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The Butte inter mountain. (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, January 23, 1902, Evening, Image 1

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THE BUTTE INTER MOUNTAIN.
VOL. XXI. NO. 258 aLTE. DOIATANA, THURSDAYrEVENING. JANUARY 23, 1902. PRICE FIVE CENTS
CNIN[S[
[XCLUSION,
UO0N W. F05TER GIVES THE SEN
ATE TAE BENEPIT Ori HIS
VIEWS.
OPPOSED TO PROPOSED BILL I
Explained That the Old Treaty Would
Come in Efect W nsti Last One Ex
pired-Uaid Chinese Benefcial
to Hawaiian Islands.
(By Associated Press.)
Washington. Jan. 23.-Former Secre
tary of State John W. Foster appeared
before the senate committee on immi
gration today, and spoke in opposition to
the Chinese exclusion bills which have
been introduced in congress.
His remarks were directed more par
ticularly to the Mitchell or Pacific coast
bill, which, he said, was a plain viola
tion of our treaty with China.
Mr. Foster said our government had
four times asked China to modify exist
ing treaties in the interest of American
citizens, and that in every instance
China had acceded to our request. He
then submitted for the consideration of
the committee three propositions.
The first was that any law passed by
the present congress which continues
the exclusion of Chinese laborers beyond
1904, would be not only without inter
national authority but will be in viola
tion of treaty stipulations.
He said that during the negotiations
resulting in the treaty of 1894 the United
States sought to have the exclusion of
Chinese laborers extended to 20 years
and that the Chinese government re
fused to make it for more than 10 years.
He also insisted that when the treaty
of 1894 came to an end the Burlingame
treaty of 1868 would be revived and come
into force, which treaty stipulated for
the free and unrestricted immigration of
Chinese of all classes into the United
States. The treaty, he said, had only
been suspended as to immigration, not
abrogated.
Should Not Apply to Islands.
His second proposition was that the
exclusion laws should not be made ap
plicable to all our insular possessions
and said the Hawaiian islands presented
the exact state of affairs which was
contemplated by the American negotia
tors for the exclusion treaty, in which
they gave the assurance that to such a
condition of affairs the exclusion law
would naturally when all the interests
of the islands asked for Chinese Immi
gration and the local authoritis agreed
that it would not in any way affect
white labor.
Mr. Foster's third proposition was
that the existing exclusion laws and the
legislation proposed are in clear disre
gard to the treaty stipulations.
He cited the provision of the treaty
of 1894, which guaranteed to all Chinese
in the United States the most favored
nation treatment and the privileges of
treaties with other nations guarantee
ing to them the same treatment as to
the protection of their persons and porp
erties as that enjoyed by native citizens.
Considering Deficiency Bill.
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, Jan. 23.-Soon after the
house met today, it went Int9 committee
of the whole and r' aimed the considera
tion of the urgent deficiency bill.
PULLED [YE OUT
LITERALLY OBEYED THE SCRIP
TURAL INJUNCTION.
FANATICISM CAUSES DEATH
Young Woman of Tennessee Becoming
Insane From Religious Excitement
Practically Commits Suicide by
Extracting Her Own Eye.
(By Associated Press.)
Nashville, Tenn., Jan. 23.-Mrs. Bulla
Abbey, wife of a young merchant, near
Sparta, Tenn., is dead, as the result of
pulling out of one of her eyes in a fan
atical and literal interpretation of the
scriptual injunction "If thine eye offend
thee, pluck it out and cast it from thee,
for it is better to go into heaven having
only one eye than suffer the torment of
hell-fire."
She became much excited over religion
early last autumn, and since that time,
it is said she has been noted for strange
vagaries in religious work.
MARRIED TWELVE TIMES.
Holds the Record for Number of Wives
-Wants Another.
(By Associated Press.,
Dublin, Ind., Jan. 23,-Phillip Veidel
burg of Madison county undoubtedly
holds the record in Indiana for mar
Piages.
He is 58 years old and has been mar
ried 12 times.
He I tto fath' if q'" hildrvn. ft to
said Veide!hurg hopes to live long
enough to marry his thirteenth wife.
he Oio. ".IAv 111 4" iiLao, .int. U11fkiC
from a family whose ancestors settled in
New York during the colonial period,
Wade Makes Confession.
(By Associated Press.)
San Francisco, Jan. 23.-Jack Wade,
who is under arrest for the murder of
Policeman Robinson, has admitted that
his companions at the time of the crime
were "Kid" Goucher and a man known
as "Brownie," both of whom are still 't
large.
KILLEDIN
BATH HOUS[
MILLIONAIRE 0OOPER LOSES HIS
LIFE MYSTERIOUSLSY IN
ST. LOUIS.
NEGRO VALET UNDER ARREST
His Skull Was Broken and While Sur
geons Relieved That in a Short
Time He Was Unable to Sus
tain the Shook and Died.
(By Associated Press.)
St. Louis, Jan. 28.-A. Denn Cooper, the
millionaire treasurer of the Graham Pa
per company, died today as the result of
an assault in which his skull was frac
tured while in the cooling room of the
Vista Turkish bathhouse at Grand and
Franklin acenuos last night.
William Strother, the negro attendant
at the bathhouse. who was on duty after
midnight, is held as a prisoner at the
Dayton street poliee station.
A diamond ring valued at $1500 and a
diamond pin worn by Cooper when he
I entered the bath, were found in the base
ment of the bathhouse this morning.
They had been concealed under the floor
ing in a crevice about the top of a joist.
A sledge hammer bearing fresh blood
stains, was found in the basement soon
after the po'ice had been summoned to
the scene of the assault. The hammer
was one which is used in the basement
I for breaking up coal.
Strother told the police at the time of
the arrest that a woman and a man had
called to see Mr. Cooper, who was pro
prietor of the place, shortly after 11
o'clock last night.
They came in a carriage and were pre
ceded by a boy with a note. The colored
man said that he had admitted them to
the cooling room and had returned to the
basement. lie did not know, he said,
when they d"parted.
Some Colored Women.
Strother also said that two colored
women, Josle Houston and Florence
Banks, had visited them in the base
ment earlier last night.
Erastus Fountain, janitor of the Vista
block, says that the two women were in
Strother's company at 9:30 a'clock, when
he made his last visit to the premises.
The police say that there is no other
evidence than Strother's statement to
prove the visit of the women and man to
the bathhouse. A few minutes after mid
night Theodore Cooper, known as "Tod,"
son of A. Dean Cooper, answered the
doorbell at the family residence, 3713
Washington boulevard.
Strother Says He Is Innocent.
Strother was at the door. "Your fath
er's been hurt," said the negro to young
Cooper. lie's over at the hathhousoe."
Without stopping to riuestion the man
closely Cooper hurried to the Vista block.
In the cooling room of the bathhouse on
a cot in the middle of the long apart
ment, he found his father covered by a
sheet.
Ihators were immediately called and
the police notified. The latter made an
investigation, and discovered the blood
stained hammer.
Young Cooper told the police that the
ring usually worn by his father was
- missing, and they made another search
for the ring and pin in the cellar, which
was successful.
For some time the physicians worked
over Mr. Cooper, who did not regain con
sciousness. They decided to perform an
operation and remove the pieces of bone
from the Jagged wound in the skull that
were pressing on the injured man's brain.
This was successfully performed, but
Mr. Cooper did not regain consciousness,
passing away about 10 o'clock this morn
ing, surrounded by members of his
family.
Strother stoutly maintains his inno
cence. Fountain, the janitor, was taken
to the police station, but was released
after telling about the presence of the
two colored women in the bathhouse
when he left.
"Tod" Cooper stated to the police that
his father had practically closed a deal
for the sale of the bathhouse property
and that the transfer was to have been
made today, but did not state the name
Sof the prospective purchasers.
PLEAS[D OVER G6f[
ML. AND MRS. GREENOUGH GIVE
MISSOULA PARK SITE.
BANKS OF THE RATTLESNAKE
Beautiful Home Including Severai
Small Islands Toward Mouth of
Stream a Free Gift to
the City.
(Ppecial to Trter Mountain.)
Missoula, Jan. 23.-Residents of this
city are rejoicing over (he magnificent
gift fromn Mr. and Mrs. T. L. Greenough
of property to be used as a city park.
The property, which will be deeded to
Missoula, includes the beautiful site of
the Greenough home on the banks of the
11attlesnake and which for natural scen
ery cannot be excelled in this section.
Mr. Greenough has been adding to the
original homestead until a sufficient acre
ige has been secured for park purposes.
The gift includes a strip of land several
Aect wide along both sides of the river
and toward the lower end the river
hr glens and several small islands will
make pretty resting places for the ap
preciative visitors to the new park.
The city will be expected to fence in
the park and to increase the natural
beauty with added improvements.
JC. AL LTRU$ST[ [MPLOY[,
SNORT IMMIS CASH
The downfall of John C. Hall, aº
trusted employe of the great wholesali
packing tilrn of Swift & Co., was an-'
nounced today. Hall is the cashier an$:
bookkeeper of the branch omee of Swit
& Co., in this city, and he is accused of
embezzling $300 of the firm's money.
Deputy County Attorney Lynch thli
morning issued a complaint chargifn'
him with grand larceny, at the request
of H. M. Buchanan, the auditor of th9
packing company in the Western d4*
vision, whose headquarters are locateG
at Omaha.
Buchanan came to this city to look
into Hall's accounts, flual's returns to
the firm having been unsatisfactory for
some thie.
The principal establishment of Swift
& Co. is at Chicago, and the branch
here is located on South Arizona street.
The story told the deputy county attor
ney by fluchanan is that Hall, for some
time past, had been in the habit of
holding back the business receipts of
the Butte house which he received.
Hall Had a System.
According to Buchanan it was Itall's
duty to deposit with the firm's hank
the money resulting from the day's re
ceipts of the branch house.
Instead of doing this, it was his custom
to credit the company with the money
in the cash book of the concern here a
hold the money back for several days
or weeks, at the end of which time he
would deposit sums agreeing with the
baek entries in the book. In that way
he gradually embezzled the sum nmed.
The gland larceny complaint charges
hite with one specific act of embezzle
meat. He is charged with appropriat
ing, the daily receipts of the busines
for December 3, 1901, amounting to the
sum of $191.37. The other embezsle
mnents charged are cut up into several
sums, aggregating the sum of $3500, Ap
proximately.
Does Not Deny Shortage.
The reason for Hall's downfall coUl4
not be explained by Auditor lluchanasi
Hall feels his exposure very keenlyl
according to Buchanan's account of ila
manner when confronted with the fants
of his shortage. lie did not deny that
his ascounts were in arrears.
He has a wife and four children, and
hi offered to work the shortage out if
he were sparedi a prosecution. lo far
as known, he has been a man of trust
worthiness and Integrity heretofore.
The complaint against Hall was tlied
In Judge Arnold's court and a warrant
was I ssued for Hallts arrest.
GOV. TA[T'S TALK
HIE THINKS A TARIFF IS NECES
SARY FOR A TIME.
MONEY FOR GOOD GOVERNMENT
Philippine Governor Believes That
When New Avenues of Trade Are
Opened Small Tariff Would
Be Slight Obstacle.
(13y Associated Press.)
San Francisco, Jan. 23.-Referring to
the Philippine tariff in a speech before
the Union League clue, before his de
parture for the East, Governor W. H.
Taft is reported to have said:
"I know from reading your papers and
talking with some of your merchants
that you are anxious to have free trade
between the Philippines and America.
In many respects that would be an ait
mirable arrangement, if it wpre possible4
to run the government of the Philip
pines without the indirect taxation in
volved in levying customs duties.
It would gratify the commisslon very
much if congress would take off alto
gether the tariff imposed by the Ding
ley bill.
"All we desire is to have money enough
to run a good government.
"My view is that as soon as trade is
establish: d and avenues opened, a small
tariff will form a very slight obstacle
to the course of business between the
Philippines and California."
fHER SON TESTI[IES
MRS. RICHARDSON WEEPS WHILE
HER SON TESTIF. .S.
STATE DO NOT CROSS-EXAMINE
Young Man Apparently Gives Full Ds
tails of His Mother's and His Own
Actions on the Eventful Night
of the Tragedy.
(13y Associated Press.)
Plattsburg, Mo., Jan. 23.-In the trial
of Mrs. Addle J. Richardson for the
murder of her husband, the defense to
day began the presentation of its side
of the case.
The last witness put upon the stand
by the defense will be Mrs. Richardson
herself. That probably will be tomor
row afternoon.
The first witness for the defense was
Johnny Richardson, the 14-year-old son
of the defendant.
Young Richardson said that on the
night of the murder he had left home
with his mother about 11:30 o'clock to
find Mr. Richardson.
They had met Fife at the church steps
and Fife had gone to the St. Charles
hotel and reported that Richardson was
there.
The state made no attempt by cross
examination to break down the boy's
testimony.
Mrs. Richardson wept while her soi
was testifying, a
She Bore Good Character.
Mrs. J. W. Grant, a sister of the mur
dered man, testified that she was at the
IRichardson home the night that Mrs.
Richardson brought her husband hor3e
from the hotel. She said her brothit
was very much under the influence 'of
liquor.
Mrs. Richardson's general reputation
in Texas, Kansas and Missouri, where
she had lived, was, she said, good.
Dr. W. M. Kerr, a resident of Savan.
nah for 12 years, and Peter Richard
von, also testified to Mrs. Rilhardson's
good character.
Christiansen was asked:
"You never heard others discuss her
I character?"
"No, sir, because I suppose there was
nothing bad in it to discuss."
I "And you signed the indi tmeu.
Iagainst her for xrurxler?"
"Yes sir."
EXPLAINS HIS VOTE
CUMMINGS OF NEW YORK HAS
VIEWS ON kHILIPPINES.
VOTED FOR THE CANNON BILL
He Believes That There Are No Politics
in Questions Where Lines of United
States Soldiers Are at Stake
Talk About Slavery.
(13y Associated Press.)
Wnshington, Jan. 23.- Mr. Cummings
of New York explained his action of
yesterday on the Philippine army post.
Ile closed by saying that his party
n=led right on the nsilbject but ended
rserably. He said he voted as he did
li a democrat-an it 'rammitny hall dem
ec4t-and was proud of it, and added:
a is no plitites in a questwon where
es of American soldiers are at
Kahn of California. who visited
the Philippines last suunier, said that If
lie minority know of the sufferings of
the soldiers in the liilllppiniis lstause of
a lack of quarters there would not have
been a vote against the Cannon bill yeaS
terday.
Mr. Pierce of Teonessee said if such
wits the case the president and officers
of the ariny were responsible as they had
ibsolute authority in the Philippines.
Mr. Cannon, in speaking of the Manila
list said he was sorry that he could
not satisfy the other side, adding: "We
iiive got the Philippines and we have
never parted with an acre of ground.
While the heathens rage we go march
ing on."
The discussion turned upon slavery
in the Jolo group. Mr. (laines of 'J'ell
nessee who had visited the group, said
the United States ofiliers told him they
could do nothing to stop slavery because
of the treaty between the United States
and the Sultan.
Mr. Moody of Massachusetis sild the
United States authori/.s hiid never
given countenance to slavery in the
Philipotne .
Mr. Mercer of Nebraska, who visited
the islands, said slavery was del rims
Ing.
Mr. Cochran of Missouri declared that
many of the slaves were ('histians
owned by Mohammedans.
MONEY WAS CACHED
OLD MAID SAVES LARGE SUM IN
KITCHEN PANTRY.
HAD IT BEFORE THE WAR
Surrounded by Tin Pans and Broken
Dishes inas Stripe Left Her Life
Savings - Found After
Her Death.
(By Associated Press.)
Crawfordsville, Ind., Jan. 23-Relatives
I of America Stripe, an aged spinster who
died this week, have since her death un
covered a rich treasure in her kitchen
pantry.
In an old tin canister surrounded by
broken dishes and battered tinware, they
I found gold and bank notes to the amount
of nearly two thousand dollars.
There were Mexican gold coins bearing
dates in the fifties and looking as bright
as the day they came from the mint.
There were also a great roll of shin
plaster money of denominations ranging
from 10 to 50 cents.
It is believed the money was bidder,
away before the war.
CONFLICTS IN ARMFNIA.
Bulgarian and Turkish Troops Fight
With Tribesmen.
(By Associated Press.)
Constantinople, Jan. 23.-The Kurds
are in the field in Armenia and sanguin
ary tribal conflicts have occurred in the
Vilayets of Bltlis and Van. Twenty
men were killed in the Bitils fight and
both sides suffered heavily at Van.
Bulgarians an1i Turkish troops ive
heen in conflict in the Vilayet of
j~ossovo. Ten Bulgarians were killed.
WAS TODAY Ii
OIT[RED
SENATOR MASON PRESENTED THE I
LONG PROMISED SCHLEY
RESOLUTION.
SAME AS THE ONE FOR DEWEY I
Philippines Will Be Pressed to a Vote
After Monday Next - Senator
Mason's ScBley Resolution Was
Read a Secont. Time.
(fly Aaoiiut Led l'ei'i.)
WashingLufo. Jin. 2J.---Satii after the
senalte cunven'ed Mr1. thine of Mottne mov
5t1 that when the aetnnte adjLurnt today
It aiuill be until Monilay neit.
Pending actilo upon the totilon, Mr.
Lodge of MPeisucihuiitiL in charige of the
Philippine tariff bill, acid he had ticen iIn
I formed by Mr. flawilna, In charge of the
ininiirity substitute, that the opponen ti
of the mneoaure were fut prepltred to pro
ceed with the debate today. but would
he Monunduy.
Mr. lAdge gave ntilet that on and af
ter Mlindiy he wouId prei s the measure
diiliv for inilder'tLion.
Mr. Ulinle' nuLtion than was audopied.
- Mr. ManLn offered the follow ing joint
re-silut ion:
"That the tztika if irotngresi he here
by tendered to AditirlI WVintli' Scott
ichley for hia brave and litile conduct
while in vtinurnand of the Ameriiiui fleet
{ at the victorituq bottle of HMti nl:igi.
"That a sword ie preasie't -el le him by
the aceretary of the navy of the Initeiti
lLtans aid tihei Hunt tof $1iO,0100, or So
much thereof eel mauy be necenarey, IN
hereby apprupriirted iicii' fur hii gpose of
this rietalutliui out ut aniy iiioney iin the
triuatury nit olherwiie appropriated.
'"That the atereiiiy (tf the navy shoda
entare to be Mr tl ek bronze mredals coin
mernorntiing the btil I of niiniigo stid
distribute the Hinee to the ofllcere ren
ihn uni''der the ,imnliid itt Hhley duii
nrK aiid battle of HanLtingo."
Mr. Mlasone Hald the r~esoluilln wase
peet e'ically the Haite iia that idlpted in
the ci' of Aumirlal l)ewey.
"I think we witihld better let thiii reio
i Ititionl gu over," uiggewfl Mr II aIn,
u. hiirmnan of ihe oiimitte' tii naval iii
yfairt s. "T e matter Involved la4 in :mn
iI 'iriversy. It oight to gl to iL ctiirniiit
d tie."
'"I di not ice that I t L i Li e .i:' .y'," Hail
Mr. Mnaon. 'that the resilution go to a
ve omittee.
"It in a statement of a hiatoriLei fact
which haa been ptaosd upon by the
d American people. Under the rules it iall
be read a coinnd time and pame i."
if The chair expliunel that li el 'tai in
e Liiiin could not he real .1 a''.it tiiii in
the taue of oijcitiin 'lhit i bhad been
Mr. litle Hnid he hIeu nil chjection le
ithe aiiond reading iii th reiluiL Liiuiiitl
it was read aitain.
Royal Marriage in Austria
lit (Ily Aoatt'iaeed Pre's.1
Ili Vienna, Jan. 23.--The Arihduliiuiti'e
' Ei'iuzabeth, grani-daughter of Etoperir
e 'raiz Joa'ph, wiia marr'ied today to
it irinye othe von Winditch-' Lr etz lIt the
- Jiaef clu'pel of the IItfburg, in the pres
ence of Emperor irttnz Joseph, ICountesu
ry fronyny formner~ly the ('rown Prinvcs
SStephantile) i the bride's mother and a
Ld numnber of pr'in'es and prlncmsaea beloong
log to the imperial family.
FIND PLAC[R MINE
MEN DIGGING A BASEMENT IN
DENVER FIND GOLD.
MINERS PRONOUNCE IT GOOD
Eighteen Feet Below the Surface in the
City of Denver Placer Gravel
Is Struck While Digging
a Cellar.
(By Assuolated P'r'ets.)
Denevr, Colo., Jan. 23.- Men employed
in the hainemnt of the sew city hall
have discovered what fnt y lo eve a plater
gold bonanza.
Profuse colors in a sedi:wtot of black
sand which avppured after washing In
tle old-fashioneui way, caused coot to
tion aimong city otilers.
Men were digging in the sand to place
the pit machinery of an elevator slout
18 feet below the level of Fourteenth
street, when the peculiar nature of the
soil, unmistatebly that of gold prodnn
Ing sand, was recognized by Thomnoas
Brisbane, a11 old miner.
(. P. Hauer, vice-prtaIdent of the
chamber of commn erve and skilled in
placer mining, pronounced It a genuine
placer find.
CANADIAN PRESS MEMBERS.
Returning From Coast 'Ihey Will Visit
in Salt Lake.
(By Associated Press.)
Salt Lake City, Jan. 23.-Nearly a hun
dred members of the Western ('anadian
Press association arrived here elay,
homeward bound from their excursion
to the coast.
The party will remain for two days as
*the guests of the Utah Press association,
and will then resume their hoteward
journey.
Baltalr and Fort Douglas were visited
by the Canadians this morning,
This afternoon an organ recital at the
Tabernacle was given In their honor,
followed by a reception at which (lover
nor Wells, Brigham IH. Roberts and
others made speeches of welcome.
MOTION TO
PULL [DOWN
MONTANA ORE PURCNASING COM.
PANY WANT THEIR BOND
MONEY BACK.
NOTICE WAS SERVED TODAY
It Will Be Based Upon the Report of
Attorney General Donovan-New
Chapter Will Be Marked in
This Celebrated Case.
($peclal to Inter Mountain.)
Helena. Jan. 23.-J. J. Mellatto.',
counsel for the Montana Ore Purthainn
comlpany, last eventng served notla
upon John F. Forbls and L. 0. Evans,
(ounsel for the Boston & Montana c(m.
puny, that on next Monday he woul4
move the court for an order dtrecting
the clerk of the supreme court to turt
over to the Delaware Surety compatl
the $350,000 given ns a hand in the ca
of the lIoston & Montana company
against tihe Moninnn Ore Purchasing
1.11n f nly.
The notice wons served 4upon the fbnlto,3
& tonirtalnn company's moiune) at the
0.rando11n hotel.
111r. l')rhil 14,1n1 lanst night that the
Aliston & Montrlnta company would re
1141I the nilotlonl.
The notice served on counnel In)4 nigh
declared that the motion would be base
upon)m the records of the eage and upo
the report of Attorney (lonoerl Donovan
on tile with the clerk of the court.
The report referred to Is the one made
by the attorney general after examining
into the fo''t1 of the Delaw(4re Horety
(I4np0lny pu4n th1e order of the -sulrmnie
court.
The introduction of tie propI(ed nor1
11(11n wIll mark it new chapter Ii t inl, liti
- gnti)n that hue Inv4'ved4 the 111i111111 &
Montl n 14(nil thil' Montana tre P04r14h45
i Ing c11il4 l)n3y.
- When thie Supreme ' ourI t yo'44 i'rday
norning took till the appeal In Ms- ra'e
of ti11' Muontaonao Ore I'urn hushlg 4)1t4l4ny
) ngnoi)nt the lilaltdh & Montana, ('Ils
.114)tlee IIIr' t ly l11noun1 ed M1st the co trS
-wm1ld c)nsider any sulrgegat nns co4unlsel
4des1 141 to 111(111' with rIf)r(. 044 to the
di-pos(tion of the $350,000 In Ilnh Illnew,
in the honds of the court.
'I'll(- m)(atter, however, was n14t r)f'rro4t
11to by counsel for .ither Hide, their urgu.
nal'ns t44'tiIg d)'voted wholly to I he maui
a Involved In the appeal under di1t14a1lon.
Claims of Counsel.
e ('ounrol for the Montana Ore Pnulhaa*
) Ing )ourpnny claim that the alt lon
1iwo444ht1 by the lRuston & Montana orom
1- Dlly, involving the ltpu)l4d gr(o4l lIn
n the l'enn'y1vantu mine, 14s been florilly
The li4ton1 & Montilla 4llor4'y1 on
) the other 1441 111 d41(lar4 that it, h))s not
il 111(")n dt1p4 ol4 4 of, and the uti4)'ton is one
yet to 1l' determined.
Prn4ti ally the sainam (Iue)tIonM are In.
volve l in file two no44ons,
The 1141414 & Montana c(ompany
b1) r4((41 4ht 1111 n41llon) ol igil(: ly In the
I'nltedl 1"ntlln court to restranh thl' Mort
o inuo ore ''urchIsing 4'ompalny from en.
It (roaching within the lines of the fens"
6 4- Hylvanif. 4l'tmtn.
.it (ig' te Knowles granted n restraining
44order, which was afterwar'ds distolv'1
by the TUIted Statet ('rcuit court of ap.
peals. The ltuston & Montana conpany
then 'omtmOnvfl'd a simi1lar action In the
1istri1t c(' 4rt of Hilver flow county.
The irrlnjulncti wax d(niled, and en ap
pet[' the supreme "courtr atlfrmed the
L order of the lower court on conditiold
that Ill' Montana (Ire PurlIhasing com
pa1y give it bowel to proloet 11)4' 1non0o
t. Moninnu company wh'ie thl owner.
i' Wili4 of thll' 1i)4144(ted ground was 40 i4sueC
The 'bondl watt originally $5;i0,000, but[
tali) boon 4n40e(44ro 4( until it amounted td
:ti~so,ooo,
''Trle' 14.1 r)'1('414 of tI hebnd was made
D tit the petition of the t oston & Montana
comlpony and f mlount01( to $350,000.
This iond was furtniiihed in cash,
t-1through thie Delaware Surety company,
the money t'Ing p1no1 1hl(, I41'' court anI
deposited by It In several banks.
STATUE FOR LINCOLN
NEW TRUSTEES HAVE BEEN AP
POINTED IN CHICAGO.
FUND NOW REACHES LARGE SUM
Original Trustees Having Died Judge
Tuley Has Named Their Successors,
Who Will File Account and
Condition of the Fund.
(i1y Associated Press.)
Chicago, Jan. 13.-Judge reter H. Cross
cup and Thomas E. Clark have been ap.
pointed by Judge Tuley as trustees of
the fund, now amounting to nearly $150,
0(0, lift by John( reerar for the erection
of a statue of Abrahmun Lincoln.
1'ih at pointmnent of these trustees was
noide in consequence of a bill filed rAwrly
a year ago by Attorney Charles 8. 1iolt,
in which it was set forth that the orig.
inal trustees of the fund, Norman Will
iunm and Huntington J. Jackson, had
both died and it was necessary to ap
point their succeisors.
In pursuan' e with the terms of the
trust they had ace .pted, a contract was
entered into by them in 18C9 with Au
gustus St. Gaudens for the production of
the s:a ue.
Bly the order entered in Judge Tuley's
(lurt the new trustees will Ire an ac
count within CO d iye, s owing the amount
and conditioi of the truot fund, as they
reeolv i it frim the hands of its present
Lustio aws.

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