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The Butte inter mountain. (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, January 24, 1902, Evening, Image 1

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L. THE BUTTE LIER MOUNTAIN.
VOL. XXI. NO. 259 BUTTP. MONTANA, PRIDA' WENING. JANUARY 24, 1902. PRICE FIVE CET
RAILROAD
MA6NAT[S
RML AND HARRIMAN APPEAR
RWFORE THE INTER STATE
COMMEROCE COMOIBSION.
BOTH TESTIFY THIS AFTERNOON
First Two Witnesses Today Swear That
the Proposed Merger of Interests
Would Kake Little or No Differ
enoe In Question of Ratee.
(By Associated Press.)
Chicago, Jan. 24.-What is expected to
be one of the most interesting resslons
the inter state commerce com.nission
ever held began here today.
The promised presence of Jamcqp J.
Hill and E. H. HIiahrniaj, who ar. cup
posed to know all about the community
of interest plans of the railroads and
who are expected to enlighten the com
nisasion on various points concerning the
plan, brought a crowd of curious people,
chiefly traction men, into court.
It is the expressed purpose of the com
mission to discover, if possible, what
changes, if any, have been created be
tween the general public and the rail
roads by reason of the "associate man
agement" of the latter.
The commissioners desire to find out
if the carrying out of the community of
interest idea has affected the rate situ
ation in a way contrary to law, or, as
claimed, if it is likely to affect the sta
bility and non-discrimination of and in
rates for which the commission has long
battled.
Hill and Harriman Present.
Mr. Hill and Mr. Harriman both
reached Chicago during the morning,
and Mr. Hill, accompanied by Mr. Gro
ver, his attorney came at once before the
commission. Chairman Knapp, being
appealed to, stated that Mr. Hill would
be allowed to testify at a time which
would permit him to take a train for
New York tonight.
Mr. Hill would not talk to reporters
who sought an outline of his testimony.
Darius Miller, first vice-president and
traffic manager of the Chicago, Burling
ton & Quincy, and former manager of
the Great Northern, was the first wit
ness.
In answer to questions by Mr. Day,
attorney for the commission, Mr. Miller
stated that the Burlington was abso
lutely independent in "its operations and
in making of rates."
"Have you received instructions from
either Mr. Hill or Mr. Harriman, in re
gard to making rates?" Mr. Day asked.
"I have received none,' the witness
answered.
Commissioner Prouty asked the wit
ness to what extent the Northern Paciflo
and Great Northern were competitors,
and Mr. Miller put the competitive traffic
at about 25 per cent.
He declared that the Burlington was
not a competitor of the Great Northern
and Northern Pacific. He said the two
northern roads had made frequent
agreements to maintain rates, but said
he knew of no penalty having been im
posed for violation of agreements.
Stubbs on the Stand.
J. C. Stubbs, traffic manager of the
Southern Pacific and the Union Pacific,
followed Mr. Mille'. Mr. Stubbs stated
that E. H. Harriman was chairman of
the board of directors of both roads, but
he was appealed to only in extreme
cases.
Mr. Stubbs said no such case had
arisen since his appointment, and that
she had proceeded under his general in
structions from Mr. Harriman.
He said that rates generally had been
fairly well maintained, but that there
had been demcnrellzation in Colorado
and Utah.
He declared that the Southern Pacific
and Atchison were competitors.
"le there no -agreement between yo'i
and the Santa Fe road as to a division
of the oil and sugar traffic?" asked Mr.
Day.
"No," replied the witness. "There is
a division of the orange traffic, but this
is due to the fact that about 50 per cent
of the crop is tributary to each line."
The witness averred that the Union
Pacific and the Southern Pacific were
competitors. Although he admitted that
the believed the Union Pacific controlled
the Southern Pacific, he declared that
this control could not have any effect on
rates.
"A look at Me map will show you
what this competition is," Mr. Stubbs
observed parenthetically.
At 12:40 the commission took a recess
until 2 p. m.
FAREWELL TO SHAW.
Many of His Old Friends Wish Him
God-Speed.
(By Associated Press.)
Dennison, Ia., Jan. 24.-More than 1000
people crowded the Denison Opera
house last night to attend a farewell re
ception to Gov. Leslie 14. Shiaw, the new
secretary of the tr'tastury.
People from all the surrounding coun
try were in ntten:ance.
Old-time farmer friends without re
gaiJ to politic', drovo 2( mnilcu to bit the
governor God -speed.
Governor Shaw r3celve3 a treme!Vlous
ovation when he arose to speak. Sr.".'e
tary Shaw left for Des Moines this
morning.
K.. Bean pt Pekin.
(By Associated Press.)
Paris, Jan. 24.-A dispatch has been
received at the foreign office from M.
Beau, the French minister at Pekin. In
'ormtng the officials that he had pre
sented his credentials. The message does
not contain any particul)rs, but the for
cign office presumes that M. Beau had
previously received satisfaetory assur
ances from the Chinese ofmlalq regard
ing the pending missionary questions.
PRELIMINARY REDUCTION Of BUTit ORES B[OAN TODAY'
IN ANACONDA'S GIAITSM[[TINO RLANT.
(Special to Inter Mountain.)
ANACONDA, Jan. 24.-Today will mark an import
ant epoch in the history of Anaconda, for the rea
son that this is the date upon which the first ore was
started on its way through the new reduction works.
The first car load of ore was dumped into the con
centrator bins yesterday afternoon.
This was followed by others, aggregating altogether*
over six hundred tons.
Today another train load arrived, and shortly after
wards the machinery of the immense plant was started
in motion and the first pound of ore was dropped into IHE NEW CONCENTRATOR-LA.(UEST IN THE WORLD.
the crushers. No special ceremony marked the occasion, but there was present to witness the event officials
of the various departments. The start today is only a preliminary run. It will be some days yet before every
thing will be in readiness for steady operations. However, from 500 to 1000 tons of ore will be received daily
and everything is in shape to handle a greater tonnage. Officials of the company are much pleased with the plant.
BOZEMAN COIURIS
JAMES ERICKSON FOUND GUILTY
OF GRAND LARCENY.
STOLE A HORSE LAST SPRING
Case of the State Against Ed Alderson
for Killing 31k Is Now on Trial
-Bosemanites Expect a
Storm.
0 (Special to Inter Mountain.) O
O Bozeman, Jan. 24.-I he jury in 0
0 in the case of the state vs. James
4, Erickson returned a verdict in I>
9 court this morning finding biot 0
4 guilty of grand larceny. 0
4 He stole a horse last summer 4
I; from Joseph Dringle and took it 4
4 over to Livingston and sold it to 0
4 Billy Miles for $15.
O He will be sentenced Monday. 4
O The case of the state vs. Ed 0
O Alderson, in which the defendant 4
O is accused of killing game out of 4
4 season, is now being tried. G
4 A strong east wind is blowing 4
4 with the thermometer registering O
4 10 below rezo. 4'
0 The snow is beginning to fall
4) and there is every indication of 4'
the coming of the worst blizzard 4
4 of the season. n
4,4,4444,4,,4,4, 4)04)00'4 v4,'4
MARKET WAS STAGNANT.
Some Pow Gains But on the Whole a
Poor Day.
(By Associated Press.)
New York, Jan. 24.-Price changes in
the opening dealings were of little sig
nificance and exceeded half only in a few
casee.
On manipulation Metropolitan, Man
hattan, Sugar, Copper and Gas advanced
1 to 1%, but trading became almost
stagnant on attempts to realize.
Large blocks of copper were taken
around 72 and a later rise in sugar to
127% caused a steadier tone elsewhere.
Distilling preferred and Pacific coast
second preferred gain.1%.
The market was very dull but prices
dropped generally to below last night.
The reaction ran to [email protected]% for Sugar,
Metropolitan, Missouri Pacific, Union
Pacific and St. Paul, and carried Read
ing a ponit under last night, the second
preferred 1% and Lackawanna 2%.
Bonds were less active and irregular.
MAKING CLOSE INQUIRY.
Desmond Takes Personal Charge of
Cooper Murder Case.
(By Associated Pres'j)
St. Louis, Jan. 24.-Chief of Detective
Desmond started out t-day to personally
investigate the mysterious murder of
Alexander Dean Cooper, the wealthy
business man who was killed at the
Vista Turkish Ilith house night befcre
last.
After questioning 4inother, the negro
attendant at the bath house, for four
h6urs without result, t.hie! Desmond de
cided to take him to the scene of the
crime and have him re-enact his move
ments on the night in question.
The inquest into the death of Mr.
Cooper has been pcstpan.] until tomor
rrow when it is hoped to have more evi
dence to present to the coroner's jury.
ISSUE HABEAS CORPUS WRIT.
Nellie Graham Will Have a Hearing
Before Judge Leslie.
(Special to Inter Mountain.)
Helan, Jan. 24.-The supreme court
today issued a writ of habeas corpus re
quiring Sheriff Thomas Clary of Fort
Benton to appear before Judge Leslie
January 28 and show cause why he
should not relase Nellie Graham, who is
serving a sentence for selling liquor
without a license.
The petitioner secured the ear of the
court through Attorney F. E. Stranahan,
ahd alleges that no public offense was
charged in the complaint upon which she
was convicted.
She further alleges that the justice
court at Fort Benton, had no jurisdiction
in the case.
MORE MURDERS
SAN FRANCISCO HAS ANO!1ER
MYSTERY ADDED T3 LIST.
PROBABLY DONE BY FOOTPADS
Joseph Pedro, Foreman of Contracting
Firm Is Found with a Bullet in
His Brain-No Clue to the
Murderer.
(By Associated Press.)
San Francisco, Jan. 24.-Another mur
der, supposedly the work of footpads,
was committed in the Mission district
early this morning, the victim being
Joseph Pedro, foreman for a large firm
of contractors.
Pedro's corpse was discovered on the
sidewalk on Seventh street, by two po
licemen about 4 o'clock, with a bullet
hole on the left side in the region of the
kidneys.
He had apparently been dead but a
short time for the body was still warm.
The deceased recently came here from
the Interior of the state, where he leaves
a wife and child.
There is no clue to his murderer.
FIRST RAILROAD
PROBABLE THAT AMERICANS
WILL BUILD IN CHINA.
ELECTRIC ROAD IN SHANGHAI
Propositions for Trolly Road 23 Miles
Long Will Be Received Up to March
2 of This Year-English Com
pany After It, Too.
(By Associated Press.)
New York, Jan. 24.-ft is likely that
American capital will build, equip and
operate the first electrical railroad in
China.
It has been learned that prominent
banking houses in this city, interested
in local traction companies were prepar
ing to invade Shanghai.
That city asked for proposals to build
and operate a 23-mile railroad there.
The Shanghai officials stipulated that
propositions must be made before Malr.
2, of this year.
Electrical companies immediately Ihe
gan to consider the proposition, but be
cause they were averse to operating in
addition to constructing and equipping
the plan was conceived to form a separ
ate company.
This firm does businesi In China and
one of its members ives :n Shanghai.
He already has been appointed Chinese
agent for the International Banking cor.
poration.
A London company probably will com
pete for the contract.
HIGEWAYMEN ARE CAPTURED.
Outlaws Who Killed Sheriffs Smith
and Beck Behind the Bars.
(By Associated Press.)
Guthrie, O. T., Jan. 24.-Word reached
the United States marshal's office here
yesterday that two of the highwaymen
that figured in the fight at Anadarko
when Sheriffs Smith and Beck were
killed last week were captured yester
day afternoon on the Kaw Indian reser
vation, 15 miles northwest of Newkirk,
0. T.
The capture was made by Sheriff tie,
lin of Kaw county, and a posse.
The two men tally exactly with the
description of the highwaymen Wv.
killed the Anakardo officers, and theyiiq
is no doubt in the minds of the authoe .
ties that they have the right men. One
gave- the name of Copper and the other
Charles Moffitt,
They have been in lidilg in that vi
cinity for two days and are now in J)lf
at Newkirk.
They were heavily armed, havims 't
voedqef ammunition. The thir4 bhgh
waggag , known to be badly wquns
fARMERS KILLED
ROBBERS IN AN ATTEMPT TO ES
CAPE KILL TWO MEN.
WERE IN A FORTIFIED CAVE
Posse Is Now Tracking the Des
peradoes Who Have Gone Further
-Robbed a General Store-Se
cured But Little.
(lUy Associated Press.)
Hutchinson, Kane., Jan. 214.-Acuor Iln;;
, a report received here, two men have
been killed and a third wounded in n
fight with robbers who looted Gross &
Richards general store at Te.umneari,
returing about $400 worth of goods.
In getting away from Tecunicari, the
robbers crossed the Spikes brothers'
rafch, where they were attacked.
-Dick and John Spikes were killed and
rered Spikes was wounded.
The sheriff's posse, in tracking the
robbers found a fortified cave filled with
bides and supplies, but the roters had
left, going further south.
HOMESTEAD LAW NEEDED.
Secretary Root Before the House Com
mittee on Insular Atairs.
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, Jan. 24.-Secretary Itoot
y3sterday appeared before the house in
sular affaire committee to urge the en
actment of a homestead law for the Phil
Ippines.
lie said there would be legislation to
enable the Filipino to acquire title to
pioperty, and the denial of that right
was, in his opinion, the cause of much
at the present disturbance.
He thought a homestead law should be
passed to permit the natives to make
entry of 100 acres of land as the maxi
mum, the local government to flix the
rnizndum.
He urged the repeal of the Spooner
amncendment prohihiting the cutting of
t'mber and granting of franchises. He
itid that Industry In the islands should
be promoted, not prevented.
The islands needed railroads to de
velop their abundant resources of tim
bhr, coal and other minerals.
DOUGHERTY KNOCKED OUT.
Defeated in Mi11 With Forbes, for the
Bantam Championship of America.
(By Associated Press.)
St. Louis, Mo., Jan. 24.-Danny Dough
erty of Philadelphia was knocked out in
the fourth round by Harry Forbes of
tChicago, at the West End club last night
in what was scheduled as a ire-round
bout at 115 pounds for the bantam
weight championship of America.
Both men were in first-class trim and
the fight was flast and clean. Dough
erty did not show in the shape hoped for
by his friends, his leads being ill judged
cnd his blows lacked steam.
On the other hand, Forbes showed to
*'operb advantage. Djugherty did somne
good wook in the third round, but
?orbes did not mind his punches in the
tast and the round ended with honors
even.
In the fourth round, at the termina
tion of a lively exchange, Forbes feinted
with his left and then sent a straight
right to Dougherty's jaw, giving him
his quietus.
Bookwalter Elected President.
(By Asspclated Press.)
Buffalo, N. Y., Jan. 24.--The warring
factions in the American Bowling con
gres camne together last night and set
tied tbir differences. Mayor Charles A.
Itookwaiter of dianapolis was ele*ted
,president of the ongress for the ensuing
year. The convention and tourney of
1903 will go to Indianapolis. McLean
and Steers of Chicago won first prize
in the two-men class. Their score of
1237 is a new record. Krug and Dyinger
of Los Angeles, California, won second
prize, with a score of 1220.
Dtate Watossologist,
St. Paut. Jan. 34.-The state board of
regents of the University of Minnesota
today elected Prof. L. L. Washburn of
the Oregon State university, to succeed
the late Otto Lugger, as 't~te onto.
mologist.
MINERS ENTOMBED
EXPLOSION AT LOST CREEK, IOWA,
A TERRIBLE APPAIR.
SIXTY-TWO IN THE MINE YET
It I. Almost Impossible to Get Par
ticular. But It Is Feared That There
Are Many Dead-Thought to
Be Dust Explosion.
(Ity Annlueated PrÂșos~.) 4)
V Des Moines, la., Jan. 24.--Newn V
O was reitlved at 1 o'clock of i. v,
terrible mine explotion tit Lost <>
AD Creek, Jowa, ten miles south of .
* Oskaloosa. Seventy miners are re- '
ported to be mintoing. . O4
4> I'artlculars are hard to obtain 4
* owing to the fact that the mine. iN 4
4) ten tilles in the country and there Q>
4, is but one telephone line to it. 4>
6+ The disaster, It hi said, was 4
* iaueed by it niust explosion and t4
4' took iittet itt 12:11).
There were 1100 miners in the 4
mine at the time, mind all have 4
got out except 60, who are enn
", torthed in the back part of the 4)
' sidet shaft.
Hixteen iutltei have been taken 4)
frorm the Lout C nri. minets all 4
h'oritly burneul, aeeoriling to a 4
telephone menssage received by m
4' the Daily I'alittal, 4'
4' The eas tnd of the itmino is on 4'
4 fire and it is statei liii I there is 4)
9 little hope now of tuving the 30 4'
w or 40 minhinrs entotmbed. ^.
MONROE WINK TEL RACE,
Victorin Motor-Paced Race at Philadel
phir Last Night.
(fty Anseeilated Press.)
Philadelphia, Jan. 24.--fenny Monroe
of Memphis carried ofn the honors last
might In the motor paced bicycle race
with Howard Freeman of Portland, Ore.;
Otto Maya, Erie, Pennwylvania, and A.
Rutz, New Haven, Connecticut, at the
Second Iteginent armonry.
Freeman captured second .and Maya
took third money. The race was run in
two heats of five rnlten each and two
finals of ten miles each. Monror and
Freeman were pitted against each other
for first money.
Freeman led the fitrt mile and then
Moirre caught him, anrid went to the
front. The latter gained steadily and on
the sixth sidle itlapted his opponent.
GOVERNMLNNT'S RULE COERCION.
John Redmond leakes a Fiery Speech
in House of Commons.
(Hiy Aeoriiated Ir'eas.)
Loundon, Jan. 24.- The debate on the
address in reply to the speech from the
throne wits resutierd in the house of
commons yesterday by John UItArmond,
the Irish national learers % iro moved an
arrrudmrnt intrluring the whole 4iurestlon
of Irish grievrtces.
lie (ierlared in ratad of remrnrdying ad
mitted wrongs the government had fallen
back on the old methods of coercion.
The Irt4 people would yet teach Mr.
Wyndham (lrier secretary for Ireland)
to repent bil refusal to grant the rea
sonable demands of Ireland in regard to
the compulsory sale and purchase of
land.
Thor. was no country in the world
where crime was less frequent than In
Ireland, yet the coeriton act had been
resurrected after a decade and had been
ruthlessly applied.
Mcores, including members of the
house of commonsu, had been unjiustifi
ably imprisoned, and trial by Jury hadi
been abolished.
Oklahoma Kearing.
(By Associated Prees.)
Washington, Jan. 24.--The hearings on
admitting Oklahoma to statehood began
yesterday before the house committee
on territories and will continue tomor
row. Delegate Flynn made the prmsen
tatlon, speaking for separate stitehood
for Oklahoma. He was supportel In his
viqwa by Sidney Clark and others.
S[ISMIC
SHOCKS
ST. W UIB IS VISITED BY TWO DI.
TINCT EARTHQUAKES EARLY
THIS MORNING.
PEOPLE RAN OUTSIDE IN FEAR
Was a Rumbling Sound and Extreme
ly Severe at Clifton Heights, Al
though No Actual Damage
Resulted.
(fly AssowinLttd Press.)
St. Louis, Jan. 24.--Two distinit shocks
of earthquake were felt In St. f.,,in and
vicinity this mnorning. 'Ihe firet shock
was Light.
The second was more revere.
It awakened persons who hnd slept
through the fhit shock, and got them
out of b"!,
The shi i'ki were aeon pia ii oI by a
rutobling saninl, and uoasiitnid the
rattling of iriikery and swmngnty of
pictures.
At Clifton ileighl the shock$ were
very severe unmi vet'rlI pereta went
into thuir yards, fining liie houses
o mdhi b4 lhak(n doe n.
The shoiks were felt distinctly in the
toi-4itolil nI(1.418$ the liver in IIllinis.
In Venice, l'uildinis shook iit win
dow l rattled so that residenil oilieved
tnlt explilon had Ioh mreii in the nelgh
borh4itl.
Shock at Quincy.
(Hy Asoreteteil Press.)
Quincy, Ill., J in. 24.-There was i pro
niuncl'4 14rthquillo shock here of 4:40
o'clock this morning. The seinsti' die
turani1ne ii5lat nearly a minute anid the
o4illlutlion wan fiurom east to w4. n. The
shaking of wllI was perielpttblt In many
brick rankle-n,",*s
Felt in Kansas City.
(fiy Asich 4 4 r11 s 4 ian4.)
Kansnas ('iy, Jun. 24.- What is be
liev'ed to have tein nii earthlI,41uk Mhork
wan experienced in the north1iit ex
trenally or the city early thits morning.
The lnolemln1nt w4a4 slight, a41 1 ) dam
age reulited.
STEAMSHIP MEN ARRIVE.
Reports of Consolidation Schemes
Without Foundation.
(fly Associated Piress.)
New York, Jan. 24.-The White Star
steamer Celtic arrived today from Idiver
pool and Queenstown. Among her pas
sengers was a number of English 1ship
ping men, whose mission, it was rumor
ed, waH to form it. c(mbitn of tralis
Atlaentic 3ajssenger and freight lines.
The party included the (tight lion. W.
J. heirrte, ihairiman of the 1144Ir-lit and
Wolff Strip Building company tund direc
tor of the L~eyland and White Star lines;
ienry Wilding of Itilitardaut, Spence &
Company, 1'ngtsih agents of the Inter
national Navlgation company, and who
suceeeded J. It. Ellerman um chairman
of the Leyland line, anld J. liruclel 1lsnny
and W, H. (.raves, directors of the White
Star line.
They are accompanied by Rialph Ne
ville and John Dickinson, nmaritmlre law
yers.
Mr. Ilmay, when seen at uarantilne,
said:
"These same rumors were current one
year ago, but there Is nothing in the re
ports. My visit here is to study the
Celtic and ilther fur a trip to this Medi
terrunean. I can give no other state
ments at this time."
EXTENT OF FLORIST INDUSTRY.
Statistics About the Raising of Flow
ers Are Given Out.
(By Aesociated Press.)
Waehington, Jan. 24.-The extent of
the florist industry of the United States
is shown by the final cen05us etatistics
as announced on the final estimates
making the culti "ation of flowers and
ornamental plants their printlpai bust
ness.
These figures show for the United
States a total of 6119 such estailish
ments, cultivating and using in their
business 42,647 acres, of which 34,692 is
improved land.
The value of the land and buildings
used by these 4'abalblishmonts is $50,619,
000, of which $22,674,350 represents the
buildings alone.
The value of tihe implements and ma
chinery for those esitblishmlents is 1,367,
087. The value of all the products, In.
eluding the flowers grown in their green
houses a.id fields and the varlous farm
crops on the lands contrulled by them
is $18,:17,420.
The amount. expended by all these es
t'titshmnents for fertilizer was $318,298
aund for labor $4,125,799.
More than one-hblt of the establish
menis are luocted in the North Atlantlo
division of states,
SAVED BY AN OFFICER.
Would-Be Assassin After King George
of Greece.
(fly Assoctated Press.)
Vienna, Jan. 24.T--The Nel Frie Plresse
today prints an unconfirmed story of an
attempt to assassinate King t4lgrge of
Greece. Accordingt to this report his
majesty was walking in the park at
Phaleron, when a man brandishing e
knife, rushed upon him. A park inspect:
or jumped between tile mand received
a stab intended for the king. The would*
be assassin was arrested.
Pass Pure Food Bill.
(fly Associated Preus.)
Chicago, Jan, 24,-:State Pure Food
Commissioner A. H. Jones, who has just
returned from Washington, says he is
co:,fldent of the passage of his bill to
es'tlhtlih a food bureau in the Unite(s
States department of agrloulture.

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