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The Butte inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, June 20, 1901, Image 1

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TO DAYS NEWS TODAY—YOU GET IT ALWAYS-ONLY BY READING THE INTER MOUNTAIN
The Butte Intek Mountain.
VOL. XXI. NO. 77 Showers Tonight; cooler.
BUTTE, MONTANA, THURSDAY EVENING, JUNE 23. 1901.
Generally fair Friday.
PRICE FIVE CENTS
LILY RIOTS IT PRO-BOER
Queen's Hall, cordon, Packet, to Hear
the Delegates From South Africa
and Police Have Their Hands
Full in Preserving
Order.
(By Associated Press.)
London, June 20.—Sentiment In favor
of the Boers is rapidly gaining ground
here, in spite of the fact that this is the
seat of the British operations in South
Africa.
The pro-Boer meeting held here last
evening was an illustration of this.
Thousands of persons began collecting
outside of Queen Hall two hours before
the advertised time for the meeting.
When the doors were opened the pres
sure of the surging moli was so great
that many peope fainted. There was
considerable disturbance and many win
dows were broken in attempts to gain
admission. Some of the auditors were
impaled on the windows.
The hall was packed from floor to
ceiling. Much hooting, mingled with
cheers, greeted the delegates upon their
arrival, and during the evening the de
livery of speeches was attended with
much difficulty owing to the presence of
Jingos.
Henry Labourehere presided at the
meeting, and beside J. W. Saner (ex
commissioner of the public works of
Cape Colony), many prominent pro
Boers, Including John Dillon, leader of
the natlonajlsts, David Lloyd George
(Welsh nationalist), James Kier Hardy
(socialist), and Sir Wilfred Lawson were
present.
During the meeting fully 10,000 jingos
gathered outside the hall, blockaded
traffic and necessitated relays of police
men to keep a semblance of order in the
crowd. Several men mounted the para
pet of the Langham hotel, and, waving
Union Jacks, proposed resolutions
against the pro-Boer agitation.
Many speeches were made and the
usual resolutions were carried amid
much commotion and excitement.
The resolutions Included an amend
ment in favor of complete independence
of the Boer republics, proposed by Lord
Battersea, which did not meet with the
CROWN PRINCE ASSAULTED
BY AN INTOXICATED MAN.
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1
(By Associated Press.)
Berlin, June 20. — While the X
crown prince, Frederick William, X
was on his way from Minder to X
Bonne, a drunken individual ap
proached his carriage at Bo
chum, Westphalia, yesterday, and
aimed a blow with a stick at the
window at which the crown
X prince was seated. The indi
vidual, who described himself as
a clerk, was arrested. He said he
merely desired to see the crown
prince more clearly.
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PANIC CREA TED BY EXPLOSION.
Sleeping Residents of St. Louis Are
Terror Stricken by a Fire That
Does $40,000 Damage.
(By Associated Press.)
St. Louis, Mo., June 20.—The J. B.
Sickles saddlery plant, a four-story
building at the corner of Twenty-first
street and Washington avenue was de
stroyed by fire early this morning. The
fire was preceded by an explosion.
Fire Chief Swingley estimates the dam
age to the Sickles plant at $300,000 on
stock and $100,000 on the building, and
to the Reynolds Carriage company at
$50,000. The damage to Celias' saloon
will not exceed $10,000.
The damage to the Lambert Pharma
cy company he estimates at $10,000.
The explosion, which occurred In the
front part of the building, was a terri
fic one, shaking the buildings for blocks
around and arousing people in the im
mediate neighborhood.
The greatest excitement prevailed In
the neighborhood during the first few
WILLIE
SEES
PE^CL
AHEAD»
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X Read the Inter Mountain if you X
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approval of the Labourehere party. The
meeting ended with the singing of tlie
Marseillies.
Several collisions occurred with the
crowd outside the hall and the police,
and the latter had great difficulty in
handling the assemblage. No casual
ties were reported.
The Daily Mail asserts that the pro
moters of the Queens Hall meeting se
cured the services of 600 or 700 stalwarts
as stewards. "These gangs of foreign
ruffians,'' according to the Mail, "were
found Inside the hall, ready to keep or
der and eject the maleeontents."
The stalwarts wer drawn from the low
class foreign clubs in Soho. Many of
them were armed with sticks, broom
handles and knuckle dusters, and they
acted with unrestrained violence in ex
cluding rowdies and throwing out .
sirable persons.
MINING COM PANY D ENOUNCED.
Judge Uses Harsh Language in Nam
ing a Receiver for the American
Concern of Minneapolis.
Mnneapolis, June 20.—Judge Pond of
the Hennepin county court has appointed
Albert H. Hall receiver for the insolvent
American Mining and Investment com
pany, which is said to have realized
$250,000 for stock sold, and the assets of
which are said to be not In excess of
$ 1 . 000 .
In a memorandum which accompanies
the order, the court says:
"That such an apparently rotten and
corrupt concern should _ exist and for a
time thrive in this community is a sad
conimetnary upon the intelligence of its
patrons and no less so upon the morals
cf a people permitting it."
Reservation Injunction Denied.
Washington, June 20.—Justice Bradley
in the equity court today denied the ap
plication of Lone Wolf and other Indians
for an injunction against the secretary
of the interior to restrain him from
opening the Kiowa, Comanche and
Apache lands in Oklahoma to settlement.
moments following the explosion. In
Locust, Olive and Washington avenues
are many boarding houses and rooming
houses, and the occupants of these,
aroused by the shock, fled precipitately
Into the streets in their night clothing.
TRAGEDY FOLLOVS QUARREL
Samuel Moore Shoots and Fatally
Wounds M. McKenzie at
Horse Prairie.
(Special to Inter Mountain.)
Dillon, June 20.—Sam Moore shot an 1
fatally wounded M. McKenzie at Jag
ger's ranch, on Horse Prairie, last nigh:-.
The men had quarreled early in the
day over a horse, and later McKenzie
held Moore up at the point of a rifle.
The men were separated.
McKenzie afterwards said he would
settle matters, and started for his gan,
when Moore shot him and then rode to
Bannack for medical aid and gave him
self up.
Bad blood had existed between the
men for some time, and Moore threat
ened to kill McKenzie a few weeks ago.
Fate of Molineaux in Doubt.
(By Associated Press.;
Buffalo, N. Y., June 20.—The fate of
Roland B. Molineux, convicted of murder
for the poisoning of Mrs. Catherine J.
Adams, in New York, in December, 1898,
Is in the keeping of seven judges of the
court of appeals, who for three days
have been listening to the arguments for
and against a new trial. The appeal
was finally submitted yesterday after
noon, and the decision will not be an
nounced for several months.
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X X
X HOPKINS WOULD ACCEPT. X
X X
X (By Associated Press.) X
X Spokane, June 20.— B. H. Hop- X
X kins of this city denies that he has X
X been appointed United States X
X marshal for Washington. If ap- X
X pointed to the office, I shall ac- X
-, cept it." X
X X
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THEClTy FATHLR.S
WILL CLE.AN
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DOINGS OF THE DAY AS VIEWED BY AN INTER MOUNTAIN ARTIST.
RIG DEMAND
T
CALLS FOR THE WESTERN ANI
MALS COMING FROM ALL
POINTS.
British Government and the United
States Army Send Orders for 19,
OOO Head for -a.va.iry Use—
Heavy Shipment Being to
Various Grounds.
(Special to Inter Mountain.)
Helena, June 20.—There is an un
precedented demand for Montana horses
in the eastern and foreign markets, and
more men are said to be in the state
to make purchases than ever before.
At least 15,000 head are said to have
been sold during the last month alone.
The British government has given an or
der for 4,000 horses for army use and
the United States government has or
dered the purchase of 1,000 for the cav
alry station in Cuba.
Other shipments are being made to the
sales grounds at St. Paul, St. Louis,
Omaha and Kansas City.
As the round-up this year is late on
account of the heavy rains, buyers have
not completed their purchases, and will
return about July 1 for more animals.
Lutheran Clergyman Falls Dead.
Norfolk, Neb., June 20.—Rev. August
Klug, aged 72, pastor of the Lutheran
church at Hedra, Neb., fell dead here
while on his way to Winona, Minn., to
attend the Lutheran synod.
Official Secrets of Recent War Revealed
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, June 20.—The American
red-book for 1898, comprising the for
eign relations during the eventful period
of the Spanish-American war, has Just
made its appearance.
It contains an exclusive summary of
the official correspondence, while the
Dupuy de Lome incident arid the blowing
up of the Maine are'treated under sep
arate heads.
The first notification to Spain that the
United States expected the independence
of Cuba was in a dispatch from Secre
tary Hay to Minister Woodford, March
28, 1898.
The president had previously instructed
Mr. Woodford to endeavor to have Spain
grant Cuba "full self government."
Spain at once asked the meaning of this
term.
In reply Secretary Hay cabled:
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X "Full self-government with ln- X
X demnity would mean Cuban in- X
X dependence." X
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It appears that just before the war
broke out Minister Wodford sent word
that the queen regent, yielding to the
request of the pope, was about to de
cree a termination of the war in Cuba
for a period of six months.
$10,000 Verdict In a Personal Injury Suit
(By Associa ted Press.)
Everett, Wash., June 20.—A Jury in the superior court today gave a ver
dict of $10,000 against the Everett & Monte Cristo Railway company in a per
sonal damage suit instituted by A. T Edwards. This is the full amount of the
claim, and the defendant has asked for ,i new trial.
NEGRO TAKES TEMPERANCE OATH
IN TH E ANAC ONDA POLICE COURT
(Special to Inter Mountain.)
Anaconda, June 20.—George McEltoj. colored, was fined $5 this morning by
Police Magistrate Hayes, for drunken ness.
After the fine had been paid McElroy asked the judge if he would admin
ister an math binding him to total abstinence for a period of six months.
The fhdge agreed, and the oath was administered in the presence of Officer
Powers and Chief of Police Taylor as witnesses.
T
PAY TAKES ON
SECOND ASSISTANT ATTORNEY
GENERAL GIVES IMPORT
ANT OPINION.
Holds That Even if the Institution has
Loaned Depositors' Money Upon
the Se urities it Must Stand
Ready to - ake <- ooa vne
Assessment.
(Special to the Inter Mountain.)
Helena, June 20.— F. AV. Mettler, sec
ond assistant attorney general, has ren
dered an opinion for J. H. Murphy,
county attorney of Jefferson county, in
which lie says banks are liable for taxa
tion on mortgages held by them as se
curity for money loaned, even though
the money belongs to depositors.
The county attorney asked the ques
tion in regard to the Bank of Boulder,
which refused to list mortgages as part
of its property to be computed in ascer
taining the value of the shares held by
stockholders.
The county attorney was of the opinion
that the bank was in the right and so
suited. It was decided, however, to sub
mit the matter to the attorney general.
"It is our opinion," says Mr. Mettler,
".hat mortgages upon real estate given
t i a bank to secure the repayment of
money which the bank has loaned be
h nging to depositors are assessable to
the bank."
Mr. Woodford was hopeful this would
avert a crisis in the trouble between
the United States and Spain, hut this
hope was not realized, as congress soon
after adopted the resolutions of inter
vention.
.The peace negotiations, both in Wash
ington and Paris are given in extenso.
When tlie acquisition of the Philippines
came up. Secretary Hay eabed Mr. Day,
saying:
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X X
X "The sentiment in the United X
X States is almost universal that X
X the Phillippines, whatever else lie X
X done, must be liberated from X
X Spanish domination. X
X X
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"in this sentiment the president fully
concurs. Nor can we permit Spain to
transfer any of the islands to another
power. Nor can we invite another pow
er or powers to join the United States
in sovereignity over them. We must
either hold them or turn them over to
Spain. Consequently, grave as are the
responsibilities and unforseen difficul
ties which are before us, the president
can see hut one plain plan of duty—the
acceptance of the archipelago."
Chinese affairs are treated only in the
initial stages of the trouble.
ALLIED THIRD m MOVEMENT
LAMED AT KANSAS CITY
Promoters BeTYeve That a National
Organization can be Built up
Strong Enough to Name
a Presidential Can
didate in 1904.
(By Associated Press.)
Kansas City June 20.—The "Allied
Third Party Movement," which its pro
motors predict will result before 1904 in
a national organization strong enough
to name a presidential nominee, was
launched here yesterday.
The conference was called by Lee
Merri weal her of St. Louis, who, with
twenty-two other St. Louis leaders in
the pubic ownership party of that city,
came to Kansas City Tuesday after a
visit to Mr. Bryan at Lincoln, where
the intention of the delegation had been
laid before the Nebraska statesman.
The committee which represented each
element present submitted the follow
ing set of resolutions as the new par
ty's principles and they were adopted:
Public ownership of all public utili
ties, such as railroads, telegraphs, etc.
While awaiting the legislation to se
cure public ownership, rigid public con
trol of freight and passenger rates and
severe penalties for rebates and other
discriminations by railroads.
Taxation of railroads and other public
utility corporations in the same propor
tion as the values of farm and other
property.
Direct legislation by the initiative and
referendum, to the end that tlie people
may initiate good legislation and veto
bad legislation.
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X X
X A graduated Income tax, to the X
\ end that wealth, which receives X
X government protection, shall bear X
X its just share of the cost of gov- X
X eminent. X
X x
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That whatever is used as money shall
he full legal tender, issued by the gen
eral government in sufficient volume for
business purposes, and that volume of
fered in proportion to population.
'
GREAT COM BINE TO KILL GAME.
Officials of Colorado Believe They
Have Unearthed a Gigantic Con
spiracy—Arrests are Made.
(By Associated Press.)
Denver, Colo., June 20.—The state
game department has, it believes, un
earthed a plot whereby a number of
Denver and Colorado Springs firms have
■ombined and employed men to kill wild
,ame out of season for their hides.
Hundreds of dollars worth of deer,
lk and antelope hides have been seized
ind confiscated in the stores of L. A.
Watkins & Co.. M. Solomon & Co., J. L.
Brown and E, J. McLean, and the pro
prietors have been arrested.
Arrests are also expected in Colorado
Springs. Efforts are being made to ap
prehend the hunters. Heavy penalties
are prescribed by the law for those vio
lating game preserves statutes and the
traffic in hides.
MRS. M'KINLEY IMPROVING;
GOING TO CANTON SOON.
Preparations Are Being Made for Her
Removal to Canton About
July 1.
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, June 20.—Mrs. McKinley's
condition continues to improve, and Dr.
Itixey speaks encouragingly of her case.
Preparations are being made at the
white house for the departure of Presi
dent and Mrs. McKinley to Canton the
first week in July.
Dr. Rixey, Secretary Cortelyou and
one of the white house stenographers
will accompany the president.
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BANKERS MEET.
(Bv Associated Press.)
Spokane, June 20.—The Wash
ington State Bankers' convention
opened this morning. President
E. J. Dyer presiding. About 80
members are present.
X
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x X
X Just election laws throughout X
tv the state. $
X Election of United States sen- X
X alors by popular vote. X
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Home rule for cities and abolition ol
the political system for using the policy
as a standing army to carry primary
elections in the Interest of dishonest
politicians representing still more dis
honest special privilege corporations.
Resolutions eulogizing the work of the
late H. S. Pingree of Michigan were
adopted.
J. H. Cook, chairman of the populist
state central committee, stated that he
would soon Issue a call to some of tho
state populist committeees, at least those
in Kansas. Iowa, Nebraska and Colo
rado, Inviting them to take up the work
of uniting the reform forces in the coun
try into a new third party, with the ulti
mate purpose of affecting a national or
ganization.
In the afternoon the convention or
ganized by electing J. H. Cook, fusion
populist, chairman: J. H. Hillis, middle
of the road populist, vice chairman, and
F. S. Kowalsky, public ownership, sec
retary.
The chairman was asked: "Will not
your movement result in turning the
state over to the republicans?"
"I do not know," he replied, "but I
would a little rather the republicans
would win than the present organization
of democrats.
"As Mr. Bryan said to me last Mon
day: T like an enemy under his own
colors better than one who steals my
colors.' "
Atanta, Ga., June 20.—The Atlanta
Constitution, in response to a telegram
of inquiry, received a dispatch from (v\
J. Bryan, denying that he is affiliated
with the third party movement. Mr.
Bryan's telegran reads: "Iowa City',
Iowa, June 20.—Telegram received. No
truth in report.
GOVERNMENT SELLS
SIOUXJ/ITY & PACIFIC,
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(By Associated Press.)
Washington, June 20.—The
government's interest In the
Sioux City & Pacific railway was
sold to-day at auction at the
treasury department for $872,000
cash and a credit of $250,000 for
the transportation of mail and
troops. The sale was made to the
Chicago & Northwestern Railway
company, which has been operat
ing the Sioux City & Pacific
railroad for a long time.
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DOUBLE KI LLING I N WYOMING
Deputy Sheriff and a Merchant Shot
Down by a Man Wanted For
Check Raising.
(B> Associated Press.)
Cheyenne, Wyo„ June 20.—A report
has just reached here from KemmereP
Wyo., of a double killing Sunday, near
Big Piney, in Uintah county.
George Ecker, a returned Philippine
soldier, about a year ago raised a check
and fled the country.
Recently he returned and was located
near Big Piney, 60 miles north of Kein
merer. Sunday Deputy Sheriff G. B,
Holden of Uintah country aijd Fred
Reardon, a prominent merchant of Big
Piney, attempted to arrest Ecker, who
shot and killed Holden and mortally
wounded Reardon.
He then fled to the mountains and
is being pursued by a posse of citizens
under the command of Sheriff James.
Fcker probably will be lynched if cap
tured.
£
vi
1
WILL the
FOUN C>LlC4G
T HRWfc
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X x
X Everyone reads the Inter Moun- X
tain. So should you. X
X x
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