OCR Interpretation


The Butte inter mountain. (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, March 15, 1902, Evening, Image 2

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025294/1902-03-15/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 2

IWViYS INlHICAiO
-M r DOCeOs ctAtt, 10aar
OIEEB 07 PAZLIAXENT.
WANTED VISIT KEPT SECRET
Re Is an Englishman, but He Favors
the Boer Cause and Is Plotting
for Their Benefit-Keep
ing it All Secret.
(13y Associated Press.)
Chicago, March 1i.---The Inter Ocean
tells of a meeting between Dr. II. G.
Clark, a former member of the English
parliament, a strong peace party man,
who Is in Chicago. supposedly on busl
ness and thet Boer envoys, C. It. Wessels,
A. D. W. \Wolmarans and Mlantague
White at a small dinner given by Petor
Vanvllssingen, in a privtate roa) at
the Chicago Athletic club.
The envoys arrived in Chicago frml
Washington yesterday. Dr. C('l,rk
reached here Thursday. Dr. Clark's vislt
and the mIotive th,.rfor, according to the
Inter Ocean, Is veiled In mystery and
it also alleges It was against his wlshes
that his presence In the city at this
time became known to any one ou.iide
the officers of the Transvaial league.
Dr. Clarlk Is kniown to be one of the
stronlgest opponents the Engllsh star
party has today.
Until two months ago, he left no stone
unturned In the house of c('llllllns in
his efforts to have the war brought to
a close.
He is now one of the acknowledged
leaders of the peace party in England.
Ills opinion is that the Boers should re.
ceive liberty. His mission to this counll
try, it Is said, has been kept a s.rr, t
and none of the Hoer delogates itr T'rns
vaal league olfflials \\111 say much of
It.
The dinner was behind close l loors
and no one save the host anLd his five
guests heard what w\as discussed.
Those present were the three spi,. rlal
envoys, Dr. Clark, t. A. ('aUlliunl. a
nmembeTr of the ('hi'ago Trlil ansvat
league, arid Mr. Vanvlissingen.
(New York Post.)
A broadway merchant vouches for the
following: '1 wats Oentertaining an out-i
of-town customer the other l)ay,. Ie
hladt't much to any, 1so I kept hinm blusy
with questions, In the effort to make
him, think he was having a good time.
Th' Waldorf was' hls hotel: ;yeo, he was
enjoylng the trlp: he had comfortable
arc:ommodlatlons at the .hotel. 'The
room's on the clghteenth floor, anyway,'
h." remarked.
" 'Did you go so high leerautse tihe hot.use
\ws1:: crowded'?'
" 'No. I picked out the room. You soe,
I read about the subway exploslons ;n
tihe newslepapterts-how the effect was not
felt above the t'nth l1'or of buildinlgs
near by. I got above the danger line.' "
Our
Jewelry
Auction
Which was Interrupted by the sud.
den death of FIr. Burroughs, will
be resumed on
Saturday
March 15, at 2 p. m.
Messrs. Briggs and Dodd, two of
the best known men in the pro
fesilon, will conduct the sale.
ýoororoooerac
Watches
Jewelry
Diamonds
Etc., Etc.
At Your Own
Price
Hight &
1airfield eo
BUTTE, MON r.
'-:4
040-*
POOR MAN'S CLUB
sALOOwS TO 3Z 'CO.a.btCTD ON
AN rNGLIS8 PLAN.
OF IDEAL RESPEC;TABILITY
Payne Whitney Is to Have a Man
sion -His Uncle, Colonel Payne,
Will Build It- Many
Jewels Are Lost.
(Spec ial C'orre'spondelonee.)
New York, March 13.--A cotnmlttee of
the c'ity club, of which Alfred R. Mar
ling I., chairman, nmt at the club re
cently to discuss the' feasibility of cs
hablshing In New York city a slcheme of
:4aloons modeled afte(r the fanmols (Ien
tral l'ubli' Ilouse Trust a.sorc:itlon of
London. The Idea is to place drinking
oef inloxlctants Ii tiiollder:ttion on a re
spcPtable bastis.
The father of the plan Is It. Fulton
('utting, who viewed its workings on the
otlher ide,. Ile collected data con(e'rnling
it, t\hl,'h \t\.is plalced before the I'lty
(clb 1 or r' .siteratlon. The general plan
in, luie.s t bi c; trm'orlorltion, which will
bihVy e'i,'ct,'eId silotons, combine themn with
el'siaurallts, land condtuct themn in local
r lpe't;bllility aliit In ltrict obh t'rvantce
of the' law. The hope is that these pleas
ant anld r'ect.itaible plaJlces may becotmen
Ipotlltir he(',lulse of the purity of the
gotods dispensedtl and the absence of the
"giln-mill" atmosphere.
TheI London s;iloon scihemtne is lndol';4r(
Iy \\hitch (b;Ir t Iritauin. Its srlt'l llr"
Is Earl r(;y, nillid among Its vlc(e presil
dents are' ihe IlhslilIop of ('heaster .andl
Jo. eph ('hamberlttin. The manaiiLgers a1,
atssistallnts of thie publile hous(e'4 are paid
It conmmission and ll lary, iand are malllLde
restlons ble. for the ploper conlduct of the
pl us"'. They ar'r not permitted to sell
liltuor to any.olne who is hahllitually aI
drunkard.
It is u1ndersted that If the 'ity club
'conclutldes to furthlr the proJJ't .1r.
'utlltig ,ill take a leading l:art In
linencing e1 ' C<j orporation.
Mansion for Payne Whitney.
l'y'ne Whitney, who recently mt)r'r'hed
Mists Heln llay, datlughter of ,e',ret,;ry
Ilay. tet'cl've.x a.s a wetdding gift front his
unclle, ('ol. (Oliver if. Payne, it magiiffill
ce'nt hotret on F'ifth avtenue that cannot
c'e.ost le's thatI $l,250,000. ('l)ione(l I';aynle
is the purchaser of the Took plolt, oppo
lite ('e'nt+ral park, that was sotl last
wee'k at ablout $ie'IX,O000.
A rnanslon to 'ost ' lout a 7t 0,OOOO will
Ihe built for his nepihew by I'oloneil
Payne. It Il uInderstolo I that utli arill
teelt s finishingh the planls a ndl that work
on the consltruction Will tie beeglull soeon
after title, lpasses. Mr. and Mr s. P'ayne
Whitney rill spend much of the' time
abroad while theli' i.w lthome Ie being
built.
Society Sees Indian Dances.
Twe'nty-live civilllized Indians went
through thile war dance of their fore
fatherllls on the olisthclld ilort' of the iuag
niflent ballroomn In thle inew ItIloe of ei r.i
aoil Mrs. Williatm J.1. t'ichleYfllh. while
150 members of New York's swellest so
clet y loocked oil. d
The guests \rho ",vltinetsed the danice t
Were membnIers of the' Thurslday Evlening
club. atnd the 25 Indiansn were students
of hliiltlnton college. It was it novetl idea
of the Schieffelins to have the real red
skins on hand for the evenlling's enter
tahilmant, and \lwhenlI tie gyratioln hs tha
coe.sed the palefac'e ladlies and gentle
tihIni shotwereld the ltrformerl's with itp
plttause(. Ilh'stites the dance, II. F". lhur
leigh of the college sang Inllian folk
lole songs and the 25 Inditl ImIlien alld t
maidsl Jouined hhin in the cihoruses, 'Theyn,
inl the co.clstume of up-to-dtlate nlgrsos, ,
they sang plantatton lsongsl,
Diamonds in East River.
No one will ever know how many dla
monds and other precious stones lost
in the recent snowstorms, were dumped
into the East river by Dr. Woodbury'ýs
men in their rush to make the streets
passable. There have been complaints
almost every day at the Metropolitan
opl)era house of jewels lost on the night
when Princie Hlenry was there, and sines
that time. It was thought at first that
a gang of picklpowk Is was at work, hut
as all the other principal theaters had
almost the same cxlperienlce an llnvestl
gation has proved that thieves could not
very well have stolehi the ornaments, the
theatrical managers and police have
come to the conctlusion that they were
dropped in the snow and carted aw\\ay.
Columbia's New Social Hall.
Earl hall, Columbla's new building for
the promotion of the religious, social
and philanthroplc side of university life,
has been formally opened. The hall cost
approximately $125,000 and was a gift
to Columbia from William Earl Dodge.
The building is on the western part of
the campus, at right angles to the
library, and though on a considerably
smaller scale, similar 'In appearance to
the library. There will be a companion
building as a chapel on the eastern part
of the camnpus as soon as the necessary
$100,000 is given. Earl hall, which has
been handsomely flitted up by Mr. Dodge
with Oriental rugs and couches, paint
Ings and marble busts, is designed by its
donor as a meeting spot for the under
graduates and as a place for the increase
of the religious and philanthropie life of
Columbia.
Hudson River Tunnel Project.
A bill relating to another tunnel under
the Hudson river has been introduced In
the senate by Senator Raines. Accord
ing to its provisions the New York &
New Jersey Itallroad company is to be
allowed tour years within which to com
plete the tunnel, work on which was be
gun by the Hudson Tunnel Iall\\ay com
pany. The proposed tunnel has Its Man
hattan terminal ili the viclnity of Chris
topher and IIudeon streets, where prop
erty has already been iuirehased. A part
of the tunnel on the New Jersey side
has already booeen completed. The new
company which has undertaken the com
pletlon of the work was incorporated,
last month at the omflee of the smccetary
of state.
Chestnut.
(Cleveland Plain Dealer)
"A case of smallpox has been discov
ered in a Massachusetts prison, the vic
tim being a burglar."
"Say, he must have been sorry he
broke 14 when he broke opt%,"
MSrfL BuIIDINet
IT IS ALLEGBeD TA- T13ESa fe
APPAIIU WILL SOON ALZ.1i
SKYSCRAPERS WILL CORROO9
Elevated Railroads Will Be Oat.l~4
Service in Twenty Years-Stee!
Must Be Imbedded in Con.
orete to Be Sate.
(I3y Associated Press.)
Chicago, March 15.-The steel frImb
work in many of the big buildings inl'tlt
business district of Chicago is corro4 ng,
making them very dangerous. It is osoti
it question of a few years when theme
buildings will fall to the ground.
This statem'ent was made by aeorge
William 8ooy Smith at the Thirty-fifth
annual dinner of the Chicago real estate
board. He added:
"That the steel frame work of some of
the sky scrapers is in the condition stated
Is nothing short of a public outrage."
The speaker explained that his states
ments were based on personal observa
tions and investigations.
"The steel frame work imbedded in
concrete will last 2,000 years," he said,
"but the steel frame work in many of the
big b'uildings is left free to the action
of the air and gases which circulate
through the tile and a space about the
steel.
The owners of these structures have
the steel painted with oil. This oil will
withstand the corroding process about
three years, then begins the corroding of
the steel and in a few years our sky.
Scraper will fall."
The speaker said that the elevated
road structures would not withstand the
corrosion. He aserted that within ten
years they would be dangerous and with.
in twenty years out of service.
The corrosion of one-fifth the thickness
of the steel framework of tile structures,
he sail, would render them Incapablte of
bearing their own wcight.
DE LAMAR IS SUED
ISAAC BLAKE DEMANDS HIS
SHARE OF SALE.
HE WANTS AN IMMENSE SUM
Claims That He Had a Contract, and,
He Now Proposes to Enforce It
-Rights Signed to Utah
Nevada Company.
(I3y Assoclated Press.)
San Francisco, March 15.--Joseph
taphael De Lamar, millionaire mine
\'ner was sued in the superior court of
his city for $3,422, 626, and whatever ad
itional sum, an ar(ounting may show'
he due to the plaintiffs, the Utah-Ne
nada company.
The suit is based on the alleged agree
Tent which DeLamar mladie with Isaac
itake on April 10, 1894, In relation to the
urchase of the Monitor and Jim Crow
lines at a place whiich is now known as
)etlamiar, in Lincoln, Nev.
Blake said he had a contract for the
ulrchase of these mllllt. and that De
,amar joined with him in it, agreeing
o give him 49 per cent of whatever
rofits might be made through the pur
hase, and 49 per cent of the stock of
ny company which might be formed' to
cork them.
It is alleged that DeLamar developed
he mines and afterward sold them at a
igure which not only repaid him for all
if his outlay, but added $7,000,000 to his
vealth.
For Blake's percentage of the $7,000,000,
he plaintiff sues, his rights having been
ssligned to the PUtah-Nevada company,
nd an accounting to show how much
).Lamar took from the mines before
celling them is also asked.
NEWS STORIES BRIIFLY TOID
LONDON.-The story that the British
idmiralty had forbidden the trailsfer
if the White Star Line to the Morgan
nterests is untrue.
WASHINGTON.-The senate yester-.
lay confirmed the nomination of C. A.
it. Scobey, to be Indian agent for the
'eck agency, Montana.
BItEMEN.-The North German Lloyd
Steamship company today announced an
nerease of ten marks, beginning March
7, in the steerage rates of New Yorlk,
:altimore and Philadelphia.
HAVANA.-It is reported that the
ourt is seriously considering throwing
>ut the case of Estes G. Rathbone, one
)f the accused, In one of the postal fraud
ases.
LONDON, Ky.-General T. T. Garrard
s dead at his home near Manchester.
te served as an officer In the Mexl.an
war and as brigadier general in the fed
eral army during the civil war.
INDIANAPOLIS.-A telephone mos
sage from Knox, Ind., to the Sin-"
Linel, says that only five or hix
people were injured in the Nickel Pli te
wreck. The wreck was followed by fire,
six cars being consumed.
NAPLES.-Gen. Clinton P. Payne of
flaltlmore is dead from heart failu e.
Caen. Clinton P. Payne was senior mein
ber of the banking firm of Clinton P.
Payne & Co., Baltimore. He went abroad
with his wife, two daughters and niece,
January 4.
SALT LAKE.--One fatality has been
reported as the result of the severe snow
storm in this section, Max Adler, em
ployed as a cook on a construction train
of the Oregon Short Line strayed from'
his car at Terminus last night and today
his frozen body was found within a halt
mile of the train,
STANDS U PEACt
FIND BY UN TED 3TATCS .
THE CAPTURE OF AGUINALDO
teneral Funston Criticised for Acting
as a Spy--Claimr d by Others
He Acted Withfin ruales of
Honorable Wair are.
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, March 15.-The senate
pent an hour in executive session yes
rdiay on the convention growing out of
the Hague peace conference relating to
the conduct of war on land and sea, and
finally ratified the agreement without
4 division.
;I Aguinaldo's Capture.
The discussion turned directly on the
conduct of the war In the Philippines
and related especially to General Fun
ston's capture of Agulnaldo. Senator
Teller inquired whether, if this treaty
had been In force at the time, the method
of Aguinaldo's capture could have been
Justified. He quoted the provision of the
treaaty relating to the conduct of spies x
and said that he did not mean himself to
say that General Funston's course would
nit have been regular, but merely to se
cure the opinion of senators who *had
given attention to the treaty and who C'
also were familiar with the details of
Aguinaldo's capture.
Defense of Funston.
Senator Burton replied to the inquiry,
.speaking especially for General Funston,
aind said that he was sure the proceed
ings on the general's part had been not
only humane, but that it had been in ac
cordance with the rules of civilized war
fare. It was true, he said, that General
Funston and his force had acted some
what in the capacity of spies, but what
they had done had been in the line of
honorable warfare. hi
Senator Hoar also spoke at some length
regarding this provision in the treaty. no
lie referreg to Aguinaldo's capture and su
said thiat he believed the adoption of the U1
treaty would have a tendency toward ta
Ile \ating the conduct of modern war
a rte.Al
Parties to the Treaty. of
Sutome ofi the niemlbers of the committee
on foreign relations said briefly that the tiI
ratification of the treaty would place in
this country in accord with the highest sti
thought of the times and expressed the an
hope that the treaty would receive the
unanimous support of the senate. The Ilv
countries party to the treaty are Ger- se.
many, Austria. Belgium, Denmark, pa
Spain, the rnilted States. Mexico, kt
France, Great Britain. Greece, Italy,
Japan, Luxembourg, Montenegro, The tet
Netherlands, Persia, Portugal, Rouma- ti
ila, Russia, Servia, Sweden and Norway. ti
Turkey and Bulgaria. The provisions of
the treaty are binding only on the con- a
tllucting powers in case of war between
two or more of them, and cease to he
binding when a non-contracting party is
either of the bellilgerents. The most tin
portant feature of the treaty, the con- m
tents of which have 'been generally fo
known, Is that prohibiting the use of dum th
duin bullets. fr<
Acts Prohibited.
Among other things prohibited are:
To .employ poison or poisoned arms; to
kill or wound treacherously individuals
belonging to the hostile nation or army;
to kill or wound an enemy, who, hav
Ing laid down arms, or having no longer
means of defense, has surrendered at
Ilscretion.
To declare that no quarter will be
given; to employ arms, projectiles or.
material of a nature to cause superfluous
injury; to make Improper use of a flag
of truce, the national flag or military
ensigns of the enemy's uniform, as well
as the distinctive badges of the general
convention; to destroy or seize the en
mrny's property unless such destruction
or seizure be imperatively demanded by
the necessities of war.
Ruses of war and the employment of
Mhethods necessary to obtain informa
l.on about the enemy and the country
dre allowable.
Relating to Spies.
s The treaty provides as follows regard- t
ng spies: "An individual can only be a
considered a spy if, acting clandestinely
or on false pretenses, he obtains or seeks h
to obtain information of the operations
of a belligerent, with the intention of
communicating It to the hostile party. t
"Thus, soldiers not in disguise, who r
have penetrated into the zone of opera
tions of a hostile army to obtain infor
matlon are not considered spies. Siml
larly the following are not considered
spies: Soldiers or civilians, carrying
out their mission openly, charged with
the delivery of dispatches destined either
for their own army for that of the
enemy. To this class belongs likewise -
individuals sent in balloons 'to deliver
dispatches and generally to maintain a
:!omnmunication between the various parts O
of an army or a territory." I
A Funny Language.
(itl'miniscences of Robert Lotis Steven- V
son in the Century.) c
The native dictionary is interesting in d
the light it casts upon the Samoan char
acter. I find "an impossibility, such as
An old man getting a young wife." An- 1i
other word means "to beg deliriously f.
Ilsh hooks." "Unwelcome" is given,
"such as a visiting party that is accom
Pani'd by neither a handsome man nor c
t pretty maid." The definition of r
"widower" is synonymous with detached
Shell fish.
There are also definitions that show t
considerable thought and Irony. "Mean
iess," for instance, can go no further
than "to climb out on your own bread
fruit tree to steal your neighbor's bread
fruit." Faapautama, like a trumpet
blown by wild lads-blown anyhow and I
at all times; so conduct without con ,r
sideration. Propoga, to look owl-eyed, 4
as a person staring when food or prop. a
erty l's being divided. "Good brown c
earth" describes an honest, unpretending
man. To show how difficult the lan
guage is for the stranger, I may say
that the little word ta means I, we two,
to beat with a stick, to play on a musical
instrument, to reprove, to tattoo, to open
a vein, to bail a cannon, to wash cloth- a
ing by beating, and to turn a somer- c
sault,
E4*er) ody ft' Butte Will See Your Want Ad
if You Put It in
The Inter Mountajn
There Is but one paper that covers all Butte;
and that is the Inter Mountain. The field is
divided in the morning. Single shot your want
ad, and reach everybody at one cost.
.!
FOUND A BROTHER
MAN SUPPOSED TO BE DEAD FOR
MANY YEARS TURNS UP.
CAME FROM GLENGARRY, ONT.
He Was Supposed to Have Been Killed
by the Utes and Mormons at
Mountain Meadows-Hunt
ing Another Brother.
(By Associated Press.)
Lagrande, Ind., March 15.-Lewis J.
Grant of Kalamazoo has just heard from
his brother, Alexander, whom he has
not seen for 50 years, and who was
supposed to have been murdered by the
Ute Indians and Mormons in the Moun
tain Meadow massacre.
The family at Glengarry, Ontario, and
Alexander went to California in search
of gold.
After a few years had elapsed' and no
tidings came from him, Lewis started
in search of him. Then a third brother
started in search of the two brothers
and he is still missing.
Alexander, now 70 years of age, is
living at Bell Grade, Kansas. He In
serted an advertisement in a news
paper and thus his whereabouts became
known.
It develops that Lewis' children at
tended school where Alexander's daugh
ter acted as a teacher, but the iden
tification never became known.
Every effort is now being made to find
a trace of the third brother.
Dead Man Discovered.
(Special to Inter Mountain.)
Dillon, March 15.-The body of a dead
man, half devoured by coyot.s, was
found this morning by George IBest, at
the mouth of French gulch, three miles
from Argenta.
The remains are thought to b,, those
of a man named Williams, who hna been
missing for the past three wpeks.
Coroner Jones has gone out after the
body, and will return with It this even
ing.
"Talkin' 'Bout Weather."
(Atlanta Constitution.)
"Well, sir, talkin' 'bout weathers, I
haln't seen nary winter like this sence
the stars felled."
"Sakes alive! Hiram," exclaimed the
old lady. "You must be a-losln' of yer
fergitfulness! Has you done lost sight
er the winter when Sis Williams was a
talkin' to the preacher atter meetin', an'
fell ter laughin', an' her jaws friz whilst
her mouth wuz wide open, an' didn't
thaw tell her ol' man come home b'llin'
full, an' she lit in to abusin' of him, an'
broke his head an' two jugs with a
light'ard-knot, an' throwed hot water on
the dog kaze he took the old man's part,
an' then put the old man to bed an'
made him drink red pepper tea tell he
thought he'd run agin' the hereafter, an'
sent fer the preacher to come an' pray
fer him? I axes you onet ag'in, Hiram,
has yer fergitfulness fergot that winter?"
"Yes," replied the old man, in a be
wildered sort of way, "I had clean lost
track of it. But I won't fergit it no
more!"
WANT ADS.
WANT AD. RATES.
Funeral and death notices, fraternal
)elety notices, entertainment notices,
trds of thanks, 10 cents a line each in
ýrtlon.
Help wanted, sitetations wanted,
ouses and rooms, real estate, etc., 15
ords or less 15 cents; 16 to 20 words, 20
ant; 21 to 25 words, 25 cents, etc. No
Iscount for additional Insertions.
Personals, fortune telling, palmists,
roprletary remedies, 2 cents a word each
isertion, $2.00 per month per line.
ANPWERS TO ADVERTISEMENTS
ddressed care the Inter Mountain and
ft at this office, should always be In
osed in sealed envelopes. No stamp is
quired on such letters.
The Inter Mountain will not be re.
.onsiblo for errors in advertisements
tken through the telephone.
MEETING NOTICE.
I. O. O. F. NOTICE.
All members of Fidelity lodge, No. 8,
O. O. F., and visiting brethren are
quested to meet at Fidelity hall on
Jest Broadway on Sunday, March 16,
t 1 o'clock to attend the funeral of do
lased brother, Clement N. Campana,
J. B. KEINYON, N G.
J. C. MITCHIELL, Secretary.
PIJBLIC NOTICE.
On and ofter May 1, 1002, e ht hours,
t the minimum wage scale of $3, shall
fnstitute a day's work for all persons
'orklng under the jurisdiction of Butta
Workingmen's Union No. 5, W. L. U. By
order of union.
J. W. .DALE, President.
T. W. JONES, R. S.
Attention, K. of P.
All members of Oswego lodge and vis
iting brothers are requested to meet at
K. of P. hall at 1 p. m., Monday, March
17, to attend the funeral of Brother
Joseph Price. The procession will leave
the residence, 810 East Summit street,
at 2:30 p. m.
ARTHUR PERHAM, C. C.
Modern Woodmen of America.
All members of Silver Bow camp, 5,805,
are hereby notified to be at camp
hall (Pythian Castle) tomorrow
(Sunday) at 1 o'clock p. m., to attend
the funeral of our late Neighbor Clem
ent Campana. All Neighbors of Silver
Bow camp are expected to be present,
and all Neighbors of other camps are in
vited to be present.
LEWIS A. SMITH, Clerk.
WHERE DO YOU EAT?
The Southern Hotel is situated in the
heart of Butte a few doors east of Main
on Broadway. It puts up the best 25o
meal ever had In the city. If you are
looking for a good place to take your
meals try the Southern and it will please
you so much that it will be your regular
eating place thereafter.
MISCELLANEOUS.
WANTED-LESSONS IN ELOCUTION.
A. B., Inter Mountain.
WANTED - ONE HUNDREDI MEN,
with, a nickel, to drink beer and eat
a hot lunch at .my saloon. Joe Prima
vera, Meaderville.
FOR RENT.
TO RENT-A 4-ROOM HOUSE TUI,
nished. A 2-room house furnished.
See on premises, 718 South Montana ~
street, or room 15, upstairs, 23 West
Granite street. W. W. Chapman.
MALE HELP WANTED.
WANTED-TWO GOOD SUBSCRIP,
tion solicitors. Inquire E. R. W., this
office.
COLLECTIONS.
BUTTE ADJUSTMENT COMPANY
collects bad bills. Trv 1t. l U N. Main.
CARPET CLEANING.
WEST SIDE ELECTRIC CARPET
Cleaning Co., 130 W, Bdwy. Tel 861A.
FURNISHED ROOMS.
FOR RENT-TWO ELEGANTLY FUR.
nished rooms, strictly modern; new
house. 821 West Galena.
FOR RENT-VERY DESIRABLE MOD
ern furnished rooms; moderate prices,
502 West Park street.
FOR SALE-OOOD RANGE AND
other household goods. Address, "S."
care Inter Mountain.
FOR RENT-ONE FURNISHED ROOM
-hot water baths and electric light; $8;
849 West Copper.
BUSI1NESS CHANCES.
FOl SALE-FluItN[TUR I OF' SIX
ron mhouse. 321 N. Washington St.
FOR S4AL--C(AIEAP-4-ROOM .1IUSIlB
and furniture'; South Side. Oechsl, 124
West Purk strt'et.
FOR- SALE-- IIAIBER FIXTURES,
complete, cheap, 101 1yUth *a itana.
FOR SALE -- RESTAURANT ALL
tiMed for busin4s.. , Only, $150. Rent
reasonable. Stand good. On Main
street. Must be sold soon. Chas. L.
Smith & Co., 33 West Granite street.
FOR SALE-10,00o SHARES OF THI
Butte Mine Exploration Co., which is
working the Pacific Mine, at 20 cents
per share. Address W. -ui.ton.
CRYSTAL SPIRINGSt - MUSIC DAY
and night. Stage leaves four times a
day, -J a. m., 2 p. m., 5 p. in., 8 p. m.
1Day time stage 26c round trip, 8 o'clock
r;tage free. C. Langlois, proprietor.
MONEY TO LOAN.
MONEY TO LOAN-LARGE OR SMALI
sums. Jackman & Armitage Company,
87 North Main street.
MONEY LOANED ON CHATTELS
and time chr:cks. Butte Chattel Mort.
gage company, 12 North Main.
LOANfS-MONEY TO LOAN AT 8 PER101
cent; no de!uy. UB.all Bros., 46 Eas.,
Broadway, Butte,
DR. HUIll POCK
12 Years In Butte.
Generatlon doctor of China from grand
father down. B3orn and schooled in the
profession. Treats all diseases, making
a specialty of chronic tr~ables. Consult
me before you waste your life away.
227 South Main Stroot

xml | txt