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The Butte inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, August 15, 1902, Evening, Image 1

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STHE_ BUTTE INTER MOUNTAIN_
VOL. XXII NO. 127 WEATHER FORECASTr ' BUTTE MONTANA, FRIDAY EVENING, AUGUST I5, zgos. FAIR-COOLER. PRICE FIVE CENTS
CONOUERING HEROES
RETURN IN GAY
SPIRITS
Montana Elks Are Met at De
pot by Immense Crowd and
Taken Up Town.
SPECIAL CARS PROVIDEb
FOR THE PRIZE WIlNNIERS
Band Did Not Sulk at Final Contest, but
Thought It Useless to Contend, as
They Had Done Their Best at First
Trial-What Salt Lake Folk Think of
the Treasure State Delegation.
When the Elks reached the Oregon Short
Line depot this afternoon they found a
warm welcome awalttng them. Manager
Wharton had four special cars in readiness
and in one which was superbly decorated,
the Boston & Montana band was asked to
ride in triumph to the city.
Of course, the first question was: "How
did you come to take second money at the
band contest ?"
"After the first contest It was a hundred
to one shot that we had won," said one of
the Elks. "Those who had an opportunity
of witnessing the immense crowd that
gathered at Liberty park to hear the great
bands of the West compete will never for
get it. Rarely in a man's life does he get
an opportunity to listen to such a contest.
"Salt Lake people place great confidence
in the ability of the three men who com
posed the adjudicating committee. They
were Ellis Brooks, Anton Pederson and J.
J. McClellan. Professor McClellan is one
of the finest organists in the United States
and at the exercises in the tabernacle he
delighted the immense audience with his
performance.
Thought They Had It.
"There was a general impression that
two members of the commuittee stood for
giving the Boston & Montana band the
prize at the end of the first contest, and
in counting the marks on which the con
test was decided, it was thought that our
band had won hands down. There was
hardly a question of their superiority
among the great audience. They con
cluded that we had won, and not even the
ardent supporters of the Denver band
would maintain after the trial that they
had a show for the money.
"There was no such thing as sulkiness
on the part of the band management when
it was decided to refuse to enter a second
time. It was considered the best thing to
do under the circumstances, as Sam Tre
loar and all who heard his band believed
that there was sufficient opportunity to de
cide on the first trial.
"Incidentally I might mention that we
got $i,ooo for the best appearance in the
parade. Never was money more easily
earned or more readily spent. Just ask
John Kirk, he can tell you how it went
and how we had several thousand dollars'
worth of fun out of it."
Notwithstanding the strenuous experi
ences which the Elk uniforms had they
looked gay and nice on their return.
"If I could only get paid for wearing
good clothes like this all the time I'd be
satisfied," said Alderman Bacheler.
"Some of us old ducks felt so years
younger when we marched along and heard
pretty girls cheer us on the line of march.
There is much celebration still going on in
the city as the Elks from other parts of
the state are being entertained by the
Butte brethren."
At 3:40 this afternoon the Elks' special
pulled into the Oregon Short Line depot.
Not less than :,ooo people had gathered
to greet the antlered herd returning. They
came up town in a hurrahing procession,
AFTER THE B ALL 18 OVER.
V - , • , (Picture by In ter Mountain.)
A6MWIR'TIO IS IN EVERY FMlj.
(Picture by Inter Mountain.)
, tis Is How Montana Elks' Faces Lit Up When They Saw the Boston & Montana Band Step Out to Capture the Big Prize.
There Were Miles of Delighted Faces, Duplioates of the Above.
44~
rs
and at 4:so when the head of the proces
sion arrived on Main there was a ring
ing welcome for the jolly crowd that cov
ered themselves with glory at the "City
of the Saints."
The reception committee was armed with
new brooms tied with purple ribbons.
HOW MONTANA BAND CAME
TO GIVE UP IN CONTEST
[Special to Inter Mountain.]
Salt l.ake, August s5.-Santriano's band
of Denver won first prize in the final band
competition yesterday without opposition,
the Boston & Montana band having with
drawn from the contest. The Butte band
claimed that the prize should go to them
on account of their superior markings in
the finals at Liberty park, Wednesday
evening, when the judges gave them a
score of t68 to Denver's t55.
The Montanans co:tl.tleded that the
"T'alnhauser o(vcrture alone should de
termine the award without reference to the
preliminary colltests. 'I he result was a
withdrawal at the last mlounent before
playing oft the tie at Saltair late in the
afternoon.
The circular upon which the .Montana
boys based t..eir argument was wid,'ly dis
tributed at the contests, and read inl part
as follows: "It is the intention, in the
first adjudication,. to eliminate approxi
mately one-hal fof the competing bands,
so much depends upon the first selection.
The remaining one-half of the bands will
compete in the second preliminary."
"The wording of the circular is per
fectly obvious on this point," said Band
master Samuel II. Treloar. "\When we
entered the preliminary contest we decided
it was only necessary to play well enough
to qualify for the finals of which we felt
confident. If we had known that the
marks were being saved up to count in
the grand total we might have been far
more careful in the selection of tile first
number and in the manner of rendering
it."
"The test piece for all lanlds in the final
competition is Tannhauser Overture by
Wagner. Should there be a tie in the
points made, or should the adjudicators be
unable to award the prizes, the bands tied
will be required to play hTrec Dances from
music to 'Henry VIII.' by German."
(Continued on Page Four.)
WILD AUTOMOBILE
ESCAPES CHAUFFEUR
MR. AND MRS. CHARLES FAIR KILLED
IN ACCIDENT NEAR PARIS
RELATIVES PROSTRATED.
liY ASSOCIAIEu I'rss.]
1 Paris, August 15.--Charles Fair and
a wife were killed in a runaway autoumobile
a accident yesterday afternoon.
Y The accident occurred at -:3o
o'clock, allniost ill front of the Chateau
a lluissoll du Mai. The Fairs intended to
dine and spend the night in Paris and re
e turn to T'rouville for lunch tomorrow. The
wife of the gate keper of the chateau was
e the only witness to t the disaster. Sihe says
a she noticed a big red automlllUile tmlllilng
e along the road at a tritnienldous piace. Sud
e denly something happened and the heavy
machine slid sidewise fronti the rihtli to
a the left side of the road for llout (Io yards.
When the automobile turned over the
t wife of the gate keeper says she saw Mr.
e and Mrs. Fair thrown high in the air and
fall with a heavy thud to' the grounlld. The
t, chautfer, lwho was hitting behind the Fairs,
i. was precipitated intio a ditch. lie stagcured
1I to his feet calling for help. 'I le ,pale
keeper's wife rushed to Irhis assistancie and
aided hit in extricating Mr. iiid Mrs.
Fair, who were buried enlleiat It the
e wrecked ilmachine and in the Inast throes of
l death. Iloth had sustiainiid glhastly iil
h juries and were albmo t unrecogni i.attle.
t Mr. iFair's heiad had been crushed in while
C his wife's skull was split.
Mrs. Ileriiani (elricli. eldler sister of
r (harles Fair, was-.cut driving when the
t news reached her that her birother and his
B wife had wbeen killed in all tiiaunto ile ac
cident in France, says a IIherahl sipecial
I from Newport. I. I.. where the ' thlt ichs
Y are splending the sunitt.er.
( On her return to it .os ('lift, iher sulln
t ier home, Mrs. (tlriclths foundl a cable
Smessage fromii Palris. ;uiuncl.ilg the deailth
Sof her brother and his wife. This she
answered, givingt instriuctions t o have the
lbodlies emblllll d and .t to New York at
once.
RIOTERS RELEASED
ON A LARGE BOND
JOHN T. LANAHAN FURNISHLS TEN
THOUSAND DOLLARS FOR THE
RELEASE OF DEPUTIES.
lit As. oI AI II I'tn I SS.]
WVilkestarre, Aiugust s . -The dieptuies
anid etployeies of the \i'arnitck is 1 usiry at
Duryea, whit were a.trre.std )ester(.ly after
toon chlarged with rietlin and co. uiiliitedi
to jail in default of $t.o.i bhail t. ;h, were
given a hearing ill ciourt today andil re'
leased uponi fturnihiiug a ndl ofi $.1.i.0oo
for the entire party. John T. I.liahanl,
counsel for the prisoners, furli .llhd the
bond. llnmediately after their release the
deputies left for Duryea where, it is sa;!ild,
they will go on duty again.
SCENE OF RIOT QUIET
AS A COUNTRY VILLAGE
Plenty of Protection for Warnecke Wash
ery but No Employes to Go to Work
-More Trouble Brewing.
[Y' ASSOIATr,. I'IRaSs.J
Wilkesbarre, Pa., August 15.-Duryea,
the scene of yesterday's riot, was as quiet
as a country village today. Sheriff Jacobs
told the owners of the Warneck washery
that if they wished to start up their works
he would see that their employes got am
pie protection. But there were no em
ployee to go to work.
Nearly all the men who worked yester
day were arrested and sent to jail by the
local authorities.
Sheriff Jaeobs believes there will be
more trouble at the washery but says he
will have a force of deputies on hand sib
clent to preserve the peace.
FAIRS' DEATH A
LOSS TO 'FRISCO
CALIFORNIA MILLIONAIRE CONTEM
PLATED EXTENSIVE IMPROVE
MENTS ON HIS PROPERTY.
Inv Ass-t llIA lEIc PItl SS.]
FaIl Iiancisco, August iS.--The terri
blI. and sudden death of (Charles Fair and
hie wile. by the coll.apise of their lauto
inl l,-ile Ine ;r 1Evcrelaux, France, ylsterdl;y
lI eelsN a greait loss to San Francisco.
Just before his delparllture for Europe ill
M.y, Mr. lair had eomphlcted arrange
ni Its for $5,inoi,ee inmlprovementrec s to the
lF;ir peopecity in this city, and it was in
tendcd on his return fromnt hi journecy in
I. ;'op" to signc coneftracts for the work In
lhe mat!er tf the ,,state, of the dend
lle iioniire and his wife has created some
I,. I .t pec' clctlli ln as tIo whatl will he'oUc'
o herbes FIair's hohlings.
Made Separate Wills.
It is kinown that aI very shorlt time ago
it Ih M,. and Mrs. Fair made wills dlispros
iine t their separate hohlings ,.d tom
lillunity properlty, bil just what t1he dlii -
, is e, elifain c.nniot le' asccrtcained at
this time. Mrs. Fair wae possessed of
pjetItt y to the value of $,150,oeo and it
is und:elr.tood that her Hill leitlceaths her
l, lili.j .s teo rel:atives in New Jersey, ibut
Ill I'the eventl of evidenc.e lrilng adduced
Ih. i Iltrls F'ir suetem'el dil to his In
jt.si , s l t. M.I,. I air', interest ill the tum
il.iity propertl y . ill ctcurally crevert to
he, r beirs, and it is on lhis point lhatl tlhe
dli.pesilitr i if the meillionaeire's (estate
int 5etly hangs.
Wait for Proof of Death.
,t hlei Ieee known that ;it at l eh hoIur
"I efic hl the Ipuhlic admiistrator applied'
fer lttiei s l of iadninistr;cti il the, (c statlle
o ( l;rl:, Fair ae l his wife. Judcle Cr
t I i ok hais not. as yt, granted the' ap
it, io.t n oi the pubic adel i d inistrator, pre '
t r-.ilg to d l:.iy mi; tters until iproof of
de,.ih htas lecn re'ceived in this city, lThis
I ::-y will give the lFair Iattorneys time
t'. Ire pre(' papee s counter'ing the plea of
Ilt public administratiI ; ,r. '[lThe 'l( i tt r %sill
Cc. i iln l tp for litearileg ill j d.,ae' I'oIok's ceourt
,ANTHRACITE COAL GOES UP
Iidianapolis Has Harcly a Thousand
Tons With WhIerh to Supply Trade.
I S 'ci,,; tlis , Augi te- I. Th' e rice of
ioll iaritIe uo 11 hars j euipedi toe $, iin in
e'i ienit.ili hs. t he piire was ixed the first
of it. i .ltl t ;, $;.5c a li bfy ithe Coal
.I h and h tas ee lhI atl thiai fIte igure,
I-clt iw .t of Ol- d. a t; rs have v ch lld a their
,I - I oal and iilt ' .pply is inl the handl
C,. , ti'. It is e('tie i e t'l hete there. are
1 t r sal e.
SISTERS WANT TO
COME TO AMERICA
EXPELLED FROM FRANC "HEY AP
PLY FOR PERMISSION TC SETTLE
IN THE UNIT ED STATES.
Ies .AssCrlIAI Ec u-.isc I
Ioeiic, August j5.- Memibers of religious
-rders expelled from France, particularly
sisters, are applying to the vatican authori
ties for permission to settle in the United
Setates. Several of themc have cocme to
Rdone personally for thle purpose of urging
their requests. A reply has been sent to
them pointing out that there are no vacan
dces in the United States and, calling at
tenion to the difficulty arising from the
fact that the expelled sisters do not speak
the English language.
Canada has been suggested as a better
field as sisters are comparatively scarce
there and because French Is spoken In a
large part of the dominion. The appli
cants, however, did not take kindly to the
suggestion and persist in their request to
go to the United States.
DAVE MEANT IO 00
A MORMON STUNT
80 HE GATHERED UP HIS SHLKELS
AND HIS WHISKY AND W:NI
OUT TO THE FARM.
A PAI-R OF LOVELY GIRLS
DAVE THERE GATHERS IN
But Alasl They Mean Only to Do the
Poor Blind Organist Who FiTds Itow
Ficklo Is Woman, Espe .illy in Her
Cups-Now Dave Is Out $2.00 and
Twenty Bottles of Wlisky.
Poor blind Date Cotghl.m. I
hear thlt sit l y lI hit., tonb <. !
Pity the rsoit' ts of this poI" i. mInt !
Last witnter hi. w .L ,., nnlil'., p;,llp r
at the poor I.'n I
Last month lie wds sit it] by) a, sltt I
car I
Last week hii took $. aid .i 1hot
ties of whisky out o the poor iant !
women who pledg 1d tit Ilil 1)1111t 11t 111h,
Last Ilirlt lii list Iht, last ifi ll. Itt iw
left their heds anti hIund at thl , poor
farin and Ifollowed him wilh hI $:ot ,,t 1
his 2o bottlles of whisky bark to hi , happy
ill jail wilih s.likes in he.r h iu ts,: Ihe'
hotme.
The story of the lithti ,1do slha;e, love
andI Iotl, victory amI I dilcal t It this por
blind mtnaitcant wiould t intI . I .ar, io the
eyes of the mIist obdle;rae rrIowI.lihe thati
ever ta.ked in Ih I.tillhtltih on the Itanks
of the Nile.
To"tuchd wihh pity at his apparently help
less t'oln ition ; his l1.,,< of "that s tilel n I~tll
(Contintud on Iate Seven I
STRANGE INCREASE
PUZZLING DOCTORS
PERCENTAGE OF INSANE CA!,I S A
NEW YORK HObPITALS LAFIGLfI
THAN IT HAS EVER B1EN.
lif A -t' JAIt o S itt. I
New i Ek, 'A\ nst, is . In it tLt t tire
days, 34 IIs'I.s s ll fillt ti mm i ut t;l
d]'anngel at It, weer ,olhliln d to I hr Ihp i tI
vile hospital ins.n; pailion, '1 I.he I' a;t
daily :ot: tags is less than Rhase. Ih,"
Iphysii;cian ;art' IIIlable I) .t l acrlu lt l Jo i Ih,
increase. I hey say tihat .So far thbis
sunlllnlir h lte i. has betl o llweatheltr hlt
enough to rt Ind the avwrag.. abae the 111,1
111:1l point. "lhuy also Stre pIu ned by ithe
fact that at of the 1 patienlts aret wswto II
and the furIthr fa(t that few of Illse
admitted are coholic patin.t.l s.
On Tutistlay ithe tlrst sigins of the in
crst werte iitnifer-. Smie of lthe pler
sons rec'iv wei.s takein from polith
Cturlts. A few were t t tilled l thll ir ,wn
volition and i h rs were admitted tn per
nits issutedl by Ilte suittperintendienit ofl tihe
( it-door poor. It is a t ret'arkallh fait
that thu Ill' aj rity of the pa:tients aire tit
usually violr 't and the attendants hlsve
had practically no r',t for three monthil s.
Philippine Reunion Adjourns.
Cont il Iltluffs, iwa. Ativttst 15. 'To
day wats tIh la. tl daty of the retution of the
Army of the ilt'hilipplines stociety and aftier
a short I.tisints meeiting thei veteranst
were entertained with iexcursions auil
sight seeing.
EL PASO LODGE MEMBERS
(Picture by In ter Mountain.)
SMOTHERS TO DEATH
IN SLUM BIN Al
NEW WORKS
Workman Engaged in Push
ing Down7 Conccntrates Is
Swept by Falling Mazs.
SLOWLY SINKS WH;LE HIS
HELPLESS IMATES LO~OK OM
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