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The Butte inter mountain. (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, September 13, 1902, Evening, Image 1

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VOL XXII NO. WEATHER . BUTTE, MONTANA, SATURDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 3,OU2. WEATHER-AI . PRICE FIVE CENTSN
VOL XXII NO. 15o WEATHER P0RECA~T. BUTTE, MONTANA, SATURDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 13, 1902. 'WEATHER-FAIR, WARMER. PRICE FIVE CENTS
SKIES ARE OBSCUREU
BY CLOUDS OF
SMOKE
Red Forked Tongues of Flame
.Dart Up and Threaten the
Heavens Themselves.
LURID GLARE LIGHTS UP
THE COUNTRY FOR MILES
While Under the Fiery Vault the People
Flee, Homeless, and Often Leaving
Their Dead Behind-Forest Fires in
Washington and Oregon Destroy Mil
lions of Dollars Worth of Property.
and Loss of Life Is Fearful.
[IY .SvOCIA'rETI IRFss.]
Portland, ()re., Sept. t..-The result of
forest fires which are raging in this vicin
ity may be summned up substantially as
follows, up to the present time.
Tillamook City has been saved front im
pending doom by a timely change in the
wind.
The forests in Douglas and Jackson
counties are on fire, but the damage yet is
small.
Superintendent Ormnsby of the Cascade
forest reserve says that no fire has yet
entered the reserve.
Fifty people in the town of Spring
water, Clackamas county, were force I to
flee for their lives and were rendered
homeless, and a fine timber Ielt was de
stroyed.
Bridges were attacked and residents
threatened inl South Portland.
The sawmill of the Bridal Veil Lumtber
ing company and the whole town of
Palnter, situated 20 miles fromt Bridal
Veil. in this county, have been destroyed.
The damage in Eastern Muhnonmah county
amounts to $42.5o00 and every family has
been fighting the fire since Monday.
Several families have hbeen burned out
on the section line road.
Three dwellings and the county bridge
are gone in Pleasant valley.
Flames surrounded the dwelling of a
resident of Rockwood and are racing west
along the base line road.
To protect the town of Gresham, men
stand guard night and day. Fully moo
tmen are at work to save property in the
dangerous heat.
At Pleasant Ilotme a sawmill was de
stroyed and four others were in danger.
Fire Companies Are Out.
Fire companies were called out to
Irvington. The residents of that part of
the land were on duty from 2 o'clock
yesterday morning.
Valuable timber has been destroyed near
Coburg, Withoil Springs, Wentdling and
other points.
Men at WVendling are swamping the
(Continued on Page Four.)
WEAR THE FLOWER
THE MARTYR LOVED
PINK CARNATIONS WERE h. KIN
LEY'S FAVORITES AND IF YOU
CAN GET ONE, WEAR IT.
Tomorrow will be the first anpiversary
of the death of President William McKin
ley, and the people of Butte will mark the
day by wearing pink carnations. The pink
carnation was the favorite flower of Presi
dent McKinley, and there could be no
more appropriate tribute of the people's
love.
The plan was first proposed by Governor
Van Sant of Minnesota, and has met with
the approval of the officials of states
throughout the union. In most of the big
cities of the West the citizens will observe
the day by simply tie wearing of the little
flower the late president loved so well, and
Butte will be no exception to the rule.
In all probability memorial services will
be held in most of the churches, and where
it is possible the decorations will be of
carnations.
It is fortunate that" Butte has so many
florists, for with the scarcity of flowers
here it would be almost impossible to
secure pink carnations were it not for the
people who handle nature's gems.
Mayor Davey thinks there could be no
more appropriate way to observe the day
of President McKinley's death than the
wearing of pink carnations. He believes
the custom will become universal.
HIGGINSON WANTS AN INQUIRY
Rear Admiral of North Atlantic Squad
ron Wishes to Be Exonerated.
[Il ASSOCIAIEI)' PEmss.]
Washington, Sept. 13.-On the request
of Rear Admiral Higginson, commander
in-chief of the North Atlantic squadron,
the naval department has appointed a court
of inquiry to investigate the circumstances
attending the accident to the big cruiser
during the maneuvers.
A board of directors from the Brooklyn,
chosen by Rear Admiral Coghlan, already
has exonerated the officers of the ship
from blame, but Rear Admiral Higginson,
h( order to make the proceedings perfectly
regular, has requested the court of in
quiry.
Embezzler Andross Pleads Guilty.
Helena, Sept. 3.--John H. Andross,
formerly cashier of the Helena Water
Power and Light company, who was
charged with embezzling a large sum from
that concern, today plead guilty to the
charge and was sentenced to one year
In the state penitentiary at Deer Lodge. -
r. AU-. H.IE
HD KL THE GOS TH T LAYS THE//LDEN EG.G.
HE'D KILL THE GOOSE THIAT LAYS THE GOLDEN EGG.
INHUMAN CRUELTY
OF DILLON DOCTOR
MRS. ELLA MILLER RECITES TALE OF
UNBEARABLE PERSECUTION IN
THE DIVORCE COURT.
In less than one hour tl;hs morning
Judge Clancy sat at his desk in the district
court, listened to the marital woes of five
women and one man and gr tted six
divorets.
There were all classes of society and
refinement represented among the com
plainants, and every degree of cruelty and
divorceable demeanor written in the com
plaints.
From the wife of a prominent physician,
in her gown of 4atest cut, with her story
of threatened murder by poison, revolver
and club, to a sallow-faced Austrian in a
calico dress, who smiled as she informed
the court th at she wanted a separation
because her husband was a convict in Deer
Lodge, the social scale was on the caipe:t.
Some of the ties that bound the coin
plainants to their homes were severed in
less than two minutes; none of the separa
tion operations took more than five.
A Tale of Inhuman Cruelty.
It was a peculiar coincidence, but the
bitterest tale of persecution and cruelty
came from the woman from whose home
life might be expected the most refinement.
Mrs. Ella Miller, wife of Dr. M. A.
Miller, a practicing physician of Dillon,
siht in the witness chair, her daughter, Mrs.
Teal, by her side, and told a tale of cruelty
in which there was every evidence of truth.
"Twenty-four years ago we were mar
ried," said the woman, "and for years I
have been in terror of my ,..e from my
husband. He has threatened to poison me,
to shoot me, to brain me, and to kill me in
every violent and imaginable manner. He
has choked me and beaten me, until I
feared that he might kill me. I would
have secured a divorce from him long ago,
but he threatened that he would follow me
to the end of the earth and kill me, if I
did.
"We were married at Carlisle, Pennsyl
vania. All our children are grown up and
married. l.ast December he beat and
bruised me and I was compelled to leave
my house afraid to return. On the 24th
of last month he camse up here to my
daughters house and tore my clothes off,
Lruising and beating me at the same time.
"One day last month he came to my
da'.glhter's house anld tore my clothes off,
saw him coming I ran out across the little
gulch and down to the railroad track,
where I was hemmed in and had to hide in
a coal shed.
In the Presence of Their Child.
"He did everything but kill mie," added
Mrs. Miller. "My daughter Bllanche has
seen him many a time. lIe has threatened
to sell his plroperty, take the money out of
the bank and leave the state if I attempted
to institute proceedings against him.
Attorney John N. Kirk, who represented
Mrs. Miller, then called her daughter, Mrs.
Teal to the stand.
"Many a time," was her answer to the
attorney's question, if her father had ever
beaten her mother, "many a time have I
gotten between them and prevented him
from beating her further. When he came
with the revolver in his hand, I saw it, a!.
though he had it hidden under a handker
chief, and when he tried to reach around
nry waist and shoot her I held his hand."
That was enough. Mr. Kirk needed to
present no further evidence. He said the
complainant left the amount of permanent
alimony and ot4ter relief to the court, with
provisions for attorney's fee.
Judge Clancy granted a decree in ac
cordance with the request of the com
plaint.
Loss Is $100,000.
[BY ASSOCIATED PRESS,]
San Angelo, Texas, Sept, xJ.-Fire at
Sonor' early- yesterday destroyed an en
tire business block. Los
BENIGN MAJESTY
IN ROYAL PURPLE
SUN TAKES ON HUE SO UNLIKE HIS
ROSY SELF THAT ALL BUTTE
STRAINS ITS NECK.
A!! Bf;ttt. was straining its neck this
afternoon. On every street corner there
was craning and pointing of fingers.
"The sun I The sun Look at the sun."
And sure enough there was something
unusual about the complexion of his
benign majesty. Like a purple disc on a
leaden sheet Old Sol stood out bereft of
his familiar rays, a rich, royal purple.
Every man had a different theory, and
every woman had two or three. Some
said the Elks of that orb were having a
grand lodge meeting. Others said some
political villifyers had given the sun a
black eye, and others said it was simply an
optical illusion. One theory, and possibly
the most correct one, was that the smoke
of the forest fires now burning west of
Anaconda obscured the sun and changed
his color, but there were plenty to dispute
this theory.
EX-REBEL COLONEL
COMMITS SUICIDE
JOHN G. GARNET TAKES CARBOLIC
ACID IN A HOTEL IN NEW
YORK CITY.
[BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.]
New York, Sept. 13.-Colonel John G.
Garnett, one of the most prominent south
erners of New York, a West Point grad
uate, a colonel of artillery under Gen.
Robert E. Lee in the confederate army
and a native of Wakefield plantation,
Westmoreland county, Virginia, has been
found dead in the Ross hotel.
He had committed suicide by taking
carbolic acid. The body had been lying
in the room for two days before it was
discovered.
Several days ago Mr. Garnett was vias
ited by his brother, Doctor Garnett of
Hot Springs, Ark., and it is supposed
they quarreled. A note stating the writer
had contemplated suicide for five days
was found beside the body.
Mr. Garnett of the Saint James Publish
ing company was engaged in writing a
history of the West Point military acad
emy. Among the letters and papers found
was one from President Roosevelt in
dorsing a plan to establish a branch of
the Benevolent Order of Spanish War
veterans.
NEW POSTOFFICE IN MONTANA
Commission Has Authorized Establish
ment of Station in Welch.
Postmaster George Irvin announced
this afternoon that a new postoffice has
been established at Welch in Jefferson
county. The commission authorizing the
establishment of the office arrived today
and named James Welch, the operator of
the big stone quarries, as postmaster.
There are about ioo people at Welch
who will be supplied with mail at the
new postoflice. Welch is six miles east
of Homestake and eight miles west of
Pipestone.
Don't Want to Spend Money.
([B ASSOCIATED PRESS.]
Norfolk, Va., Sept. 3j.-The great coun
cil of Redmen of the United States Which
adjourned yesterday reported adversely
on the report of California for a $ao,og.
appropriation fIr a competitive drill.
PARTITION LIKELY
IN THE FAR EAST
AMERICAN COMMISSIONER TO CHINA
SAYS ORIENTAL EMPIRE IS
ON ITS LAST LEGS.
[IIY ASSOCIAITID krI-fs.
"."t: Francisco, Cal., Sept. 13.-Speaking
of ihe commercial outlook in the Orient,
G,.. T. S. Sharretts, the United States
commissloner, who recently aided in fran
i'+ • new tariff for China, and who is now
htre en route to Washington, said:
'lRefornl is urgently needed in the
fin:tncial policy of China and its method of
l ,;agemlnllt of the finanlcial aTffirs,
eslecially in collecting revenues.
"As it stands Amerlcan ratle with ('hlin
is of little importance, antd will iever
aiotllll to much under the pIroposed new
t:a ilt or under any tariff. The collction
of the governlilent's revenules is placed in
toI( hanils of middlemen or thieving ofli
cialts, if you will, who permit abouti to per
cent of their collections to reach the gov
ertlotment. China is on the eve of bank
rlt' cy, and unless the powers get toglether
aoln force the country into revolutioniziut,
Its methods within the next so years there
Will be an awful crash in the far East.
"1 hina will appear in the deplorable role
of defaulting in her payments of ilndet
nily to the treaty powers and the division
of the Chinese empire among the big world
powers will surely follow."
Mr. Sharretts gave it as his opinion that
China would attach her signature to the
new tariff bIefore long,.
Mr. Sharretts was instrumental in pre
venting the signinlg by China of the pro
ptosed new British commercial treaty
whicih, by providing for an abolition of the
likiu tax and art increased duty on all im
rt.., he says, would have injured Ameri
* trade with China.
OIL FIELDS FIRE
UNDER CONTROL
CONFLAGRATION STILL RAGING
FIERCELY AND 500 MEN
ARE AT WORK ON IT.
[Yv ASSOc IAI.D It l iR.ss.]
If,;llnIiont, Tex., Sept. I. ()ne acre of
Spindle T'op heights, in the grect Beau
motn* oil field, is a secthing mass of
flannw and stilling smoke. The fire is tri
der i ntrol. The wind from the east is
fan.ing the flames from the district.
Thiy five or forty derricks have been
raislI to the ground in the Kelth-Ward
sectl.n. Across the avenue the Ma;tnll th
37,5-h-barrel tank of the Higgins people is
on Irie, but the oil is being drawit from the
bottom and packed away, which will event
ually starve out the fire. The great Texas
Flora gusher is ablaze, sending flames 80o
feet into the air. The Wood well is on
fire. Several persons place the loss at
$a5ooo, while others think It will be
greatr. The actual destruction of ma
chincry will be enormous. The Higgins
Oil and Fuel company are possibly the
heaviest losers.
The burning oil field is now under com
mand of B, S. Cullinan, a Standard Oil
man, for years in charge of their interests
lat Corsicana. Mr. Cullinan has mustered
Soo men to his aid. They have too steam
boilers at their service and streams of
steam will be applied today. The fire
fghters have been able to advance to
Within 150o feet of iLe burning structure.
IN ASHES AND MUD
TOWNS ARE BURIED
ONCE POPULOUS DISTRICT IN ISLE
OF MARTINIQUE ARE NOW
UNINHABITLD.
[ui Asso' At. I aII s n' I
Fost de Francelll, island of Marlltiniull,
Sept. t. -Angel Ilheilpiln, pr< sihnt of the
IPhilahrlehlllhn Geographical society, who is
in Martinitlue il thell intl'rct of tllhe N.;ini
al Geographical Society, has ma'lt Ithe fol
lowiing report fil the crutltin'.i ofl MontIl
I'chlti.
The scene of destruction in the last
crllptfi, l f M.i 1 f''rii e fllr trr.' as th t;.
of II.e rulp,lion of May H. wh. n St. I'i rr '
wails dc tre yled, Ilj incidt ll th I, ,ll. ,d
;Iarea lyi s g betiii ' . M us ' )thite :;I ld (:li 11,1t
and inv lv ith Har1I.ite 'j rtl s de(l lItr1hln,
l ., Ilse Point, M rine li ;ll, i a d Ajnup tll;i
li illon, whIere alon,, upwiard olf .o1 pfr
lso', wer kiln ed, as well as 1l.orn Itlm,,r,
with a death list i of prolll ly i ot ll'h hllhl
in l f ll peIIr s, Mer..ilin lli ' ale "I I ld the
heiIght, somei whatl thie sid. ' J) l of f i l t.
elilt'li, th111' hl;u l, howl, r,, ha ving th, lastI
cilla lte uIlI(,' 1 tiu lltouc isd. Il
(;rel t cilders also fI ll over ll .. rii llion
of triland lliviere, ;Illd I'rl ' hl i r ils lllv
erel deep willh ;iIshes. i I';Ili- i the tsl-es
lie o e, foot llIop, anllld ll ly the antl
usanti l covers the ruins of St. Pierre.
AlI of Morne Roige, with the exception
likf e bout fo ,y hses anllld the beautlill
church, lhas bel n swept to Ill, grol d, and lll
crate greatir part of the Iiliow has been
At Ajlitluilloni, where the llo llwn his
been irostrated, there is n tracelll of fire
of any kind.
t"'he' destructiveI blast, intealll d f (co fin
ing itself to a sctionlll of area, is was the
icase dUlrilng the first (ruptioll, was ldis L
tributed d radially, crosrting the low cloudit
of the vollcano near th knob oied darek
Jacob and skipping zones between its rays.
"The danger of lount I'hele is thus lla
Ierially increased and perhai.s no position
iness the lorth f the islancd for i period ofltely
"The gsixvtrmnt has judiciously or
deNred detil of the cualtis rean Sthed
by a radius of about eight or tell Miles
frmUncle r Is Too Poor.ater
"The recret pheary of war themea war dprecisely
like thaissuedt of Mruling dthat th remasultins i
soldier. ,s frodying at posts with the teUnrriblted
swift andnot e disinterr wich ured and shpped
focated. government sulhur e itnse frm the
crater during the tel ent 'r tiallo-s was
comparatively insignil lant, although it
densely adl ed to h lth ' salh 'ltnd which
overIlowel the Plrt:chiloy. 'Ise electrical
ilhlninatiolns 'Iuing the ,',trus were w nll
derful and greatly slnlp'a,',sed those of
July 9.
Darkness for Six Hours.
"During the tl,,ll I was nl th l v" h'a leln,
the afternoon t.1 t"hil 'r ptlll i, Mou t IPelee
was terribly an tih.,,, ' l refigc froi tl.,insg
bonbs i ll Io L ,e sought in a hole., "1 1
great cole coult il[t be %i,
"fill the w. :y to the lilus t;ii I hb pity
was enveloped in ashes : ld olnd, 'I lIe le
srtructiol of the several towns ;aid locall
ties w as siM a llall onmi l, rrccturrlling at 1):1 i
p. 1. u There is liuch uncasiness all over
the Island of Malttinique.
"The illumination of the eruption of
St. Vincent, five miles froml here, oii the
night of Wednesday, was most terrifying,
and on 'Thursday morning the ash cloud
from St. Vincent volcano carried dark
ness to Fort de France for a period of
nearly six hours.
"No details of the casualties on St.
Vincent have yet been received here."
Uncle Fain Is Too Poor.
[lY ASSOCIATED ('RESS.]
Washington, Sept. 13,-Under a ruling
of the secretary of war the war department
has issued a ruling that the remains of
soldiers dying at posts within the United
States cannot be disinterred and shipped
home at government expense.
FINANCIAL ALLIANCE
TO CONTROL ALL
RAILROADS
Vanderbilts ter Into Com
bine W . Pennsylva
nia--T >)rner Trade.
GREATEST j MBINATION
IN RICA'S HISTORY
Have Capita Two Billion and Mile
age of T Thousan6d-Can Abso
lutely Dominate Traffic in the Middle
States and on the Atlantic--Deal in
Coal I elds Started Negotiations To
w.ad tlh. Greatest Combine Lxtant.
lIIt A I h , tt 1 Ii I'll
lI i t I l , hit i.h i ilt . tli . tit r
A t ,un i , i ith h. . i,.t ", , n'rI by
the'111 1, t I , I l \ 1 1111 i l , ,I i thi .I I C
i , I11 h l , ,il\hlit. l ti i ll i I. . the
I'ii il Li t t '.s1 -Itin \ wils nn .it
111 11.1, .11- 1 i l1, ,, i in Ill. 11 1 1 i t it
n.ui Il s , Hi lt I ., .in A l w ln t ,t hilri.
Itil 111l1 i l(i .1i,l 1, i l l . dll .1.1 11 IirI" l. t.
l h i ,l' I lllhi ,lll in l \ I ll it 1 .I 1.11i' l.lli ; "
Inlht ,., h, ll l .1 111 , t lh.' .I i l .llnt is to
l hlit IIi, It, Ii i, - e .i t ti* .1, : ,, It i ,(l t. ti
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u111 th, bl iil ....1I t I, 1. a ' 1"1.
I)r.l i, C]oal riids.
Ih I l f ih . n ti L.s i ll \II .1 i t. l.ii- ,
ill 11 , 1"1 in l l .Iit.1 l l( t- \ .uule l iinit Ih .
1,lis I i\h ,il i li t I I t ll i t Iih, i i til 1
I.111l %1, d.hI 111, 1 ,II roi)1 , hi i ') tile
H llls ,is i ' il hi tll t iti it .l 'i I , li
i'1 111n`1 ,i 11 i , Io ) 111 .1 tnt-l 1 1i I1
.. ",k i n I h 111 11 .11 ,11 11h 1 n tl er yl
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iby li tl u l Ilaunk :uiii i Il, II h . h 1,h 1. i
(tiil inhIl - I .1.111ii Iii till'1 . ,, l , Ii'III. h li ri
hIt 1'. Ihi u1i %,h , ;:h ull II,' l l l t ii ,1L
,- Iu h niIi, In h,"' , ,h . hi .,l 'Ii, e a
',trlil.lnl l ht -i t I . . I1'1 .nthl.
' hI , 11 11, tc i l I hIt llt- i ,, Iri,11 .111 e t"i(i, . v ire
1ili\o ,iltl t,,i.· inalI ly I1i.itlh, i ,111.1 5u ,11ii re
h, lt tli ill :I ' 11 1 t t It.i nl ' rb :t. hIl s.
,\ 'hurt Jlimn l - - it, I f ,r titre 1 . K.
Vaildl ll t',l I l ;Ihbnt Ib ru | (I ,ais ri, lilth
pr','tilh Ill .,I Ih , IP'e lil y. .1.1ni.i raiilr,,ail
wil iil to ,, '. "ltI tI .,11 . i ii hnhi . T hin*
i, hil, iliw lin iI, ,, W I n i h ,I 111i11, li %;vas rotl -
j.'r iti , l I ht iit . V hill e , , i l( - 11 i4. im n
dih hiiit lyh , \1 1h1:11 Iln ,, il t,.1. .1)I ,',', :o
1I'1 1l .1, 1 .ilii;1 ii . r lI1 ,u n e. :iii1 'I l. tIIr ive
iii ll - I ',i. I I, rt IIIIIIh, i'ly .' n olII, i h , ilti:L
((f ' lilhl l l ll o I',li I",)ur .)
SENATOR HANNA IS
TO ATTEND CONFAB
CONFIRINCE BETWEEN HIM AND
THL PRESIDENT REGARDING
IJTHMIAN CANAL.
I V A.i, IA I II I'( ;'
'I lvl;mid, Ohio, Sept. . .Senator
Il;111nua has gone to NeW sY'llk wher(. hei
will Ibecome the guest f I'oresident (;ris
con1 of tilt J IInernational Navigationl .')ln
pany oil thlI latter's private yacht.
On Tuesday, St.aitor Ilaiua, tplln the
ttivita;tiionI of I'riidjt t i.usevelt, will go
to (yster Biay to a;llte l a 'onlerei c.t at
which Se.uatrs Alli,,o atul Platt will also
hb prese.it. It is n lderstor dl hetilationt
in coni' l ctiln wilh ('tlha and the inter
clai';llC caull will bie aimo;g tlhe siubjects
discussed.
CORPORATIONS MUST ALL
FILE RECORD OF RETURNS
Within Twenty Days After September 1,
If They Have Not Complied With
Law, Trouble Will Come.
('.ils ,t t t'he Ci rl r;tll s o11 f Silver fliw
comity gt I raily tlihir riports andl file them
w ihiii the next eight lays, they will have
O' inllilit ; viil:utiiul of tit- st. le law
threlca;-I i l i na.d t on their part.
"'Ihe liw ni the utl.jeit i ,;itoni 'ied in
section 151 ot the civil coI. It rei qtires
ill corpo'al ;tions to file ;an atl reports of
their capitl; stock, a,,twit and liabilities
withi _n.s da: ys after Sptiilir i. The
setion also pro vides that in ti. failure of
a corporation to comply with this law, all
the directors s hall he jointly and severally
liable for all Icblts of the corpl ration,
until the proper rcport is made and pub
lishc(il i a daily newsplalper,
As yet but one corporation, a mercantile
company, has filed it replort.
CRIMES ACT MAY MEAN WAR
John Redmond Says It Justifies Any
thing, Even Rebellion.
E[uy AssoctA'tiIt rItuItSS.]
Waterford, Ireland, Sept. zj.-In ac
knowledging his reception to the city of
Waterford John Redmond said the agrar
ian question, the last real obstacle to
home rule, was near a settlement. The
ranks of the Irish landlords were in re
volt amoun;; th, few wealthy political land
lords who had long led them to ruin.
The Crimes act proclamation justified
any resistance, even armed rebeloo. ,

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