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The Butte inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, July 01, 1901, Image 1

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VOL. XXI. NO. 86
5648
o ?o
The Butte Inter Mountain
Clear Weather Sunday.
BUTTE, MONTANA. MONDAY EVENING. JULY 1. 1901.
Fair Tonight and g
f —
PRICE FIVE CENTS
IRON MEN
WILL STRIKE
THIRTY-FIVE THOUSAND MEN
INVOLVED IN THE COMING
STRUGGLE.
REAL TEST OF STRENGTH WILL
COME IN TWO OR THREE
WEEKS.
UNITED STATES STEEL COR
PORATION DECLINES TO
TREAT.
(By Associated Press.)
Pittsburg, Pa., July 1.—As a result of
the refusal of the representatives of the
American Steel Sheet company and the
American Steel Hoop company subsidiary
companies of the Unite# States Steel cor
poration to sign the workers' new scale,
circulars have been sent out from the
national headquarters of the Amalga
mated Association of lion, Steel and Tin
Workers declaring a strike at all the
P'ants of the two combines.
More than 35.000 men are Involved.
For the first few weeks the situation
will not show the strength of the asso
ciation. Almost all the plants of the
company, union and non-union, will be
compelled to shutdown during the early
part of July to give the men a rest.
Union and non-union men alike are
demanding a short vacation, and the
prediction is that the Companies will be
unable to keep anyone at work for two
or three weeks after tomorrow.
The heat Is intense, and the men, the
president said today, are almost in a
state of revolt.
It will be after the first of August, per
haps, when the combihe makes a seri
ous attempt to start up in full, that the
real battle will begin U' no settlement has
been reached at that time.
City Officials Indicted.
Cripple Creek, Col., July 1.—Several
city officials of Cripple Creek have been
indicted by the grand jury on a charge
of complicity in a robbery last fall.
Great Naval Maneuvers
at Newport This Week
Many of the Noted Warships Will
Take Part in This Years
Operations.
(By Associated Press.)
Newport, R. I., July 1.—The sham bat
tle and naval maneuvers Friday and
Saturday will be nearly as extensive as
those off Newport last summer.
The battleground was selected by Rear
Admiral Francis J. Higginson, com
mander-in-chief of the North Atlantic
squadron, and Captain Chadwick, presi
dent of the naval war college, a month
ago.
Wood's Hole will be (he objective point
and Newport the base of supplies. The
flagship Kearsarge, the battleships Ala
bama and Massachusetts and the tor
pedo boat Bailey will participate.
The squadron will sail from Newport
Friday morning and will steam at once
for Wood's Hole. Naval defense mines
will be supplied to the ships from the
torpedo station and tents from the naval
department.
Charles Schatzlein President.
(Special to Inter Mountain.)
Helena, July 1.—The Aetna Banking &
Trust company, incorporated in West
Virginia, tied articles of incorporation
and a statement with the secretary of
state today. The capital stock is $100,
000 in $100 shares, $2,500 paid in. The
subscribers are: F. A. Heinze, sixty
Shares; Henry Mueller, *0 shares;
Charles Schatzlein, 60 shares; Charles
R. Leonard, 35 shares; Frank W. Has
kins, 35 shares. Mr. Schatzlein is presi
dent.
New Bank tor Chinook.
(Special to Inter Mountain.)
Helena, July 1.—The Bank of Chinook
has filed articles of incorporation,
RUSSIA GOADED TO WAR BY CHINA
Many Deaths Follow Great Heat
PEOPLE EAST OF THE ROCKIES SUFFERING»
WITH NO RELIEF IN SIGHT.
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X New York, July 1.—The hot weather which has
X caused so much suffering in this city last week con
tinues today. At 10 o'clock the temperature was
89. The humidity early today wasi 45 per cent. Be
tween 1 and 9 a. m. seven deaths due to the heat were
reported in this city. Six deaths from the heat were
reported from Brooklyn between midnight and 10 a. m.
Chicago, July 1.—At 9 o'clock this morning the
thermometer on the street level showed 89. The hu
midity Intensified the suffering, the air showing 85
per cent moisture.
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St. Louis, Mo., July 1.—The Intense heat that has
prevailed for several weeks continues unabated. At 5
a. m. the thermometer recorded 80 degrees, and two
hours later it had risen to 82. Yesterday there were
eight deaths and 12 prostrations. At 12 o'clock the
bureau thermometer registered 94 degrees in the
shade, while on the streets the record was several
points higher. The temperature is still rising, but
there Is a cool breeze from the south. TTp to noon
there had been reported four deaths from heat pros
trations.
Cincinnati, O., July 1.—The thermometer regis
tered 82 at 8 a. m. today, two to five degrees higher
on the street level.
day.
Louisville, Ky„ July 1.—The thermometer at 8 a.
was 98 and indications are for a record breaking
St. Paul, Minn.. July 1.—The mproury here early
today at the weather bureau office was 70; sky over
cast and threatening rainstorms.
CLASH OF AUTHORITIES IS MORE PRONOUNCED
GAP BETWEEN THE OFFICIALS
OF THE CITY AND COUNTY
GROWS WIDER,
Wider grows the gap between the of
ficials of the city and county over pool
selling at the Montana Jockey club's
meet, and both sides declare they are
determined in the matter.
Mayor Davey and Chief Reynolds are
non-committal today, and simply say
The Kearsarge and Alabama will each
land at Wood's Hole one five-inch breech
loading rifle, and the Alabama will lay
six naval defense mines. The Massachu
setts will land two torpedo chutes, two
three-pounders and two six-pounders,
and will plant four naval defense mines.
Marines of the Kearsarge and the Ala
bama will lie put ashore under com
mand of Major C. A. Doyen, fleet marine
officer. This equipment and this force
will hold the place against the fleet.
After a sham battle and the pas
sage of thhe mines by the fleet, an
offensive force will he landed from the
ships and will capture the place.
The sham battle is calculated to give
every opportunity for mining, counter
mining, signalling and landing men by
night and day and all tactics that ac
tual conflict would afford. The Bailey
will attack the fleet at night.
Details of the expedition and maneuv
ers have been prepared under the super
vision of Rear Admiral Francis G. Hig
ginson.
Stephen Carver, Ensign S. Sweet, John
W. Cark, Peter Miller and George Jones,
all of Choteau county, are th eincorpora
tors. Capital. $20,000 in $100 shares, of
which three-fourths is subscribed by Mr.
Carver. The office will be at Chinook.
Bishop Potter's Wife Bead.
New York, July 1.—Mrs. Eliza Rogers
Potter, wife of Right Rev. Henry C
Potter, protestant Episcopal bishop of
New York, died suddenly yesterday.
Referred to Supreme Court.
Denver, Colo., July 1.—Judge Palmer
of the district court today severely rep
rimanded Rev. M. A. Rader and Rev.
W. H. Tnhnage, accused of contempt of
ccurt ,and discharged thehm.
Declares
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Ma^yor
Davey
'S?»
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Is
Still
Looking
Up
The
Law
And
He
ll. *
Will
Send
Police
To
Arrest
Fool
Sellers
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that if they have the authority, which i
it is apparent they believe they have, ;
pool selling will stop at the track. ;
Neither of the city officials yvould'i
come out boldly with a statement re- )
garding his intended course, but each !
says he w ill show his hand soon. j
County Attorney Breen is decided in j
hls statement regarding the proposed j
action of the county officials should the j
city authorities attempt to interfere !
with the track management in the pool j
selling. j
The county attorney reiterated what
he said Saturday in connection with
his stand in the matter. He said the
statements of Mayor Davey and Chief
Reynolds regarding the pool selling was
at variance with the law.
"Why," said Mr. Breen, "the city au
thorities have no more right to inter
fere with the race track affairs than
they have to interfere with something
which might lie going on in Walker
ville or the other outlying districts.
"There is absolutely no law in the
statute which prohibits pool selling at
race meetings, and as these race horse
Empress Bowager I ears a Plot.
Shanghai, July 1.—Marquis Tseng has 1
received a dispatch from Sian Fu to the j
effect that the empress dowager, fearing i
a trap to capture her, declines to re- !
turn to Pekin, and has notified the grand ;
council that the future capital will be j
Kai Feng Fu, in the province of Ho |
^ an - • I
Single Bolt of Lightning
Kills Thirteen Persons
(By Associated Press.)
Chicago, July 1.—Twelve men were
killed and a boy is reported killed by ;
a single bolt of lightning. The victims !
were fishing in Lake ruichigan at the I
SOOTH CAROLINA IS SEEKING LIGHT ON LIQUOR LICENSE
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, July 1.—The state of
South Carolina, acting through the gov
ernor and attorney general, has insti
tuted proceedings before the commission
er of internal revenue to test the ques
tion whether the state can be legally ré
quired to take out special tax on whole
sale and retail liquor licenses under the
LOOTERS
CAPTURED
FIVE MEN CALLING THEM
SELVES AMERICANS TAKEN
BY CHINESE TROOPS.
PRISONERS HAD DEMANDED
BLACKMAIL-AND FILLED
CARS WITH PLUNDER.
(By Associated Press.)
Pekin, July 1.—Five men calling them
selves Americans were captured by Chi
nese troops in a town fifty miles from
Pekin and were today turned over to
Major E. Robertson, commander of the
United States legation guards here.
The men, who were armed, demanded
5,000 taels from the keeper of a pawn
shop. They filled ti\e carts with plun
der and then began shooting, not know
ing that the town was occupied by 100
Chinese troops.
The United States legation was noti
fied and the quintet was brought in.
All parts of Pekin occupied by the
British for police purposes were turned
over today to the Chinese authorities.
The foreign ministers will meet July 3.
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i men have come into Butte from other
; states, expecting to receive courteous
; trea tment and intend carrying on their
iaces in a respectable inaner, we intend
) to protect them as we would any other
! organization.
j "Should the city authorities attempt
j any interference at the traik the eoun
j ty officials will use them exactly as
j they would ordinary persons who might
! cause trouble there.
j "I mean this, and I think (he sheriff
j will act in acordance with this state
ment. That official agrees with me in
the matter."
Mayor Davey says he takes advice
from the city attorney when he finds It
necessary. He says he has not request
ed an opinion from Mr. Lamb as yet,
regarding the authority of the city
police force to interfere at the race
track.
Ex-Chief of Police Mulholland states
that during the race meet held at the
same track in 1896 the race track man
agement requested the service of the
department at the track, and that dur
ing that year he was chief of police and
Cattle Inspection Law Upheld.
1 Denver, Colo., July 1.—Judge Hallett
j of the United States district court had
i denied a writ of habeas corpus to Ed H.
! Peid, an Omaha cattle shipper, *vho was
; sentenced to six months imprisonment
j by the district court of Arapahoe county
| for failure to pay the state inspection
I fee'on a shipment of cattle from Texas.
fcot of Montrose boulevard, on the North
Side. The fatal bolt struck the pier
where they were seated and all were
thrown into the lake. Only the boy's
body has so far been recovered.
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special dispensary laws, and has mad''
a demand upon the commissioner for a
refund of all such taxes hitherto paid,
amounting to $4,916. The point at issue
is far reaching. The main question in
volved is whether the internal revenue
laws of the United States apply to the
'dispensary system of South Carolina to
as to enable the collector to demand pay
ment of these taxes.
Savage Attack Upon Socia' *ibs
HELENA CLERGYMAN SAYS N0TF * RGAN
IZATI0NS ARE FOSTERING DEBAUu.ERY.
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(Special to Inter Mountain.)
Helena, July 1.—Rev. Charles L. Bovard, pastor
of St. Paul's Methodist church, has again attacked
the Montana and the Lambs club as evil places on
the ground that they foster debauchery by reason
of maintaining bars.
The clergyman preached last night from the text
"Woe unto him that giveth his neighbor drink, that
putteth the bottle to him and maketh him drunken
also." He reiterated what he said a week ago about
the two clubs and contended that they fostered de
bauchery. He claimed that during the week he had
received letters from citizens upholding his course in
attacking these two chief social resorts in Helena and
read from an unsigned letter he claimed to have re
ceived from a business man in which he claimed he
joined both clubs for business reasons, although he
did not approve of their methods and would surely
lie boycotted and ruined in business if his name were
known.
The minister said he had received letter from
mothers indorsing hi« attack upon the clubs. One of
the c-ity newspapers, in criticising Mr. Bovard, has
said it is no crime to treat a friend. This furnished
material for a scathing reply from the minister, who
intimated that the editor's style of writing was
unwholesome, while hit morals were decidedly so.
The same editor had called the minister's atten
tion to the fact that President McKinley, who is a
prominent Methodist, served wine upon his table at
public dinners. Mr. Bovard said that if such were the
cas,e the president was violating a cardinal principle
of the church, and intimated that he proposed to find
out if it were so and Inform the president that his
serving wine was held up as an excuse for drinking
in Helena.
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EACH SIDE IS DETERMINED AND
TROUBLE MAY COME FROM
POOL SELLING.
seven men were stationed at (lie track
during the meeting.
In 1897 the county authorities perform
ed the duties of keeping the peace at
the track, and the services of the po
lice- deprtment were not requested, ac
cording tq Mr. Mu 1 hoi land.
Gen. Shafter Steps Down;
Régiments Mustered Out
General Young Takes Command of the
Department of Caluornia—Sol
diers Start for Home.
(By Associated Press.)
San Francisco, July 1.—Two important
military events occurred at the Presidio
yesterday—the retirement of Major Gen
eral W. R. Shafter and the installment
of General Young.
General Shafter went on the retired
list at noon, when he formally trans
ferred the command of the department
of California to Major General S. B. M.
Young. In the afternoon the Forty
fourth, Forty-ninth, Forty-eighth and
Thirty-eighth volunteer regiments were
mustered out.
The mustering out of the four regi
ments required the services of eight pay
masters. Over a 'million dollars was
disbursed. The money was taken from
the sub-treasury to the Presidio in eight
wagons, each under the charge of a pay
master and his clerk.
Forty-five artillerymen, mounted and
armed, escorted the treasure and pay
DEATH TO LIBERTY
OF DUTCH SUBJECTS
Political Writer in Cape Colony D*'
dares Suspension of the Con
stitution Is Wrong.
(By Associated Press.)
London, July 1.—The Daily News pub
lishes an article by its parliamentary
correspondent on the political situation
in Cape Colony in view of the piopaga
tion of the Cape parliament, the wntsr
WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY FOR NAVY
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(By Associated Press.)
Washington, July 1.—Rear Admiral Bradford, chief of the bureau
of equipment, will point out in his annual report the necessity of
equipping American men-of-war with a system of wireless telegraphy.
As soon as the appropriation is obtained he will recommend the sys
tem to be adopted for the naval service.
Believing that Commander Richardson Clover, naval attache in
London, is deeply occupied with his current work, the rear admiral has
recommended to Secretary Long that a wireless telegraph expert be
sent to England to represent the navy in the trials of the two systems
developed by Lloyd's agency.
Having made arrangements for the establishment of coal depots
on the New England coast, the navy department will now give special
attention to the Pacific. A depot capable of accommodating 10,000 tons
of coal will be located at San Diego, California.
Instructions have been sent to Captain Merry at Honolulu, to
begin condemnation proceedings at Pearl Harbor, which is to be the
site of a large naval station. Nine hundred acres of land will be
acquired.
The report of the board ordered to examine Guam, with a view to
improving the harbor of Asana and locating a town upon its shore,
will ire submitted the middle of July. The department will then com
plete the plans for a depot in the harbor which will accommodate
10,000 tons of coal.
COLUMBIA
THE WINNER
CONSTITUTION LOSES BY A NAR
ROW MARGIN IN THE FIRST
CONTEST.
BATTLE OF THE CUP DEFEND
ERS OVER 30 MILE COURSE
A PRETTY ONE.
BREEZE LIGHT AND YACHTS
FAIL TO MAKE THE FAST
TIME EXPECTED.
(By Associated Press.)
Bateman's Point, R. I., July 1.—The
Columbia lias proved the victor in the
trial contest witü the Constitution off
this plai e.
The Columbia crossed the line at
2:32 3-5; the Constitution at 2:33 1-8.
When the Constitution and the Colum
hit hoisted sail for the first race of the
season between America's cup defender
yachts the breeze inside the bay was
very light and the yachts had difficulty;
in getting out to the starting point.
The contest was a windward and lee«
ward affair of thirty miles. Columbia
was the first out. but she was only a few
minutes ahead of the Constitution. The
boats were almost identical in appear
ance.
After waiting at the lightship 10 min
utes the judges apparently decided that
the wind was too near the southwest ta
risk starting from the lightship, so tfia
whole fleet started off to the eastward.
The preparatory gun was fired at
11:30. Five minutes later the warning
signal was given. Both yachts at the
time were to leeward of the line, the
Constitution being furt'herest away.
Both yachts at once began manouev
ling for position.
The starting gun was fired at 11:40,
the Columbia crossing the line first and
to windward at 11:40:22 and the Consti
tution right under'her lee at 11:40:23.
Both boats went across the line on the
starboard tack under ail sail and stood,
about south, wind being southwest.
corps to the reservation. In order to
protect the soldiers on the grounds from
swindlers, 100 men of Troop K, Fifteent'l
cavalry, were stationed around tho
reservation.
Two of the regiments mustered ouf,
the Forty-eighth and Forty-ninth, were
colored, and the men had between threa
and four months' pay due them.
During the day an accidental shoot
ing. which may have a fatal ending
occurred, George Price, colored,
regl«
min»
George Price, colored, of
eighty'
ment, accompanied by John ...wgers of
tueky, Company
Forty-eight
the same company, went y™ lhe store
of Hirsch Bros, to buyjvi'évolver. While
the clerk was exarnj^dig a pistol it was
discharged. Thc,- /,ailet entered Price's
abdomen, lnmÿ™B a wound which may
result fatfjj*'
There, 'Still remains three volunteer
regiments to be discharged—the Forty
thXfC Forty-seventh and Forty-first.
-Yhey will be paid off today. The volun
teer army will then have passed intq
history.
saying that an issue of the gravest mo
ment, namely the suspension of the con.
slilution of Cape Colony, has arisen. He
adds;
"From the night of June 30, for an
indefinite period, the king's suaj cts in
Cape Colony will be without the protec
tion of law and will be governed by mil
itary rule.
"Taxes will be collected under war
rant of the government and parliament
has been prorogued until August and la
not likely to sit at even this date.
"This illegal move was made doubt
less at the instigation of Lord Milner
and Colonial Secretary Chamberlain.
"Liberty is dead so far as our Dutch
subjects are concerned. The crisis calls
for the authoritative intervention of the
liberal party."

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