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The Butte inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, July 03, 1901, Image 1

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The Butte Inter Mountain.
VOL. XXI. NÖ. 88
BUTTE, MONTANA, WEDNESDAY EVENING. JULY 3. 1901.
PRICE FIVE CENTS
BUTTE WILL CELEBRATE IN ROY Hi STYLE
X>. V. NEWBRO,
Chairman Executive Committee.
Early this morning the bulldngs of
Butte began to blossom with bunting
and by mid-day the national colors
were streaming gaily from the houses
of the residence district and the down
town buildings were gay with stream
ers. Preparations are going forward for
a celebration that will be carried on in
royal style.
This forenoon at the office of Chairman
D. M. Newbro a meeting of the various
committees was held and flnsliing
touches put on the plans for the big
celebration tomorrow. The various com
mitteemen that all was in readiness for
the day's events and that there was not
a sign of failure in the elaborate plans
FIGHT OVER
ASSESSMENT
CENTRAL PACIFIC ROAD PRE
PARING FOR BATTLE IN
NEVADA COURTS.
WORK OF ASSESSORS IN IN
CREASING TAXATION RATE
IS DENOUNCED.
COMPANY CONTENDS THAT IN
CREASE IS UNFAIR AND
ILLEGAL.
San Francisco, July 3.— F. II- Harriman
Is preparing for a strenuous fight in the
courts to set aside the recent increase
of the Central Pacific assessment in Ne
vada.
The assessors added $6,000,000 to- the
former valuation of the road by increas
ing the rate from an average of $11,000 a
mile to $20,000 a mile.
Other roads in the state were raised
about 40 per cent., and by these means
the state assessment roll was increased
$14,000,000.
Nevada people are determined to main
tain the legality of the assessment, which
was advanced under a latv of the last
legislature, putting all the railroads in
a separate class for taxation purposes,
regardless of differences of guage.
Tl»e railroad people contend that such
a classification is illegal.
NOT A FREIGHT CAR NOW MOVING
STRIKE AT EAST ST. LOUIS BE
COMES SERIOUS AND GREAT
DAMAGE MAY FOLLOW.
(By Associated Press.)
St. Louis, July 3.—The strike of freight
handlers in East St. Louis has spread
And now 1,700 men are out.
Of these 1,100 are freight handlers and
the remainder drivers of transfer wagons
who went out today in sympathy with
their fellow workmen.
Not a »vheel is moving among the
f. eight sheds, where 3,000 freight cars
stand ready to be unloaded. Many of
these cars are loaded with fruit, vege
tables, ice and other perishable goods.
Fatalities at a Fire.
San Francisco, July 3.—An early morn
ing file in the Italian quarters destroyed
three lodging houses. A young woman
Is missing, and an aged wo»nan is dying
from burns received while trying, to es
cape from one of the destroyed build
ings.
America Leading the World In Food Products
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X *
% . (By Associated Press.) »
38 Washington, July 3.—Secretary Wilson of the department of agricul- X
Î8 ture, is quoted as saying in an interview about the work his department X
38 is doing: X
38 "There is »io doubt that this country within a few months will be in X
38 a position to dictate to every other nation on the globe in the matter X
X of food products. X
38 "We will produce within our domain everything that goes upon our X
X tables and upon our backs. We will then be commercially and indus- X
X trially almost independent of the other nations of the world. X
X "Hence any trade combination which may be effected against us will X
X count for nothing. Whenever we got ready we can come pretty near X
38 starving any other nation. Therefore an effective combination against X
38 us will be an impossibility.'' X
% Mr. Wilvjn then went on to say that steps are being taken to begin X
38 the raising of hay in the Philippines, primarily for the horses and X
38 »nules which the government has the»-e. X
X Experiments are being made with coffee, and it is expected that some- X
X thing will be accomplished toyc-rd:; its #rowt$» during the next fs«nl X
38 year. Rubber will be cultivated extensively, the secretary says, in X
X Porto Rico, Hawaii and the Philippines. X
$XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX4rtCXXXXXXXXXX
made for the occasion. If the skies
smile tomorrow Bute will see the grand
est 4th of July celebration that has ever
been witnessed in the state of Montana.
Chairman Newbro and Secretary
Cowperwaithe have the program of to
morrow in their inside pocket. This
morning it was revsed and brought
up to dale and the varous duties of the
aides to the members of the general com
mittee have been laid down. No changes
in the order of parade have been made
wlO» the exception of transferring the
Meager Guards to the middle of the first
division, to the position of honor at the
head of the second division. In all
other respects the order of parade re
mains as previously announced in the
Inter Mountain.
At sunrise tomorrow the Fourth will
be ushered in by the firing of a salute
of guns—one for each state and territory
and outlying possession of the union.
The salutes will be fired from the court
house yard by Captain McMahon, an ex
perienced gunner.
At 11:00 the band concert given by the
Boston and Montana band will begin at
the court house. The school children of
the city will be present at ihe concert
and led by J. W. Thomas, will join in the
patriotic airs, mingling their voices with
the melody of the band. The concert will
begin with a descriptive fantasia "Recol
lections of the War," by Beger, followed
by a grand medley "Remenescences of
SALISBURY CABINET STIRRED TO ACTION
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X X
X • (By Associated Press.) . X
X London, July 3.—The presence of a strong group of X
X Canadian and colonial ministers and officials in Lon- X
X don has acted like a tonic in invigorating the jaded X
X Salisbury government. X
X ' Mr. Morleÿ's inquiries respecting the fate of the free X
X institutions of Cape Colony have been frankly met by X
X Mr. Chambei-lain, who has easily proved that the X
X home govei-nment has not interfered with the right X
X of colonists to govern themselves, and that the con- X
X stilution of the chief colony in South Africa has not X
X yet been suspended, although warrants have been X
X issued for the expenditure of money in the public X
X service. X
X This constitutional question gave the Canadian min- X
X inters and the colonial guests much to talk about at X
X the luncheon ordered for them at the Constitutional X
X Club. X
X Ministers Blair, Fielding, Mills, Davies and Fisher X
X were the most conspicuous figures present, but South X
X Africa, Australia and other self-governing sections of X
X the empire were represented. X
X It was an informal conference over the present X
X ph oses of imperial policy and the necessity for adopt- X
X lng measures for binding the empii-e together was X
X dwelt upon. X
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DEFEAT ADMITTED
BY THE CHINESE
(By Associated Press.)
Simla, July 3.—Advices received here
from the Sikkln. order say an edict
signed by the emperor and empress
dowager of China has be n posted in
Chinese Thibet, announcing that the
Europeans have been victorious in north
ern China, and ordering that the lives
of missionaries and Christian converts
be respected, on pain of decapitation.
HILL AND M ORGAN WILL MJEET
Coming Conference of the Two Bail
road Magnates Begarded as
Important.
(By Associated Press.)
New York, July 3—James J. Hill,
president of the Great Northern railway,
will arrive in this city a day or two
after the Fourth. His presence here
about the time that J. Pierpont Morgan
returns from abroad is regarded by Wall
street as a matter of more than passing
importance.
It is said Mr. Hill will urge upon Mr.
Morgan the appointment of Darius Mil
ler, second vice president of the Great
Northern, as general traffic director of
that road, the Northern Pacific and the
Burlington.
Americans Greet President Campos.
Rio de Janeiro, July 3.—Rear Admiral
Cromwell and officers of the United
States cruisers Chicago and Atlanta,
called upon President Campos yesterday.
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X Suspension of Business and a Giant Parade of Unequalled Spien- X
X dor Will Mark the Day—The City Gay With Flags. X
X x
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the South," by Chambers. Then the band
will play "America" and the stirring
march, "We'll Never Haul the Old Flag
Down," by De Witt. Following these
will come "The Star Spangled Banner"
and "America" and in these airs the
voices of the school children will blend
with pleasing harmony.
At the conclusion of the concert Rev.
J. E. Nofsinger will deliver the invoca
tion, the school children will sing under
the leadership of Mr. Thomas and Mrs.
E. B. Weirlck will read the Declaration
of Independence. Following another se
lection by the band Hon. J. L. Wines,
orator of the day, will deliver the Inde
pendence day oration. At the conclusion
of the exercises Rev. J. L. Albritton will
pronounce the benediction.
At Intervals the exercises at the court
house will be punctuated by salutes of
guns under the direction of Captain Mc
Mahon. This feature of the day's exer
cises has been prepared with special
reference to giving to the outdoor exer
cises an air of military splendor, pat
terned after the patriotic exercises held
In the naval service.
INDICTMENTS II POLITICAL SCHEME
(Special to Inter Mountain.)
Helena, July 3.—"This thing was be
gun as a blackmailing proposition and
has now. assumed the character of a
political scheme," said R. M. Cobban
when questioned today concerning (he
timber land cases in which 102 indict
ments were recently retui-ried fey the
United States grand Jury against a
number of settlers in Missoula county.
Mr. Cobban is the one man competeni
to describe each transaction, for it was
lie who located the settlers and aftei -
ward purchased the land to which they
had perfected title. He arrived in He.
ena Monday to consult lawyers with
reference to the indictments against
him.
"The animus of the case is shown ii.
the way Senator Clark's name has been
dragged into the affair," continued Mr.
Cobban. "As a matter of-fact, Senator
Clark was an exceedingly slow and wary
purchaser. He did not buy until after
the lands had all been offered to F. A.
Heinze and afterwards to the Big Blaclt
foot Milling company.
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
RIOTING AT BUENOS AYRES.
(By Associated Press.)
Buenos Ayres, July 3.—Rioting
has occurred in Buenos Ayres over
a bill for the unification of the
Argentine debt. Sevei'al persons
have been wounded.
Naval students made a demon
stration against the unification
bill, and Dr. Jose Terry, a former
minister of finance, in a lecture to
show the disastrous consequences
that the acceptance of the bill
would entail upon the country,
declared the unification scheme
might bring about the interference
of the powers.
At the close of the lecture per
sons who had been in the audience
paraded the streets and made a
hostile demonstration. They broke
the windows In the offices of La
Tribuna -and El Pais, newspapei's
which are supporting the bill.
The police charged upon them
and several were wounded.
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
THE CHINESE ONCE MORE CONTROL A PORTION OF PEKIN
(By Associated Press.)
Pekin, July 3.—The British and Jap
anese sections of Pekin have been for
mally transferred to the Chinese. There
Is delay on the part of the Italians,
French and Germans in transferring
their sections in the Tartar ciw- The
Germans have transferred their se^on
of the Chinese city, all of which is no-.v
IN A DILEMMA
UNITED STATES PLACED
THE DEFENSIVE BY A
SPANISH PAPER.
ON
(By Associated Press.)
Madrid, July 3.—The Liario de la Ma
rina, organ of the Spani-h party, has its
leading editorial on the question of the
claims growing out of the destruction of
the Battleship Maine. The paper says the
higher interests of Justice have placed
before the United States the hard alter
native of admitting the legality of the
claims and paying them, which would
represent an enormous sacrifice; or of
confessing before the whole world that
Americans were stupid and lying in
accusing Spain and of provoking a war
for which Spain was unprepared and as
the result of which she lost all her
colonies.
The exercises at the court house will
be in charge of President Horgan and
Vice President Leyson.
At the conclusion of the mid-day exer
cises the races at the track will claim the
attention of the crowd until evening.
The band concert given by the Mon
tana State band will begin at 0:30, at
the corner of Main and Broadway.
The programme will be as follows:
March, "First S. D. I." (Halstead);
grand funtasie on "Old Folks at Home"
(Dalby); trombone duet, "Ida and Dot
tie Polka" (F. Losey), W. H. Northey
and R. J. Clarke; selection, "Tannhäu
ser" (R. Wagner) ; waltz, "Calanthe" (A.
Hoffmann); mazurka russe, "La Czarina"
(L. Ganne); two-step, "Fan Tan" (R.
Anthony); "Chinese March Characteris
ti<iue;" cornet solo, "Kentucky Home"
(J. Masten), E. Stanaway; "Dance Char
aeterlstlque, Flirtation" (Dalby); two
step, "The Colored Major" (S. R. Hen
ry); flower song, "Hearts and Flowers"
(T. M. Tobanl); medley, "The Wonder"
(Mackie); "Star Spangled Banner." E.
Stanaway, bandmaster.
"Before I could do business with him
I had to submit abstracts of title and
wait until his »'epresentative had in
spected the lands."
"What was your actual part in the
transaction?" Mr. Cobban was asked.
' The fact that I located these settlers,
charging them $100 each. After they had
perfected titles I bought the lands from
them, as 1 had a perfect legal right to
do."
T have not the slightest fear as to the
outcome, but do regret that the names
of so many of the best people of the
jSlale should be put before the public in
In false light. The entire transaction was
legitimate in all respects and will he
shown to he such in the courts."
Mr. Cobban left for Missoula yester
lay. There are twelve indictments
against him, one alleging perjury and
tin- remainder subornation of perjury,
the allegations being that he was one of
the persons who induced settlers to take
up the lands with the understanding
they were later to be transferred to
Senator Clark. It is charged they swore
falsely in order that they might be able
to complete their part of the contract.
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
SOET COAL COMBINE LIKELY.
(By Associated Press.)
New York, July 3.—Independent
dealers in soft coal say the re
ported syndicate of operators with
J. Pierpont Morgan at its head
will eventually succeed in consoli
dating all the principal soft coal
properties of the country.
This concentration of the Indus
try which is in sympathy with the
community of interest idea will,
dealers say, be a less simple op
eration than an amalgamation of
the anthracite mining properties,
because soft coal is found more
generally and in greater ubund
ance.
A representative of Mr. Morgan
smiled when asked about the re
ported leadership of his company
in the soft coal combination.
"It is always Morgan," he said.
X j
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under the jurisdiction of ten police cen
sors. A thousand Japanese troops have
arrived here and nearly 4,000 more arc
coming to replace the force in the pro
vince of Chi Li. Orders have been given
f r the rebuilding of two of the large
gates of the city. The merchants in the
ruined portion of the city are rebuild
ing, showing that they expect the court
to return.
QUESTION OF POLICING DELAYS THE CANAL
%XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX't*s****sXXX
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, July 3.—Admiral Walker, head of the
Isthmian commission, says the reason why the final
report of the commission is not ready is because of
unavoidable delay on th' part of the draftsman and
the necessity of making new estimates. hase 1 on data
brought by the last surveying party.
It is said in some quarters that a deilea! ' question
has come up for solution which must be disposed of
before the report can he made public. This question
pertains to the policing of the route of the proposed
canal for the maintenance of order and security and
protection of property in a comparatively small area,
where nearly 30,000 men will he employed.
It is understood members of the commission have
decided that the United States should have policing
power over an area 12 miles wide, from ocean to ocean.
Tills will include two large cities, hut special arrange
ments can be made in relation to then».
The Colombian government is slow to agree to such
a pi-oposal, fearing it might involve a permanent con
cession which it is not ready to give in consequence
of the tentative stage of the canal project.
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx
under the supervision of Marshal Lloyd,
The parade begnning at 8:30, will be
who will be assisted by Captain DeGay
Stivers and Harry Galwey who will have
charge of the first and second divsions of
the parade. Captain Stivers' aides will
be T. B. Stevens, Tom Morrow, A. N.
Voeder, Arthur Mueller, Walter Barclay,
Mark Drumm, and Ben E. Calkins. Mr.
Gahvey's aides will be C. F. Kelley, Jas.
T. Finlen and Thos. S. Killgallon.
From Main street the parade will
march west on Silver to Montana, north
on Montana to Park, east on Park to
Wyoming, north on Wyoming to Wool
man, west on Woolman to Main. Here,
as the giant parade swings Into Main
street, 1.000 dozen Roman candles will
be distributed to the marchers and the
column will move, a blaze of red fire
and poping candles, south on Mai»» street
to the point of formation where each di
vision will disband. Accompanying the
parade will be a number of wagons
containing set pieces of fireworks which
will Immediately precede the flambeau
club and enhance the patriotic display
by man-made glories as costly and elab
orate as fire works can provide.
At the concluson of the parade a bal
loon ascension will l>e made from the
school building on East Broadway, and
the ascending balloon will carry a quan
tity of red fire aloft to be spread abroad
over the city as the balloon goes sky
ward.
NO BRITISH FLAG
FLIES AT SKAGWAY
(By Associated Press.)
Ottawa, July 3.—The secretary of state,
acting for the minister of customs, has
issued orders to Customs Officer Busby
at Skagway, Alaska, directing him not
to insist on the display of the British (lag
contrary to popular fe -ling there. Mr.
Busby had no orders from Ottawa to
hoist the Hag.
Gold in Santa Cliuquira River.
(By Associated Press.)
Lima, July 3.—A commission of 32 per
sons has returned from an exploration
of the river Santa Chuquira. The mem
bers report they found plenty of gold
in the.river.
FIRE DESTROYS NOTED HOSTELRY
NEW ROAD IS PROJECTED
Dream of "Brick" Fomeroy for a Short
Line Between Denver and Salt
Lake Will Be Realized.
Denver, July 3.—A new short line rail
way that will decrease the distance by
rail between Denver and Salt Lake City
is projected by the incorporators of the
Denver & Salt Lake Railway, Tunnel
and Mining company that tiled papers
with the secretary of state yesterday.
It Is capitalized at $7,000,000. The In
corporators are J. E. Ratchford of Syra
cuse, N. Y., and John J. Reilly, D. W.
Hannum, L. N. Cullis and David J- Kelly
of Denver.
The company Intends to complete and
use tile Atlantic and Pacific tunnel, pro
jected by "Brick" Pomeroy, which Mr.
Hanford bought at sheriff's sale on
March 4 last.
French Troops Will Not Leave Pekin Just Yet
XXXXXXX-.XXXXXXXXXXXX.XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
(By Associated Press.)
Pekin, July 3.—The French proposed to delay their evacuation of
Pekin until autum. They believe that their presence there is necessary,
as the desertions, which have been widespread, are increasing.
The Society of Allied Villagers is replacing the Boxer organization.
This society was ostensibly formed for local protection, but it is realy
insurrectionary, as it resi.sts the collection of regular taxes, because the
vilages suffered heavily last year, and objects to the additional tax
for the expense of the court's returnand indemnity for the «'a'holic con
verts, who generally greatly outn miier the i rot stunt-,
The people have some ground A complaint, it is said, hut rnouey
being needed, the government must make demands, and when they are
resisted the Chinese troops must enforce the government's orders^
If these troops fail, the foreign troops must int rpose. Hence there
is good reason for the French remaining, as the converts are under their
protection. Another reason is that the railway runs through the dis
turbed districts, and must be protected. The Germans intend to evac
ate Pao Ting Fu by July 5.
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J. E. COWPERTHWAITE,
Secretary Executive Committee.
Fi'om the beginning of the band con-,
cert at the court house It» the forenoon
until the close of the balloon ascension
In the evening the crowd .attending the
Fourth of July exercises in Butte will be
amused and entertained by the varying
delights of the day. It will be twelve
hours of solid entertainment, the well
planned work of a competent commit
tee.
A meeting will be held this evening at
the city hall, where Marshal Lloyd will
meet his aides, the heads of organiza
tions having places in the parade, and
plans will he perfected for tomorrow's
great event.
HEAT WAVE
GOING AWAY
HOLER WEATHER PROMISED
FOR IHF FTRICKE.il EAST
ERN criES.
1EMPP r t t 'JRF Will TAKE A
DECIDED RP.0P SOMETIME
TONIGHT.
NEW YORK MORGUE UNABLE TO
HOLD ALL VICTIMS OF
THE SUN.
(By A ssoclated Press.)
Washington, Juy 3—The end of the in
tense heat is in sight, according to the
weather bureau, and tonight will witness
a decided drop n the temperature over
the eastern half of the country.
Pittsburg, Pa., July 3.—Eighty-six
deaths directly attributable to the ex
cessive heat have occurred in Pittsburg
since last Wednesday. The torrid wave
was broken at 9 o'clock this morning by
rain, when the mercury dropped from
81 to 72.
New York, July .'i.-^-It was not as hot
In this city this morning as it was yes
terday, but ttie percentage of humidity
was much greater. There were so many
bodies in the morgue today that com
partments could not hold them all and
it was necessary to send the remains of
sixty persons to the potter's field before
the expiration of the live days allowed
for dentification or reelaimation.
HOMESTEAD HOTEL, IN VIR
GINIA, FREQUENTED BY
M'KINLEY, BURNS.
(By Associated Press.)
Richmond, Va., July 3.—The. Homestead
hotel, at Virginia Hot Springs, Bath
county, was destroyed by fire early thi*
morning.
All of the occupants escaped, hut many
of the guests lost their valuables. Tha
origin of the fire is unknown.
The Homestead hud a capacity of 430
guests and has numbered as its patron
many of the most prominent people of
the United States, including Presidari
and Mrs. McKinley and members of thl
cabinet.
Extensive additions have recently bem
made at a cost of $300,000. The hotel )■»
said to have been well insured.

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