ring, the
Track and the Diamond.
-
Edited by
DANIEL J. WALSH.
Yachting, Outdoor and in
door Athletics.
OE THE WORLD
BICYCLE RACING IN BUTTE IS
NOW AN ABSOLUTE CERTAINTY.
Plans in Hand for an Eight Lap Board,
Saucer Track—W ork to Begin in a
Few Days—Opening Day June
15—We.l Known Bicy
lists Will Be Here
Butte is to have a bicycle track—a
first-class, up-to-date board saucer track
—that will lie as tine as anything ever
erected for the promotion of the fas
cinating. honest and manly sport of bi
cycle racing. For weeks the idea has
been nothing more than an incipient
project, but now it has taken definite
shape, and liefere thirty days elapse
Butte enthusiasts will see enough of the
scheme in evidence to insure its ultimate
materialization.
The announcement that the bicycle
track is now an assured thing was made
last night at the McDermott hotel by
John B. King, manager of the Butte
Athletic association, a new organization
about to be incorporated for the foster
fing of all athletic and gymnasium
sports.
Mr. King is the authorized representa
tive of considerable Butte and Salt Lake
capital. He has been an assiduous work
er in the interest of the new project,
and now states that his efforts have met
with flattering success. All deails for
the promoting of the enterprise are now
complete he says, and all that remains
is to decide upon a site for the track
and begin work upon it.
Plans for the track are now complete
and In the hands of Mr. King. They
are for a regulation eight-lap saucer
track, banked on the ends to an angle
of nearly 45 degrees, with good, fast
stretches on the back and front. It
wil be thoroughly equipped, with dress
ing rooms, training quarters and all the
essentials of a first-class track. It will
be an opeu air affair, constructed much
after the fashion of the old Roman am
phitheaters, and will have a seating
capacity of over 6000. The track will be
eliptieal in shape and the seats will he
arranged all around it so that every
spectator will have an unobstructed
view of the riders at all times.
The races will he held at night. Twen
ty full power arc electric lights will be
put in position around the track and in
Its center, so that the light thus afforded
will be as near equal to daylight as
possible. The events include novice, lap.
heat, pursuit, handicap, team and con
solation races, and. in addition, several
ENTRIE FOR THE
LOCAL RACING MEET.
some of the best
west and that fact
guarantee of
zood
Secretary and Manager E. D. Laurence
of the Montana Racing Association after
weeks of toil with his assistant, Robert
Curran, last night announced four stake
events for the coming race meet together
with a long list of entries for each event.
The entries include
known horses of th
alone is sufficient
sport. . ,
Mr. Laurence stated this morning that
he would announce other stake events
and entries tonight. The stakes as al
ready announced are as follows:
The Montana Derby. $1.500— For 3-year
old (foals of IS 8); $10 to accompany the
nomination: $15 additional if not declared
out on or before June 1, 1901: $100 addi
tional to start. The Montana Jockey club
to add an amount sufficient to make the
value of the stake $1.500, of which $250
to second, $150 to third and $100 to fourth
horse. Colts to carry 122, geldings 119 and
fillies 117. Allowances—Non-winners of a
stake in 1901 or of five or more races (sell
ing races not counted) since April 1, 1901,
allowed 7 pounds: beaten maidens allow
ed 12 pounds. Twenty-six are entered.
The Daly Memorial Cup, $1,000—A
handicap for 33 year-olds and upward; $5
to accompany the nomination, $4;> addi
tional to start. The Montana Jockey
dub to add an amount sufficient to make
the value of the stake $1,000. The win
ner to receive $650 and a piece of plate
of the value of $15.0, the owner of the
second hors" to receive $200, the owner
of the third horse $100 and the owner of
the fouith horse $50. Weights to appear
three days prior to the race. Accept
ances to be made through the entry bbox
the day pre -edig th" race before 11:39 a.
m. Two miles. Thirty-six are entered.
The Miners' 1'nion Stake $1.000—A
handicap for 3-year-olds, and upward;
$5 to accompany the nominations. $45 ad
ditional to start. The Montana Jockey
c'ub to add an amount sufficient to make
the value of the stake $1.000, of which $200
to the second, $100 to the third, and the
fourth horse to save its stake. Weights
to appear three days prior to the race.
Acceptances to be made through the en
try box the day preceding the race be
fore 11:30 a. m. One mile. Fofty-seven
are entered.
The Butte Selling Stakes. $850—for 3
year-olds and upward; $5 to accompany
the nomination, $30 additional to start.
The Montana Jockey club to add an
amount sufficient to make the value
ofthe stake $850. of which $150 to second,
$75 to third and $35 to fourth. The win
ner to lie sold at auction. Horses en
tered for $3,000 to carry weight for age,
if for less two pounds allowed for each
$500 to $1.500, then one pound for each
$100 to $1.000, then two pounds for each
$100 to $500. Entries to be made through
the entry box (with selling price) the
PURE BLOOD
There is no health possible without pure
blood. Purify and enrich this life-cur
rent, and go d health will result. Hos
tetter's Stomach Bitters is the best medi
cine in the wo.Id io do this. It cures in
digestion, constipation, dyspepsia, bil
iousness, inactive liver, weak kidneys,
and prevents malaria fever and ague.
Fee that our private revenue stamp cov
ers the neck of the bottle.
Improves the
Appet : te and
Induces Sleep.
n OSTETTER'S
STOMACH
BITTERS
of the soul-stirring and hair-raising
motor cycle races.
Many of the best riders both at dis
tances and spurts have signified their
intention of appearing In the various
events. They are enthusiastic over the
proposed track and say they could wish
for nothing better than a long season in
such a climate as Butte affords.
The racing will be strictly under the
rules of the National Cycling association.
The officials will all be thorough)' com
petent and everything will be as or
dained by the association. In tact the
racing could not possibly be in more
competent hands in any particular.
Manager King is a thorough sportsman,
having managed such affairs and others
with great success. He is an old news
paper man. and a sporting editor at that,
and what he does not know about sports
in general is not worth knowing.
The site for the new track .has not
been definitely decided upon. Mr. King
has an option on several places, all of
which are desirable. In fact so desirable
are they that it will be a difficult matter
to choose among them. All are admir
ably situated, are easy of access and
convenient to rapid transit. Manager
Wharton of the Butte street railway has j
been approached about the matter and
has signified his intention of furnishing ,
effieierg service to and from the track. !
It is intended to have the track ready !
for racing by June 15. Indications are j
that it can not only be completed by !
that time, but will be ready in every
detail to promote the sport. The racing I
will continue for at least sixty days, j
Everything depends on how the sport
will be received. There need be no ap
prehension or doubt on that score, how
ever. as anyone who has ever seen a
first class bicycle race is, as a matter of
course, an enthusiast.
To once see a squad of men of brawn
and muscle fighting every inch of a mile
for track supremacy is to be a iover of
bicycle racing forever after. Particu
larly is that so in the case of a board
saucer track, where not only does the
speed and graceful riding of the contes
tants appeal to the onlooker, but the
skill of the men to ride practically on
a perpendicular wall appeals to all.
Bvitte will soon be educated to the
sport, and when that time comes the
peope will surely have the ubiquitous
and ever-contagious bicycle racing
craze.
day preceding the race before 11:30 a. ni.
Six furlongs. Forty-nine are entered.
The Hot Times Stakes, $S00—A handi
cap for all ages; $5 to accompany the
nomination. $30 additional to start. The
Montana Jockey club to add an amount
sufficient to make the value of the
slake $800, of which $150 to second, $75
to third and $35 to fourth. Weights to
appear three days prior to the race.
Acceptances to lie made through the en
try box the day preceding the race
before 11:30 a. m. Four and one-half
furlongs. Fifty are entered.
4-23
........May 13-25
........May 14-25
....May 23-June 1
...May 25-June li
....May 27-Jun-i 8
....May 27-June ,9
..........June 1-15
........June 10-27
.........June 12-29
....June 15-July 4
Racing Dates of 1901.
Westchester ..................M
St. Louis (Fair roGunds)
May 11-July 20
Wurth (Chicago) ........
Latonia, Ky.............
Toronto, Ont ........
Gravesend ..........
Newport, Ky.........
Hawthorne (Chicago)
Ingalls Park (Joliet)
Harlem (Chicago) ...
Highland Park, Mich
Sheepsh' ad Bay ....
Washington ark (Chicago)
June 22-July 20
Butte and Anaconda, Mont.,
........ June 29-Sept. 7
Fort Erie, Ont .........July 4-August 3,1
Brighton Beach ........July 5-August 3
Hawthorne (Chicago)
July 22 August 3
Windsor ..............July 22-August 24
Ivinlock Park tSt. Louis)
.......... July 23-August 26
Harlem (Chicago) ........August 5-17
Saratoga ....................August 5-t7
Hawthorne (Chicago) ......August 19-31
St. Louis (Fair Grounds)
August 26-Sept. 28
Sheepshead Bay ......August 31-Sept. 14
Latonia, Ky...............Oct. 28-Nov. 9
Lakeside (Chicago) ....Oct. 28-Nov. 13
Washington ..................Nov. 11-30
Harlem (Chicago) ............Sept. 2-11
Gravesend ..............Sept. 16-Oct. 5
Hawthorne (Chicago) ....Sept. 16-Oct. 3
Kinloch Park (St. Louis)
Sept. 30-Oet. 26
Westchester ...................Oct. 7-26
Westchester ..................Oct 7-26
Harlem (Chicago) ............Oct. 7-20
LIPTON IS VERY ENTHUSIASTIC
Says His Boat has Demonstrated That
She Will bail the Finest of
Knees.
(By Associated Press.)
Southampton, May 6.—None of Sir
Thomas Lipton's party came ashore here
after the return of Shamrock 11 from
the spins. Sir Thomas, it is asserted, is
more enthusiastic than ever.
"I consider it demonstrated beyond
question," he said to a representative of
the Associated Press, "that the new
chalonger will make the finest fight ever
made in a contest for the America's cup.
I do not know what America has to ar
ray against us, but I am convinced that
the Americans will be pleased to see a
good race and will bear me no ill will if,
as I now think possible, I should win
the cup."
BEST OF ENGLISH YACHTS.
The London Times Thinks Shamrock
II. the Finest of All Chellengers
for the Cup.
(By Associated Press.)
London, May 6.—A yachting corre
sondent of the Times, after asserting
that Saturday's trial "justifies the high
opinions already expressed about the
challenger," comments on the absence
of resistance, and says:
"She makes a deal of fuss on the sur
face, but there is no drag underneath.
-
.
She skims along more smoothly and
with less apparent resistance than any
other yacht we have yet built on this
side of the Atlantic.
"So far as could be judged she seemed
to hold a remarkably good wind and to
start quickly away in the lightest o)t
breezes. In estimating the value of the
trials it must be kept In mind .hat «he
conditions were eactly those In which
it was epected she would show to Che
best advantage. The manner in which
she justified high expectations augers
well, however, for her performances un
der other conditions."
TRAP SHOOTERS SHOW FORM
'
j
j
j
1
j
j
I
,
!
j
Good Scores Made by Anaconda and
' Butte Sportsmen in Practice
Yesterday.
Members of the Anaconda Gun club j
and C. H. Smith. A. Walker, D. Yancey,
J. Spargo, P. Allen and W. C. Bachelor
of the Butte club, engaged in practice
shooting at tlie Anaconda grounds yes
terday. The day was an ideal one for
blue rocks, as is evidenced by the excel
lent scores made. C. H. Smith carried
off the honors with an average of almost
90 per cent.
Of the six events shot off. five were
singles, at 25 birds each. The sixth event *
was the Yancey shoot, at
doubles. The score for the
follows:
10 pairs of
day was as
H. Smith
Walker ... .
Allen ......
Bachelor .. .
Spargo .....
Bob Emmons
Quane .....
Harri ty ... .
Nell.......
B. D. Mahan ..i 12
Dawson .. ..
Yancey ......
Mo Kill ......
Webster.....
MciGvern ..
Johnston .. .
Cairns ......
Kunkle ......
L. G. Smith ..
Sant Emmons
Klepetko .. ..
Twohy ......
Tolan .......
Berthels ....
Lewis .......
Russell ......
Walter Mahan
E. Klepetko ..
First event ......
!fi
3
3
ft
it
3
:
Fourth event ...
Third event .....
3
3 *
*
<
t>
3
Sixth event ____
!
!
23
20 i 23
22 !
12
! is
21
20 i 17
20 1
15
! 1 »
14 15 i 13
14 |
S ;
15
20
21 ! 13
H !
13 1
i 19
13
IS I IS
H i
14
; 2 o
....
••••!••••
. . . .1
1 IT
K
14 ....
....j
.. . . I
! il
18
15 | 20
19 |
1G ,
! 19
18
16 ! 22
19
10
1 12
16
22 20 | 18 j
1 is
17
17 | 14
---- 1
____ j
is
: 14
20 | 21
:t> |
21
! 24
19 19
....!
r 1
13
; 15
12 j 10
....!
.... j
15
il
13 j 16
16
: io
15 20
....I
i H
! 12
IS IS
15
! i'
16
19 ...
____
j 15
14
19 21
....
| 20 i 19
19 | 19
....
i 15
IS
19 | 17
to
18
! 19
21 | 21
19
12 !
14
io ? — ! —
....
i is
22
IS | 20
....
I-
! 20
l • ) ....
....
I-.
••••I H

H
NATIONAL LEAGUE GAMES.
Cincinnati 7—St. Louis 5.
(By Associated Press.)
At St. Louis—
St. Louis .......................
Cincinnati .....................
Batteries— Breitenstein and
Hahn and Peitz.
Umpire—Dwyer.
At Chicago
Chicago ..................
Pittsburg ................
Batteries—Waddell and Chance
see and Zimmer.
Umpire—Emslie.
R.
H.
E.
5
12
1
7
10
4
Nicholas;
2.
R.
H.
E.
2
9
3
4
9
1
Cincin nati
Standing of the Clubs.
Played. Won. Lost. R./C.
Brooklyn .......
...10
6
4
Pittsburg ......
... 11
6
5
Boston .........
... S
4
4
Philadelphia ...
. .. 12
6
G
New York .....
. .. 8
3
5
Chicago ........
. .. 14
5
9
St. Louis.......
. .. 9
3
6
got) !
.goo
.«46
.500 !
.500
2375 i
2357
2333
r <•
AMERICAN LEAGUE.
Milwaukee 21—Chicago 7. x »
At Milwaukee— R. H. 5L
Milwaukee .....................21 25 S
Chicago........................ 7 3 7
Batteries—Hunting. Reidy and Connor;
Patterson and Sullivan.
Detroit 10—Cleveland 3.
At Detroit— R.
Detroit.........................10
I
;
j
I
I
j
Cleveland ..
..... 3
9 3
Batteries—
and Yeager.
Siever and
Buelow;
Scott
Standing of the
Clubs.
Played. Won. Lost
:. P.c.
Detroit.....
8 3
.737
Chicago ____
....... 11
7 4
.646
Washington
...... 8
5 3
.622
Baltimore ..,
....... 8
5 3
.622
Cleveland ..
....... 11
4 7
.363
Philadelphia
...... 8
3 5
.375
Boston .....
3 5
.375
Milwaukee .
....... 11
3 8
.272
PACIFIC LEAGUE.
Spokane 3—Portland 11.
At Spokane—
Spokane ......0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Portland ......1 0 0 0 0 5 3 2
Tacoma 11—Seattle 3.
At Tacoma—
Tacoma .......2 0 3 0 2 0 2
Seattle ........8 1 3 0 0 0 0
New Motor Cycle Record.
(By Associated Press.)
Sacramento, Cal. May 6.—At the Velc
drome races this afternoon Bell an
Stone on a motor cycle lowered th !
world's record for five miles on an eight
lap track, making the distance In 7:2;
The former record was 7:40 2-5, made o
the same track by the Turville brother
two weeks ago. Prior to that perform
ance the record was 7:48.
Date of International Garnet.
(By Associated Press.)
London, May 6.—The Oxford-Cam
britÄ' committee Saturday received the
official reply of the Harvard-Yale com»
mittee, fixing September 21 as the daté
for the international games to be held
on Berkeley oval. New York.
GOSSIP OF THE BOXERS.
Representative James Butler nd a
beer glass were too much for Champion
James Jeffries In Kunsas City several
days ago. The big fellow wet down b *•
fore them and would have been out If
the barkeeper had couted, but istead
the bout was awarded to Jeffries on a
foul.
The champio had been playlg lr.
Kansas City, and betwee times he held
out at Frank Jones' place on Walnut
street. Any one who had business with
him at 4 o'clock i the morning could
have found him at that hour without
fail. One morning, as usual, he was en
tertatning a crowd of admirers, among
them Representative Butler, who owns
the Standard 'heater there.
The champion was telling how fights
were won, and in some way gave offens?
to Butler. The representative reached
for a beer glass, let it drive and caught
Jeffries just behind the ear. Perhaps be
cause the champion was standing o one
foot, or possibly because he was "over
turned,'' he went, not to the ropes, but
the footrail at the base of the bar.
Mutual explanations, followed by a visit
to a Turkish bath, restored peace.
The following morning Jeffries had a
similar experience. He was explaining
ring tactics to a crowd at Jones' place,
ami declared that no man could hit him.
Frank Jones took him at his word and
tried it. By accident, or perhaps be
tuse the champion was a bit unsteady,
the blow landed and Jeffries went down.
When the big fellow left for St. Louis
he looked as if he had just had a mill
with Ruhlin.
"I'm going to cut it out after Kansas
City," he said.
A match between Champion Terry Mc
Govern and Aurelio Herrera, the Bakers
field wonder, has been arranged. The men
are to meet sometime this month at 126
pounds, and Manager Harris bets Man
ager Carillo $5,000 to $3,500 that McGovern
will win.
This contest puts a somewhat new
phase on McGovern's relation to the pu
gilistic situation in San Francisco. It
was expected that the champion was to
meet Frank Erne • this month at 133
pounds. This information has been given
out by the club managers, and while
Manager Harris has refused to say defi
nitely whether he would give Erne a j
chance, he has to a certain extent inti- j
mated that he would.
But now that McGovern is matched
with Herrera for May, he is certainly not
going to fight Erne in that same montn. '
Manager Harris has probably concluded
that from a strict business point of view
it is unwise for Terry to go out of his
class again. The Herrera go is all very
well from the standpoint of McGovern
and Harris. They undoubtedly think
they are picking up a little easy money,
and that xyew is held by nearly eveiybody
else who has followed the careers of the
two men.
Harris says he is not trying to evade
Erne, and promises that he will give the
Buffalo pugilist a dectided answer. The
latter is willing to put up a forfeit of $1,
Herreraisno e Sb asp 7890$ ETAOI HS
090 that he will be at the reqerved
weight.
Herrera is no doubt a very capable
young man. He hits hard and is strong
and agile. He performed once in San
Francisco with "Crocky" Boyle and won,
but his victory did not impress sporting
men. His swings were wild, his style
awkward and clumsy, and his headwork
poor. Since then he has won several
fights. But he cannot have gained suf
ficient experience to make him a formid
able antagonist for such a man as Me
1 Govern. Of course, if he wins he will
! I have jumped at once to the top, just as
Jeffries did, because McGovern like
Fitzsimmons with Jeff, holds him in too
! low an estimate. If he loses his reputa
tion will not have suffered.
i --
The death of "mysterious" Billy Smith
in London as the result of injuries re
I ceived in the prize ring emphasizes the
I superioi ity of the American plan of hav
Ijing the referee in the ring, where he can
-7judge as to the advisability of stopping
iia bout and can also prevent foul tactics
; by the contestants. In England the ref
j eree sits outside the ring, remaining in
I one sput throughout the fight. A tricky
I fighter could take advantage of that fact
j and get in foul blows.
Joseph Walcott, the negro boxer, is .
spoiling for a fight with Thomas Sharkey
and his manager, Thos. O'Rourke, has
signified his willingness to offer a purse
of $10,000 if Walcott's ehallengs is ac
cepted.
Wolccott, however, declares that the
true reason for Sharkey's failure to come
to terms is that the sailor is afraid he will
meet defeat and to show that he is sin
There are no stipulations In O'Rourke's
offer. He says that the fight can be de
cided in one of the clubs now doing busi
ness or he will guarantee to pull the af
fair off in private if this is agreeable to
Sharkey.
LAUNCHING OF CONSTITUTION
America's Cup Defender to Be Floated
! and Christened at Bristol
Today.
j (By Associated Press.)
i Bristol, R. I., May 6.—All arrange
ments have been made at the Here
jshoffs' yard for the launching of the
(Constitution this afternoon. The yacht
(is in complete readiness. Butler Duncan
and his party will be admitted into the
■shop, hut according to the present plans
the Hereshoff plant will be closed to
sightseers. The water Is the only place
from which the launching will be vis
ible, and boats, launches and rafts are in
readiness.
The Constitution will be lowered into
the water slowly and gradually under
control of a windlass. From the time
the bottle of wine Is broken on her
bow until she Is afloat probably 20 min
utes will elapse. In that Interval, by
means of searchlights and flashlights,
jealously guarded secrets of her hull will
be observed by a hundred eager eyes,
and many a camera wll record the grace
ful yacht on Its way to the water.
AUGUST FLOWER.
•Tt la a surprising fact." says Prof
Houton. "that.In tny travels in all parte
of th* world, for the last ten years. I
have met more people having used
Green's August Flower than any other
remedy, for dyspepsia, t!c~zr""d liver
and stomach, and for constipation. |
find for tourists and salesmen, or for
persons filling office positions, when
Irregular habits exist, the. Green's
August Flower Is a grand remedy. It
does not Injure the system by frequent
use, and Is excellent for sour stomachs
at.c. indlsgestion. ■ Sample bottles free at
Newbro Drug Co., Flnlen-Medin Drug
company.
Sold by dealers In all clrlllcod coun
tries.
Get Green's Prize Almanac.
j
j
'
For full information and Pan-American
Folders, address any Great Western
Agent, or . P. Elmer, General Passen
ger Agent 113 Adams St. Chicago.
MINERS' UN ION NOTICE.
All members of Butte Miners' union
are requested to attend the next regular
meeting, on Tuesday, May 7. Business
of importance to be transacted.
J. J. QUINN, President.
FRANK A. CONNOR.
Recording Secretary.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.
Estate of Thomas Sib rt, alias John
Lee, deceased.
Notice is hereby given by the under
signed, administrator of the estate of
Thomas Sibert, alias John Lee, deceased,
to the creditors of and all persons hav
ing claims against the said deceased, to
exhibit them, with the necessary vouch
ers, within four months after the first
publication of this notice, to Mie said
administrator at the office of J. P. Col
lins, No. 9 East Granite street, Butte,
Montana, the same being the place for
the transaction of the business of said
estate, in the county of Silver Bow, state
of Montana. J. P. COLLINS',
Administrator of the Estate of Thomas
Sibert, alias John Lee, deceased.
Dated Butte, Montana, this 3rd day of
May, 1901.
LEWIS A. SMITH,
Attorney for (he Estate.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.
Estate of Andrew L. Stromberg, de
ceased.
Notice is hereby given by the under
signed, J. P. Collins, administrator of
the estate of Andrew L. Stromberg, de
ceased. to the creditors of and all per
sons having claims against the said de
ceased, to exhibit them, with the neces
sary vouchers, with four months after
the first publication of this notice, to the
said administrator at his office at No. 3
East Granite street, Butte, Montana, the
same being the place for the transaction
of the business of said estate, in the
county of Silver Bow. state of Montana.
J. P. COLLINS.
Àmlnlstrator of the Estate of Andrew
L. Stromberg, deceased.
Dated Butte, Montana, this 4th day of
May, 1901.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.
Estate of Frank Germ, deceased.
Notice is hereby given by the under
signed, administrator of the estate of
Frank Germ, deceased, to the creditors
of and all persons having claims against
the said deceased, to exhibit them, with
the necessary vouchers, within four
months after the first publication of this
notice, to the said administrator at No.
9 East Granite street, at th? office of
J. P. Collins, public administrator, Butte,
Montana, the same being the place for.
the transaction of the business of said
estate, in the county of Silver Bow, state
of Montana. J. P. COLLINS.
Administrator of the Estate of Frank
Germ, deceased.
Dated Butte, Montana, this 3rd day of
May, 1901.
.
FIRST CLASS SLEEPER SERVICE
TO KANSAS CITY VIA C. M.
& ST. P. RY.
A first class sleeper for Kansas City
leaves the Twin Cities dally via C. M.
Ar St. P. Ry. (from Minneapolis 7:50 a. m.
and St. Paul 8:00 a. m.), and arrives Kan
sas City the following morning at 7:00
o'clock, runn'ng via the "Milwaukee's"
well known Hedrick Route. This serv
ice is particularly well suited for trav
elers, not only to Kansas City locally,
but to points beyond In the south, south
west and California, best connection be
ing made at Kansas City for all points.
Write J. T. Conley, Asst. Gen. Pass.
Agent. St. Paul, Minn., for full informa
tion concerning lowest rates, etc.
SupprmSl
Mtnstruafloa
PAINFUL
Kmlruatlon
And s PRE VENT! VB for
R1CALE
IttlGULAKITIES.
Are Safe and Reliable,
l^^^crfeetljrjlajmlrss
Purely Vexe
• 4 Neve»
£aü!
Red
Cross
Tansy
Pills
Th* Ladies
PR1CE$1.00
Seat postpaid on receipt
price. Money r ifnnded if not as we"
Hin de (lochona Go.
Deo Moines, «um.
For sale by Newbro Drug Co., Butta,
Mont.
MANHOOD
RESTORED
Prescription
1959
Before and Aft«..
Will qul.'kly cure you of all nervous
diseases, suer as lost manhood, pains
In the back, seminal emissions, nerv
ous debility, unfitness to marry, ex
haustlng draii a, Impotency and all It*
horrors. A written guarantee and
money refunded If six boxes does not
effect a permanent cure. $1 per box,
six for SB, by mall, securely pa<ked.
Manufactured by A. Augendre, Parla
Address and mall to Newbro Draft
Co« Koto Agents. Butts, lfinltsa
6LEEPER SERVICE TO KANSAS
CITY VIA "THE MIL
WALKEE" LINE.
First-class Pullman sleeper from Twin
Cities every day via the Chicago, Mil
waukee & St. Paul railway to Kanaat
City.
Leaves Mlnneapo'is at 7:59 a. m.. St.
Paul at 8:00 a. m., arrives at Kansas
City at 7 o'clock next morning.
Direct and most comfortable route to
Kansas City and the southwest and
California.
Pullman tourist sleeper also from Twit»
Cities every Tuesduy, running through
to Los Angeles, Cal.
Apply to ticket agents, or write J.
Conley, assistant passenger agent, St*
Paul, Tor lowest one-way and round-trig
rat's to all points south and « tt. •
I STATE SAVINGS BANKS
£ John a. Creighton ......President iff
ÿ G. W. Stapleton ____Vice-President 5
'K T. M. Hodgens ............Cashier ;
5* Hodgens .......Asst. Cashiers
ÿ R. B. Nuckolls ......Asst. Cashier]
Ä Under state supervision and Jur
Isdiciton. Interest pall on de
g posits. „ * .
S Sells exchange available In all !
5 the principal cities of the United j
K States and Europe. Collections |
5 promptly attended to.
Tiansuct general bankingbusiness]
Directors—J. A. Creighton. Oma
ha. G. W. Stapleton, A. H. Bacet.
E. D. Levitt, S. V. Kemper. T. M
Hodgens, J. O, Hodgens.
( or. Main ami Park Streets, Butte
2TV-,
AV'iNG*
Under State Supervision. S
Pays 5 per cent, on savings de- fl
posits. Interest compounded quar- S
terly. 2
Pays 7 per cent, on time certlfl- S
cates of deposit, not subject to 2
check. ¥$
Issues savings certificates on S
building and loan plan with def- 8
inate time of maturity and definite
payments. £
Loans on reel estate to be repaid m
In monthly Installments running
from one to ten years, to suit bor- *|
rower. •M
Trustees—Lee Mantle, president; 3
Chas. Schatzleln, vice-president;
Fayette Harrington, treasurer;
Charles R. Leonard, attorney; A.
B. Clements, secretary: F. Aug.
Helnze, Henry Muo'ler, Frank W.
Haskins, James H. MonteltU.
Daly
Bank and Trust
Company
Of Butte
Established 1882—Incorporated 190L
General Banking Business
W. W. Dixon ................. President
John D. Ryan .......... Vice-President
C. C. Swlnborne ................. Cashier
K. A. Kunkel ........ Assistant Cashier
$ S
ijj W. A, Clark J. Ros3 Clark
|W. A. CLARX & BROj
I BANKERS I
I Transact General Hanking Business $
•f Buy gold dust, gold barB, silver 3F
bullion and local securities. jr
$ Bones for rent in safe deposit $
i vault - S
i* Sell exchange available In all of si
: f the principal cities of the United
■ ' States and Europe.
Special attention given to collec- $
$ tlons. jjf
^ ALEX J. JOHNSTON. Cashier, ijj
i FIRSTNATIONAL BANK
p KUTTE, MONTANA.
$ Capital Stock, $200,000.00
R Andrew J. Davis, President
g James A. Talbot. Vice Pres,
g IS. B. AVeirick, Cashier
Geo. Stevenson, Ass't Cashier i
Buys and sells Foreign Exchange
and itisues Travelers' Letters of
Credit, available in all parts of
the world.
W MBW XX XX MW tWXWXX.MtMl».
§DB. HUIE POCKi
B it Years in Butte.
Generation doctor of China f»-un !
grandfather down. Born and!
schooled In the profession. Treats)
all diseases, making a specialty of 4
chronic troubles. Consult me be- j
fore you waste your life away.
337 South Main Street.
KKSXNX*5

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