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The Butte inter mountain. (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, July 23, 1902, Evening, Image 1

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THE BUTTE INTER MOUNTAIN
VOL. XXII NO. to8 WEATHER FORECAST. BUTTE, MONTANA, WEDNESDAY EVENING, JULY 23, 1902. FAIR WEATHERI PRICE FI C
FACULTY DO NOT
FANCY OUR MARY
AUTHORESS IS TURNED DOWN BY
THE POWERS THAT BE AT OLD
RADCLIFFE COLLEGE.
FEAR, SHE IS FAR TOO
"ADVANCED" FOR THEM
Her Fudges and Her Libertlism Are Too
Far Ahead of the Times for the Blue
Stocking Girls in the Famous College
-There Is Doubt Whether Mary Will
Have an Easy Time at Any Big School.
Will our Mary secure admission to Rad
cliffe? Is the bright, shining light of our
talented authoress to be diffused over the
classic precincts of that ancient school, to
enlighten, shall we say, the Gentiles, and to
be a glory of our people, Israel and other
wise, forever and ever? In other words,
can Mary make it?
Dispatches from the East are to the
effect that the learned faculty of Radcliffe
look askance at Miss MacLane; that thty
are not sure she is entitled to a place upon
their roster roll, upon which are engraved
the names of so many of America's famous
women. Not that they do not think she is
a proper young person, for against Mary,
as a maid, naught can be breathed; but
that they fear she is altogether too far
"advanced" for the limited scope of their
curriculum.
Mary Had No Doubt of It.
When Mary announced, witn a calmness
astonishing in another young lauy, that she
meant to enter Radcliffe, some who had
been to the effete East expressed doubts as
to her having an easy time in securing
admission. Radcliffe is beyond the point
where the faculty grab at anything to in
crease the attendance. There are as many
as a hundred young ladies enrolled already,
it is said, and great as would be the honor
for the school to have Mary write of it, in
some future effusion, as dear old Alma
Mater, some of the parents of the scholars
now enrolled might be inclined to doubt
the wisdom of Mary's liberal ideas securing
circulation among their daughters. If, in
the secret recesses of her heart, she cher
ishes a desire for one little peep at his
satanic majesty, she keeps the unhallowed
emotion to herself. What, then, must have
been the consternation of fond parents with
heiresses at the school to hear that the
Butte girl, the genius from the wild and
woolly West, was about to be let loose upon
their darlings, with the fudges, the liberal
ismn and the rest I No, Mary has little
chance to enter Radcliffe.
Where Is Mary to Go.
Nor Is it to be presumed that she can get
into any of the other big schools without
rigid examination. For Mary must pay
the penalty of notoriety. She has given
birth to sentiments, emotions, and ideal
not usually found in young ladies of her
age, and in turn must expect to receive dif
ferent treatment.
Mtry, the dispatches have it, hears the
rebuke with customary sang froid, and has
no doubt that Radcliffe Is the loser. Which
shall she try next? Wellesley, perhaps.
At all events, the good people of Butte may
be certain that Mary is not abashed, and
that her good opinion of herself has not
been in the least diminished by this open
slight from one of the leading educational
institutions of the land.
PARAGUAY TO SEND EXHIBIT
President of the Republic Taking an In
terest in St. Louis Exposition.
lay ASSOCIATED PRESS.]
St. Louis, July 23.-Russell Stanhope.
secretary of the committee on foreign rela
tions of the Louisiana Purchase Exposi
tion, has received a letter from J. U. Ruffin,
United States consul at Assumption, the
capital of Paraguay, South America, ap
plying for space for the Paraguayan ex
hibit.
M. Ruffin states that this is the first time
that Paraguay has taken such an interest
in a World's Fair and that the president
of the republic will soon issue a decree,
providing for the exhibit.
The executive committee of the exposl
tion has approved the recommendations to
grant a building space for the erection on
the fair grounds of the house of Hoo-Hloo.
The organization of Hoo-Hoos is known
throughout the country as being com
posed of lumbermen and it will be typical
of woodcraft. It will not contain ex
2eibits but will be formed to similate the
etter "H," and the room will be finished
iII different woods as an object lesson of
the architectural utility of wood con
struction and the art of interior finish.
Hypnotist is Arrested.
lay A.SOC'rIAE. PRESS.]
Mattoou, Ill., July 23.-Jackson D. Hill,
whom Miss Lucy Bush of this city, says
hypnotized her into eloping to Charlestor
and marrying him against her will, and
who deserted her four days later, has
been captured in Kentucky. Hill had a wife
at Delevan when he married Miss Bush
and was living with wife No, 3 when ar
rested.
International Trust Conference.
CBY /.5SOCIAIFED PRESS.,
London, July a3.-Replying to a ques
tion in the house of commons today, the
premier, A. J. Balfour, said the imperial
government was still considering its reply
to Russia's suggestion regarding an inter
anational trust conference, but it was im
possiblh, as yet, to announce Great
Britain's position on the subject.
Asked to Amend Complaint,
(8Y ASSOCIATaD PRESS,]
New York, July 23.--When the case of
J. Aspinwall Hall and others against the
United States Steel corporation came up
for lrgument before Vice-Chancellor Em
sey in Newark today, counsel for the com
ansata asked to amend their bill and
dendaeqa consequently asked time to
asNed th r answer. The case then went
ovtr to Ietber i.
WITNESS IN CASE
OF LATIMER JURY
PRIVATE DETECTIVE FIRST WITNESS
ON THE STAND BEFORE THE
CORONER'S JURY.
LATIMER HOPED TO GET
DIVORCE FROM HIS WIFE
Hired the Witness to Watch Movements
of the Woman and Suspected Man
Distrig Attorney Would Not Let in
Any Hearsay Evidence as to What the
Deceased Said Before His Death.
[IY ASSOCIAT~n PRESS.]
New York, July 33.-Harry J. Parker, an
insurance adjuster, who worked also as a
private detective, was the first witness to
day in the coroner's investigation of the
shooting of Albert C. l.atimer, in his
home in Brooklyn on the morning of July
a. Parker testified that dn May t, this
year, Latimer visited him and employed
him.
"Why did Albert C. Latimer visit you?"
asked District Attorney Clarke.
"He told me he wanted to get a divorce
from his wife for unfaithfulness with a
man whose name was given by Mr. Lati
mer as Tuthill," Parker replied.
"On May 2, of this year, I went with
Mr. Latimer to Tuthill's residence on
Vanderbilt avenue and there I was told by
Mr. Latimer that it was Tuthill's house
and I was to keep a watch on it and re
port on Tuthill's movements to him. On
May 4. I saw Tuthill go to Latimer's
house about s :3o or 6 o'clock. l.atimer
was accustomed to reach home as late as
6:3o or 7 o'clock."
Parker testified that, on one occasion,
Tuthill went to see Mrs. l.atimer at her
home and remained there until the middle
of the afternoon.
Before Parker left the stand, District
Attorney Clarke made the following state
ment :
"I have had no conversation with this
witness, but I understand he can testify
that the deceased said that in case of his
death, he would know the man who killed
him, naming two persons. This is hear
say and not admissable under the laws of
evidence. It seems to me that if this dec
laration is to be introduced now it would
be illegal, censurable and cruel. As far as
I am concerned, I do not propose asking
this man to make that declaration."
Maggie Fitzgerald. a servant employed
in a house near l.atimer's, said that, after
the shooting, she saw a man she thought
was Latimer go to a window and call for
help.
This witness testified also that about the
time the police arrived, she saw a man on
the roof of the Latimer house.
The case was given to the jury, which
brought in a verdict declaring that l.ati
mer was killed by a pistol shot wound. No
accusation against anyone was madte by
the jury.
ANNUAL MEETING
PUT-IN-BAY, OHIO
BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS
MEET AND HEAR THE REPORT
OF SECRETARY CELLARIUS.
IDY ASSOCIATED PRE`sS.]
Put-in-Bay, Ohio, July 23.-The tenth
annual meeting of the United States
League of Building and Loans, began to
day with a large attendance.
Secretary H. F. Cellarius of Cincinnati,
submitted his report, which is as follows:
A slight increase in membership with a
small decrease in the aggregate assets is
the showing made by the local building
and loan associations of the United States
during the past year. There are now in
the United States 5,302 local buliding and
loan associations with a total membership
of 1,539,593 and assets amounting to
$565,387,966. In most of the states, these
associations have about held their own, al
though the reduction of the interest rate
for the past few years has had a tendency
to bring back money loaned out by them at
higher than existing rates and associations
unable to make desirable loans have re
turned some of the idle accumulated funds
to their stockholders, causing a decrease
in their assets.
The total expense of operating the as
sociations was a little over $5,000,000,
making an expense ratio of less than m per
cent to assets. The receipts for 9oog, in
cTuding cash on hand January i, 1got, were
$395,987,216, and the disbursements, $368.
077,296; the cash on hand January I,
1902, being $27,909,920.
President Kostmay, in his address urged
the making of efforts to increase the memn
bership of the league and called attention
to the saving of $1,ooo,ooo by the exemp
tions under the war revenue act. If the
legislatures of the different states, he said,
could see the Building and Loan associa
tion in the same light as did congress, they
would be convinced of the necessity of the
exemptnon from all taxation for, in his
earnest opinion, he could see no reason
why the building and loan association
should pay taxes In any way, shape or
form.
Fashionable Wedding in London.
ray ASSOCIATED PRESS.]
London, July 33.-There was a fash
ionable gathering at St. George's church
this afternoon to witness the marriage of
Maj. Charles Hall, of the Oxfordshire
light Infantry, to Mrs. C. Albert Stevens,
wife of the late C. Albert Stevens; of
New York. Joseph Choate, the United
States ambassador, gave the bride away,
FITZ AMD BOB THE HIEROES OF THE HOUR.
4 "
forgittin' us notables.
Our Mary-Damn, damn, damnr
Mr. Tracy-T'anks, awfully' me Aoidy.
The Fat Boy-Gee, I wish I could swear like dat !
CUDIHEE IS OFF ON A STILL HUNT
FOR TRACY WHO HAS DISAPPEARED
CUDIEE I OFFON ASTIL HUN
FOR~~ TRC H HSDS·PAE
[SPECIAL TO INTER MOINTAIN.1
Seattle, Wash., July 23.-Since Tracy's
disappearance last Thursday, not one word
has been received as to his whereabouts.
Sheriff Cudihee has left Seattle without
saying a word as to his destination, and it
is presumed that he is on a still hunt.
Cudihec went alone last Monday night.
Search for Tracy has been formally aban
doned. The few remaining members of
the various posses scattered over the coun
try are straggling in. Excitement, a week
ago at fever heat, is now allayed', and the
community has sunk back into its former
sense of security.
It is generally believed that Tracy has
left this part of the earth for good, and
few think he will ever return. Ilis ex
ploits are now only a memory, so fast does
the hour-glass run, and unless the redoubt
able bandit should bob up serenely and pop
over an officer or two, it is likely that he
will pass entirely out of the minds of the
men who for three weeks have been breath
ing his name in awe.
Ils long fight against overwhelming
odds, his awful ferocity and unquenchable
hatred of the officers of the law will
become fireside legends, to be whispered in
front of the glowing log when the winter
winds are whistling and the snow is sifting,
sifting down the huge chimney. Tracy is
a memory. There is nothing left to tell,
and, as is usual in such cases, comparisons
are now the order of the day.
Compared With Younger Brothers.
J. B. Quinn, now practicing law in
Seattle, was municipal judge of the town
of Fairibhult, Minn., when the three
Younger brothers-Cole, Jim and Bob
were captured after the raid on the bank
of Northfield, and it was he who committed
them for trial. The chase for Ilarry Tracy
REGULAR ROUTINE
OF THE PRESIDENT
SEVERAL NOTABLES DINE WITH THE
ROOSEVELT FAMILY AT THEIR
SUMMER HOME,
[BY ASSOCIAtED PRESS.]
Oyster Bay, N. Y., July 23.-The presi
dent entertained at luncheon today l'resi
dent Schurman of Cornell university,
President Butler of Columbia university
and Capt. Norton A. Goddard of New
York, who long has been identified with
the president in New York.
President Schurnman is passing the sum.
mer at his country home near here and
came to spend the day with the presi
dent.
President Roosevelt today received T.
B. Maddis, secretary and general agent
of the City municipal association of Phila
delphia, who called to enter a complaint
on behalf of the association against Wil
liam McCoach, collector of internal rev
enue, First district of Pennsylvania, who
it is stated, also holds a city office. No
action upon the case was taken.
'Ihe papers in the court-martial ease
of Maj. Edward F. Glenn of the Fifth
infantry, tried for cruelty to the Fili
pinos, have been received by the presi
dent from the war department. He is
final review authority. It was not an
nounced whether he will make his in
dorsement on the papers or not.
Captain C. J. McConnell, chief engin
eer, U. S. N. (retired), who was fleet
engineer of the flagship New York dur
ing the Spanish-American war, talked
briefly with the president tody 'on
teehnical questions relatits to the proposed
isthmian canal.
bri~gs to the mind of Judge Quinn the in
cidents of the hunt for the outlaws at that
time, and he says the pursuit of the Young
er, was attended with altogether less dilli
culties than in the hunt for Tracy, for the
reason that there were six men in the
Younger party, and they had to travel
through an open country.
"'here were eight men in the party that
rose into ithe little town of Norfield that
bea, iful fall day. Four of the roblbrs
wer t. to the bank, two of them entering,
thl other two remaining outside on guard.
hce other four members of the band rode
aro.lnd the streets shooting into windows,
terrorizing the people. Cashier Hayward
stubbornly refused to open the vaults and
Ch.tliry Pitts shot him dead. lie also
wounded Hunker, a clerk, as he was trying
to ~get away.
Robbers Took Fright.
From a hardware store across the street,
Clhll Miller, another member of the band,
was killed, and Bill Chadwick was killed
b ya shot from a hotel window. The ro-l
bers took fright at the stubborn resistance
of the people and made for their horses,
p.trured by Soo men, nearly all of whom
were armed. Nearly all of the desperadoes
wt.re wounded. lBob Younger the most
sllanosly. His arm was broken, and it was
wide seeking relief for him, weeks after
ward, that information was gained that
ultimately led to the capture of the Young
err
'I hree of the horses were killed, which
left the robbers with one horse short. (ole
Younger lifted Bob on in front of him and
rot. away with the rest of the band. After
riuning about a mile and a half, the rob
ber, captured a horse from a farmer plow
ing in a field and put Bob on it. They en
tarrd a strip of timber and for mc days
Sheriff Barton and 30o deputies could not
t a trace of them. The horses were
und, however, nearly starved to death,
IHACY EATS MEAL
i AT LOGGING CAMP
SPERADO IS NOT WOUNDED AND
STILL HAS PLENTY OF AMMU
NITION AND HIS GUN.
1, i' AbbO' IA'r:ED i, Essj
Ticorna, Wash., July s3.---Tracy, the
ilhw, appeared at Miller's logging campl,,
ftr miles from Kanaskata, yesterday and
, dinner. When asked why he did not
4ke advantage of the lull and escape from
r, un river valley, Tracy said:
I " have some business to settle with
)derrill's brother. I understand that the
brother wants to see Ime."
Tracy is not wounded, and looks fresh
jnd rested. lie is wearing a derby hat, but
had a slouch hat in his pocket.
hIh still has his Winchester and two re
volvers and a good supply of anununi
Scorpion Goes Aground.
F[s ASSocIATELD rsess.]
Newport, R. I., July 23.-The gunboat
Scorpion went agraundl in the upper har
bor today.
Many Persona Are Drowned.
[IIn AY(s(O.IAED, PsRES,]
hamburg, July 23.-It is now announced
mat toy persons were drowned by the
nki:n;, lMoniday morning, of the steam
ti ri Ii:: o; this port, after a collision
the i lvcr Elbe with the tug Hansa.
bhowillg that the robers had aband-ine.lI
themn solle timne presvioulsly.
Pursuit Was Abandoned.
The pursuit was fiially Ialtd,.ndl. but
a short timne aftcrward the three Yonnigt,A
and Pitts showed up at the hocul ,, a
farmer tl have Bob ou'ngIer' wItin it
tended to. Cole and hoh Y luInger at,o
lutely refutsed to leave Iloh, land lthe two
unlknown memllllers of the pillty, -' ulpllst l
to libe tht James bys, parldt (Ico tjrpuy
with themln. A Scandiiaviar boy sicoglli.rled
the party as soonl as they eiiteredi tlhe
house andl sneakedl out of tIhe balk Ii,.
Mounting a horse, Ihe boy rode to Midacli:e
anlld nottied Sheriff G;lilspin.
The bandits Iecame ll splliciolls i Ithe
absence of the boy and retrea;ted to ,
cliump of willows, about half ia wile Ironl
the house. Ihere they were surroutlll Iby
the slieriff and posse, who Iegan inu di
ately to pour a murderous lire inito thlt
w;llows. Pitts way killed at alst lihe
first fire, and the three Younger Iboy wire
severely wounded. Jimn Younger was shio.
through the plate, aiid for a Ilong lime his
life was despaired of. Finally a rush was
mllade by the posse, and Ithe thre Ytlllnl'lrs
threw up their hands in tu of sullrrlller,
standing over the dead hI. of, I'ils.
Brothers Pleaon Cilty.
The Youngers pleaded guilty to Imlurder
in the first degree, aii escapelld.l I wilh ia
senltein of iillprisonillla t for life, Ilecliuse
the legislaturi of Milnnesot, at the prI -
vious session, had abolllish d capital pun
ishmenllt. The next sesslonI of thc legisla
tore, however, restoredI he old law. 111oi
Yotlngr lied in the plet,.loiliary, aiid ('ole
anid Jimll are Ilow olt Ol parole, thouIgh they
are not allowed to leave the stale.
lIut the Younger Blrothers, dlespite their
long career, cost the aluthorities in Tien
and blood, far less th;an this Pacific Coast
deslperado. Few realize what it run T'racy
has made for it.
LARGE SUMS BEING
DONATED STRIKERS
FIFTY THOUSAND DOLLARS AMOUNT
OF ONE CHECK SENT ANTHRA
CITE COAL WORKERS.
tIIY ASO(1 IA-I: I',D 1SS.l
lindianalpolis, July 1.1. Secretary tWilson
of thle Ilnited Mille Workers tollday recivel
a check for $5o,o000 from thhe strike fund
of the Illinois organization. 'Ihe Illiinois
illiners have witlhin four weeks given the
natiollal organizationll $l0,ooo for strike
funds and still have nearly $5olo,0Io ill re
serve. This donillation, it is said, is tile
largest ever received for a strike.
Wilson has received notice froll illdi
vidlals of chec'ks for as lmuch as $1,oo0
that are now onl their way to headquarters,
indicating that the appeal to the public for
funds has beei effective.
Secretary Wilson says no attallipt will
be Ilmade to pay the anthracite strikers
stipulated sums of money weekly.
"Our intenition," said he, "is not to pay
regular benefits, but merely to take care
of the strikers and their families."
It is believed that the miners will not
attempt to keep the bituminous coal out
of the anthracite market, except as a last
resort.
Communted His Sentence.
(aY ASSOCIATED PRESS.]
Washington, July 23.--President Roose
velt has commuted to dishonorable dis
charge and il years' imprisonment the
death sentence of Private Guy Stevenson,
Troop M, Ninth cavalry. He was con
victed by court-martial In Samar, Phil
Ippine islands, of rape.
MAi ONiC LIVED
FERGUS FALLS
DENI I OF LITTLE MINNESOTA
HA T WELL REMEMBER OUP
AUTHORESS AS A CHILD.
KNEW HER. FATHER AS
"FLATBOAT MACLANE"
He Was Associated With James J. Hill
and Was Accounted a Luadmlu Ctizen
of the Little BuOtling Town--Mary
Want to School There but Failed tO
Evince Evidences of Future Grandeuur.
[Y CrIAlI rtiO INriN Aii'NI lAIN.J
Feryu Fiall, Minn., July :rT,. iep 'o
of tills lity are ta;kinkl a .'u ,h.ldi of
interest iii Mary Ala it.tlc, the Maite
hi ve nltci1111 he $15.,11 ill ,I .c.Ih i. h. celllCc
ilt publicall. 'I l ;aIh,bll t\wo\ 11ltllh iloa:l).
NMils Mtac aII hi Ine l t li hfllhctl here,
anid her tImiily was fir %,,ls Iil, ,,I Ih
most lprominenti.l ill thii ,|i . I ,iah.,lst
Mftcl.anelc. is her I.,lthei wI.s 111 ~hI, Ilacs
on1 of tihe.l C tughi i l l id. ely lh.llo II.lt of
poneer Ilimi , c;1c1 iw ned ae te i.Iu t iet c.
bloalt which li.ed the Re.I d li4.i a11 i mIile
Fort II;rry thl.ir hI ; ii.llua; tei s ll int- h lay`l
whenl J;ai. c IJ. Hill wc~., I. kin.11 allt.r i hl.e
river I, lillh 'h1111 11i llctlly' lll. l.i I.-g l
roads. in the ,;ll ii l ii l. lly.
M r. NIa ll lc ll ' ih its ti. iii tle.l l ;iI, fir it;
this city aid s;uirll a ao y c hl. Ilc Ilotlur
that was ever m)inlc. ll l ,i I h .,III , I nlclIng
1ip h11how h .e rItp,l,i jillI n , I, 1 tIJwII.
W i itl i t i 111/el 1i Iiiiii nIII i ./1... ii cd
thie advrllllt iof tLh ll ailracl. th' Ilillat
hu~i, hI I. I . Il alihln.,I. d C i l llll n Mr.
t1 ,. 4 e11v;11l ad lhllt nI,, whfich .411, h'e.u his
iunle. ;t l ii 6 ili a liIn. l i4k Il ,4 ti i.n , 11 i.
I ihit-,l ly .,l,(iniiiIs lin. d., ll tlcc. lway;il y
Founiid I n ri I .4Ilc Slow.
II ll I lI till l I Il ii ;li hlt all tl.lihi h lf lll.
cinnuili il. y, %111 o1 evi c111 i, l 11 111i ( c'l , h illt
shin k riichhiin; therl I IT. 'cccii. led
I1 .iliii iiiiu fl level ill tic ii\ 'i , t :ii. Cl Il h ille,
I II I d1 1 , l a l n .le i n nml .n h. 1 l y a l l , l h <. a r -
r i v a l . ll i , w i h . I n l ,,p l I I, 1 . lto, I t
f uiiti ti, look cfter hi ini ti " I. ii the \\1c. e
anti li ll y II I;l 11 a ' nl I h . il 1 h,,t ;till
111cite. toi that 11' ii iiIs hLcl fv1cly .t tI tw r
chihiire Il, tihe yo ei it If whiio /1is wa , ,y
I111 seciii l ieI or l1s hir ' show thlai the .
children were Ihcight .iuleitci , it Ilithose
who Wt l wi -i ;ell . st.ainl edl ;:ilih th I.icnely
art noil ct . It titll cclillI that i. i , II llcit
tllolil lShoiw t.lendetlic l, , it, i e, IIo aiy
the lecst, pectialci.
POLAND'S GRIEF OVER, THE
GREAT CARDINAL'S DEATH
Many Telegrams aind Letters of lhe.ret
Rleceived--Advocated Polish In
dependence.
i li l A ,li I IAI, Ill t I u'l i9 I the
R oII,1 . Jiuly -! I h I ei u ai ii, o f ('i ar
dli ial sl .('eho w sk l, w lho d i dl hei , yeter
Idty, .ell.l il d in - I ht I t i, mii r iil ill
tih t hapelll e Artl Ill l lt alaltl a II the
piqI lil ,; llidin whele they wt'11. ull" ,i.'lll ly
Deaiith of Mry . Macill y Will Notf Interfered
o With li. th Caryin // Out i of Plan. ,
wlel're It pl' in of llt 1 rAlll. i a ull, . .,1;1idl
il tro llwd td with peii pleh, lIt ii l lin;i liiay
AI ll. i a i r p il , il , e ig IIo ol bt.lil t di ilti
.od ey tlrt ;1 ll i le , 4.I i "ni f r f l - l'ei ire
p lo uilrin l in fro ni a;ll q u 11rt 1Ri l. I'h g rie f
of I'llanid, C ardinal I.e,,eh low ski', iative
coutrr y, arlntl ut s to :,ii11lntu I is cilltion l iilted.
oon.tratio, tl Ihe r citral hly -lu having hnad
vprsiolla (l iio i ligrata i ii:iitirl ia y wer toldly
itn accnlllt of htr is ilvu ity i1 P rtrish to wok
pendenhe.
WILL MAKE NO, DIFFERENCE
Death of Mr. Mackay Will Not Interfere
With the Carrying Out of Plans.
Killod by Her Grandson.
liln A SO, IAI-I tA l t 1l1:s., ]
VaIlludo, Jagly 64, one orthe Iwe. l rd, the
viert president ;itl Wgiiinl oaf Iiluuaer waith
nlast lrcil Cabidle nally hoy, w.as a stkl to
day what aspect hgr sllt, h Vo John MIackay
wolged have ioll lved hllt a llort tihle. Tcol
panV. lIF repliedl :
"I do not know who will -uceed Mr.
Mackay as presidnt. grief that is e htirel atn
te hinds of th d oard. You an sa, howiide.
'--a-.-------
ever, that thFire will Ane nap hali. of polic
llT: progrrsi, of iC rolitiny a i partic
ularly Mr. Mt 'kay'i plan will i.- fire thfully
carriel olit. The conlllr ,s fur th, I'acifig
caleornin destroyci let e build t ng, incsud
will proceed prreci'.ey as thnill Mr.
Mackaying t. Marth hin ad ot occuhrred," church
Progress of Tailors' Strike.
New York, July -.;.---lt wits reported
oday tht omlarge ge4,0r or 5, of E h Jewelo,
Molt garment strikers had gonl to work
after a settlement, but thil is conitrallicted.
The ililuf[u turers said they hall offered
coniracts to the central borly, which had
anll causcped asle satisfaclory, but that the
work.e h vtlrel t retlrlle ald tht at the
vari ls ulioli headlltuartlers they were told
that thacadem strikrs would ot return to work
buctilet briweek.
Killed by Her Grandson.
bily AsSOCtiATre iRItnss,]
Paducah, Ky., July 23.--Mrs. Sol. C.
Vaughn, aged 64, one of the wealthiest and
most prominent womieln of Paducah, was
last night accidentally shot with a small
rifle by her grandson, Vaughn Dabney,
aged i,, and lived but a short time. The
boy was so crazed from grief that he at
tempted suicide.
Fire at Annapolis.
[IY ASsOCzIATD PRass.]
Annapolis, Md., July 23;.-A fire this
morning destroyed nine buildings, includ
ing St. Martin's German Lutheran church
and the large general store of E. J. Jewell
and caused a loss esthnated at $5o,ooo.
Two hundred marine guards from the
naval academy did effective work as -
bucket brigade.

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