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The Butte inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, May 11, 1901, Image 1

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Advertisers Are On to the Fact That the Inter Mountain is the Whole Thing, When
it Comes to Daily Newspapers in Butte.
The Butte Inter Mount yin.
VOL. XXÏ. NO. 45 Probably Showers Tonight BUTTE. MONTANA, SATURDAY EVENING,, MAY 11. 1901.
_ £ ______
Warmer, Cloudy Tomorrc £ PRICE FIVE CENTS
PRESIDENT PREPARES TO SPEND
II QUIET SUNDAY KT DEL MONTE
A SEVERE ORDEAL AHEAD OF HIM IN THE WEEK AT SAN FRAN
CISC0-0HI0 GOVERNOR AND CONGRESSMEN CLASH
OVER PRECEDENCE-HEREAFTER WILL FOL
LOW SEPARATE ROUTES.
(By Associated Press.)
Del Monte, Cal., May 11.—The presi
dent and his party arrived at Delmonte
this morning and will remain over Sun
day at this far-famed resort. "There is
no flxed programme, except the visit to
the Grand Army encampment at Pacific
grove and a drive along the ocean front
this afternoon, and two days of rest
will prepare the president and his party
for the ordeal they will have to undergo
at San Francisco next week.
Governor Nash and his p'arty and the
Ohio congressional delegation also
reached the Delmonte hotel this morn
ing. They leave for San Francisco this
afternoon.
The Ohio people who are on their way
to San Francisco to see the launching
of the battleship Ohio are not having
the lovely time they anticipated. The
Ohio congressmen and Governor Nash's
party have clashed over a question of
precedence and harmony Is wanting.
The people of California have been cor
dial in their reception of the Ohio party,
but naturally President McKinJey has
received the most attention, and Gov.
Nash and ihis party, who are traveling
on a separate train, have been a little
in the background. At Los Angeles it
was all McKinley, and the Ohio guber
natorial party felt slighted.
The special bearing Gov. Nash and
other Ohio people arrived here -before
daybreak and joined the presidential
party. The chagrin that the guberna
torial, party expressed over its alleged
mistreatment at Los Angeles became
more intense during the trip of the last
24 hours, and broke out into open revolt
here at conferences in the Hotel Del
monte.
The special ears bearing the Ohio con
gressmen were attached to the Ohio spec
ial at Los Angeles. This seemed to add
to the ill-feeling of the governor's party
Who complained that they had been an
annexed section to the presidential party
and now were given third place. The
congressmen seemed equally dissatisfied
with the new arrangement, and finally it
was decided that the congressmen should
CECIL RHODES IS AFRICAN PREMIER
AMAZING REPORT FROM CAPETOWN OF HIS ELEVATION, AND
THAT OF DR. JAMESON, THE RAIDER-KITCHENER MAK
ING STEADY GAINS IN HIS WARFARE AGAINST
THE BOERS.
(By Associated Press.)
Cape Town, May 11.—News, from South
Africa to-day declares it has been decid
ed to reconstruct the ministry with Cecil
Rhodes as premier, Dr. Jariiison as col
onial secretary, and Sir John Gordon
Sprigg as treasurer. The premier, Sir
John Gordon Sprtgg, however, authorized
a statement that there was no founda
A NATION'S BILLS
What the fifty-sixth con
GRESS LEAVES IN ITS WAKE.
PENSIONS COME THE HIGHEST
Fostoffice and Army Follow—Many
Million LeBB Than Preceding Session
—Large Increase in Number of Civil
Officers—Permanent Appropriations
Cost a Lot of Money.
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, May 11.—The volume con
taining statements of appropriations,
new offices, etc., required by law to
be prepared and published at the
end of each session of congress un 1er
the direction of committees on appro
priations of the senate and house lias
been completed for the second session of
the Fifty-sixth congress by Thomas P.
Cleaves and James Court, clerks respec
tively of those committees. A summary
of the report shows the grand total of
<790,338,575.
Pensions in the Lead.
The details by bills are as follows:
Agricultural, $4,582.420: army, $115,734,
•49; diplomatic, $1,849,168; District of Co
lumbia, <8,502,269; fortifications, <1,364,
011; customs collections, <9,747,471; legis
lative, <24,594,968; military academy, <772.
642; naval, <78,181,791; pensions, <145,145,
230; postofflees, <123,782,688; sundry civil,
<61,795,908; deficiencies, <15,917,746; mis
cellaneous, <7,990,230; permanent appro
priations, <124,358,220.
The statement shows that in addition
to the specific appropriations made, con
tracts are authorized to be entered into
for public works requiring future appro
priations by congress in the aggregate
sum of <4,224.640. These contracts in
clude »1.384,640 for permanent improve
ments and increased facilities at certain
navy yards, <2,341.500 for public build
logs previously authorized to be con
travel hereafter as they had done before
reaching Los Angeles.
The cars of the congressmen were ac
cordingly taken out of the Ohio special
here and they left for San Francisco at
noon while Governor Nash and party left
at 2 p. m., for San Francisco. Then Col.
J. D. Ellison and Willis G. Bowland who
have charge of all arrangements for Gov
ernor Nash and the Ohio special met a
committee from San Jose and notified
Chairman Miner that they would not vis
it San Jose as an annex of any other
party. It was then decided that the
Ohio special would go from San Fran
cisco to San Jose Sunday night. It was
also specified that the Ohio special would
leave San Jose before the presidential
train arrived.
This unpleasant controversy started at
Los Angeles on Thursday night but the
local committee would not let it precede
the president's train and the time was
accordingly changed and left Los Angeles
at 10 a. m., Friday instead of 10 p. m.,
Thursday. This caused indignation.
As the two trains have different routes
on returning from San Francisco there
will be no more trouble with railway
schedules and receptions along the way
but the Ohio people insist that Governor
Nash shall not be ignored hereafter as
they insist he has been during the past
three days.
CARBONADO MINES WILL OPEN
(Special to Inter Mountain.)
Billings, Mont., May 10—It is rumored
that the Carbonado coal mine will re
sume operations by the middle of May
under the old management. The infor
mation comes from a reliable sourcee. It
is said that C. J. Cunningham, the form
er superintendent, is already on his way
to Montana from the east to take charge
oof the mines.
Lahd Is being bought up in Carbonado
by outside parties who claim that it is
for grazing purposes, but in reality it is
believed to be for minéral purposes, and
that it is bemg secured for the coal com
pany.
tion in the reports of the reconstruction
of the cabinet.
Lord Kitchener reports under date of
Pretoria, May 10, as follows:
"Since May 5, twenty-eight Boers have
been killed, six wounded and 130 taken
prisoners and 183 have surrendered. Nine
thousand rounds of ammunitions, 230
wagons, 1,500 horses and large quantities
of grain and stock have been captured."
structed in various cities and for cer
tain lightnouse tenders and a revenue
cutter, and $458,900 for school buildings
and sewer system in the District of Co
lumbia,
The contracts authorized in excess of
appropriations made at the first session
of the Fifty-sixth congress amounted to
$54,215,734 more than the contract au
thorizations of the session just closed.
Gain in Civilian .Offices.
The new offices of a civilian character
created number 3,263, with annual com
pensation of <2.500,601; and those abol
ished or omitted aggregate 211, at an
annual pay of <246,226, a net increase of
3,603, at a yearly cost of <2,239,075.
In addition to the new civil employ
ments shown, the volume also exhibits
a net increase in the military estimate
over its organization as it would have
existed July 1, 1901, of 77,194 officers and
enlisted men, with annual pay amount
ing to $16,312,910; and 50 officers and 5,000
seamen in the naval establishment, with
a yearly pay of $1,802,425.
The net number of sailors increased
is 528, at a cost for the year of <75,473.
The total appropriations made by the
Fifty-sixth congress aggregate $1,440,
489,483, or <127,723.198 less than the <1,568,
212,637 appropriated by the preceding
congress.
THE COAST FISHER IES TRUST
Salmon Packers Will Start With a
Capital of $200,000,000—Not Yet
Ready for Subscription.
(By Associated Press.)
New York, May 11.—The Journal of
Commerce says: The consolidation of the
Pacific Coast salmon cannierles is still in
tentative shape. As for the financial ar
rangements, it is understood that these
are well in hand, but that the point has
not yet been reached for calling subscrip
tions.
The present plan contemplates the for
mation of a company, to be known as the
Pacific Packing and Navigation So., with
a stock capitalisation at < 366 , 060 , 000 ,
equally divided into seven per cent cumu
lative preferred stock and common stock.
In addition, an issue of <7,000,000 seven
year debentures at six pV cent is proo
posed..
FUGITIYE FILIPINO REBELS FLEE TO M1NP0R0 WHERE
THE BLUE COATS ARE CHASEING THEM
TO SUBMISSION.
» Manila, May 11.—The trial of Captain Frederick J. Barrows of the 3k
30 Thirteenth volunteer infantry, quartermaster of the department of %
3k Luzon, on charges connected with the commissary scandals, was fin- S
3S ished .to-day. The verdict has not been announced. 3k
% , The department of Southern Luzon Is sending various expeditious 3k
3k in pursuit of the remaining Filipino bands. It is, expected that the Sk
3k island of Mindoro will be occupied in the near future. Many fugi- 3k
3k tives, Tagalogs and a quantity of arms are reported to be concealed 3k
3k in Mindoro. %
3k The United States Philippine commission is overrun with applica- 3k
3k tions for civil commissions, and the officers of the new province are 3k
3k submitting many questions to the commission. The routine business 3k
3k of the commissioners is hea.vy. The provincial officers have encount- 8S
X ered no serious difficulties. ^
% A party of insurgents partly burned the bridge next to Lucban, 3k
% Tayabas province, Thursday night, but were driven back without loss 3k
Ä on either side. jc
* X
3kSk3k%3k3k3k3kX3k3k3k3k3k3k3k3k3k3k3k3k3k3k\\3k3k3k3k3kASk3k3k3k3k3k3k3kSk5*3k3k3k3k3k
WOO Will CONTROL THE NORTHERN
PACIFIC ?
(By Associated Press.)
New York, May 11.—How is Union Pa
cific going to be affected by the contest
now in progress for control of Northern
Pacific, is a question which is being dis
cussed with great interest by Wall
street. If Mr. Harriman and his asso
ciates succeed in their endeavor to ob
tain control of Northern Pacific, the an
swer to the question is comparatively
Simple. By that operation the Union
Pacific, through its control of Northern
Pacific, would come virtually into pos
session of the latter's one-half interest
in the Burlington system, and the posljK
tion would be materially strengthened/
If, however, it should develop, as the
street seems inclined to think will be
the case, that Mr. Morgan and Mr. Hill
have obtained a clear majority of the
Northern Pacific stocks, a situation will
be created which, in the present temper
of the opposing forces, is thought by
Wall street to be one of much gravity
For the Burlington control gives the
Great Northern and the Northern Pa
cific, both paralleling the Union Pacific
on the north, an outlet of thpir own from
Minneapolis and St. Paul to Chicago,
and gives the Northern Pacific also a
direct outlet from the Pacific coast to
Kansas City, Omaha and other points in .
the Union Pacific territory.
The St. Paul and Northwestern roads
also find their interests menaced by the
Burlington deal, and these companies,
which are in harmony with the Union
English Newspaper Prophets Now Say
" I Told You So," in Speaking
of American Stock Panic.
(By Associated Press.)
New York, May 11.—British half-penny
journalism now has a more congenial
American theme, says the Tribune's Lon
don correspondent, than mercantile com
petition or a multi-millionaire's shipping
raid. The incidents of the speculation in
Wall street are entertaining reading and
the moral is drawn that the American
gambling spirit courts disaster by sheer
excess of recklessness. .
Unwillingness of speculators in Lon4
don to join in the American game is
cited as convincing proof of English con
servatism and sobriety of judgment. It
is true that no fortunes were made ill
London in American markets. The spe^.
cuuators were cautious and ill-informed
A POLITICAL BOXING MAI2H
Great Falls Democratic Club Will Wit
ness a Rattling 20-round Fight
May 18.
Great Falls, May 11.—In its prepara
tions to get in good training for the
next campaign, the Young Men's Demo
cratic club of this city is importing one
of the best known pugilists of the state,
"Kid" Oglesby of Helena, who will go
on the stage May 18 for a 20-round
match with Jack Wode, of Great Falls.
It is thought the club members will be
able to learn much in the way of ducks,
swings, jabs and other ring 'mysteries.
It is not openly asserted that these
methods are to be used in campaign
wark, but from the enthusiasm with
which the club took up the proposition
it is generally understood that the club
members are fitting themselves for ef
fective work at the polls.
It is recognized in the club's select
circles as the legitimate provincet of a
political club to take up athletic train
ing, especially such as tends to success
in a hard fought battle at the polls.
Nothing, they say, is so conducive to a
winning ticket as the fact that cam
paigners can thrash the stuffing out of
a political antagonist. These muscular
disciples of Thomas Jefferson are in a
fair way to make Cascade county Solid
ly democratic, and great enthusiasm
marks the coming opening of their act
ive campaign.
HAWAIIANS MUST SETTLE IT
McKinley Will Taka Vo Notice , of
Petition to Remove ProakWnt
Solo From Office.
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, May 11.—Officials who are
acquainted with the president's view»
Pacific, are said to be likely to make
common cause with the latter in case it
is excluded from participation in control
of the Burlington.
General War in Prospect.
It remains to be seen whether or not
tlie present contest will be allowed to
develop into a general fight all along the
line, a struggle which, it is felt by care
ful observers, would be destructive in
the extreme. Such a conflict, it is point
ed out, would not only embrace the
transcontinental lines and the roads be
tween the Mississippi and the Rockies,
but might also spread to the eastern
territory.
In view of the vast possibilities of
less and disaster resulting from an open
breach between Mr. Morgan and the
other powerful interests referred '"to,
however, involving the complete aban
donment of the "community of interest"
principle, it is not believed among the
best posted men in the financial district
that the Union Pacific will be shut out
from participation in some form qmï to
some degree in the Burlington deal,
whatever be the outcome of the battle
or actual control of the Northern Pa
cific.
"Mow will the fight over Northern
Pacific affect the Union Pacific Inter
ests'?" Russell Sage was asked last night.
"I think Union Pacific will not be hurt,
and I think its stock will be mort valu
able later on than it is now," he replied.
and predicted the break in the market
lung before it came.
Perhaps the best "tips" for the Ameri
can market were provided by Mr. La
bouchere's Truth, and those who heeded
him profited by the rise in American se
curities, but sold out prematurely.
Stories are told of some fortunate
drives made in American and Canadian
Pacific stocks, but the majority of the
speculators stayed out, and when the ac
tivity of the American market was sus
pended wagged their heads and said that
they had foreseen the inevitable collapse.
These brokers were surprised by the dis
patches just received indicating a greatly
improved feeling in the American mar
ket and leader writers were convinced
that they had been premature in playing
to the English gallery.
regarding the legislative situation In
Hawaii, do not believe he will lie in
dined to take notice of the memorial
from the Hawaiian legislature asking for
Governor Dole's removal. That friction
exists between Governor Dole and the
legislature has been known for months,
but the president, believing the Ha
wuiians should work out their own sal
vation, has taken no ateps to inter
fere.
Officials who discussed the matter said
Governor Dole has acted within his au
thority in refusing an extension.
RUSSIA MUL CTS AN AMERICAN
Must Fay for Prematurely Leaving
Czar's Army, or See His Aged
Father Lose His Home.
(By Associated Press.)
St. Paul, May 11.—L. D. Horne, a natur
alized citizen and a member of a whole
sale firm in this city, has been forced by
tile Russian government, of which coun
try he is a native, to pay a fine of 600 rou
bles, amounting to <350.
Mr. Horne received notice several
months ago from Russia that the fine had
been imposed because he did not serve
his time in the Russian army. Through
the American minister at St. Petersburg
he arbitrated the matter, claiming ex
emption because of his American citizen
ship. He offered to go to Russia in per
son, but the American minister informed
him that it would be exceedingly diffi
cult to secure his release from the arrest
which would surely follow.
The Russian government attached the
homestead of Mr. Horne's parents at
Niesen, Northern Russia, to secure pay
ment of the fine. Mr. Horne"s parents
are aged, and their only property is their
sobs. To prevent them from being turn
ed out, Horne paid his fine.
QUIET THtINALL STREET FEIER
SPECULATORS NEED THE TIME TO STRAIGHTEN UP THEIR
BOOKS, DEMORALIZED BY THE WEEK'S PLUNGING
GREAT UNION AND NORTHERN PACIFIC DEALS
STILL IN THE DARK.
(By Associated Press.)
New York, May 11.—With both the
stock exchange and the consolidated ex
change closed today, and with practical
ly nothing doing on the curb, Wall street
was very quiet. Although the exchanges
were not open for business, nil of t>
larger brokerage houses had their clerks
at work straightening out the accounts
of speculators and putting their books
in order. In the rush days from Mon
day to Friday none of the usual making
out of customers' statements was done,
and it probably will be late tomorrow
before the balancing of accounts will
be finished.
Many speculators went downtown to
await the bank statement and to get the
London quotations for American securi
ties. At 2 p. m. London's price gener
ally showed advances as compared with
the close at New York yesterday, the
extreme rise being 18 points in Northern
Pacific. Other stocks generally were up,
but United States steel common was
3-8 and the preferred 1-2 lower. Illinois
showed a decline of 1 1-4. All Interest
in the financial world remains aYtsorbed
in the great contest for the control of
Northern Pacific and the rivalries that
have been caused by that battle.
Heavy buying in Union Pacific yester
day provoked much comment, and today
the "street" was wondering whether tne
fight of the railway giants was to be
transferred to that stock again. The
high price for Northern Pacific in Lon
don today was taken by many as indi
cating that buying for the control of
the property was still going on wnerever
the seller had the stock to deliver. It
was learned today also that at the time
Kuhn, Loeb & Co. were settling with
shorts yesterday at $150 a Share, they
were paying the same price over the
counter to all who offered the securities
for instant delivery.
A representative of the Harriman syn
dicate made the following statement to
day :
"In spite of all that may be said and
printed to the contrary we - stand on
our assertion of the past few days, that
we believe possession of Northern Pa
SULTAN DEFIES THE WHOLE WOOED
CHARGES THE AMBASSADORS WITH SMUGGLING IN TURKEY.
AND DEMANDS IMMEDIATE RENEWAL OF ALL FOREIGN
POSTAL SERVICE WITHIN HIS DOMAINS-HIS
THIRD NOTE QN THE SUBJECT.
(By Associated Press.)
Constantinople, May 11.—A third note
evidently emanating direct from the sul
tan, was delivered to-day to the ambas
sadors, demanding in peremptory lan
guage the immediate suppression of the
foreign postal service und reiterating
churges against foreign officials. The
ambassadors lmrr.edately returned the
EUROPEANSCOLOMIZE BRAZIL
Germans, Italians and Portuguese
Lead in Numbers—Many Foreign
Settlements.
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, May 11—'Three hundred
thousand Germans have located in Bra
zil, according to a report received at the
state department from Consul General
Eugene Seegur stationed at Rio Janeiro.
He was directed last summer to submit a
report regarding the foreign population
in Brazil. His report shows the number
(H foreigners in Brazil as follows: Ital
ians 400,000; Portuguese 400,000; Germans,
300,000; Spanish 100,000; Poles 80,000;
French 10,000; English 5,000; North Amer
icans 5,000; other nationalities 100,000.
One of the best of the foreign settle
ments of Brazil, Mr. Seegur says, is that
of the Germans at Bluemanau, in the
state of Santa Catharina. In spite of lib
eral inducements, this colony received
only 10,000 immigrants during the last
fifty years. Under the monarchy Mr.
Seegur reports, strong efforts were made
by the national government to obtain
colonists from Europe, especially from
Germany. It cannot be said that these
efforts were conspicuously successful.
The German government prohibited im
migration to Brazil until 1S96, when the
prohibition was removed- Besides those
in the province of Santa Catharina, there
are many German subjects in Rio Grande
do Sul. Mr. Seegur closes his report by
saying that as a rule only a very small
percentage of the colonists, oone or two
per cent, preserve their original nation
ality.
CARDINAL WILL TA KE A REST
New York, May 11.—Cardinal Gibbons,
who will sail for Rome today, said last
night:
"My visit to Rome has no special sig
nificance. I am going to make my regu
lar visit to the Holy Father. I will see
his holiness and confer with him regard
ing the condition of the church in Ameri
ca. I am certainly not going to Home for
the specific purpose of discussing church
conditions in the Philippines."
The cardinal said that he was worn out
and was seeking a long sea voyage. He
probably will not return until the end of
summer.
cific is now held by Kuhn, Loeb &
Company. It may take some time to
prove this and it is even possible that
some legal trick may be devised to
wrest control from us. At this time,
however, there is no doubt in our minds
that we are in power. As far as the
Burlington deal goes, that is only indi
rectly involved in the Northern Pacific
controversy and we believe it will go
through in due time." At the banking
house of J. P Morgan & Company, no
statement regarding Northern Pacific
could be obtained.
Mr. Hill reported to the new bureau
that there was no truth in the news to
the effect that he and J. Pierpont Mor
gan desired to secure conti ol of Union
Pacific.
"There is nothing in that story," said
Mr. Hill.
WILD HORS ES FOR THE ARMY
Trouble for Tommy Atkins—Broncho
Busters Might Get a Job in
South Africa.
(By Associated Press.)
Vancouver, B. C., May 11.—Hundreds of
horses which have been running wild
during the last few years on the plains
between Lillioet and Cariboo and Okan
ogan, are being captured to be sold to the
British government for use in South
Africa.
An imperial cavalry officer is now at'
Kamloops buying them as rapidly as theÿj
are brought ii The horses are of gootP
size, most of them being mustangs, in
bred with domestic horses that have been
lost by the ranchers at various times and
joined the wild herds.
Inspect California Waterways.
(By Associated Press.)
San Francisco, May 11.—A number of
eastern congressmen, most of them mem
bers of the river and harbor committee,
will soon visit California and durlngij
their stay of three weeks will thoroughlyi
inspect the river and harbors of the sjate/
Congressman Burton of Ohio, will head
the jiarty.
note to the porte, thus creating partial
cessation of relations between the em
bassies and the Turkish government.
The charges relate principally to smug
gling and assert that the foreign am
bassadors not only allow this evasion
of the Turkish law, but themselves en
gage in the illicit bringing of heavily
taxed goods into Turkey through the
mails.
STARS AS STOVES
HELP HEAT THE WORLD, ACCORD
ING TO FIGURES.
MEASURE THEIR HEAT RAYS
Astronomers Decide That the Far-off
Arbs Send in Their Little Packages
of Warmth—Delicate Instruments
Necessary in Making the Calcula
tions—Triumph of Star Gazers.
(By Associated Press.)
Chicago, May 11.—Whether the stars,
millions of miies away, Bend to the earth's
surface any heat along with their rays
of light, a question which has long puz
zled astronomers, has been finally solved.
The heat from these far oft bodies has
not only been detected but measured. It
has been matured by one of the most del
icate and sensitive astronomical instru
ments ever made—an instrument capable
of measuring heat of a candle a mile
away.
The credit for solving the problem and
for constructing this delicate instrument
belongs to Prof. E. F. Nichols of Dart
mouth. The experiments, were, however,
performed at the Yerkes observatory of
the University of Chicago, where Prof.
Nichols spent two of his summer van
tions. The results obtained from tn.-.-a
experiments have just been carefully re
viewed and computed and sent to Prof.
George E. Hale, director of the o'.se va
tory.
Appreciable Star Heat.
Prof. Nichols' experiments at the
Yerkes observatory have at first proved
beyond a doubt that ihe pi irmts and some
of the fixed stars send an appreciable
quantity of heat to the earth. The quan
tity. however, is so minute that the won
der is that an instrument could be made
sensitive enough to detect it.
Prof. Nichols was assisted :n tills valu
able work bv Prof. Charlie K. St. John
of Oberlin college, and A. L. Cotton, tor
meriy assistant at the Lick observatory.

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