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The Butte inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, July 08, 1901, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025294/1901-07-08/ed-1/seq-5/

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The Montana
Music Co.
Cordially extends to all lovers of
Art and Music an Invitation to
visit Its store, where man speci
mens of
Steinway, Vose,
L B. Chase
And other pianos are always on
exhibition, and will be gladly
shown.
Sold on Easy Payments
Montana Music Co.
119 North Main St.
tww\vwv%\«
Montana Book Co. $
209 N. Mata St PhOM 294
Sporting Goods
Harrvmocks
Fishing Tackle
Newest, Freshest Stock in the
City at Lowest Prices.
The
'Examiner'
Served to your address
anywhere by carrier
2J4c a day
By F.d Shield's "City
News Depot.
MONTANA BOOK CO.
W. H. KLEIN. Mgr.
New Century
Type-Writer
Greatest Speed
Most Work
Least Effort
Best Impression
Most Copies
Most Durable
CALKINS' BOOK STORE
37 North Main St.
Perfection
Press Copying Books With Robber
Backs are the Newest and Best.
Copying Presses and Baths.
Typewriting Supplies, Office
Stationery complete. New Indian
Pictures mounted, only $1.25 Doz.
Evans Bookstore
114 N. Hain St
L. F. Prescott
Monuments
Tablets
Headstones
Curbing, Etc.
Scotch and Ameri
can Granites
Italian and American
Plant greatly enlarged, with new ma
chinery for handling work at lowest cost.
New and Elegant Designs
In Substantial Iron Fencing.
OFFICE AND YARD:
425 South Montana Street, Butte.
Kxssxxxxxxsxxnisxxxxxraxxxn
Idr huie pock!
g i a Ycers in Butte.
y Generation doctor oi China f*ocu j
£ grandfather down. Born
schooled In the profession. Treats !
all diseases, making a specialty of*
chronic troubles Consult um be- j
fore you waste your Ilfs away.
217 South Main Struct.
tssu&xxxxxasxxxxxsxxxxi
HINDI MIN WITH I FORI '
LOCKED IN A PRISON CELL
Man Wanted by Anaconda Authorities
Captured by Chief Reynolds This
Morning — Officers Had Been
Searching for Suspect Since
July 3—His Victim Seri
ously Injured.
After three days of search Chief of
Police Reynolds succeeded this morning
in locating Frank Boswalli, alias Depos
qual, the Anaconda Italian, who on the
night of July 3rd severely stabbed Frank
Rossle, a fellow countryman. In the lat
ter's cabin in the Copper City. Depos
qual was arrested and will be taken to
Anaconda today. He claimed that his
limited knowledge of the English lan
guage prevented him from entering with
a conversation with Chief Reynolds, but
upon being accused of having recently
arrived from Anaconda the wily little
foreigner knew enough English to deny
that he had ever been In that city. He
afterwards practically admitted his con
nection with the trouble at Anaconda.
A RARE, WARM WEATHER TALE
Refreshing Yarns About Snowbanks
of a Decade Ago—Wasted Street
Corner Lecture.
"Talk about warm weather," said a
member of the court house prevarication
club during a recess in JJudge McCler
nan's court today, "this is warm, I'll ad
mit for this season of the year, but it
somehow reminds me of a siege we had
June 1st eleven years ago. I remember
it well. I was walking down Arizona
street shortly after dark and when be
tween Mercury and Galena a young duck
jumped out from behind a telegraph pole
•nd grabbed my watch. I tackled him
and we had it nip and tuck for a few
minutes. In the shuffle the timepiece
flew into the snow and I hauled the
young scamp up to It and picked it up.
Then I yelled 'police' like a thief, but
no policeman responded. I do not believe
there was one out of his rendezvous that
night. I held to my man a while and
then began giving him a lecture on the
course he was pursuing in life. Just as
I told him he ought to brace up and stop
his woolly ways he hit me a blow along
side the head and knocked me down."
"That must have made you warm,"
said the judge with a smile.
"Made me warm! No; it made me see
seven distinct brands of stars and caused
me to resolve that the next man who at
tempts to get away with my watch will
not receive a lecture from me."
And this cool way of relating cold
weather stories had a chilling effect upon
the atmosphere to such an extent that
the thermometer dropped several degrees
and a gale of laughter sprung up among
the amused spectators.
BOOMING TH E PICTU RE MARKET
Montana Money Sends Price of Paint
ings Beyond the Reach of Mor
gan's Millions.
The New York World tells of the recent
purchase of paintings by Senator W. A.
Clark of Butte. The World's story of an
auction of paintings is as follows:
The World correspondent hears on
what seems to be excellent authority,
that the exquisite Hoppner portrait of
Lady Louisa Manners dressed as a peas
ant, which was sold Thursday by auction
for the sensational figure of $73,662, was
bought for Senator Clark, of Montana.
But according to another report, for
which Duveen, the dealer who bought
the picture, is given as authority, he
purchased the picture as a speculation,
and Mr. Morgan and Mr. Yerkes are
bidding for the portrait which Duveen
declines to sell under $10,000 advance on
the price he paid.
Better Happners have been sold within
a few years for half the amount just
paid, but values have been enormously
raised by the buying by Morgan and
Clark.
President William McKinley Advises
The people to save up money for a
rainy day. The most economical fuel
for summer Is the Cottonwood Coal com
pany's washed nut, $4.00 a ton. 814 Utah
avenue. 'Phone 276. *
ä
Teddy grins with de*
light at the idea of
smoking a
HENRY
IRVIN&
#
HABANA
XGAR
To Be Had Only at
CHRISTIE & LEYS'
12 N. Main St.
DR. "
kennepy.
OSTEOPATH
O fflee Cor. Mont, an d
Granite Streets
\ foaminat'a >
pREm
XX« XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
*
K
K
m
m
Pilsiner jjj
*
m.
«a
That's Just Right
because It is Butte Brewery
beer. Palatable, wholesome, refreshing,
it tastes just right, and is just the thing
for health and comfort these summer
days. It is rpade from select hops and £
malt, with special care through every
stage of brewing, and is bottled in all &
it's original purity. Delivered In cases ^
at your residence by your dealer or by £
*
*
*
*
m
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
THE BUTTE BREWERY
252 North Wyoming.
Deposqual and Rossi had trouble over
money matters and after a dispute last
ing for some time, the two men, who
had been working together for a number
of months on the railroad section, began
a fistic encounter. Rossi, who was dis
covered by neighbors in a faint condition,
refused to go into details regarding the
affair but said that he was getting some
the best of his opponent in the fight when
the latter, seizing a fork from the table,
stabbed him in the abdomen, and neck
several times. Deposqual made his es
cape from the cabin and was not seen
again by any one who had known him
until this morning.
The Italian had evidently become hungry
and called at the section house of the
Great Northern railroad for something
to eat. Some of the employes recognized
the fugitive and, knowing that Chief
Reynolds wanted him, notified that offi
cial. Word was received from Anaconda
to the effect that Rossi, although serious
ly injured, has a good chance to survive
his wounds.
SWINDLED PRISON CONVICTS
Shabby Tricks Played Upon Men Be
hind Bars by Crooked Dealers
on the Outside.
"There are apparently some people in
this world who are too mean to live,"
said a well known Butte man to a re
porter this forenoon in the lobby of the
Thornton as he folded up an eastern pa
per. "Here I have been reading a story
in this paper that is published in Chi
cago. It is to the effevt that men who
reside in this state have robbed the con
victs in the penitentiary until measures
had to be taken to prevent the swindling.
How did they do it? Why they acted
as agents for the inmates of the prisons
and sold articles the convicts made, re
turning part of the money, sometimes,
and keeping the rest and in many cases
never making any returns at all. You
see the convicts make hair bridles and
other skillful creations and send them out
to people over the state whom they know
and depend upon the honesty of the re
cipients of their confidence to sell the
goods and return them the money.
"Now the men who sell Vne convicts
wares frequently swindle them and so
general has this practice become that S.
C. Ashby, clerk of the board of prison
commissioners as been appealed to to
straighten out the tangle. He has taken
steps to establish a rule that will place
the responsibiliy for all such acts where
it belongs and compel those who have
dealings with men behind prison bars to
respect the rules of common honesty in
their transactions with the men who
wear stripes. The story of the tricks
played upon the convicts by the men out
side the bars has traveled to the east
ern part of the country and is now being
published in eastern papers as a choice
bit of gossip and a character sketch of
the residents of this state. Its enough to
make a man want to shoot somebody.
And what a lesson it is for the convict!
He must have a poor example f honesty
to go by when he finds himself swindled
while he is in prison.
"A short time ago one of the inmates
of the Deer Lodge prison wrote a story
for an eastern magazine that offered a
prize for the best literary contribution
received. He tried his hand at writing
another and was obliged to send the
communication to Governor Toole and
ask his opinion of the story before it was
allowed to go out to the publisher. The
governor looked the story over and said
it was all right and he had the satisfac
tion of knowing that the publisher of the
magazine confirmed his judgment for the
story won one of the prizes offered by
tbe publication that bid for literary work.
The convict is now engaged upon an
other story which he will pass up to the
governor for perusal before he sends it
away. Queer things happen in the Deer
Lodge pen I guess. It is a place that
takes in all kinds of characters and there
appears to be a sensation of small or
large purportions flowing out of the place
all the time."
SHEEP BANDS ARE IN DANGER
Inspectors Righting an Epidemic of
Scab on North Montana Ranges
—Trouble Ahead.
G. R. Pyle is in the city from his
home in Fort Benton. He is one of the
flock masters of the state and is well
posted on matters relating to the sheep
industry of the state.
The sheep of the northern part of the
state are threatened with an epidemic
resembling scab," said Mr. Pyle to an In
ter Mountain reporter this forenoon at
the Thornton. Sheep Inspector Freeman
who is a resident of Chinoon, says there
is a very threatening outbreak of this
disease among the flocks of the northern
section of the state. He furtheer says
he is taking Immediate steps to prevent
the spread of the disease. How many
sheep have been tainted with the threat
ened epidemic is not known at present.
"Of the sheep under treatment since
the first appearance of the disease last
winter, a great many have been cured by
dipping. Many of the bands are proba
bly clean, but are being dipped for the
third time as a precaution. The flocks
which have been quarantined owing to
exposure, proved not to havee contracted
the disease and have been released.
"The first discovery of the spread of
the infection was made at the shearing
LEY SON'S
Store News That Counts
Butter Dish, $3.00
An elegant assortment of Butter Dishes in all the la
test patterns at $3.00, $4.50, $5, $7.00 and $12.00.
A 2 piece sugar and cream set; a temptation for money
savers...................................................
Only $4.00
A satin engraved 3 piece set, exceptionally good value,
or as Webster calls them—bargains......................
Only $6.00
A very cholcF 3 piece set; call and see it................
Only $9,00
Grand assortment of cake baskets in new and elegant
designs, engraved, embossed and hand burnished, at...
$3.00, $3*75. $4*°°. $6.00, $8.oo,
$10,00 and $12.00
A beautiful tea service of 5 pieces in satin engraved
or hand burls hed........................................
Only $17.00
Pickle Castor, $2.25
Something very
choice in Pickle
Castors in all
tbe latest col
orings abd dec
orations, ruby,
blue, violet,
crystalloid, at
$ 2.25
$3.00
$3-75
-■ *
A handosme 5 piece tea servise, must be seen to be
appreciated, remarkably low for such quality..........
Only $25.00
Beauty and business are easily described in this 5 piece
(tea service ............................................
Only $ 35-50
A superb 5 piece tea service, richly engraved, the pos
essor of which any house wife may well be proud of,
would be cheap at $50.00; this week......................
Yours for $38.00
Strietiy One Prlee. Alt Goods Marked in Plain Figures
J. H. LEYSON, 221 North Main
KEEP COOL
SUITS
MEN'S
CRASH
Three-Piece, Well Made, Well Shrunk,
ONLY $5.00
37 Suits, Summer Weight, Light Colors, Nice Effects, $15.00 to $18.00 Values
Choice Now' $7.65
Flannel Suits, Pants and Coat, Light Stripe, $12.00 Kind now S8.C5
BOUCHER, The Clothier Butte, Mont.
sheds on West Fork, 20 miles nortth of
Chinook. Some 5,000 head weree being
sheared when the scab was reported.
The band was all sheared but about 25
head when the Inspector arrived and de
clared a quarantine. They are not badly
infected, but may have exposed many
others. The Silver Bow Sheep Co.'s
bands, numbering 500 head, are in very
bad shape and have been diseased three
or four months. They are camped ten
miles northwest of Harlem, and are
quarantined on that range. Another
band close to the Silver Bow's com
pany's sheep and are also quarantined,
but have not yet shown signs of scab.
"Almost all the sheep north of Milk
river between Havre and Woody Island
creek are owned by Bear Paw wool
growers, who send them north early in
the spring. They are floated from one
Watering place to another and cross each
other's range frequently, so that wide
spread damage may have been done. But
the next 90 days will settle that question.
Inspector Freeman has appointed
deputies to assist him in handling the
unexpected work now devolving upon
him."
Missoula Excursion.
The Northern Pacific excursion to Mis
soula on t'he 21st promises to • take a
great crowd of people, the rate of $2.00
for the round trip Instead of $7.50, the
regular fare, proving a great drawing
card. The company is preparing to run
two trains on that day, to accommodate
the crowds that will most likely take ad
vantage of the days' outing. The trains
leave Butte at 7:30 and 8:00 a. m., re
turning here about midnight, and giving
seven or eight hours in Missoula.
Suspiciously Quiet.
According to the statement of the au
thorities at police headquarters business
iîî 'on the hum" today, the weather be
ing t°° warm for the real bad man to
get in his work. He couldn't get a suffi
cient crowd to pay him for his trouble.
But although business is "on the bum"
not a solitary bum appeared for the
business to fasten itself on to. and the
police are wondering what's coming
next.
Knights of Phythias Installation.
The Knights of Pythias of Butte will
hold a joint installation of officers at
Damon hall, over the Red Boot Store on
Main street, this evening. All the
five lodges of the city will participate.
DR. CHUNG'S
Celebrated Herb Sanitar
ium. Guarantees to cure
all diseases by means of
his famous Chinese médi
ta eines, never before intro
duced Into this country. He has cured
thousands and can curs you.
Advlcs free. 9 West Galena street,
Butte, Montana.
\ Richards *
i The Butte Undertaker
À ^Ä« ,,l[er ' 307
* 104 W. Park Street
representing upwards of a thousand
members. But it is not expected that all
will turn out this hot weather; indeed,
if they should do so, they would have
to take turns in going into the hall.
There are some 1,200 members of the
ldoge having headquarters In Butte, but
not all are members here, some of them
still holding their membership at other
places and following on the plans of
so many who come to Butte, "Just for a
little while," expecting to leave in a
month, or a year—which they never do.
"Tomorrow," mused she, gazing with
her deep blue eyes into the glowing
grate, where, as the coals crumbled at
the touch of the flame, divers and sundry
fantastic forms seemed to gather, only
to disperse again, "to-morrow I shall be
seventeen. Moreover, I have been rear
ed in the strictest of New England
homes. Why should I not, then, write a
novel dealing frankly with the( sex
problem?"
Of course there was no reason why
not, except that she was an extremely
Indolent girl; and this we told her.—
Detroit Journal.
ANOTHER STRONG MINING COM
PANY OPERATING IN BUTTE.
The Butte Mining & Development
company Is sinking a three compartment
shaft at the corner of Sllv.er and Colora
do streets. The shaft is down 350 feet
and the indications for a great mine are
very encouraging. The vein on which
the company is sinking is the largest in
Butte. It has always been known as
the Mother Lode of the camp. The
plant consists of three eighty horse pow
er boilers, a five drill air compressor,
which does away with hand drilling, an
engine capable of hoisting from a depth
of 1,200 feet, powerful pumps, tanks,
cars, blacksmith shop, shaft house, lum
ber yard, etc. A force of twenty-five
experienced miners is puttng the shaft
down at the rate of 80 feet per month.
They expect to strike flue ore at a
depth of 650 feet. You do not find a
copper mine in Butte except with depth.
Anaconda Copper Mining Co
Hardware Department
3« eir BUTTS Jm
Corner of Quortae. end Main Streets
Mining and Blacksmith Supplies. Mechanics' Tools
Shelf and Heavy Hardware
REVOLVERS. GUNS, RIFLES AND AMMUNITION
Montai* Agents fir Alsen & Salt Lake Portland Cements
Wholesale and Retail.
Orders and Correspondence Solicited
The company thinks that in securing the
"Emma" they got one of the best claims
in Butte. About $40,000 has already been
spent on the mine and Its magnificent
plant. There is now about $65,000 cash
in the treasury.
The following list of officers, not one of
whom receives any salary, absolutely,
guarantees the honesty and legitimacy
of the proposition:
President, former U. S. Senator, Lee
Mantle, vice president, former Post
master J. H. Lynch; treasurer, Fayette
Harrington, cashier of the Silver Bow
National bank, of Butte; secretary W.
W. McDowell, former owner of the Coj)
peropolis mines.
Directors: Hon. Lee Mantle, V J. H.
Lynch, Fayette Harrington, Geo. H.
Robinson,c onsultng engneer and expert
for the Montana Ore Purchasng com
pany; Jas. A. Talbott, vee president of
the First National bank of Butte; W. L.
Moyer, vice president of the Western
National bank of New Yrk City: A. E.
Spriggs, former lleut.-gov. of Montana;
Jay Anderson, merchant, White Sul
phur Springs, and other well-known
gentlemen.
The par value of the stock is $5.00 per
share, but the company has decided to
place 25,000 shares of its treasury stock
on the market at $1.50 per share. Pros
pectus mailed free. For further infor
mation write or call on the agents of the
company, Reynolds & McDowell, 46 East
Broadway, Butte. adv
DOES IT PAY TO BUY CHEAP?
A cheap remedy for coughs and colds
Is all right, but you want something that
will relieve and cure the more severe and
dangerous results of throat and lung
troubles. What shall you do? Go to a
warmer and more regular climate? Yes,
if possible; if not possible for you, then
In either case the only remedy that has
been introduced In all civilized countries
with success In severe throat and lung
troubles, "Boschee's German Sy-up." It
not only heals and stimulates the tis
sues to destroy the germ dise; se, but
allays inflammation, causes easy t xpeeto
ration, gives a good night's rert. and
cures the patient. Try one bottle. Rec
ommended many years by all duvggists
In the ''.orId. Get Green's Prize Alma
nac.

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