OCR Interpretation


The Butte inter mountain. (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, June 19, 1902, Evening, Image 1

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025294/1902-06-19/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

VL THLE BUTTE INTE MOUNTAIN
VOL.XXII NO. 80. WEATHER FORECAST. BUTTE, MONTANA, THIURSDAY EVENING, JUNE 1g, 1902. PAIR WEATHER. PRICE FIVE CENTS
T- .. . -------- - ... ..... ... . - .." .... _.. " ... =·====~---~Zt~.~-___ I - --.
MAYOR HINCHCLIFFE
TAKES PERSONAL
COMMAND
He Instructs His Policemen
to Be Aggressive and Is
Going to Keep Peace.
WORKMEN ARE PROVIDED
GUNS AND AMMUNITION
Paterson's Determined Chief Executive
Increases His Police Force and All
Have Firearms and Instructions to
Use Them-Meeting for Today Ar
ranged by Anarchists-Instant Arrest
Will Follow Violent Language.
[1v ASsocIATED Pla s.l
Paterson, N. J., June zu.--Mayor Hlinch"
cliffe took personal command of the police
of this city today. He went to police
headquarters and had all the reserves lined
up. Then he said to them: "Men, if your
clubs prove useless, you know what to do.
Be aggressive from the start."
In addition to the regular police force of
o104 men, tllere were sworn in todlay
twenty-three constables, twenty-five dep
uty sheriffs ahd ten firemen who are to
do duty as policemen. All the men were
immediately armed with revolvers and
night stibks.
Ten silk manufacturing firms opened for
business this morning. In each of these
plants every employe was armed with a
revolver. The weapons were supplied by
the men's employers with the approval of
Mayor Hinchcliffe.
At the Pelgram and Meyers mills, every
oaurth man was provided by the manage
aient with a gun with thirty rounds of
ammunition. No dye shops started up this
morning, although several were opened.
The dye house owners were willing to
start operations but the men refused to go
to work, as they feared violence.
As the morning advanced more of the
silk mills opened up, including some of
the largest in the city. It was reported
that a number of silk mills in Jersey City
had been shut down on account of the
lack of material as a result of the close of
the dye houses at Paterson.
Not to Incite Violence.
Mayor Hinchcliffe announced today that
only the executive committee of the I)y
ers' helpers union would be permitted to
hold meetings for the present and that if at
any of these sessions one word was ut
tered that tended to incite violence, the
speaker should instantly be arrested.
The mayor insisted that representatives
of the city he present aL the meeting of
the strikers' executive committee this morn
ing.
About 400 Italian strikers gathered in
that quarter of the city where the larger
part of the Italian colony lives, and started
to march to Turner hall only a block from
police headquarters.
It Is said that the proposed meeting to.
day was arranged for at a meeting of an
archists last night.
The procession had barely gotten under
way when the reserves charged the parad
ers. There was a quick scattering in all
directions.
Harry Harris, the reporter who was
knocked down, beaten and finally shot with
his revolver by the mob was very low to
day, but hope of his recovery is enter
tained.
OPENING OF THE TILPEN CLUB
Prominent Democrats to Speak at the
Banquet-Mr. Bryan Is Invited.
[BY ASSOCIATED PRI'SS.]
New York, June 19.-Former President
Cleveland, David B. Hill, Governor A. J.
Montague of Virginia, and Colonel Gaston
of Boston, will be the speakers at the
opening of the new Tilden club, Seventy
Fifth street and Broadway tonight.
William J. Bryan also received an invi
tation to be present.
There will be a reception and collation
in the main hall, but on the floor above
there will be a special banquet for 70
guests. There Mr. Cleveland and Mr. Hill
will meet. The speech-making will begin
before the banquet.
Leading citizens have accepted invita
tions to be present, including the Tam
many triumvirate--Murphy, McMahon and
Haffen.
MINING CONGRESS A SUCCESS
Governor Tools Doing All in His Power
for the Butte Meeting.
[SPECIAL TO INTER MOUNTAIN.]
Helena, June 19.-Governor Toole is do
ing everything in his power to make the
International mining congress in Butte a
success. Last week he invited all gov
ernors and lieutenant governors to attend
or send representatives. Governor Dock
ery of Missouri and Governor Van Sant
of Minnesota have sent personal regrets,
but say they will send representatives.
Today Governor Toole sent another ler
ter to all governors, giving indorsement
to the idea of Irwin Mahon that the con
ference of governors, when the mining
congress meets, would not only prove of
benefit to the St. Louis exposition but to
the country at large, also heartily renewing
his previous invitation.
Favor General Strike.
SIY' ASSOCIATED PRESS.]
Saginaw, Mich., June 9o.-The call for
a national miners' convention has had the
effect to stop negotiations for the settle.
ment of the strike of 2,500 bituminous
workers in Michigan, which have been in
progress nearly two months. As President
Williams signed the call for the conven.
tion, with the approval of the executive
board, there is little doubt that Michigan
will vote in the national gathering for a
strike. The cities of this vicinity are
already feeling the coal shortage,
MR. ROOSEVELT IS
WELL SATISFIED
CONFERENCE WITH THE PRESIDENT
RELATIVE TO THE PROBABLE
FATE OF RECIPROCITY.
RFPUBLICANI SENATORS
MUST GO ON RECORO
South Dakota, Nebraska and Kansas All
Favor the Measure, and President
Roosevelt Believes That to Be Suffi
cient Indorsement of His Stand
Favors a Treaty With Cuba.
[BY ASSOCIATED PRI'S..]
Washington, Jutne i9.-Senator Platt,
chairman of the committee on Cuban re
lations, today was an early caller at the
White house, where he had a conference
with the president on the subject of the
probabllc fate of the Cuban reciprocity
measure in the house.
He declined to make any statement con
cerning the president's views as expressed
to him, but said, speaking entirely for
himself, he would force the senators who
are holding out against reciprocity to cast
their votes either with or against the party.
"There is not a beet sugar state," said
the senator, "where, if the question was
before a republican convention, reciprocity
would not be indorsed.
"\Vhere a lot of men are setting them
selves up in opposition to their party they
should be forced to go on record by their
vote."
Nebraska and Senators.
Senator Millard of Nebraska, who op
posed the reciprocity plan, was present dur
ing part of the conference and the presi
dent remarked to him that Nebraska had
indorsed his (the president's) course, and
turned down her own senators.
To a number of callers today the presl
dent stated that he finds a sufficient in
dorsement of his stand on the Cuban
question in the action of the conventions
recently held in South Dakota, Kansas
and Nebraska.
To a personal friend lie said today he
felt particularly grateful to Congressmen
Burkett of Nebraska and Martin of South
Dakota for their attitude in their conven
tions; also that he took a pride in the In
dorsements from the three states above
named, because he was peculiarly well
known to those.
It is known the president would ne
gotiate with Cuba providing he had the
assurance of o50 senators that they would
vote for it. but lie does not want to try
this expedient without a guarantee before
hand that it would carry.
ROYALTY ATTENDS
AT ASCOT HEATH
IMMENSE CONCOURSE OF PEOPLE
ATTEND AND SEE AN AMERI
CAN JOCKEY WIN.
[av ASSOCIATED PRESS.]
London, June 19.-;old Cup day, the
most important from a social viewpoint of
the whole Ascot week, attracted an im
mense concourse of spectators to the
heath today, The royal procession, which
was identical with Tuesday's, arrived on
the ground about I o'clock in the after
noon.
Queen Alexandra, the Prince and Prin
cess of Wales and the Duke and Duchess
of Connaught and other members of the
royal family and the Windsor guests en
tered royal carriages which, attended by
a mounted cavalcade, drove up the course
to the royal pavilion, greeted on all sides
with salvos of cheers from the brilliant
gathering of people.
The array of coaches and motor cars was
unusually great and the club tents and
the royal and other enclosures were filled I
with ladies in dainty summer costumes,
Oriental princes in vari-colored rainment,
and distinguished visitors from all parts
of the world.
The all-ages stake was won by Remne
des Fleurs, ridden by Reiff, the American
jockey.
The Gold Cup, valued at £ o,ooo,
with £C,ooo in specie, about two miles,
was won by the Duke of Portland's Wil
liam III, Osboch was second and San
toi was third.
Street Car Strike.
aBY ASSOCIATED PRESS,]
Pawtucket, R. I., June 19.-Disturbances
in the street car strike were resume,. this c
afternoon, after two days of quiet. The
cars on the Weeden and Prospect street a
lines were attacked with stones. Two em- a
ployes were hurt by being struck with the
missiles. The arrival of a detachment of
infantry quickly put an end to the trouble, c
Granted an Extension. c
[SPECIAL TO INTER MOUNTAIN.] C
Helena, June 19.-The supreme court f
tlhis morning granted an extension of 30
days for the respondent to file briefs in
the case of the estate of A. J. Davis, John I
H. I.eyson of Butte, administrator and
appellant. o
Degree Conferred on Mr. Payne,
laY ASSOCIATED PRESS.]
Hamilton, N. Y., June 19.-Colgate uni
versity today conferred the degree of LLD, .
on Sereno E. Payne, chairman of the ways f
and means committee of the house of rep- o
resentatives, li
Goes Through a Bridge.
(a, ASSOCIATED PREss.]
Shelby, N. C., June r9.-A portion of a
mixed train on the South Carolina and
Georgia Extension railway went through 1
a steel bridge into Broad river this after
noon. One man was killed and 14 people
Injured,
CLOSE OF CANAL BILL DEBATE
Senator Clark of Montana Speaks in Favor of
the Nicaraguan Route--Senator Morgan
Closes the Argument.
UNITED STATE SENATOR W. A. CLARK OF MONTANA.
Hp I
[BY ASSOCIATED PRraS.)
Washington. June i.--When the senate
convened today it was with the intention
of leginning the voting on the Isthmian
ca.Ual question at 1 o'clock.
Mr. Proctor of Vermont was relieved
from service as one of the senate con
ferees on the military academy appro
priation bill, and Mr. Burrows of Michi
gan was nained in his stead.
Mr. Morgan of Alabama presented the
following letter he had received from See
retary of State Hay. concerning the point
raised in the canal debate by Mr. Kittrcdge
of South I)akota:
"I ami requested by the minister of Costa
Rica to inform the committee on inter
oceanic canals that lie has been instructed
by his government to make known to the
senate of the United States that the go.
ernment of Costa Rica is prepared to take
all necessary steps to put themlselves in a
position to negotiate with the government
of the United States for concessions for
the Isthmian canal, on terms substantially
as proposed by the government of the
L'nited States."
The comnlunication was laid on the
table.
The conference report on the bill to pr-
vent the false branding or labeling of food
or dairy products was agreed to.
Senator Clark' Splakb.
Consideration of the Istnatlan canal.
-question was resumed and Mr. Spooner
offereed formally his amendment as a sub-,
stitute for the pending so-called Hepburn
Nicaragua canal bill.
Mr. Clark of Montana then addressed the
senate in support of the Nicaragua canal
route. lie thought that if one half the
objections to both the Nicaragua and
Panama routes were valid neither route
should be adoptedl. However, he was
satisfied the concensus of conservative
opinion ini this country was that a great
isthmian waterway should lie constructed.
The American ,eople, lihe said, were not
to be deserted. "You may delay the
project," said he, but you cannot defeat
it."
The difficulties of conustructing the canal,
lie believed, were exaggerated. lie
thought the Nicaragua route was more to
be preferred as it was, in his opinion,
more feasible anld practicable than the
Pallnama route.
Mr. Clark, declared that the Panama
scheme was a hoodoo which ought to be
shunned and avoided. He said the Panama
SUE THE FORMER TREAS.URER
National Hollow Brake Beam Company
Want a Settlement.
Ins ASSO(IATIK) PRSS.]
St. Louis, June 19.-Eight suits ag-.,
gregating $ioo,ooo were fiBl.d in the cir
cuit court today by the National IHol.
low Brake Beam company of Chicago
against Ward Lcigh, former vice president
and treasurer of the corporation, who now
lives in St. l.ouis.
Failure to take up notes, neglect to turn
over collateral security to the company,
contracting debts without authority and
drawing upon the company's funds with
out authority are the chief allegations set
forth as a cause of action,
Mr. Leigh was treasurer of the Hollow
Brake Beam comphny from July, 1882, to
May of this year, when he resigned.
He also for a time was vice president
of the company and chairman of the
finance committee.
Arrive From Manila.
San Francisco, June 9.--The United
States transport Kilpatrick arrived today
from Manila. She brought 658 casuals,
of which 15o were marines and 53 en
listed men of Troop H, Third United States
cavalry.
Invited to St. Louis.
Washington, June t9.-William D.
Saunders, secretary of the business men's
league of St. Louis, today invited the
president to that city and secured a prom.
Ise that if it can be arranged he will be
there September ao.
N. A. CLARK OF MONTANA.
canal plea had left a heritage of ruin,
disaster and desolation.
Mr. Allison explained why he shmuhl
vrte for the Spooner substitute,. lie le
lie-ved there was a general desire nmenr
the American people for an isthmiani canal
and the people desired, too, that the
United States government should con
struct and oolatrol the canal.
Close of Debate.
'!r. Mnrgtan. chairmiian of the inter*
N-sanic canal contnittee, at the concluslai)n
of Mr. Allison's remarks, began his speech
closing the debate.
lie said the canal issue seemted to have
coihe down to ~i: tingle polilnt-that of
Ihuance. On that point he deferred to Mr.
Allison, but hlie did not believe with himt
that it would he necessary to iossue bIlIoii
to pay for the construction of ia canal.
Mr. Morgan particularly delnounced tIhe
I')utanua canal route as a "place where
labor and death join hands."
lit. said he had been trying to prn
t-ct the 'United States front the shame of
intercourse with it. 'Those who wanted
to "touch that thing " might do so. IHe
would not do it, he declared, for both
er.nals.
Mr. Morgan urged congress to deter.
mine the question of route atnd anot coward
ly refer the matter to the president.
In conclusionl he said: "Just one word
id parting with this (Itestion. This duty
was assigned to me by the senate and
was not sought by Ile. If we are to Ibe
h',eaten here today andl America is to hle
lIsgraced, I shall have had the honor and
jhe American people will give it to itie,
ttfer I oam dead., or having devoted hotest
]ly and sincerely the best years of my life
-, the success of our project."
At - p. in. debate on the canal qiuestion
as closed by previous agreemelnt. The
Iponer amendmhent as perfected was
eat.
The first yea and nay vote was upon an
aoendatnnt offered by Mr. liacon to the
|Spotner aulnendment alllnnouncing a colmit
tac to have charge of the preliminary work
of the canal. It was inl lno way a test
vote. It was adopted, 55 to .a.
' The first actual test vote on the Isthmian
ptroposition was on1 an amllendlimenlt bIy Mr.
Mitchell of Oregon, giving to the pIresi
dent the choice of routes, even if the could
secure title for the PIanauma route. It was
laid on the table, 32z to 42.
'rThe vote on the Spooner amlendinlnt
was 42 to 34 anld it was adopted.
SEVERAL ARMY PROMOTIONS
Military Affairs Senate Committee Favor
ably Reported Some Changes.
l(Y AIHSO(IA'IIn I' '-S.:.i
\Washington. Jtine i9.-- ltle senate comr
mittee on military afflairs today ordered
favorable reports on a numlber of army
~nritmotions, tile most impollrtant of which
Mere:
Brigadier Generals J. C. Balies and
George W. Davis, to ,ce major generals;
('oaoels Theodore J. Wint. Fralnk Bald
winl, Jesse M. Ice and William II. Car
ter, and Major T'asker II. BIliss, to be
brigadier generals.
('olonel Forwood, to Ibe slurgeon general
with the rank of brigadier general, and
I.ieuteilant ('lonels J. A. Augur and
('harles A. Nobles to be colonels, the
'former of cavalry and the latter of in
fantry.
Single Line Rates.
fia AssocIlArn rt I'iss.l
Austin, Tex., June t9.-The state rail
road commission has handed down a de
cision holding that all the IHarriman lines
in this state shall operate under single
|ine rates. l'his order, if enforced, means
a reduction of about 25 per rent in the
revenue on all the Southern Pacific lines
10 the state.
Short in His Accounts.
Washington, 'lune o9.- henry Rechtin,
- disbursing officer of the department of
justice, was arrested today on the charge
of mIisappropriating $,,6oo of goverhrient
'funds. He confessed to the shortage.
Rcchtin Is from Cincinnati,
PREACHER BARRED
BY THE LEAGUERS
EPWORTH STATE CONVENTION RE
JECTS MINISTERIAL CANDIDATE
FOR THE PRESIDENCY.
PASTOR MARTIN ROASTS
BUTTE YOUNG PFoOPLE
Declares Gilded Youth of This City
Forget Early Teaching and Go to the
Theater, Card and Laniring Parties,
All of Which Is Shameful-Great Fdlls
Chosen and Oftices Arc Llectcd.
Gr'eat Illk was chisetn this i t ti.. .l i
ias tilt,' next Itectilig pilae iIt tile t att
coiveulitin uI the Ih i.pw th lt ..i01.tt. ))hilt
gate t. V. I.tdtlwig ul the I, l,tiatit LIty
tiln I lihalf it the M~IeltodisL% iti that Sit
tiun, ivitId the idle' galtes ui 111hs II
vituitonln was ccrlpt d wilthut fullthici di,
CUSllioll.
IRev. l.. J. A. Smuilth of I'hilipshttg
moved that the tintr of tlm etll g hie tlIt
to tihe e cttettive co.'lt1itjlie ., nut liprovoked
a l'luwh by udhling that fi1e con,1 ittee
make it a )year nt 11now. The date was
left to the cutlllltiltti..
1eyv. J. A. Martin of li;tilt , ta moved
that a street liieerting he h il Itniglht.
The chair appointed hint to cond'lt it.
The lueicher took .casill ion renild
the cIIltiug that there wtas a cryinig ieied
for evangelical work in Il ltei, as he
learnedat at the younig people of the churcll
were itmuclh given to lthatr, icard and
daincing parties.
Denuunced Butte Youths.
"Over in the Hitter i4,t we don'it Ido
that," said he. "Its a shll;llt , n . ., viy tlr
young peoplhe here It Itttte atf forget
ting their early teacihing."
As no championll for tilhe gihlcl ylhtsl of
intie aippeared tihe matter was droppied
without further disutssi.ion.i,
"No tiiniiters of the glislpl ineed
applly."
lIhtis was the slogan of the I;pwiirth
I.Leagiers when the (l('isti(l of a pIrsi
delint for the ensuing year camei before it lit
the Itlorliilt g snssiitn.
\\'hen thie nnillintinllR Cl littee Ibrought
ill its re'port with the reet'i, nenll titinll
that the Rev. Edward Mills of Stevens
ville tie eleeted for the nittiiig wear, th.
e(tnv'llntinn reftlud tl) ar(ept it. raising the
objection thaiit ithey did llnt wanlt a paslor
ait Itht' heuad of th tte sta league.
'Provoked Warm Discussion
I:or a tille thir was a walrn diculs
(I ntitin..ld otin Page Tlhter.)
LARGE CROWDS IN
HOUSE GALLERIES
ROUTINE BUSINESS TRANSACTED
BEFORE OPENING DEBATE ON
THE PHILIPPINE BILL.
vHY AS"Ol'AI.I I I(I'4 S..]
Washington, June o-- I het attendante,
both upointhe floor atid in the galleries of
the house tolday was larger thal usual in
anticipation of the ope ing of the delbate
on the I'hilippine civil governmetll bill.
SoIme routine busineslll's was tlranallltd he
fore the regular order was demanded.
A nIInber of confere'ce reports were
adopted.
T'Ihe senate almentCllelltn to the I ill to re
fund taxes oIn legacies, etc., were concutrred
in.
'The regular order wais demanded. It
was on an amedmlllllllent to a ill to amendil
the act for the relief and civiliz'tion of
the C(hilpewa' Iindians of Minnesotla, which
was undler consideration when tih house
adjourned yesterday.
The amenidment had been olfered by Mr.
E';ddy of Minnesota. It provided for open
bids for the sale of timber lands on tlie
Iindian reservations in Minnetsota.
Mr. Curtis of Kansas, Mr. Mayne of
New York, and Mr. Iacey of lowa, op
posed thlie anlendel1nt l on thle ground that
open bids wouli only inure to the benefit
of Minnesota bidders.
The Eddy aimendment was lost, 9 to 87.
The bill then was passed.
At r o'clock the routine business had
been disposed of and the house went into
coimiittee of the whole to consider the
bill establishing civil government in the
Philippines, with Mr. ;illett, of Massachu
setts in the chair.
Mr. Cooper of Wisconsin, chairman of
the insular commllittete, beganl ;a11 extended
speech opeiiiiing the debate in support of the
bill.
INDIANA REPUBLICANS
MEET IN CONVENTION
Lively Contests Between Rival Candi
dates for Governor-Local
Option Question.
IlY ASSO'IATItI) I'I SS.1
Montpelier, Ind., June ig.-T'he republi
can state conveiitioni here today has before
it some of the most bitter contests that
have ever confronted a body of dele
gates in this state.
With great energy the supporters of
three gubernatorial candidates, Gen. J. J.
McCullough, of Bennington; I'. W. Clem
ent, of Rutland, and Fletcher Proctor, of
Proctor, battled up to and evein after the
hour of opening the convention.
The supporters of Clement, who is the
high license and local option candidate,
demanded that a resolution adopted by the
Vermont Local Option league be incorpor
ated in the platform and the members of
the state committee were wrestling with
this question prior to the opening of the
convention.
SPECIAL NATIONAL
CONVENTION OF
COAL MINERS
Expected That There Will Be
No New Developments Until
After It Is Held.
PLAN OF SETTLEMENT
IS STILL HOPED FOR
Some Dissatisfaction Expressed by the
Strikers Because the Dato of the
Meeting Is Set for Onle Month Ahead,
but the Leaders Around Strike Head
quarters Believe It Is a Wise Move
Condition in Anthracite Is Unchanged.
lll .ASi i SIA l Bl it i rill . I
\Vilkshhirl,.. I';a., June I1). Now that
tlh ' IIll for ; special natiin ld ill nvntionil
ha.s h l eii nll ll i tuiI July 17, i i, Ili (. ex
p''l. thlere trill I anly viay import;ant
d ll lv'lrlllpln llS ill till r stik l sitillal ln until
that il I i'.
It is ot uik.ly. however, thait s.otme of
Sllil llliti lgs si ll l al itlake acll tiion
himilt tio thait of thi (ienitral I'nth ylvuania
dislt ict wl ich I 1 night e r t t d lie lui cult
down the soi coall producititon from that
t rlitiry i tnt liitl-l.
IMuch i itation Is exPromissed Wihiny the
aled. \\'Fiv the -Milade Limit. strik
the l n.ii u I t, lit' l ate foi r iJuly i] wlas a
will. ilove.
A rtial rlsittaillient of clat Iprdlction
whihctlave ia seriurr, s ffct llh the thusi
i ntitof ithe co.tiry, wand it is n lhop thalt
durting the next lorth If 1e 1' pln 1may be
dlvrise ll tit slicI tlalllh iI .nte lif llairs
l i liir tilon itn tliy anthracite it iu r to re
maicein uofc$tonged.
Much Liatigation Is Promised Within the
Five-Mile Limit.
IIn' As iA IIII 1-14l .i.4s
Blaickfoot, hidho, June ii 1.- Filing of
F il Ihall reservation 'laiils is going on
castelll at nh land offillcel hiere. No tltnn
flicts lh ve occurred, although the feeling
against c "sooners," who, it is apparent,
i.curred It majorsty of the more vatluable
secti'nns, is Mtill very hitter.
tihr Ilmnts wilhin the five mile limit of
lil llul rli . promise uc ritll roil l diiil Iigat
tion. T"luist• lain were to he sold at pull
lic allidaunl lnil July 17, at the liillillunu
price of $0o an acre.
Unless parties wlon are exploiting theom
1".iin1 show actual minliral deposits by that
time, they will he "knocked down by the
land olWh i.ls as agricultire lian s, lot
wiihsltandiig i lhl- miisi.rni c'liilliillha.
PGAINST THE USE OF TOBACCO
Pity the Ship That Took it to England
Did Not Sink.
llv AS oi' IA I l'I rel S.I
Milwaukee, Wis., June o.. Ilishop
Nicholson of the Milwaukee Episcopal dio
vise, has created a t sensationi among the
priests and laiety of the diocese by issuing
a hor' of a Ipronuncieniiitio a Iainst the use
of nltiacco.
The bisihop Intinisl there is Inot one
race of spiritual hellp or physical gain from
the use of toacco., but untohl evils have
re('ulted from its uise.
'Thlie extent to s h the lishop's abhor
retire towards tolbarcco go.s is evidenced by
the statemeint that if it is true that Sir
Walter Raleigh introdluced toacco into
lEntgland, it is a pity that the ship that
carried him did not sink in the ocean.
NORBECK JURY IS DISMISSED
Minneapolis Detective Is Now a Fugitive
-Believed to Be Guilty.
[Iny As:s,o IAl I,t rIoss. I
Minneapolis, Minn., June io.--Judge
Iharrison today dismissed ithe jury that
has been hearing the ease of Christopher
Norlbeck, detective, charged with bIribery.
The fugitives have not been heardl from
anil as there are other indictlmients hang
ing over him, it was deided Iafter a
conference between the judge iald the
county attorney, that it would be better to
let the jury go.
His Nlight is considered a confession of
guilt and its moral effect is the samie as
that of a conviction.
Return to Work.
rnv Ats5(oIAlJ Ii I'JIss.1
Ilazeltoi, Jute 19. -The regular en
gineers, firemleit anld liIpump rutnners at the
Sandy R1un colliery, operaten by M. S.
Kemmnerer & Co., returned tolday having, it
is said, been granted the eight-hour day
concession with the understanding that it
is to continue indefinitely if other com
pauies accede to the demand at the close
of the strike.
Lose Copy of Contract.
lSEIAI., To iN'a OIuNTrrA|N.j
lhelena, June ir.-The American Book
company claim to have lost copies of its
contract and bond with the stit: of Mon
tana and State Suplrintlndlent Welsh fel
lowing up his l .teiiill:,.iuii to secure a
settlement fur vi, . aiots of that contract
today forwarded to tite C'hicag;o office of
that company certified copies of these pa
pers,
Destroyed by Fire.
Iay AssoLIArEO PSESS.]
Reading, Pa., June gs.-The Patterson
pattern shops and drill works at Bords
boro, this county, were destroyed by fire
today. The loss will aggregate nearly
$300,000.
Reductions In Sugar.
[(a ASSOCIATED PRESSS,
New York, June 19.-The following re
ductions were made In refined sugar today t
Grades 5, 6 and 7, ten points; all otbhr
grades, 5 points.

xml | txt