OCR Interpretation


The Butte inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, May 13, 1901, Image 8

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025294/1901-05-13/ed-1/seq-8/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 8

SPORTING NEWS
Happenings of the Ring, the
Track and the Diamond.
Edited by
DÂNIfL J. WALSH.
*~.~ryir>r^»M»riri ii ■ n -, n n n n
Yachting, Outdoor and in
door Athletics.
ÖnfiTWORtD
JEFFRIES SAYS MORE THINGS OF
HIS TALKED OF GO WITH RDHLIN.
Champion in a New York Interview
Says He Is Beady to Go to 'Frisco—
Hedges on the Date of the Mill
—Strong Probability of
No Fight at All.
New York, May 17.—James J. Jeffries
arrived in this city last night from Pitts
burg.
"I'm only to stay in New York for
about ten days," said the champion, "and
then I shall go to San Francisco. Of
course 1 am going to fight Ruhlin if he is
really in earnest for a meeting, and also
Sharkey and Fitzsimmons. They will get
their turns in the order named.
"The exact date on which I am to meet
Billy Madden's portege has not been set
tled, although it is generally understood
to be early in July. I'll be in 'Frisco only
a few days when every arrangement for
the fight will be completed. Then I will
go to Los Angeles and begin training."
There Is no certainty that Jeffries and
Ruhlin will fight in San Francisco or
anywhere else. They claim to be in
earnest about the matter but those who
claim to know, say that their talk is all
bluff. There is probably no doubt that
the men are anxi us to fight but the ques
tion arises, will they face each other tor
such a small purse as the 'Frisco clubs
will hang up?
The only argument in support of the
probability of a tight, is that the big fel
lows need the money and may be willing
to go in for $S.0J0 or $10,000 when they
realize that they can get no more.
It is not many years ago, since a fight
between such men as Jeffries and Ruhlin
would have brought a purse of $50,000 or
$60.000 in New York state- In those days
fights were more on the level than they
are today and a club could afford to hang
up a rich purse, as it was sure of patron
]
!
i
I
j
I
NATIONAL LEAGUE GAMES.
(Bj
Associated Press
)
At Chicago.
R.
H.
E.
Chicago ...
............6
8
2
St. Louis ..
................3
5
2
Batteries—
-Waddell and King: Murphy
and Nichols
Umpire—Emslie.
At Cincinnati.
R.
H.
IS.
Cincinnati .
..............6
7
1
Pittsburg ..
..............1
9
i
Batteries—
Hahn and Peitz; Leeve:
and
Connor. Umpire—Dwyer.
Standing of the Clubs.
Played. Won.
Lost. P.C.
Pittsburg ..
........16 10
6
.625
Ci nein na ti
........16 10
6
.625
New York .
......... 12 7
5
.5S3
Boston ____
........13 7
6
.539
Brooklyn ..
.......15 7
8
.466
Chicago ....
........IS s
12
.414
Philadelphia
........16 7
9
.438
St. Louis ..
........16 5
11
.313
AMERICAN LEAGUE GAMES.
R.
H.
E.
Milwaukee .
9
4
Cleveland ..
..............2
7
1
Batteries—
Dowling and Leahy;
Hart
and Yeager.
Chicago ...
..............5
9
4
Detroit ....
..............7
15
1
Batteries—
Katoll and Sullivan; Sievers
and Buelow.
Standing of the Clubs.
Played. Won. Lost. P.C.
Detroit ____
........17 13
4
. 7 65
Chicago ....
........17 11
6
. 647
Baltimore .
........12 7
5
.583
Boston ....
........13 7
6
.530
Washington
......12 6
6
.500
Philadelphia
........16 7
9
.45)
Milwaukee
........17 6
11
. 353
Cleveland ..
........17 4
13
.235
PACIFIC LEAGUE GAMES.
Spokane ..
....4 0 0 2 0 0
0 0
*—6
Tacoma ...
...2 12300
0 0
*—8
Batteries—Wilner and Rafert: Stopher
anti Shea. Umpire—McDermott.
Seattle .....2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 4—?
Portland 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3—0
ENTRY LIS T STIL L GROWING
Secretary Lawrence Announces Two
More Handicaps and Another
Rich Stake Event.
Entries for the coming race meet of
the Butte Racing association are daily
increasing. In addition to the long list
announced several days ago, Secretary
Lawrence has compiled 148 more, which
he made public last night. The entries
are for three new stake events. The
events are as follows:
The Anaconda Handicap, $1,000—For
all ages; at one mile: $5 to accompany
the nomination: $45 additional to start;
the Montana Jockey club to add an
amount sufficient to make the value of
the stake $1.000, of vhich *200 to second,
$100 to third and $50 to fourth: weights
to appear three days prior to the race,
acceptances to be made through the
entry box the day preceding .the race be
fore 11:30 a. m. Sixty-six are entered.
The Hamburg Handicap. $1,000—For 2
year-olds, at five furlongs; $5 to accom
pany the nomination: $45 additional to
stait: the Montana Jockey club to add
an additional amount sufficient to make
the value of the stake $1.000. of which
$200 to second, $100 to third and $50 to
fourth; weights to appear three days
prior to race; acceptances to be made
through the entry box the day preceding
the race before 11:30 a. m. Thirty-nine
•re entered.
T.he Silver Bow Stakes. $1,000—For 2
year-olds; four and one-half furlongs:
$5 to accompany the nomination; $45 ad
ditional to start; the Montana Jockey
club to add an amount sufficient to make
the value of the stake $1,000, of which
1200 to second, $100 to third and $50 to
fourth; 5 pounds below the scale; stake
winners, or winners of four or more
races since March 15 to carry seven
pounds extra; of three races of any valu
pounds extra; of three races of any
age, that would not only make good the
purse, but would coin money for the in
vestors.
Now things are much different. The
public has been "faked" so often and so
hard that the sports are wise and they
hesitate long before they will give up
their good money to see two pugs come
together under any concluons. This anti
pathy to prize fighting, as it is cooked up
today, has been growing for some time
and it certainly was not alleviated, in any
way by he recent Ganz-McGovern fiasco
that Harris and Herford so neatly perpe
trated on unsuspecting Chicagoans and
others.
The sports were fooled once more after
they had vowed never again to be caught
napping and now they are determined to
get wise all round- They want to show
clearly that you con not fool all tiie peo
ple all the time.
Because the club managements realize
that a fight today will not command the
patronage of days gone by, no matter
how much on the level it is heralded to
be, they are leary about hanging up large
purses and then going in the hole to make
good. Therefore it is extremely doubtful,
if a purse of more than $8,000 or $10,000
can be obtained from any 'Frisco club or
in fact any club at all.
As it costs money to go to 'Frisco and
to train after a fighter gets there and as
even $10,000, is a small sum compara
tively speaking to cut up between two
fighters and their managers, after all ex
] penses have been paid there appears to
! be little inducement to offer Jeffries ana
i Ruh'in. Still as was previously stated
I the big fellows need money and as they
j realize that they can hope for nothing
I better at this time than Frisco wijl offer,
they may bring themselves to accept the
best that can be done, and fight.
value since that date, five pounds extra.
Allowances—Maidens, 3 pounds; beaten
maidens, 7 pounds; entries to be made
through the entry box the day preceding
the race at 11:30 a. m.
RACE WAS EASY F OR FOSTER
He Handily Out Sprints Bundon in a
Seventy-five Yards Run for
$100 a Side.
Jim Foster, scheduled as from Ana
conda, -but who rumor has it is none
other than Tom Morris, who defeated
"Cuckoo" Collins at 100 yards for a large
purse at the World's fair, yesterday took
tho wind out of the sails of T. E. Dun
don in a 75 yards match for $100 a side
at the race track. The time recorded
by the watch holder was 8 seconds flat.
That could have been bettered by Fos
ter had he desired, as his win was a
walkover.
The start was by mutual consent. As
a result there was considerable jockey
ing before the men got otf. Both sprang
from their "set" at the same moment,
and were on even terms for the first
25 yards. After that it looked as though
Dundop carried weights and Foster won
as he pleased.
Foster was the favorite throughout.
His admirers had much confidence in
his sprinting abilities and were willing
to back up their judgment with cash.
There were no takers, however, at the
track, though it was rumored that $200
had been placed up town Saturday even
ing.
There is some talk now of a match
race between Foster and Grinrod of
Helena.
The scheduled race between Herbert
Johnson and Bert Sherlock, who ran two
dead heats several days ago, was called
off until next Sunday. The race was
postponed because it was said the stake
money of $25 a side had not been posted
in time. The race was to have been at
50 yards.
SOME LOCA L AMAT EUR GAMES
Baseball Fans Are Treated to Five
Interesting and Spirited Sun
day Matches.
The Butte baseball team yesterday re
deemed itself for the defeat it suffered
the previous Sunday at the hands of the
Montanas, formerly the Butte Juniors.
The Buttes scored nine runs against
their opponents' two.
Thirty-three large, juicy tallies were
piled up yesterday afternoon at Athletic
park by the Davis & Weimescarry ball
tosseds. Their opponents on the dia
mond were the Carpenters' ball team.
The best the saw and plane handlers
could do was nine runs. A week from
Sunday next the victorious team will
cross bats with the Southern hotel ag
gregation of spheroid chasers.
The typos of the Standard yesterday
put aside all newspaper cares and took
on some trouble at Athletic park. Ana
conda, In the shape of the Anaconda
Juniors. When the trouble had been
figured up it represented a total of 23
runs to the credit of the Juniors against
5 for the printers.
t he Crescents proved too much for the
Silver Stars at the Anaconda Lake park
yesterday morning. After the smoke of
battle had cleared away it was found
that the Crescents had scored nine runs
against two for their opponents. The
victors annnounced that they would play
the Never Sweats at Mountain View
park on the opening day.
The clerks of the Copper City Com
mercial company tried conclusions with
the bookkeepers of t'he general office of
the company at Anaconda Lake park
yesterday afternoon. The game was
close and Interesting despite the large
scores. The clerks came oft victorious
with a total of 16 runs. The bookkeepers
scored 14 tallies. A second game will
be arranged.
ANAC0NPA~ GUN C LUB SHOOT
Poor Scores Prevailed Although D. D.
Twohy äfiows Good Marks
manship.
The members of the Anaconda Gun club
held another interesting shoot yesterday
afternoon. The scoring done was not as
go d as usual. D D. Twohy displayed the
best marksmanship and twice hit 21 blue
rocks out of 25. Mr. Twohy took two
turns in the fifth event to fill in , which
accounts for the double score credited to
him. The score card shows the following
result:
Event
1
2
3
4 5
Event.............
2
3
4 5
A. Harrity......
16
19
11 19
F. Klepetka.....
15
17
1Y 21
T. J. Straehn ....
.......13

10
J. Stuart Johnson .
18
14
If —
L. G. Smith......
......15
17
12
If —
H. R. Burg.......
....... 6


_
H. H. Nell........
......17
18
18
2? '18
B. D. Mahan......
20
20
If -
E. J. McGiven ....
20
14
2Ç 20
W. Jenny ........
.......13
11

F. I. Cairns ......
......15
14
15
i£ a«
D. D. Twohy.....
.......20
21
18
20 21
Berthels..........
.... ..
20

- -
J. H. Cochran ....
...... —
6
8
—' —
E. Klepatko.......
...... ~


T 0
DOUBLES
20 TARGETS.
Harrity ...........
V4
J. Stuart Johnson
D. D. Twohy ....
B. D. Mahan ............................lb
THEIR LAST PRACT ICE SHOOT
Butte Rod and Gun Club Members
Prepare for the Coming State
Tournament.
The last practice of the Butte Rod and
Gun club prior to the state tournament
to be held at Great Falls, beginning Fri
day, was had yesterday at the regular
weekly shoot of the club at its grounds
in the Boulevard additfon. Fairly good
scores were made.
Three events were decided. They were
CONSTITUTION IS THE BEST
Of THE HERRESHOFF PRODUCTS.
mss
m
The accompanying cut shows the bow
of the cup defender, Constitution, from
the starboard side. The drawing was
made at Bristol. R. I., the day the yacht
was launched. Experts say the hew
boat is better by far than anything ever
turned out by the Herreschoffs. The
general opinion is that the new defender
will prove herself worthy to keep the
America's cup on this side of the At
lantic. A yachtinag expert says of the
yacht:
"The Constitution above the water line
will closely resemble the Columbia—in
fact, in this respect, is as near that
champion as she could be made— açjj
keen, indeed, will be the yachtsman vpfc
will be able to distinguish one rom « Ye
other when afloat at even a very mo^r
ate distance. Under the water the C^wt,
stitution is slightly modified toward the
lines of the 'seventies.' and with tbal
alteration, which was a proved success,
is added considerable width, and wlth*4
little more weight of lead she willT»
given a large increase of power over he
older sister, the Columbia.
"It is clear, then, that the New York
Yacht club, and indeed the whole coun
try, can confidently look forward to gq|
Constitution as being a yacht embosjwj
ing more of the great desirabilities than
was ever before built in America, ail8
as loyal and patriotic citizens can but
hold to the comforting assurance that
the old trophy won just 50 years ago will
remain with its present custodians for
another period, or until Sir Thomas Lip
ton comes again.
"The Constitution's water line is as
near the 90-foot limit as it was possible
with the finest kind of mathematical
calculation to bring it. Her length over
all is substantially the same as the Co
lumbia—132 feet. Her sheer and free
board do not show any departure suffi
ciently great to be perceptible even to
the artistic eye. Her beam is from 18 to
20 inches greater than the Columbia's,
while her draught is a few inches less.
"The Independence will try to swing
her enormous sail, and may have the
luck to do so safely. The same with
the Shamrock II. There can be no guess
work about the Constitution. She will
have more hoist than the Independence
which means that it is far greater than
the Columbia was. She will have.L»
gaff that will astonish the world, beta#
five feet larger than that of the Co
lumbia, and as the latter-^ gaff had eVsn
much more length than will be carried
by the boston boat, why, there seems no
use of shouting yet awhile by anybody.
"So in the matter of booms. The Bii
dependence is jotted down as 108 feet 5
Inches. The Columbia was 109 feet'' 8
inches, while the old Shamrock carried
one of about 111 feet. The Constitution
will be longer than either by feet, aftd
in the matter of sails aloft she Will
not be found wanting'. ''
"In a word, the Constitution's sAW
spread will be in excess of any of thM
year's big boats, and it should enable
her to outsail the Columbia ten or twelvé
minutes at least over a thirty-mile
course. How much or how little It may
help her to vanquish the "enemy" both
at home and abroad remains to be test
ed. Certainly the flatter floor, the wider
midships section and slightly fuller wet
ted lines forward and aft, without ex
cessive proportions to cause poundtng
In a seaway, indicate that the Consti
tution will be a far better all around
boat than the Columbia.
"Tha Constitution is emphatically A
j
Nos. 1 and 2 at 25 birds, 16 yards rise,
and the Butte Rod and Gun club shoot,
40 birds, at four different styles. The
score is as fallows:
Name—
1st.
2d.
3d.
Bachelor ...........
22
29
C. H. Smith.........
23
36
Goddard ............
16
P. McGowan.......
23
Slemons............
21
29
Walker.............
23
34
Yancey-.............
19
31
Spargo ..............
22
27
Booth ...............
,. ...... 18
28
O'Brien .............
........19
14
28
Home Run the Feature.
Missoula, May 13.—There was a lively
practice game of baseball at the south
side grounds yesterday afternoon. The
teams were made up of members of the
first and the second nines of the city.
Crawford and Mitchell, the Missoula
battery, played together on the team
captained by E. J. McCasey and that
team won the game by a score of 15
to 12. The feature of the game was
McCasey's home run.
Long Ride in an Auto.
Utica. N. Y.. May 13.—Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Shaw of Chicago passed through
this city yesterday on an automobile
tour from New York to Chicago. Mr.
Shaw wagered $2000 that he could make
the trip in 144 hours' running time, land
hopes to make It In 120 hours, or 10 dâys
of 12 hours each.
bronze and steel boat. There is not
enbugh wood in her cabin flooring and
the apologies for her bulkhead to fill
an oruinary lumber cart. More weight
Is thus saved.
No risks have been taken in reducing
the Constitution's freeboard or height
above water. Her designer could not af
ford to do so. the designer of the chal
lenger could. Her owner ha3 all to gain
and little to lose, so the designer of that
uoat has cut down his freeboard to save
weight. This is a mistake.
"In the midship section of the new
yacht the bilge shows the same smooth,
easily rounded lines for which all the
Herreshoff boats are famous, although
jthe lines are slightly fuller and some
jwhat flatter than in the Columbia. In
'other words, the new boat's midship
(section has greater power and stability
'than in the champion of 1899.
j "From the point just below the bilge,
Swhere the section turns on its down
jward course to the lead keel, there is
{very little difference in the lines of the
jtwo boats, and, excepting the matter
jof the Constitution's slightly reduced
{draught and more beam, the departure
(in their models is not great. Consider
ing that she will carry little more bal
Sast than the Columbia, it may readily
x=be seen that she can utilize greater
power and carry added sail to the very
best advantage.
"The side deck line of the Constitution
is slightly fuller than the Columbia's
from the midship section forward, and
she is a trifle wider at the tatfrail, thus,
giving an easier turn to the frames and
lengthening and broadening the floor on
which, $he sails, easing the section lines
both 'forward ad aft and giving her a
rounder and fuller bow. On dieck the
Constitution is larger than the Columbia.
"In regard to the wetted surface, there
seems to be no appreciable difference be
tween the two boats, which means that
with the same wetted surface and with
increased stability, and consequently
greater sail power, the new boat will be
driven through the water at a greater
speed than the Columbia was. The length
of the lead keel of the two boats is
substantially the same, so that the Con
stitution will show the same qnlckness
In stays for which the Columbia was
noted.
"That the Constitution is a lighter boat
than the Columbia is a reasonable prop
osition, for while the two boats have the
same length and are otherwise similar,
k considerable saving of weight has been
{effected by the longitudinal system of
construction and the reduced thickness
Of plating permitted thereby, and also
)ay th£ substitution of a thin steel deck
for the heavier wooden deck of the Co
lumbia. Further, it is only reasonable
to infer that there will be some slight
Baving of weight aloft, so that in the
total weight of hull, spars and equip
ment, there will be a matter of several
tons in favor of the Constitution.
"The sail area of the Constitution
may not be definitely stated at this time,
but careful calculations based upon her
relative stability, as compared with the
Columbia, would indicate that she will
carry a greater area of canvas than wag
ever before seen on a single sticker
on either side of the Atlantic, or, possi
bly, will ever be seen in the future.
"There has been much said about the
sail spread of the Independence and that
of the Shamrock II. Comparisons have
been made with that of the Columbia,
and loud cries of exultation Indulged In
that at last Captain 'Nat' Herreshoff
has been outdone on his own (round.
Wait and as»'*
Livingston Gets Paddy Ryan.
(By Associated Press.)
Livingston, May 13.—'Manager Ham
mond has secured Paddy Ryan, the
hard-hitting pitcher of last year's Hel
ena V-tm, and that gentleman arrived
in the city yesterday to play with the
Livingston ball club. His arrival was
hailed with Joy by the fans, who are
now confident that Livingston will sice
up with any team in the state. Ives, a
fielder from New Boston, 111., is expected
•here the first of the week.
"Bo" Needham Passes Away.
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, May 13.—Moulton T.
Needham, popularly known as "Bo"
Needham, secretary and treasurer of the
Washington Baseball club, died here on
Saturday night of typhoid pneumonia.
He was 32 years of age and unmarried.
The remains have been taken to his
former home at Rockford, 111. Need
ham was formerly sporting editor of tha
Detroit Free Press and the Ohio State
Journal.
Martin-Childs Fight Off.
(By Associataed Press.)
Grand Forks, Mich., May 13.—The
Martin-Childs colored championship
fight, scheduled to take place In this
city Tuesday night, has been declared
off. The governor issued orders to the
sheriff to prevent the mill. Manager
Madden, with Martin and Ruhlin, left
for New York this evening. The Olym
pian Athletic club is loser by a consid
erable amount.
Shamrock Repairs Completed.
(By Associated Press.)
London, May 13.—The repairs on
Shamrock II were completed y.esterday.
Watson and Jamieson are satisfied that
the challenger is in perfect trim.
a
*
*
o
Ticket Office
Cor. Park and Main Sts
Butte Schedule
Arrive
Depart
"North Coast Lim
ited," East bound.
11.46 p.m.
11.56 p.m.
"North Coast Lim
ited," West bound
No. 14, East bound
7.52 p.m.
8.82 p.m.
local, for St. Paul
and East; Bill
ings and all Mis
souri River points,
also Denver.......
1.66 p.m.
No. 13, West bound
from St. Paul and
East, and all B. &
M. and Missouri
points, Denver....
12.26 pm.
Garrison Local to
and from all points
West .... ........
1.46 p.m.
6.45 a.m.
Mixed, to Whitehall
daily except Sun
day; Twin Bridges
Tuesday, Thurs
day and Satur
day; Norris and
Pony, Monday and
Friday; leaves and
arrives from N. P.
Local Freight De
pot ..............
5.45 pm.
5.36 a.m.
Short Lina to Donvor
W. H. MERRIMAN. t en). t(L
"BUFFALO"
(NEW YORK)
PAN AMERICAN
EXPOSITION
Three "Limited" Traîne dally making
connection at Chicago with ad Eastern
Cheapest rates and Superb Service via
Chicago
Great
WESTERN
Railway.
_ for Folder, containing mape of
Buffalo and Exposition (hounds, end
4. P. ELMER,
Oea'l Passenger AgL,
SHIBAin, ILL.
DOWN THE
GREAT LAKES
In the old davs the trip up and down the Great
Lakes was the favorite trip of travelers —there were
no tourists then. The boats then used did not com
pare with those now on the lakes, and the trip re
mains the finest one in the world of its sort.
The Northern Pacific, via Duluth, connects
with the Lake Steamers, and a trip on the "North
Coast Limited*' —in service again Way 5th —and
these steamers to the Pan-American Exposition at
Buffalo, will be something to recount to your chil
dren's children.
Send six cents for "Wonderland 1901,'* ready
May 1st, to CHAS. S. FEE, St. Paul. Minn.
Any local agent will quote rates.
Rio Grande
Western Railway
GREAT
SALT LAKE
ROUTE
The only transcontinental * line
passing' directly through quaint
and pisturesque
SALT LAKE CITY
A Stop-Over Is Allowed at
SALT LAKE CITY
BEAUTIFUL GLENWOOD
COLORADO SPRINGS
OR DENVER
on all classes of tickets on applica
tion to the train conductor.
Scenery Unequalled in The World
X
Ticket Office
47 E. Broadway
w. r, mcbride
Gen. Agent
Buffet-Smoking-Library Cars
Club Life on Wheels
Attched to "Great Northern Fly
er," connecting EVERY DAY
at St. Paul and Minneapolis with
all Limlfed and Fast Mall Trains
for Chicago, New York and the
east.
LEAVES BUTTE.
For St. Paul and East,
dally ....................8:50 p. m.
Great Falls local, daily 9:45 a. m.
ARRIVES BUTTE.
From St. Paul, daily____9:45 p. m.
From Great Falls and
Helena, dally .......... 3:45 p. m.
FULL INFORMATION FROM
City Ticket Office, No. 41 North
Main Street, Butte. J. E. Dc.wson,
General Agent.
Fast
Fast
Time
Time
TO
DENVER. OMAHA
KANSAS CITY
CHICAGO ST. LOUIS
and- All Eastern Pointa
Tha ONLY LIMB te
San Francisco, Los Angeles, Portland
and
ALL PACIFIC COAST POINTS
via
Ogden and Salt Lake City
Tickets to all Principal Cities In the world.
A trip over this company's line Is a guaran
tee of unequalled service and courteous
Depart
TIME
1:00 am
4:00 pm
Ticket Office, 105 N. Main Street
Butte, Montana.
H.O.WIbSON, General Agent

xml | txt