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The Butte inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, July 08, 1901, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025294/1901-07-08/ed-1/seq-1/

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The Butte Inter Mountain.
VOL. XXI. NO. 91
Partly Cloudy and Cooler.
BUTTE, MONTANA. MONDAY EVENING. JULY 8. 1901.
Possibly Light Showers.
PRICE FIVE CENTS
CHRISTIAN ENDEAVORERS
CROWD MANY CHURCHES
TWENTIETH INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION OF THE SOCIETY
FORMALLY OPENS IN CINCINNATI.
LEADING WORKERS IN THE CAUSE MAKE INTERESTING AD
DRESSES ON TIMELY TOPICS.
WI LU AM SHAW OF BOSTON TELLS HOW THE WORK OF INTER
ESTING BOYS SHOULD BE DONF.
(By Associated Press.)
Cincinnati, July 8.—After the business
session of Saturday and the evangelical
and other mass meetings of yesterday,
the regular programes of the 20th inter
national convention of the Christian En
deavor were begun today.
Several of the laigest churches in the
central part of Llie city were used, in ad
dition to Odern ha'l and three large audi
toriums heretofore used for exposition
purposes.
Two quiet hour meetings were held
from 8 to !» a. m., concluded by Floyd VV.
Tomplins of Philadelphia and Cornelius
Walkin of Brooklyn.
O. Campbell Morgan of Baltimore con
ducted a meeting on Biide teaching and .1
F. Carson of Brooklyn one on "The Holy
Spirit;" Miss Margaret Koch of Water
ville, Me., conducted a conference on
"Bodily and Vocal Development."
At Auditorium Endeavor, President
Clark presiding and H. C. Lincoln of
Philadelphia as director of music, "The
Twentieth Century Home" was the topic
discussed.
William Shaw of Boston spoke of "How
to Hold the Boy.' He said in part: •
"Get within reach of him. Win his
friendship in any legitimate way. Don't
be forever saying 'Don't.' Give him
something to do.
"Remember that hoys are hero wor
shipers—they admire masterful men and
women; remember that letiing them have
their own way does not win them, that
a firm hand and a warm heart are abso
lutely necessary.
"Don't let him row up with the idea
that only women aie interested in re
lfgious work. If the junior superintend
ent is a woman get a man before the so
ciety once in a while. But be sure he is
a nian.
"If after you have done your best and
you find that the boys will not come
with the i ttle girls, then organize a
boys' junior society with athletic and
other features, as we'l as prayer meeting
and bible work. Do something, anything,
everything, but hold the boys for they
are the coming men."
At the First English Lutheran church,
Secretary Willis Baer presiding and Per
cy S. Foster as musical director, there
were many addresses on the school of
methods for the junior Christian En
deavor.
At Odeon Hall, the new field secretary,
Clarence E. Eberman, presided, and ad
dresses were made by local, district and
srate union officials. Evangelical ser
vices were conducted by Dr. C. L.. Work.
LIGHTNING HITS
LIBRARY BUILDING
BOLT GLANCES ON THE CUPOLA.
TEARING OFF SOME OF
THE SLATE.
THIRD TIME THE STRUCTURE
HAS BEEN DAMAGED BY
ELECTRICITY.
Again lightning has practiced with un
tiring aim on the Butte library, pro
jecting a bolt from the clouds and clip
ping the towering cupola with deadly
precision.
The librarians and others who happen
ed to be in the building shortly after
1 o'clock this afternoon, during the fierce
thunder storm that passed over the city
at that hour, were treated to a sensa
tion in the shape of a bolt of lightning,
which struck the cupola of the building,
tearing off a small quantity of the slate
roofing and causing close and lively
guessing as to when the next stroke
would come.
»The stroke was not a particularly di
rect one, but it made a deafening noise
In the building, giving all the occupants
a severe nervous shock. The actual
damage to the library is slight; as the
electric fluid glanced as it struck the
tower.
Arbitration Causing Trouble
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(By Associated Presst)
Washington, July 8.—Efforts are being made by Peru and Bolivia
to induce Venezuela and other South American republics to refuse to
participate in the Pan-American congress in case there should be no
modification in the proposal that arbitration be limited to future ques
tions only.
Senor Don Fernando E. Guachalla, minister of Bolivia to the Unit
ed States, who is also accredited to Venezuela, has, just presented his
credentials to President Castro, and information received at Washing
ton Indicates that he has explained to the Venezuelan authorities the
injury which will be done to the cause of arbitration in general, and
to Bolivia and Peru in particular, should the congress be not allowed
to consider the application of arbitration to pending as well as to fu
ture quest! >mv
Representatives of Bolivia and Peru stationed in the capitals of
other countries are. It is understood, making similar representations to
the govern men tq to which they arç accredited.
The authorities in Washington have no apprehension that any
countries other than Bolivia and Peru will decline to attend the con
gress, and the impression is growing that Peru and Bolivia will see
fit to modify their attitude and participate in the congress.
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The library building seems to be es
pecially susceptible to lightning visita
tions. It was struck once last summer,
and again three years ago, the damage in
each case, however, being merely nom
inal.
But it is not an interesting life for the
lady librarians, who look for trouble at
every little squall of wind and rain that
comes over the city. If lightning strikes
anywhere, it is pietty certain to prac
tice on the library before beginning op
erations elsewhere, just to get its hand
in.
The bolt that crashed against the
tower of the big building today came
with a loud ripping detonation that
startled residents for blocks around. Had
the licit hit the tower squarely the dam
age would doubtless have been severe;
as it was a portion of the roofing was
scattered abroad and an uneasy feeling
of dread distributed through the sec
tion of the city in which the big library
building is located.
RUSSIA RAISES
HER OWN PEOPLE
St. Petersburg, July 8.—It has always
required many yards of red tape to get
in or out of Russia, but now, as a re
sult of recent disturbances, the pro
cess is even more difficult. Added pre
cautions are being taken where the
regulations seemed stringent enough be
fore.
It is generally known that the intend
ing visitor to Russia must get a pass
port from his government, and that it
must be vized by a Russian consul be
fore it will be recognized as valid by the
Russian officials. The passport itself
costs a dollar or two, the vize a dollar
more.
The tourist fondly imagines that all
regulations have been complied with and
that his passport can be used as a ticket
of admittance, to be shown at the fron
tier and then packed away in a trunk
until his return.
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ASSISTANT SECRETARY
OY NAVY WILL RESIGN
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, July 8.—Frank W.
Hackett will tender his resigna
tion as assistant secretary of the
navy in the fall. He will leave
Washington today for New Hamp
shire to inspect the Portsmouth
navy yard. He will inspect other
navy yards and naval military or
ganizations before returning to
Washington next month to act as
secretary in the absence of Sec
retary Long and to prepare his
final report. The president and
Secretary Long have not deter
mined upon his successor. Charles
H. Allen, governor of Porto Rico,
has been suggested.
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Returning Soldiers in a Collision.
(By Associated Press.)
Ashland, Ore., July §.—A head-end col
lision took place on the Southern Paci
fic at Black Butte summit, 22 miles north
of Dunsmir, yesterday between a south
bound California express and a special
north-bound passenger train of seven
coaches, carrying mustered out volun
teers from the Phillipines. A tramp on
the soldier special was instantly killed.
Bicyclist Seriously Injured.
(By Associated Press.)
Berlin. July 8.—In the bicycle compe
titions for the world's championships,
which began here yesterday, the 100 kilo,
metre amateur championship race was
won by Robl of Munich in 98 1-10 min
utes. Bonhours of Paris fell early in the
race and was seriously injured.
DEATH AT FORSYTH
TWO PERSONS BURNED AND ELEVEN IN
JURED IN THE ROSEBUD
COUNTY CITY.
(Special to the Inter Mountain.)
Billings, July 8.—The town of Forsyth was visited by a terrible fire at
at 2:30 o'clock this morning, by which! wo lives were lost and 11 pe sons
badly injured.
The fire started in the Occidental hol'd, run by a Mrs. McGuire as a sec
tion house.
The building was a large three-story frame structure, 300 feet from the
Northern Pacific depot, and was patronized chiefly by railroad employes and
laborers.
When the alarm of fire was sound ed the building was enveloped in flames,
and inside of an hour th building was entirely destroyed, together with North
ern Pacific oil house and coal docks, the latter blocking the tracks and de
laying all trains several hours.
The fire started in the stairway of the second story of the hotel, shutting
off exit from the two upper floors.
Some of the occupants jumped to the ground from both stonies and of the
number about eleven were seriously injured.
DUKE OF AOSTA AND A PRING
(By Associated Press.)
Rome, July 8.—The Duke of Aosta,
cousin of the king of Italy and heir pre
sumptive to the throne, fought a duel
last week with a Russian prince, be
lieved to be Duke Eugene of Leutehen
berg, grandson of Czar Nicholas I. The
Russian received a severe sword thrust
through the stomach. Duke Eugene is
When he reaches the frontier his pass
port is demanded. That is the first
requisite, and until it has been pro
duced and inspected he cannot get his
baggage examined. Should the pass
port not have the correct vize, or should
it present anything of a suspicious
nature to the official who examines it,
the traveler is detained, and perhaps
sent back or arrested.
No sooner has the passport been dis
posed of than a boy appears with a pa
per, which must be filled out. It seems
that the minute personal description in
the passport and its certification of citi
zenship are not enough. The police must
have more particulars.
And this passports demon fellows you
all through Russia—you cannot escape
from it, and your paper fs covered with
inscriptions and stamps, and your pock
ets are emptied of kopecks and roubles.
.
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GREAT BRITAIN MUST PLAY FAIR
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(By Associated i. ress.)
Washington, July 8.—Consent fo the arbitration of British claims
against the United States will not lie given by this government unless
Great Britain agrees to the arbitration of American claims pend
ing against her. This is the decision of the state department upon
the request of Great Britain that certain claims arising out of the
expulsion of British subjects from Hawaii during the royalist trou
bles, in those islands be referred to arbitration. Great Br.tain has c in
sistently declined to arbitrate claims presented by this government,
including the Fiji claims, which are declared to have greater merit
than those which resulted from the conditions in Hawaii. The Fiji
claims amount to several hundred thousand dollars., while those sub
mitted by Great Britain have a much smaller aggregate.
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ODD QUESTION AFFECTING RAILROADS
YYILL SOON BE SETTLED IN DENVER
(By Associated Press.)
Denver, July 8.— E. P. Sargent of Pe
oria, 111., grand master of the Brother
hood of Locomotive Firemen, is now in
Denver, and tomorrow Deputy Grand
Chief Younger, of the locomotive engi
neers, will arrive.
The object of these two officers In
Denver at this time is to meet repre
sentatives of the engineers and firemen
of the Santa Fe and Colorado Southern
and act as a board of arbitration In the
dispute over the rights of men operating
on the joint track between Denver and
Pueblo. The question has been argued
for months and it is expected that it
will be settled by the visitors.
No Hope for Americans Who Fought England
XXXXXXXXXXXXXX'XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
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X (By Associated Press.)
X Washington. July 8.—Americans who fight in the Boer armies and
X who are or have been made prisoners bv the British will have to en
X dure their captivity until the close of the South African war.
X Great Britain has declined to comply with the raouest of this gov
X ernment to release an American now confined in the island of Ceylon,
X and this refusal will probably prove a bar to further representations
X by the state department in behalf of Americans captured as beilig
X erents in South Africa.
X The test case was that of a naturalized American named Morgan,
X who claims residence in Virginia. Lord Milner, British high commisr
X sioner in South Africa, disapproves of the release of foreigners who
X fought with the Boers. He has announced that a person who serves as
X a belligerent with the Boer forces loser, his nationality and must be
X treated as an enemv. This view is concurred in by the legal officers
X of the state department.
X The department is satisfied, from investigation made by American
X consuls and the British authority that all reports that the British are
X ill-treating their prisoner* are without foundation. The only hard
X ship that Americans captured in South Africa will have to undergo
X will be that of confinement.
Sxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
E FIGHT A DUEL OVER A WOMAN
own to be suffering from peritonitis
d from this it is concluded that he was
e Duke Aosta's antagonist. The duel
s excited the widest interest, because
the rank of the principals, and there
much speculation as to its cause. It
reported that the Russian affronted
c king of Italy recently by making in
presence a slighting remark about
e queen, while on a visit to Naples.
. if a delusion lingers in your mind that
I at least you will have no trouble in go
| jng away from the empire you are harsh
|*y undeceived at the frontier, for if your
jd( rumeiit does not contain a special per
! mission written across the back for you
I to leave Russian soil you will be detain
ed until the omission is made up. You
nmy be arrested.
Tedious as is the process of landing in
Russia under the most favorable eÄ'U in
stances, it would be well nigh impos
sible to accomplish without endless an
noyance were the wheels not greased
ei ch time to the tune of about fifty
roubles, or $25. Kvery minor official puts
his hand behind his back, and it is ex
pedient to place something in it. This
sum of money must be regularly counted
as one of the expenses of entering a
Russian port.
The censorship of the press is con
The point in dispute Is how many San
ui Fe and how many Colorado Southern
engineers and firemen shall be employed
on the joint track. Many technical points
involving an interpretation of the rules
of the railways and of the secret or
ders are to be decided. The question is
unique and is attracting wide attention
among railway men.
Mr. Sargent says his organization has
never been in better condition and that
there were no grievances to settle. The
qquestlon of next importance whicn he
thinks will com up in his order is to
get the wages of firemen on the roads
in the east up to a more uniform plane
with the men of the west.
SAFE IN N//ÜRFS FORT
BAN'/ iTS DEF Y OFFICERS
HOPE OF CAr *jRlNG THE MEN WHO HELD UP THE GREAT
NORTHERN EXPRESS TRAIN GROWS FAINT.
BELIEF GENERAL THAT THE HIGHWAYMEN HAVE RETREATED
TO HOLE-IN-THE-WALL COUNTRY.
WOMAN KNOWN AS AN INTIMATE OF KID CURRY THOUGHT TO
HAVE AIDED THE GANG.
(Special to Inter Mountain.)
Malta, July 8.—Up to noon today no
hope of capturing the men who aeld up
the Great Northern train is entertained.
One by one the men who accompanied
the authorities on the chase to the south
ward have returned, and the general
opinion appears to be that the robbers
have made good their escape.
The robbery occurred on the evening
of Wednesday, and it is supposed the rob
bers immediately began their long ride
to the southward, heading for the Hole-in
the-wall country in northern Wyoming.
The men were evidently well mounted
and have doubtless by this time escaped
from the state.
The men composing the sheriff's posse
sent out from Glasglow have despaired
of capturing the men and the chase has
been given up from this end of the line.
Hopes are entertained that the robbers
may be apprehended while on their way
out of the state by the authorities of the
southern counties of Montana.
Telegrams Fly Thick.
Telegrams have passed between Sher
tinned more rigidly than ever. In the
leading room of every hotel there will
be dabs of black ink over certain para
graphs or sections of foreign papers.
But the censorship is not merely con
fined to the press and to book publica
tions. All printed matter which enters
Russia is subject to it. and nothing may
be printed within the confines of the em
pire until submitted to and approved by
the censor. This refers even to business
cards.
American consuls or business men here
may unwittingly send home to have cir
culars printed and sent out. They will
be held up at the frontier unless the
printed form shall have previously been
approved by the censor. This approba
tion is necessary before the printed mat
ter can be rescued and then it is subject
to a heavy duty.
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GREAT STEEL STRIKE X
SETTLEMENT COMING X
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(By Associated Press.) X
New York, July 8.—A plan has X
been agreed upon which will set- X
tie the great steel strike within X
the next five days. As matters X
stand, all that remains to be done X
is to hold a final meeting to for- X
mally ratify the plan and an- X
nounce its terms. The programme X
now is to hold that meeting and X
make that announcement Wednes- X
day or Thursday of this week in X
New York or Pittsburg. The main X
points at issue have been settled X
and there will be no great steel X
strike. This early settlement is X
the direct result of J. P. Morgan's X
efforts.
Supreme Court Reverses Decision.
(Special to Inter Mountain.)
Helena, July 8.—The supreme court
tl.is morning reversed a decision of the
district court of Silver Bow county in
favor of the plaintiff in the suit of Frank
Boucher vs. Joseph Barsalou to quiet
title to property in Granite street, Butte,
and ordered a new trial. Barsalou as
owner had borrowed money on the prop
erty from Sam Ayotte and gave him a
deed as security. He repaid the money
but neglected to have the land deeded
back to him, though he remained In pose
session as a tenant. Ayotte sold the
property to Boucher, who brought suit
to: rent in order to quiet title.
Cloudburst Does Damage.
(By Associated Press.)
Albuquerque, N. M., July 8.—Word has
been received here of a destructive cloud
burst in San Andreas canon, south of
this city.
Philippines Tariff Now Ready
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(l!y Associa ted Pressai X
Washington, July 8.- The new Philippine tariff has received its fin- X
Is, hing touches at the war department, and it will be sent by mail to X
Governor Taft in a day or two. It is expected it will be promulgated X
early next month, to go into effect immediately. X
An important provision affecting goods in transit has been inelud- X
ed, permitting consignees to declare all imports which shall arrive X
in the Philippines within sixty days after the tariff is put into oper- X
ation, either under the old schedules now in use or under the new X
duties. X
After that period the old military customs revenue law, founded X
upon Spanish law. will forever cease and the new system, designed X
especially to promote United States trade will take its place. X
The new law Is expected to produce annually $15.000.000 revenue X
for the support of the insular government and to reduce materially X
imports from all countries except the United States and Spain, special X
attention being given to the protection of Philippine industries against X
rivals in the Pacific and Indian ocean. X
The authorities in Washington and the members of the Philippine X
commission have been working on the tariff since la^t August, and X
it is expected that congress at Its next session will approve the X
schedules without modification. ^8
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iff Griffith of Valley county and officers of
Biilings, Red Lodge and other cities in
southern Montana, and every assistance
and encouragement has been extended to
the authorities to intehcept the fleeing
men.
From traces found near the scene of
the robbery it is learned that the robbers
were camped for several days near the
place where the train was held up.
Rumors are rife in Malta and Glas
glow today concerning alleged accom
plices of the robbers, and several per
sons are under suspicion.
Detectives in the employ of the Great
Northern road are wonting on clews that
lead them to believe that residents of this
vicinity were implicated in the hold up
and that employes of the company gave
notice to the robbers that the valuable
consignment of money was on board the
train that was held up.
Woman Is Implicated.
It is said a telegiam was sent to Malta
in cipher shortly before the robbery oc
curred and was taken to the robbers'
camp by a woman well known in this
vicinity as an intimate of "Kid" Curry,
who is supposed to have been one of the
robbers.
Rumors are flying about and many
stories are told of men who saw the rob
bers as they began their journey to the
south and rode out into the range coun
ery.
None of these stories is accredited,how
ever, as it is believed the robbers rode
ail night and by Thursday following the
robbery of the train were lost in the
trackless ranges of central Montana.
Experienced trailers are firm in the be
lief that the riders scattered as soon as
they were near the southern boundary of
the state and reached the Hole-in-the
Wall by circuitous routes.
Members of the Curry Gang.
The men, as near as can be learned, are
members of the famous Currry gang that
were concerned in the robbery of the
bank at Belle Fouché, S. D., four years
ago.
"Kid" Curry is known in many sections
of the country as Tom Jones, and the
other men are thought to be his brother,
Frank Jones, and the noted desperado,
Longebaugh. All the names by which
these men are known are aliases
Two years ago this gang held up a
train in Wyoming, and they are known
to have several murders charged to their
acco.unt.
Officers on the Watch.
(Special to Inter Mountain.)
Red Lodge, July 8.—Pursuant to re
quests from Sheriff Griffith of Valley
county officers of Carbon county have
been on the lookout for the members of
the gang that held up the Great Northern
train Wednesday near Malta.
From what is known of the Curry gang
in this county it is believed the men are
the famous robbers captured by Sheriff
Dunn in the month of September, four
years ago, charged with the robbery of
the bank at Belle Fouché, S. D.
Then, as now, a large reward was of
fered for the arrest of the men and ex
perienced trailers took up the pursuit
that finally ended in the capture of the
gang after a long chase.
Headquarters in Wyoming'.
It is known that the members of the
Curry gang made their headquarters in
the Hole-in-the-Wall country in Wyom
ing, and it is believed that the gang rode
south from the scene of the robbery and
then separated and went, one at a time,
through the thinly settled districts of
this section of the state to the' safe re
treat of the Hole-in-the-Wall country.
All the experienced trailers in this por
tion of the state have been on the look
out for the men for days and are at
ready for a brush with the celebrated
desperadoes as they were when a prie«
was put upon their capture on former oc
casions. •
Trial Trip for Naval Boys.
(By Associated Press.)
San Francisco, July 8.—A draft of 124
ai prentice boys from the Pensacola has
been put aboard the naval training ship
Alert, which will sail Wednesday for
Yokohama, via Honolulu. She will com«
back to San Francisco by way of Puget
Sound and the Columbia river.

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