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The Butte inter mountain. (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, May 02, 1902, Evening, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025294/1902-05-02/ed-1/seq-2/

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BY IJNUSUAL POMP
CONSECa~TE Nsrw BIS HOP OF
COLORADO DIOCESE.
MAGNIFICENTLY DECORATED
NIew Prelate Succeeds Rea. John F.
Spaulding in an Import nt Epis
copal Charge-Large Edifice
Is Crowded.
(Tly AssuHclatted PrI.s.)
Denver, (Col., May ".--lRev. Dr. 'harles
S. Olmtead, formllierly if l'tnnTsylv\atiI,
was consecrated as blshljp of the Etapi
copal diocese of ('oliratlo at St. John's
cuathedral In this rlty tolday' succeeding
the late lllRsholi Joihn F. iSptalding. The
large edlflee was cro\wslted anl nllmore than
half of these who desired tI attend the
sevl'\c'es were unable to gaint adllilllssioli
to the church.
The services, which were tl attlinded by
unusual poin and spltendirt , bielati at 10
o'clocik this tlorniniti anl warI noit ciln
hluded until n'tearly I Ip. t1.' T'he tat ' l -
di'ail was magnitllf'.eticly dIlcortateil. Au
orchestra o(f 2+ pliht s attd c; chi ,ir of 13
voaies furnlishcd Inmuls.
Afttli prtay'r nlld ia hyiani , It 'y. .,Icj lph
Houghton oif this citly, litti' r of . cr'.
a1Olla'ies, tr'ii- i Iiua lo.1, iitl'hh i wias
respondcd tIo y the entlire cl;l'tg, tl olla .
tfsllot p Ilalghtlon ('oltini ni if lIt cl-tnre
then delivered an inltere.tnlil. lAtil'res
tahe sermoan.
Robing New Bislsop.
After furthear seleclttiolis lay thte o'r
chestru.ll and chlitr, I31sthop Joh it 1 1. White
of lti(thigaiun i'lty iand Flredflick W. 'Tay
lur of tQuincy, Ill., clad in their ti pi-l
copal robes, :adlvatncd o Jaiillthola-etehit
Oltlatead. Hie aros' andiil, with bowed
head, waxs eonciirted t thei c eittet' of ( tlt
altar, where stood ltitholp Williamn II.
tHare of iSoiuth Duakata and Abit tLeon
ard of salit ILaIke, Ithe a)tcmlittet up
pointed to consecrat,'.
Thea fve fa(rmd li .ir1's ant1 II waere,
iw ilit' the tcatltiaitonials ofat the. hlshop
eleat were reI.la. Then 'altat his prom
ite of (a confoittllt y, o11 i i of I n I s' n l tao l
einn prominses lit tIhle riltual oif the
churcth.
Scalrc'ely I tound tcould l htie a l lit tthaa
churlch iexceptll the .,.nice ,iI lhr' lhix1hita)
elect aIx he maitle the ll i ,rsp'aslllsc
The bidding toi pra3'yr wail by t'r sil
Ing IlItshop Tuttle. It 'icas t prtt) Iatr'
mlat'y antd ithe anti're tonglegiall ilt took
part. Th'l'et litany servi -s fiollaowed.
Next cm lite the axaln llation of the
bishalop-elect.
This waih ain're ly a nia ltir iof fiorm to
colnforim \'with the anlctiient htulas iof the
chutrch, for during limodern Inlis it hiasa
been the 'usllltm tIo is'eetlItaIJ all thc'
qualllifcations of a c a ndlliate r, f ll th of
fleai beftore Ie is pletsentled fa a i'o ncca'a
tion.
Selections b; Chairs.
The' most ntmportantt part of tlle ex
orcis.s--the thbing of the pew bishop
was 1''ry limprpiesiv. A.s the conit
tee on cunnsecration said taihi words that
madeli him a prilncei of tli churc.th, the
work of rohing himl beatill,
He was iinvested with lithe ptrlle and
red of his iifthel with IIIUt'I cl'neremlony,
whlle the chai'r stlang an anthlem from
Mendelssothn.
After prayer alnid lthe conlmunll n serv
he, Ilishop (lllttsteP d gave the lnedie
tion and the servicel s weir' over.
iEarly int the ior'ning, holy cunt
Inlulion walls ,olebratled lat the cathedr'al
and all the 1'llpiscopall churches In the
city. with speelal plrayesl fir tlihe bisholp
elect, and the welfare of the diocese.
At the conelhsinl of the cereotn .ies In
the cathetdra;l, ia lulltcholt wa servetd
tlhe blisop and clergy at \tiolfe hall and
later i reception was givoti at the' Ilrowni
I'alaee hotel, In ,honor of IIsiHop n ild Mrs.
Ohnltttiead ail the visiting blships.
G6RMAN COMBINE
LEADING PLANTS OF THE EMPIRB
JOIN HANDS.
DO AWAY WITH COMPETITION
Also Expect to Repel the American In
vasion of the German Markets
-Increase TarirP on
-Machinery.
(13y Assoliated Press.)
Berlin, May 2.-German cast iron
works and foundries are preparing to
form a gigantic combinati.lon which will
embrace all the leading plants of the em
pire.
The negotiations have progressed so
far that an agreement has already been
drawn up and signed by most of the
concerns with the exception of the
Tnion foundry and seve.al other large
works, which will, however, be obliged
Co enter ,the combination.
There will be no transfer of capital,
but the main purpose will be to do away
with competition and defend the market
from "American invasion" and Aher in
terests.
The relchstag tariff commission, will,
in a few days, take up the debate on the
increased tariff for machinery, agricul
tural implements, tools and finished in
dustrial products, which will strike more
ctloely at American trade than that of
i:ny other country.
Raw material interesty are demanding
ai high protective tariff to stop the prog
ices of American iron, steel, coal, copper
and other imports whlelt manufacturers
arc again in favor of a low tariff so
as t , admlt cheap Amer'lcan material.
'P merlcan tools and agricultural Im
pltmontil have revolutionized the farm
s " and factory methods of Germany
S'I any attempt of the agrarians and
rr e-umaterial men to exclude them will
, 't with bitter resista lce.
Get the Increase
(By Aisociated Prees,)
teaumoat,Texaa , May 2.-The car.
I ttern have been granted the increased
:ly of from 85 to 40 cenbt per hour de
inwge.¢ but the contractors have an.
Shat every anmn who falls to
Increase will be dlsoharged,
V ,r ..
t I
H$CBOK g
wKý. ' ue ":
("OL t! I .. " V, 'ý ýly . tý 1
I , ,,, b ·. ~ a
FATHER KNICKERBOCKER: "OH, I DON'T KNOW! IT MIGHT BE DWVERI"
-Chicago Inter-Ocean.
SHOT 1f[ S[XION
CRAZY MAN USED A REVOLVER
IN FRONT OF CHURCH.
POLICE FINALLY GOT HIM
Large Number of Citizens Fail to
Make the Arrest - At Last
Knocked Over by
Little Boy.
(Ily Acssoc,cilattd Prest.)
VWlikesb.rre'. I'l., May 2.-After shoot
ing a Inan twice, .Peter Wannett held
the lIolice and ni posse at bay for nearly
t wo hiutris. Wannett firelr many shots
at th" c'rowd, but wase finally brought to
earth by ita boy who knocked him sense
iess wilthl it sto e,.
\Wcinnctt was found. parading before
the l ussliatl 4'a thul li' churtch, twirling a
re'volv il' and iniakincg 'til'rks about the
Mexton Itulesinit ct.iinc' out of thq
church l nd W\Vuntlnti betigail shooting at
hitl. (I)ii. bulle't cwIcnt through Itucssinit's
atr andi anoither istruck his thigh.
Mc''oeral ipersonsc . tiled to overpower the
Ilnfuriate'ld ithan, but wer\\'(''e shaken'll off, and
hie ran,. shllouiting ait thoseI' who purs'ued.
WVhi n the policei' arr'ived he wais Ott
top ut' a statcp bluff, aiii they 'could not
ach':l hil \withoiut explusing themselves.
'1'tihy 'calehd uponl c1itiz',ens for tlhc, and
th ti blull was suirrOlindeid.
F'itr morlile than an lhour pulltie anid clti
zens tried to retach Wan\liett, but eacth
thnl tih y tlapprl'olne'h d lit)he flel' .
f'lntilly, Just LLas ti' Iollcit hiad sec'cur'ed
tilles, \VacIInectt dasheld througlh the line,
cshootincg right illd left, anti got away.
Ite, was brought to bay ita iilte distant,
iand l anolther ciritle fionlmd.
'his time the crowd,, having no other
w'eapuoc)ns, IbegL1ll thrc'O\cing stones, aIid
finally a boy brought the man down.
\VWiaelltt was theni taken to jail.
MATIR Of IIM[
PHILIPPINE ISLANDS WILL SOON
BE PACIFIED.
REAR ADMIRAL REMEY BACK
United States Could Not Withdraw
Troops-Chaos Would Result-
Natives Certainly Not Capable
of Self-Government.
(By Associated Press.)
New York, May 2.-Rear Admiral
Itemey, who has arrived here on the
Brooklyn after a tour of sea duty in the
far east, was interviewed on the condi
tions in the Philippines.
He said; "Concerning general condi
tions in the island, General Chaffee told
me before I left that things were pro
gressing satisfactorily-slowly but sure
ly-and that pacification was only a mat
ter of time.
"Talk of the withdrawal of the United
States from the Philippines is based
upon an inaccurate and incomplete
knowledge of the conditions out there.
The country could not withdraw. Chaos
\ould be the result.
"My observations have convinced mne
that the natives are not capable of self
governnment yet."
The crew, officers and marines of the
Brooklyn presented a loving cup to Itear
Admiral Remey.
Cannot Open Negotiation.
San Jose, Costa Rica, May 2.-Presi
dent Iglesias in his message to congress
says that no negotiations can be made
with the United States concerning the
proposed Nicaragua canal bill before a
constitutional amendment authorizing
the leasing of land for the canal is made.
The president says also that the present
crisls has resulted in the exportation of
Costa Rican gold ooin.
BEE[ LIfT OV[R
ONE THOUSAND HEAD F03 W .ICE
THERE WAS NO SALE.
CONSUMPTION FALLING OFF
Result of the Agitation Against the
Packer - Everything in Leadio
ness to File the Bill-Awaiting
Orders From Washington.
(By Associated Press.)
Chicago, May 2.-Leading packers sub
mitted to a reporter that the consump
tlon of beef has fallen off 37% per cent
mince the agltation against the packers
began.
One thousand beef cattle-not 10,000,
as was reported--were left over from
yesterday.
One buyer declared that there would
L4e more than 1,000 head left over today,
w\Vlle another( exIpressed the opinion that
the export Ibusiness would clean up to
day's receipts.
The yards received 6,000 head of cattle
yesterday, It was estimated, against 17,
700 head a year ago.
Recolpts for Ap.il were estimated at
approximately 14,000 head less than for
the same month a year ago.
The bill for an infuction to be filed
against the so-called eof combine is
completed, and, as Attorney Day, relre
sentative of the department of justice,
will probably leave for at East tom.r
row, all that remains tp be done, it is
said, is to wait for word from Wash
ington to act.
The attorney general has a copy of the
bill as It has been prepared in Chicago,
and D1istrict Attorney Buthea, while au
thorlzed to go ahead on his own accord
and proceed as he may see fit, will prob.
ably await the attorney general's order
as to the time of filing the bill.
NEWS STORIES BRIEfLY TOLD
NEW YORK.-Lieutenant Ciovernor
and Mrs. Woodruff will sail on the
Kalserln Maria Theresa for Italy today.
WVAhHINGTON.-UnIted States Con
sul McWade at Canton has Informed
the state department that the plague
epidemic exists at IHonnan, Canlton
province, but 'Is decreasing.
CHICAGO.-President Marvin Hughltt
of the Chicago & Northwestern railroad
authorizes a denial of the Wall street
rumors that changes are to be made in
the directorate of that road to satisfy
new interests.
VENICE.-The pardon granted by
King Victor Emanuel to the officers of
the United Slates cruiser ('hicago, who
have been imprisoned here, arrived this
morning, and the prisoners will be re
leased \\lthout delay.
NEW YORK.-Charles T. Yerkes has
scored In his hearing -before the parlia
mentary hearing on tubes, says the Lon
don correspondent of the Tribune. The
Herpstead residents who opposed his
scheme were not heard.
WASHIIING'iTON.-A conference report
on the Indian appropriation bill was pre
sented to the senate yesterday. It shows
that the senate amendment provided for
the opening of the Uinstah 'reservation in
Utah was retained.
LONION.-The Dally Telegraph says
this morning that it learns that 'Sir
Michael Hicks-Beach, chancellor of the
excheqirar, has decided to abandon the
duty of 2 pence on checks, which wai
proposed in the budget.
WASHINGTON.--Today's sessions of
the annual convention of the Sons of the
American Itevolution consisted of a busl
ness meeting during the forenoon and
patriotic exercises at Mount Vernon, the.
old home of Washingtol
PEACE PROMISIN(
MUCH EXPECTED OF MEETING ON
MAY FIFTEENTH.
ALL SECTIONS REPRESENTED
British Terms Said to Be Reasonable
and General Delarey Agrees to
Abide by Decision of
Majority.
(By Associated Press.)
Pretoria, May 2.-Boer meetings con
tinue to be held, chiefly in the Trans
vaal to receive the Jlberal leaders' ex
planations of the terms.
It ei said the heated discussions that
have occurred have usually shown the
majority to be In favor of peace.
It is said that about 200 delegates will
attend the conference to be held at
Verelngging, Transvaal colony, May 15,
and that all sections of the burghers will
be thoroughly represented there.
It is expected that a vote by .allot will
be taken at this conference.
It is reported that General DeWet has
frankly declared the British terms to be
reasonable and that it is advisable to
accept them, while General Delarey is
said to be ready to abide by the decision
of the majority.
The outlook for peace, therefore, is
promising.
WAR VETERANS IN
SESSION ADDREaSSED
BY MISS BARTON
(By Associated Press.)
New York, May 2.-Over 200 guests as
semibled in the Union League club,
Brooklyn, last night to participate in a
,banquet given under the title of a "'ol
dier's Welcome," given by the War Vet
erans' association to the honorary mem
Iers and its distinguished life member
Col. Theodore Roosevelt, president of the
United States.
The president was not present, but a
letter of regret from him was read.
Letters of regret were also received from
David B. Hill, Miss Helen Miller Gould,
Mrs. Margaret Long and others.
Miss Clara Barton addressed those
present as soldiers and comrades, and
thanked them for the great honor con
ferred on her in allowing her to sit with
them and live over again the days so
well remembered.
LIQUOR MERCHANTS
SOON TO ORGANIZE
POLITICAL PARTY
(13y Associated Press.)
Louisville, Ky., May 2.-A political or
ganization which 'is now being formed
throughout the United States by the al
lied liquor Industry will be formally
Launched at a meeting which will be held
in Pittsburg, June 6.
It is expected the meeting will be the
largest gathering of liquor interests ever
held in the United States. Angelo Mey
ers of Phfladelphia, general manager of
the distilling company of America,
says: "At the Pittsburg meeting, the
National Wholesale Liquor Dealers' as
oclutlion, the National Distilllers asso
ciation, the Retailers association, the
National Association of Brewers and any
nulmber of kindred organizations will be
united under one head.
Officers will be elected and the organi.
zation will be kept intaft after the
methods of the big political parties."
FRUIT GROWERS ORGANIZE.
New Concern Represents Eighty-eight
Per Cent of Business
San Francisco, May 2.-The fruit grow
ers of this state have ,organized under
the name of the California Distributors
with Frank H. Buck, as president, and
Alden Anderson, as secretary and gen
eral manager.
Those already in the association repre
sent 83 per cent of the business done last
year, and an effort is being made. to in
duce the other 12 per cent to join with
a view of absolutely controlling Eastern
shipments.
BI I [A I IS MA F
ITAND FORIERLY (,WNED BY THE
ELDER ASTOR.
SOLD TO STEEL MILLIONAIRES
First Used for a Pasture by Early
Dutch Settlers of New Amster
dam-Situated Outside
the Gate.
(By Associated Press.)
New York, May 2.-Contracts will
shortly be signed for the sale of the
famous Boureel building at Broadway,
Thames and Cedar streets to a new cor
poration backed by the fortunes of sev
eral steel millionaires to be followed by
replacing the structure with a modern
25-story office building.
The entire deal Involves about $5,250,
000 and may be reckoned one of the most
important transactions in the history of
New York real estate.
*The Bourcel building was once owned
by the first John Jacob Astor. It formed
a part of his daughter's wedding dowry.
Mr. Astor acquired it In 1828 for $121,
000. The title to the land is a remark
ably interesting one. It runs well back
into the seventh century when William
Dyre and his wife conveyed the land to
Thomas Lloyd for $2,550.
It was then described as a lot on the
great highway, the Broadway of the
present-"outside the gate," which
means north of the Old Lanigate at
Broadway and Wall streets, one of the
entrances to the city of New Amsterdam,
when under Dutch rule.
The land was used for pasture.
WANTADS.
WANT AD. RATiS.
Funeral and death notices, fraternal
society notices, entertainment notices.
cards of thanks, 10 cents a line each in.
sertion.
Help wanted, situations wanted,
houses and rooms; real estate, etc., 15
words or less 15 cents; 16 to 20 words, 20
cent; 21 to 25 words, 25 cents, etc. No
discount for additional Insertions.
Personals, fortune telling, palmists,
proprietary remedies, 2 cents a word each
insertion, $2.00 per month per line.
AN. WERS TO ADVERTISEMENTS
addressed care the Inter Mountain and
left at this Efice, should always be In
elosed in sealed envelopes. NTo stamp is
required on such letters
The Inter Mountain will not be re
sponsible for errors In advertisements
taken through the telephone.
WHERE TO STOP IN BUTTE.
The Southern hotel, Dan Tewey, pro
prietor, right . in the heart of Buttes.
Street cars reach it from every depot
for 5c. fare. Elegant brick hotel, In block
with two higher priced hotels. Beds,
rooms, and table unexcelled. The South
ern hotel's 25c dinners from 12 to 8 are
famous. Board and lodging $1.50 and 81
a day. *
MISCELLANEOUS.
THE NEW YORK CAFE, 54 E. BROAD
wa, serves the finest meals in the city
at reasonable prlces. Home-made
bread. Private rooms Only the best
served.
WANTED-At Inter Mountain, clean
white rags.
FOR RENT.
Furnished Rcoms.
FOR ItENT-FINELY FITIRNISHED
rooms for business purposes, suitable
for dressmaking parlors and other
business purposes: light rooms; in the
busiest section of the city; reasonable
rent. The ,laule block, above Symons'
store, West Park street.
FOR RENT-NICELY FURNISHED
front offices, in the busiest center
of Butte. The largest, lightest 'busi
ness rooms at reasonable rent in
the city. The Maule block, above
Symons' Dry Goods store, West Park
street.
FOR RENT - ELEGANTLY FUR
nished rooms, $10 up. Baltimore block,
in the business center of Butte. 71
West Park street.
FOR ItENT--FULRNISHED IOOMS
for housekeeping. 10 North Washing
ton street.
FOR RENT-One furnished front room
in modern, private house; gentlemen
only. 115 South Montana.
FOR RENT-2 FURNISHED ROOMS
for housekeeping. 207 North Crystal.
FOR RENT-FURNISHED ROOMS,
complete for housekeeping. 219 West
Galena street.
FOR RENT -- TWO FURNISHED
rooms for housekeeping. 328 South
Washington.
FOR RENT-NICELY FURNISHED
rooms, steam heat, electric light, free
'baths. Barnard block, 17 West Granite
street, Butte.
CARPET CLEANING.
WEST SIDE ELECTRIC CARTfIT
Cleaning Co., 130 W. Bdwy, Tel. 8067A.
HELP WANTED.
Male.
WANTED-A MAN WHO HAS HAD
experience in paint and wall paper
business. Butte Paint and Wall Paper
Co., 131 West Park St.
WANTED-MEN TO LEARN BARBER
trade. Special offer May 1 to 15. Board,
room, scholarship and outfit of tools.
Term not limited. Steady practice, ex
pert instructions, positions plentiful.
Write today. Moler Barber College,
Minneapolis, Minn.
Female.
WANTED-AN APPRENTICE FOR
dressmaking. Apply at 535 W. Silver,
MONEY TO LOAN.
MrONET TO LOAIt-LA1GE OR SMALL
sums. Jaokman & Armitage Company,
87 North Main street.
LOANS-MONEY TO LOAN AT 8 PER
cent; no delays. Hall Bros., 48 East
Broadway, Butte.
COLLECTIONS.
TTE ADJUSTMENT COMPANY,
collects bad bills. Try it. 115 N. Main.
FORi ALE.
WINTERS
, WINTERS
WINTERS
WINTERS
W. H. WINTERS, REAL ESTATE,
Mortgage Loans and Insurance, 23-21
Owsley block.
FOR SALE
$37,600 will buy one of the best 'business
blocks on the eas( side of Main street,
between Park street and Broadway.
This property is easily worth $50,000.
Investigate today.
$32,600 will buy one of the best business
blocks on the south side of Park street,
between Main and Wyoming streets.
This property cost $40,000.
$10,500 will buy one of the most select
vacant lots on the north side of East
Park street.
$10,500 will 'buy one of the finest brick
tenement houses in the city. This
property cost $12,0u0 a little over a
year ago.
$6,500 wull buy two 12-room brick tene
ments In best renting district. The
owner refused $8,000 for this property
less than one year ago.
$4,000 will buy a swell 7-room -modern
brick residence on Washington street|
easy payments if desired. This prop.
erty Is worth $6,000.
$900 will buy a fine vacant lot on Gold
street. This lot is worth $1,0b. Will
sell on terms to suit purchaser.
$1,100 will buy choice lot on Idaho street;
This lot is worth $1,600.
$10,000 buys a well-rented business bloclg
on Arizona street. This property cost
the owner $12,000 less than one year
ago.
Call and examine my list of real estate
bargains. I have several hundred. bar
gains In improved and unimproved real
estate.
I have clients who desire to borrow
the following sums of money upon Butte
real estate security. None but strictly
first-class security offered:
$2,250 for a term of years; Interest 15
per cent.
$2,500 for two years at 12 per cent.
$2,500 for one year at 10 per cent.
$3,000 for three years at 10 per cent.
$4,000 for two years at 10 per cent.
$4,700 for two years at 10 per cent.
$5,700 for three years at 10 per cent.
$6,250 for two years at 10 per cent.
$8,000 for one year at 9 per cent.
$12,000 for three years at 8 per cent.
$17,000 for three years at 7 per cent.
$24,000 for three years at 7 per cent.
$50,000 for five years at 7 per cent.
$85,000 for five years at 6 per cent.
I have several other applications for
smaller amounts; good security and sat
isfactory interest.
Remember, I am not a member of the
fire Insurance trust, therefore can save
you money on your fire insurance. Get
my rates before placing your fire Insur
ance policies. Standard companies only.
W. H. WINTERS,
Office 23-24 Owsley block, Butte, Mont.
'Phone 717M.
WINTERS
WINTERS
WINTERS
WINTERtS
Lots.
FOR SALE-REAL ESTATE IN BIT
ter Root Valley, hay grain, fruit and
stock, town property, lots, blocks and
acreage. Dickinson and Cannon,
Stevensville, Mont.
FOR SALE-CHOICE WEST SIDE
lot. See owner, Room 3, Columbia blk.
FOR SALE-YOU CAN, IF YOU WILL.
put $25 a month In a home, instead of
paying it out for rent. Lots in the
Gallatin Addition $10 down and $10 a
month. A house on one of those lots
will cost $15 more per month. More
new houses building in the Gallatin
Addition than any other part of the
city. The bests selling ground ever
placed on the market in Butte. Butte
Land and Investment Co., 19 West
Granite street.
FOR SALE-DO YOU WANT A SINNI
lot on the West Side, 45 feet wide and
100 feet long? South front. Sewer
also. Only $1,000. Best building lot on
West Side. Charles L. Fmith & Co.,
33 West Granite street.
House%
FOR SALE-DOUBLE HOUSE OF SIX
rooms each, modern; a good paying in.
vestment, close in and a bargain.
Address L., this office.
FOR SALE-BOARDING AND LODG
ing house; close in; modern; 35 board
ers; 17 rooms; price, $1.600; good lease.
Address H., Inter Mountain.
FOR SALE-BRICK HOUSE, MODERN
improvements, within two blocks of
postoffice. W. T. M. Address General
Delivery.
Furniture.
FOR SALE-FURNITURE OF 8-ROOM
house, close in; everything first-clas.
House for rent; modern. A snap for
the right party. See G. W. Robert
son, Red Chair, 114 South Main.
FOR SALE-CHEAP-6-ROOM HOUSE
and furniture; South Side. Oechsll, 134
West Park street.
GRIIAT FURNITURE BARGAIN.-We
will have on sale one of the newest and
best outfits of second hand furniture
ever offered for sale in Butte. Don't
miss seeing it. Wt have the finest new
couches and box couches ever brought
to Butte. Buy, sell, exchange. Stor
age, pack and ship.
B.UTTE EXCIIANOE FURNITUIRE CO.
42 West Broadway, Butte. Mont.
Horse and Carriage,
FOR SALE--HORSE AND PHAETON;
Spider phaeton and safe family horse.
Mrs, Jessio (. Knox, box 1034.
Mining Stock.
FOR SALE--10,000 SHARItES OF TUE
Butte M!ne Exploration Co., whlith I,
working the Pacific Mine, at 30 cents
per share, Address W. ISttoih

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