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The Butte inter mountain. (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, July 08, 1902, Evening, Image 8

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BOXING CONTEST
IS ON TONIGHT
TEN ROUNDS BETWEEN KEARNS
AND ROGERS IN ADDITION TO
LIVELY PRELIMINARIES.
The to-round boxing contest between
Kid Rogers and (;torge Kearns at the
Grand theater on Broadway will take place
tonight as advertised. The men are in
excellent condition and one of the fast
est and hett hnxing contests ever seen
in Inutte is looked for.
Rogers is confident that he will win,
while Kearns is equally buoyed up that
he will he the victor of the mnatch.
There is very little difference in the
build of the nun and there will not be
half a Ipound difference in their weights
when they enter the ring tonight. They
will weigh IJ.3.
Rogers has the reputation of being one
of the best boxers in the lightweight
class, buit has never heen fortunate enough
to get a championship match.
Kearns has boxcd with many of the
best men of his class. .Mose Lafontise
and others who have seen him in training
have picked him as the s inner.
In addition to the main event there will
bie two four-roundl preliminaries. Jockey
Mlurlphy and Jockey Wilson will box four
lively rounlls andlr there will hie another
equalnty (as 'mooI pre liminary.
The ring sohi h will be aued arrived
front Ielcena this afternoon. It is well
pamniled. There will he canvas on the
Etage to insure no harm to the boxcrs
in case of a fall.
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
Brocklyn 5, Cincinnati O.
Cin, innu:ti luty R.-The Cincinnati team
coul h, nothiilg slith Newton yesterday.
Their five s,;tti red hits were made in the
first four imnninco. The ('niitnnatis played
a miseralh gb u l in the lit hl. Attenldance,
5oo. Score :
R. II. E.
Cincinnati ............ ...... o 5 2
Brooklyn ......... ........... 5 II o
Iatteries--'l hi ibt 'i and 'iet : Neat ton
and Ahearn. I 'mires-- ',wers and
IBrown.
Pittsburg 5, Philadelphia 3.
Pittsburg. July 8.--i'til the eighth in
ning Iiberg's curtIs kept P'ittsburg puzzled
effectually; theni fuour hits won the gaime
for the home tICam. Attendance, 1.950.
Score:
R. II. E.
Pittsburg .. ........ ........ 5 7 3
Philadelphia.. ............... 3 R8
lBatteries-Tannehill and Smithl; lberg
and Dooin. Umplire-Entslie.
No Game; Wet Grounds.
At Chicago--'hicago-New York game
postponld; wet grounds.
St. L.oui, July R.--llston St. Louis game
postponed on account of rain.
AMERICAN LEAGUE.
Cleveland 8, Chicago 5.
Cleveland. July f.--('levelan outlbatted
Chicago and won easily. iemntis was sent
to the bench for di'.sputing one of Sheri
dan's decisions, while Manager ( larke
Griffith was order, p, off the fiebl. Atte:nd
ance, 2.517. Score:
R. II. E.
Cleveland .. ........... 8 13 4
Chicago................... . 6
Batteries--lRlris and \Voiods ; IPatterson
and Sullivan.
Boston 4, Philadelphia 2.
Bostoni. Julty 8.---lostonl won yesterday
by bunching four hits in the seventh in
ning. Both Iitchers were eltective. At
tendance. .1.876. Score:
R. II. E.
Iloston ....... ............ 4 8 2
1'hihhla lphia ..... ........... 2 6 4
]tatt'ries--Vhinters and 4, arner; Plank
and Powers.
Baltimore 13, Washington 0.
lialtimore. July 8.-The Bltaltimore team
batted ()rth out of the box in the secotll
inning yesterday afternoon, and theli visitors
never had a chance to win thereafter. Sel
bach made five clean hits, one for every
time he came to the bat. Attendance,
2,114. Score:
R. 11. E.
Baltimore ...... ............. 3
Washington.. ..... ....... 7 1
]Batterie,*--Powell and Robinson; Orth,
Townsend, Clarke and Drill.
Western League.
At Oiinaha--t)iaha. I: )enver, o.
At )es Moines-Dl)s Moines, 7; Colo
rado Spirings. 4.
At St. Joseph --Peoria, 2; St. Joseph, 4.
STANDING OF THE CLUBS.
National League.
'layed. Won. Lost. P. Ct.
Pittshirg. . . 5o 45 14 .763
]Brooklyn. .. . 66 38 28 .576
B]oston .... . 56 31 25 .554
Chicago . .. . 62 32 30 .516
P'hiladelphia. . . 66 29 37 .439
St. .ouis. . . 64 27 37 .422
('ineinnti . . . . 6 24 36 .400
New York. . . . 61 21 40 .344
American League.
I'llayed. Won. Lost. P. Ct.
Chicago. . .... . 59 36 23 .6to
oston. . . . 63 36 27 .571
St. l.ouis. .. 59 31 28 .525
]Philatdehllhia ..... 50 31 29 .5o8
I)etroit..... . 60 28 32 .467
Baltimnore .... 63 29 34 .460
'Washington ..... 64 29 35 .453
Cleveland. . . 65 27 38 .415
Western League.
Clibs. Won. Lost. P.Ct.
Omaha ................ 38 24 .613
Kansas City............ 40 26 .6o6
Milwaukee ............ 32 26 .552
Denver ............... 33 27 .550
St. Joe ................ 32a 3 .5o8
Colorado Springs...... 27 34 .44_
Des Moines............ 22 28 .367
Peoria........... ....., 19 37 *339
NEWSPAPERMEN
VS, BLOOMER GIRLS
WILL PLAY BASEBALL AT COLUMBIA
GARDENS NEXT SUNDAY-WILL
ATTRACT THOUSANDS.
Nine newspapermen selected from the
editorial and reportorial staffs of the
Butte papers will endeavor to entertain the
New England Bloomer girls on the base
ball field at Columbia Gardens next Sun
day afternoon. Arrangements for the
game were made yesterday between Man
ager Clark of the Bloomer girls and
)Dan \Valsh of the Standard, the latter act
ing as manager for the Press club of
tulttc.
It has been several years since a fe
male baselall aggregation has made a tour
of the state and it is expected that they
will attract a large crowd to the Gar
dens next Sunday. Of course tihe news
paper men may draw their share of spec
tators, but it is reasonable to suppose
that the Bloomer girls will he the cynosure
of the eyes of the male contingent who
will go out to witness the game. The
newspaper men may be thei means of at
tractin:g the attention of sonic lady friends
anld admirers.
Why Bloomer Girls Are Attractive.
Attired in pretty uniforms the Illoomer
girls will doubtless be attractive. While
it can ha:rdly be expected that a wo
mian can play hall like a man, it is bet
ter ithan an (evn money wager that they
cani play ball Ibtter than an aggregation
of newspapermen whose routine of daily
life permits of nio mliore vigorous exer
cise thanI an occasional run for a street
car or a hustle after a newspaper story.
Icrhlaps the star player of the Bloonmer
girls is Miss Grace \'oods. the pitcher.
NMiks \\',oods is a Vassar girl. The other
Tin. lbers of the Blnomer girl team are
l.izzie Arlington. pitcher: Iert Smith,
catcher: L.illy Martin. first base: MMollie
itrayland, secondl base: Minntic Bennett,
third base: May iHwardl, shortstop;
Kitty Anderson. right licl: Annie GiIhs,
center field, and Flossic St. Clair, left
field.
Newspaper Line-Up.
Ed Charlton has been selected to enap
tain the newspapermen's team and has a
likely array of talent to stlcet from. After
a relega:ion of eight years front the ball
fiehl. Johmnie MrcMurray. city editor of
the Miner. will make a reap;,pearance on
tihe diamond. Dick Kilroy. who formerly
playe d with the r)iDblin Itles : harry
Neimnieyr, who useid to pliv with the
Flolrldora . extette : Spike Hla.ins., who
has a goodr, theory of the gamne and writ(es
stories albout the M'iCloskey family; Hilly
(;ni.n who played with "l:atty Felix"
lonts.i in Indiana years ago: Frank Ward,
who takes photographs of hall plavers,:
John Cole. who is a lbaselall critic: Ilrad
St. Char!es. who knowns more anout a
chunk of quartz than lie does bmasehall.,
and various other mlnmbers of the craft
will compoise thm' newslpapermen"i's team.
WEIGHTS AND ENTRIES
FOR TOMORROW'S RACES
First Race--Selling : plire. $250; one
mile and 40 yards. 3 ye'tr ilds and up:
8q, IHert I)avis .................. 6
io0 July Gyp ......... . ..r........ .06
87 Hleadstrong .................. 9t
88 Sylvan L.:ss .................104
82 I(nmany ..................... I. 6
66 W alton ...................... 1o.,
5o Ilan l.addie .................. 1.4
6o, Sir lauis .................... o9
90o Courtier .....................o4
59 I'ing ........................ o6
Secoid Race--Stlilug: purse. $250; six
and( one h:ilf furlongs. 3 year oiiis and up:
66 The Maia .......... ... It
87 Iernota .....................
87 O ur l.izzie .................. 1 ,
8.3 M innic I ...... ................ to
6o Dlevereux ................... .. 14
o60 MorntianIa ceress ..............o
(87 The Scot .............. ...... 114
Fla er .................. . 14
89 Plltouius ....................103
Third Race-Purse, $-'5; 3-year-olds;
non-winners iio-; selling; li mile.
- ouise McMurtrie ............11
39 John II. Carr ............... 112
- Winnecook ..... .......... 11o
- al: l I d .................. 115
89 l'orso Maid ..................1Io
52 Friar ('harm ................111
69 Cathello ............. ......... io
8 Jerry Edilwards ................12
4 lBlackthorn .................1 15
39 Nellie Hall;wthorne ............. Io
83 Sallie (;reein .................110
50o Miss Roma .................. o10
Fourth race-Prse $300oo; for 4-year
olds and up; .3 mile.
88 C(aptivate ........ ............. 7
(85) WVaultuches ..... ...........II
58 Joe K .. ........ ..... ......109
(84) Nanon ... ..................oo
78 May \\'............. .......116
78 Ben l.edi .................... 109
58 \Williiam F. ...............III
Fifth Race-Purse, $250; 3-year olds
and upwards; beaten allowances; three
furlongs:
61 Populist .......... .......... i19
86 Clay ........ ............... 12
78 Judge tThomas ...............119
86 Virgie D ....................10o
- Ilonest John ................119
- Rattler ..... ................. 19
92 lMeteora ....... ............Io i
86 Joe Jewett .......... ....... 112
(61) Big Dutch .. ............. 119
- Prince Farewell ............. 19
Sixth Race--Purse, $300; 3-year-olds
antl upwards; hurdle handicap; over five
hurdles; I M miles:
73 Sam Green ..................150
48 Auriffera ...................152
(8o) Coley ...... ........ ....... .6o
- Metoden ......... ...........135
88 Mistleton .... ......... .....1 46
8o Barnato ..... .... ..........13o
So Genncrose .......... .......125
New Billiard Table Fad.
Rich New Yorkers have now the cloth
on their tables made to match in color the
frescoing of the ceiling and the furniture
of the room. Women billiard players have
more eccentric whims in this respect than
the male devotees of the game. Red cloth
is considerably used now In covering ta
bles and yellow is employed also in rare
cases to match golden frescoes and hang
ings.
ISPORTS
WAS BAD DAY IFOR
RACE HORSE TALENT
It was hard luck for the talent at the
race track yesterday. The horses did not
run to form and heaps of money went into
the books by the turn of events. Those
who bet on Homage, an even money and
odds-on favorite, did not get a run for
their money. Jockey Linten gave the
horse one of the most wretched rides ever
seen on the Butte track. The fact did not
escape the eyes of the judges and Linten
was summarily suspended for incom
petency. Liniten rode lHomage like a
hobby horse. lie got off badly with the
horse and trailed the bunch all the way.
Homage came down the straight spraddled
and all outr Foal Play at 4 to t won.
There was a general shaking up after
the fourth race, when l.inten was sus
pendled for incompetency. At the same
time Jockey Van Camp was suspended.
Hlis riding of late has been anything but
satisfactory to the officials.
In addition to the suspension of the
jockies it was announced that hereafter no
more entries would lie received from the
stable of Nichols & Rowley, owners of
Foul Play and Rubino.
'I he racing at the track has been excel
lent during the meeting and yesterday the
finishes were close and spirited and the
crowd well pleased.
The ride given Captivate Iy Jockey Mc
Gavin was unsatisfactory to the judges and
the boy was called to the stand for in
vestigation. It was announced that his
excuse was scmi.satisfactory. The day's
sport, however, was fine.
()le of the largest uionday crowds ever
seen at the track was there yesterday. The
betting was highly spirited.
Yesterday was the day when the pool
room ordinance was to have gone into ef
feet and betting was to have been prohib
ited at the track. No action was taken at
the track. Chief of lolice Reynolds was
there, but all understanding was reached
at 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon that the
matter wotuld he t aketl into the courts and
settled.
F:ollos ing is a summary of yceterlday's
races:
SI'MMARY:
First race. selling, seven furlongs;
pulrse'. $250 :
I.. I. Woods' br g The Scot, the imp.
St. Andrew--Briar Rose, III (Col
lis). 6 to I ..................... r
MHayes & Co.'s hb i Our I.izzie, ioy
(I lc(; avin ) 3 to I ................ 2
i. Bh;lr's b g hleadstrong. 105
I l'K lly I .t to I ...... .... .. ... 3
('atiine. 3 to I ; Burdock. 6 to I;
Theronl , 3 to t; Ilgo. 7 to t; Bernota,
4 to i, also ran.
(;ood start, won easily hy four lengths.
three between second anttd third. Time,
I :30u';,
Second race. selling, mile and a fur
ltHg : purse. $250.
C. '. Fink' b El Fotnse by El
kin Rey-Fonsetta. 11,4 (Sheehan),
4 to I .. ................... ... I
ARE NO SURE THINGS
A party of sporting men were seated in
the Itutte (afe the other evening when the
conversation turned on "sure things."
Said one:
"There's no such thing as a sure thing
in this world, and particularly so in race
track matters. Now, for instance, can any
of you say what you think would be a sure
thing in a race?"
"Well," said one of the group, "I fancy
that getting a 'one, two, three' bet on any
horse in a three-horse race could be
classed as a pretty sure thing."
"So?" said the first speaker. "Well,
just to show you that it isn't such a sut
thing as you think, I'll tell you the story
of a time when I made just such a bet
under just those conditions, and yet I
never cashed in.
"It was out on the outlaw tracks at
St. l.ouis, several years ago, and I had a
string of three horses with tme. I was
just about making expenses, not coining
big money, but satisfied to come out
about even at the end of the meeting. I
had the worst dog of my string entered
in a race one day in which there were only
two other entries. My mute hadn't a
ghost of a show with either of the others,
PLAYED IN SNOW STORM
I.eadville, Colo., July 8.-It was a gro
tesque spectacle at the ball game yesterday
between the Homesteads of Denver and the
local team. The snow fell through most
of the game and the termometer stood at
32.
The umpire wore a winter overcoat and
the players double sweaters, while those in
ENTRIES FOR GOLF
CHAMPIONSHIP CLOSE
New York, July 8.-This is the last day
on which the entries will be received for
the National Amateur Golf championship
to be played at Chicago. Although Secre
tary lallou refused to disclose the names
of the probable competitors it is believed
the list this year will be the largest ever
received. The fact that the qualifying
round had been reduced from 36 to :8
holes is one of the reasons given for this,
but equally important is the decision to
allow 64, instead of 32 men to qualify.
The entries include players from all
parts of the country. It is said by those
who have Intimate knowledge of the entries
that the field will be the most representa.
tive ever gathered on a championship golf
John Kane's b m Sylvan Lass, 1o4
(Rowan), 2 to I .......... ........
D, Dennison's ch g Mistleton, so8
(See), 6 to r............ ..3.. . 3
Captivate, 8 to 5; Archibald, a to s;
Ledea, so to z, also ran.
Good start, won all the way by two
lengths, six between second and third.
Timiei, :57%.
Third race, selling, six furlongs; purse,
$25o:
J. S. Gibson's b g John Boggs, by imp.
Friar Tuck-imp. Czarina, so8
(llowson), 2 to I................. I
Smith & Co.'s ch g l'latonmus, too (Mc
Kinnon), 5 to t.................. 2
W. Clary's b g MacFecknoe, iss
(Kelly), 6 to I .................. 3
Blanche Shepard, to to i; Jim Gore
II., 6 to 5; Miss Blarney, to to i; Bert
Davis, 15 to I; Girlie Ducat, 15 to i;
Torso Maid, 4 to I, also ran. llaralamb,
Jennie Reid, Calhello, William, scratched.
Good start. "MacFlecknoe led to the
three-fourths pole and fell back, all out.
Won handily by a length, nose between
second and third. Time, :16)4.
Fourth race, selling, seven furlongs;
purse, $250.
Nicholls & Bowley's b m Foul Play,
by imp. Foul Shot--Theresia, 1og
(Kelly), 3 to I .. .........
Iiedmont stable's b g Ned Dennis,
tI t (See), 7 to 2 .. . ......... . 2
Cushmlan & Vaughan's Ih in Under
growth, 107 (Powell), so to I..... 3
Courtier, to to I; July Gyp, 4 to I;
homage, 6 to 5. also ran. Pfhg scratched.
Good start. Courtier led to the last
turn. Won by a nose, two lengths be
tween second and third. Time, 1:3o!4
Fifth race, selling, six furlongs; purse,
$250.
(). P. Romigh's Is in Iigh Hoe, by
hlimyar-Jane T., 0o9 (Kelly), 8
t 5 ......... ... ................. I
II. I. Wilson's hr f imp. Mildred
Schultz, 98 (\Winslett), 8 to 5 ..... 2
W. P. Magrane's b g The Singer,
112 (Iloss), 3 to 2 . ... ........ 3
(;usto, 6 to I; Moroni, io to 1, also
ran.
.Good start. after i5 minutes' delay.
Gusto first away. High floe took the
lead at one-half and ran half length ahead
of Mildred Schultz to the stretch, where
she pulled away and won easily by two
lengths, three between second nd tlird.
lime. £:573.
Sixth race, high weight handicap, four
furlongs: purse, $400:
A. Neal's h n Ilurtle, by Ophir.I.it
tie 'Tat, 117 (l.inton), 2 to r....... t
S. Polk's ch g Charles Lamar, 120o
(Clayton), 5 to 2................. 2
llolcomb & McKenna's ch f Meteora,
I I. (Tuberville), even ........... 3
Iill Bohamson, so to I; Cushion. 30o to
I: Tony Berry, 40 to. ; I.itLmh of the
L.aw. 2 to i, also ran.
Good start. Charles Lamar first away.
Meteora led to the last turn. Won in
drive by a neck. neck between second and
third. Time, :4 14-.
but I thought something might happen to
one of 'em, and he'd get second money
anyhow, so I put him in on the long shot
chance.
"Just before the race, one of the owners
was joshing moe about my pet, and finally
he says, 'I'll bet an even hundred that he's
not one-two-three.' Before he had time
to take it back I had my hundred out and
in the hands of one of the gang standing
'round, and, of course, he had to come up,
too.
"Then the crowd began to jolly him
good and hard for making such a fool bet
for the horse was, to all appearance,
Ibonnd to come in at least third. Now
there is a case of what seems to be a dead
sure thing, and I suppose everybody here
would say the same. The fact remains
though, that I lost the iet.
"How? Why, that blamed mutt ofmine
fell in the stretch, and when I got to him
lie was dead. The 'vet,' said he'd broken
a blood vessel, and was dead before the
jockey got on his feet.
"Which goes to prove that there's no
such thing omn the racetrack-or anywhere
else, for that matter-as a 'dead sure
thing.' "
the grandstand wore overcoats and seal
skins.
Near the bleachers a fire was kindled,
where the people in attendance went be
tween innings and warmed their hands.
Denver beat the home team badly by a
score of ao to 3.
This is the coldest July weather ever ex
perienced here.
ground. Last year there were 141 entries
of whom 139 started and 513 returned com
plete cards. Travis, the present champion,
will of course be there. Others of thie
Eastern contingent will include C. H,
Seeley, C. B. McDonald, John Stillman, R.
W. Watson, Jr., Devereaux Emmett, F. S.
Douglas, F. A, Marcellus, W. H. Thomp
son and C. B. Cory.
M'Chesney Sold.
Chicago, July 7.-Sam- Hildreth has sold
his 3-year-old McChesney, by MacDuff
dam Manola Mason, to P. J. Ryan of Chi
cago for $5i,ooo.
Mr. Ryan was formerly a partner of
John Condon in the latter's racing enter
prises here, but sold out his interests to
Mr. Condon a few years ago at the re
ported price of $7o,op*. He is a leading
bookmaker here.
PREPARING FOR
THE BIG CONTEST
MAMMOTH AREA BEING ERECTED IN
'FRISCO FOR THE JEFFRIEB
FITZSIMMONS FIGHT.
San Francisco, July 8.-Ground was
broken yesterday for the erection of the
temporary arena at Fourteenth and Va
lencia streets where Champion James J.
Jeffries is to meet Bob Fitzsimmons on
July as. The San Francisco Athletic club,
which is to bring off the championship
battle, has a contractor under bonds to
complete the structure by July at. The
plans for the new arena embrace several
innovations, and the ring itself will be in
the plain sight of all who attend the fight.
There will be a seating capacity of 8,ooo,
with the usual facilities for lighting the
ring.
From Harbin Springs, where Champion
Jeffries is training, and from Skaggs'
Springs, where "Lanky Bob" is preparing
for his life's struggle, come the reports
that both pugilists are beqding to their
work with increased zeal, and that since
their momentary relaxation on the Fourth
of July have been early on the highways
for their accustomed spins and late in the
gymnasiums, where the trainers pit their
skill against the fighters.
Harry Corbett, who is now sojourning
in the neighborhood of both training
places, says he expects his brother Jim to
reach here soon. A large contingent of
sporting men is gathered at Harbin and
Skaggs' Springs. Alex Greggains, presi
dent of the club under whose auspices the
heavyweights will battle, will leave here
for both camps in a few days. He pro
poses to study the condition of both men,
and to put on the gloves with them.
Not a Fake.
Harry Baggerly, the sporting editor of
the San Francisco Bulletin, and recognized
as one of the best sporting writers in the
country, was present at the Gans-McFad
den fight, and here are his words as to
whether the fight was a fake or not. Bag
gerly says: "And as to its being a fake,
which the talent declared in unmistakable
voice that it was, it was just about such a
fake as the Ruhlin-Jeffries fight was. Big
as he was, Ruhlin was a little 5-cent toy in
his opponent's hands and McFadden was a
penny toy which Gans tossed about ad
lib." That's how much one of the great
est experts in the country thinks the fight
was a fake. It was nothing more or less
than one man outclassing the other and
because some of the spectators cried
"Fake I" the usual "wise" reporter who
cannot write up an account of a fight cov
ered his deficiency in the matter by
writing about a fake. There was nothing
in the betting, in the fighting nor the
ability of the men to warrant the same be
ing labeled as a fake.
HOW THE PITCHERS LINE UP
The averages of the pitchers of the
Pacific Northwest league, up to date, com
piled by W. W. \Valsworth, follows:
Won. I.ost. P.' Ct.
Roach, Butte........... 5 o I.ooo
Pfeister, Spokane....... o .o00oo
Hogg, Seattle ......... 8 1 .889
Thompson, Helena...... 5 2 .714
G;ay, Butte ......... ro 5 .667
Stovall, Seattle ........ I 5 .667
Wiggs, Helena .........I s .611
Engel, Portland ........ 9 6 .6oo
Slagle, Portland ........ 3 2 .6oo
Kostal, Spokane ........ 71 8 .579
Burns. Butte .......... 4 3 .57i
Hawley. Butte ......... 6 5 .545
HIickey, Seattle......... 9 8 .529
Dowling. Butte ........ .5oo
McCarthy. Tacoma..... 6 7 .642
\Vitbeck, Portland...... 6 7 .642
Russell. Spokane........ 6 7 .642
Drinkwater, Tacoma.... 4 5 .444
Johnson, Tacoma....... 3 5 .375
Mahaffey, Portland..... 3 5 .375
Carter, Seattle.......... 3 5 .375
\Vhite, Tacoma......... 4 7 .364
Partridge, Helena....... a 4 .333
Glendon, Portland. .... 2 4 .333
Salisbury, Portland..... a 6 .143
Gatch, Spokane.... o 2 .ooo
Donnelly, Butte....... o 2 .ooo
Harmon, Seattle........ o 3 .ooo
Fleming, Portland...... 0 4 .ooo
FIELD DAY.
Entries received by W. J. Adams at 828
East Galena street.
Eitries close July io, 8 p. m.
SUMMER DAYS .
Are not necessarily hot ones if you
dress in one of our delightful fancy
cheviots or flannel suits. Light in
weight, stylishly cut, perfect fitting,
and finished in the most superb style.
They will enable you to defy the most
sweltering July or August day. Prices
only a trifle more than the ready-to
wear kind.
.IRMES W. BELL
Tailor and Drape r, 50 B. B'way, Butte
Suits to Order
$15.00
And up. Year's wear or money back.
Garments called for, cleaned, pressed and
delivered.
Allen the Tallor
Phone 9098 59 W. PARK
S PORTING GOODS.
B.. cLMIvLYv
aseball, Athleti Goods ,FIsla
Tackle Fire Arms,Amiurstlm
Carl Engel, ,1., West Park
Writs for Prices
Tuesday Specials
4 baskets Pie Cherries ............ ag
a crate, 24 baskets, Preserving
Cherries ........ ........$.5o
t box Fine Ripe Peaches........goc
a large basket Apricots ............ac
Fine New California Cabbage,
solid heads, pound.............ase
That every one gets a trial of that
7Sc California Grape Vinegar,
today ....................4oc
t pound can Salmon ........toe
a gallon Amber New Orleans
Molasses ...... ........ ..6s5
t package Coffee ..............tzo
a boxes Spanish Saffron..........se
4 gallon Fancy Pickles, in glass..s5o
t gallon Extra Catsup........400
t pound jar Imported French
Mustard ....................12/x
3 quart bottle Catsup............to
L. E. COOK
331 East Park.Street
Butte. Mont. o
S Capital.......0oo,ooo.oo
G Under state supervision. Five per
o cent Interest, payable quarterly,
0 paid on deposits.
o Money to Loan on o
0 a
0 Real Estate o
F. AUG. HEINZE......Presl.ient 0
0 A. B. CLEMENTS........Cashier 0
00000000000000000OOOOOOOOOOOOOOO0000000
oooo0000ooooo00ooooooooooooooo
i STATSAVINGSBANK S
0 0
0 0
o John A. Creghton....... President 0
G. W. Stapleton.... Vice President
o T. M. Hodgeus............Cashir 0
3. O. Hodgens.... Assistant Cashier 0
0 R. B. Nuckolls.. Assistant Cashier 0
0 o
o Under state supervision ando
Sfjurisdiction. Interest paid on deo 0
O posits. 0
a Sells exchange availaete in all 0
the principal cities of the United 0
S States and Europe. Collections O
0 promptly attended to. a
o Transact general banking busiless. 0
g Directors: J. A. Creighton, Cma-.
0 ha; G. W. Stapleton. A. H. Bret,
O . D. Levitt, S. V. Kemper, T. M. o
a Ho igens, J. O. Hodgens.
0 Corner Main and Park Sts., *utte.
0 0
o00000000000000000000o0000,
0000000000000000000000000d
o 0
o The First National Bank s
o Of Butte.
8 (Established 1879.)
Capital ....... $210,09.A
o OENERAL BANKING
o 0
o Drafts drawn on all principal cities 0
8 of the World and Letters of Credit 0
o issued. 0
C ANDREW J. DAVIS.... President 0
o TAMES A. TALBOTT..Vice Pres.
o E. B. WEIRICK..........Cashier 0
o J. S. DUTTON..Assistant Cashier o
000000000000000000000000000
00000000000000000000000000
0 W. A. Clark. 3. Ross Clark. 0
O 0
W. A. CLARK & BRO.
0 BANKERS 0
0 Transact General Banklng Business
o Buy gold dust, gold bars, silver 0
bullion and local securities. Oi
0 Boxes for rent in safe deposit
0 vault. 0
8 Sell exchange available in all of
0 the principal cities of the United
0 States and Europe. O
S Special attention given to collee.
0 tlons. 0
S ALEX J. JOHNSTON i
0 Cashier. 0
oooooooo00000ooooo000000o0000oooooo00000000o
000000000000000000000000
DALY
o BANKAND TRUST
COMPANY s
0 OF BUTTE 0
o establlshed 1882 Incorporates 1901 8
o Capital.. .$100,000.00 0
o 0
o General o
o Banking Business 8
o o
5 JOHN D. RYAN........President 0
o JOHN R. TOOLE..Vice President
SC. C. SWINBORNE......Cashier
o R. A. KUNKEL.....Asn't Cashier
00000000000000000000000000
C. R. Leonard, Pros, T. R. Hinds, V-Preos
Fayette Harrington, Cashier
Silver Bow National Bank
CAPITAL, $100,000.00
This bank solicits accounts, offers prompt
and careful attention to business of cus
tomers. Collections promptly attended to
and remitted for on day of collection.
Sell foreign and domestic exchange, trans.
act a general banking business, pay in.
terest on time deposits.
Directors-Charles R. Leonard, F. Aug.
Heinse, S. Marchesseau, A. Bal.iforth,
R. A. Louis, C. W. Newton, T. R. Hinds,
John MacGinnis, Fayette Harrington,

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