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The Butte inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, October 10, 1902, Evening, Image 1

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O THEi BUTTE INTER MO)UNTAIN
VOL XXII NO. 176 WEATHER FORECAST BUTTE, MONTANA, FRIDAY EVENING, OCTOBER to, 1902. FAIR, WARMER. PRICE FIE EN
SENATORS ENDEAVOR
TO SOLYE THE
PROBLEM
Quay, Penrose, and Platt to
Confer With Governor Odell
on the Coal Strike.
10 ONE IS PRESENT TO
REPRESENT OPERATORS
And It Is Therefore Surmised That the
Senators Are Trying to See What Can
Be Done by the Government in the
Way of Forcing Matters to a Head
Mitchell Is in New York, but Was Not
at the Conference and Will Not Speak
rov ASSOCIATED PRFsa.]
New York, Oct. to.-Continuing their
efforts to bring about a solution of the
anthracite coal strike Senators Quay and
Penrose of Pennsylvania, and Senator
Platt and Governor Odell of New York met
today for another conference.
The meeting place was Senator Platt's
office in the down-town business district.
The conference began shortly after to
o'clock, but none of the coal operators nor
anyone representing their interests ap
peared.
The absence of amy representative on the
operators' side of the dispute was regarded
as indicative tha:t this morning's confer
ence between the pyliticans would be de
voted to an effort to discover some means
of forcing the strike to an end.
Another phase was injected into the
situation today by the making public of
David Wilcox's letter to the president
demanding that the federal government
proceed against the miners' organization
as a conspiracy to prevent interstate com
merce. Mr. Wilcox is said to represent all
the coal operators, and the publication of
his letter is regarded as somewhat in the
nature of a statement of the operators'
position.
Mitchell Will Not Speak.
President Mitchell of the Miners' union,
with the district presidents, spent the early
part of the day at his hotel and declined to
answer any questions except to say that he
expected to return home today.
It was reported that just before he left
the Fifth Avenue hotel, this morning, J. P.
Morgan had a brief private conference
with Senators Quay and Penrose. This
could not be confirmed, however.
President Baer of the Reading road,
came over from Philadelphia this after
noon, and shortly after his arrival here
went to J. P. Morgan's office. Later,
Chairman Thomas of the Erie road, also
called, and the three remained in close
consultation for some time. At 12:30
Mr. Baer and Mr. Thomas left the Morgan
offices and went around to Senator Platt's
office, where Senator Platt and his con
ferees were in session. They were quickly
ushered into the room.
The conference in Senator Platt's office
broke up soon after I o'clock. Senator
Platt stated that everything had been put
off until Tuesday.
Chairman Thomas of the Erie road said
after the conference that no conclusion had
been reached.
FOR SERVICES AS RENDERED
Denver Woman Sues Estate of Million
aire for Large Sum.
iRY ASSOCIATED PRESS.]
Denver, Colo., Oct. so.-Suit has been
filed in the district court by Miss Mary F.
Lathrop against Judge Moses Hallett of the
United States court, executor and trustee
of the estate of the late George W. Clayton,
to recover $5o,ooo for alleged legal services
rendered to the Clayton estate.
The will of George Clayton created a
trust fund of $z,9oo,ooo for the establish
ment in Denver of a college for poor white
male orphans, and Miss Lathrop bases
her claim on alleged services in defending
a suit which sought to have the trust de
clared void and the fund distributed among
Clayton's heirs.
TOOK STORIES OF
THE CHICAGO FIRE
LOCAL MEN WHO WERE TELEGRAPH
OPERATORS ON THE NIGHT OF
OCTOBER 9, 1871,
Yesterday was the thirty-first anniver
sary of the big Chicago fire which broke
out October 9, 1871. In recalling the
awful disaster that attracted the attention
of the whole world, H. O. Wilson of the
Short Line said this morning:
"I remember that fire distinctly. I was
a telegraph operator at Deadwood, S. D.,
at the time, and took the account for the
Associated Press. It was a frightful
calamity for those who had to go through
it; but Chicago has been the gainer in the
long run, for the town arose, Phoenix-like,
from the ashes, and was rebuilt on a much
more magnificent scale."
Levi Wilson, who is at present the local
manager for the Western Union Telegraph
company, was located in San Francisco at
the time and had charge of that end of the
fire story, and it has the distinction of
being one of the biggest stories ever hand
led by the "A. P."
GILLIS NAMED FOR
THE STATE SENATE
POPULAR REPUBLICAN NOMINATED
TO VACANCY CAUSED BY MR.
BUZZO'S RESIGNATION.
LATTER'S LETTER READ
IN COMMITTEE MEETING
Three Candidates for the Legislature to
Fill Vacancies on the Ticket and
Other Places Left Open by the Con
vention Receive Attention-Meeting Is
Enthusiastic and Encouraging.
Silver Bow county republicans intended
to have a meeting of the central commit
tee last evening. Not only did they have
the meeting, but held a rousing rally in th
large hall at headquarters which was filled
to overflowing with enthusiastic friends.
Old-timers in the party, men who have
always been republicans but have never
taken an active part in the campaigns,
were present to lend a word of encourage
ment or advice and when, after two hours
of speeches, plans and deliberations, the
meeting adjourned it was with the feeling
that every man had made up his mind to
get out and make a winning fight for the
grand old party.
Much regret was expressed at the busi
ness engagements which compel T. W.
Iluzzo, the nominee for state senator, to
'e absent from Montana (luring the cam
,paign, but when Malcolm (;illis was named
and in an earnest speech announced that
lie would accept and go in to win, the
candidacy of the new leader of the county
ticket was hailed with acclamation.
Mr. Buzzo's Letter.
At 8 o'clock Chairman A. N. Yoder
called the mecting to order. As the hall
was crowded to its utmost capacity, it
was necessary to ask the members of the
committce to take the scats in front.
After a few parliamentary remarks the
chairman asked Secretary M. A. Berger to
read the declination of Mr. Buzzo which
was as follows:
To the Republican County Central Com
mittee:
"Gentlemen-It is with sincere regret
that I have tendered to you my declination
as a candidate for state senator from Sil
ver Bow county. This course has been im
pelled on account of business reasons sole
ly and not by reason of any lack of inter
ct in republican politics or in the success
(Continued on Page Three.)
MALCOLN GILLIS WILL
BE POPULAR SENATOR
MALCOLM GILLIS,
k"
Who Is Making the Race for State Senator From Silver Bow County on the Re
i publloan Ticket,
vWhile Mr. Buzzo's friends regret his
departure sincerely, the republican party is
fortunate to have many capable and pub
lic-spirited citizens from whom to select
a candidate to take his place on the ticket.
In Malcolm Gillis, the forcible, upright,
young advocate of republicanism, the
central committee has been peculiarly for
tunate. Everybody in Butte knows Mal
colm; everybody respects him; and the
news of his candidacy will fully offstand
the regret for Mr. luzzo's unavoidable
withdrawal.
Mr. Gillis has not only been a constant
and earnest worker in the republican
ranks, but also a prominent and active
champion of the rights of the working
men, one of whom he is. His candidacy
will be welcome to the clean, honest citi
zens of the county who know his worth
and who have every confidence in his
ability and integrity.
Silver Bow county's next senator was
born in Canada just 40 years ago. When
a lad of 8, his family moved to Michi
gan, where Malcolm received his education
at the publio schools and imbibed the
spirit of sound republicanism. In the
Michigan mining district he learned the
professlon of engineering. He came to
Montana in ,88g.
CRAND ARMY WILL
COME TO 'FRICO
DECIDE UNANIMOUSLY TO HOLD
NEXT ENCAMPMENT IN CITY SY
THE GOLDEN GATES.
SI
UNION VETERAN LEGION
TO SUSPEND COMMANDER
Charges of Arbitrary Action and Ilo
Refleotions Upon His Character Are
Made Against General R G. Dyrenforth
-Case Is of Wide Interest to the
Men Who Fought in the Days of 'e1.
[BY ASIOCIATED PRI S8.]
Washington, Oct. to.-The Grand Army
of the Republic today decided by b vote
to hold its encampment in 1903 at. San
Francisco. -
Practically the only competitor was At
lantic City, but few votes being cast fo
Saratoga. The chances of the latter plaee
were destroyed by the decision of the
New York men to support San Francisco
and when the solid vote of that delegation
was cast today for the Pacific Coast city,
it was recogni-ed that Atlantic City's
prospects wcec very slim.
General Shaffer made the speech nom
inating San Francisco, while Department
Commander Hall of New Jersey nam
Atlantic City. The vote was San Fra.
cisco, 573; Atlantic City, 178.
The selection of San Francisco was then
made iunanimnous.
Bellfore the place of meeting was chosen
the list of national officials was comn_
pleted. A. \V. Atchison of Texas was
chosn surgeon general and Rev. D. B.
Shucy of Kansas chaplain in chief.
During the day the committee on legiw
lation presented its report. The report
was devoted especially to the committee's
effort to secure a modification of the civil
service laws in the interest of veterans,
which was stated congress had failed to
concede.
The committee finds that the president
is in hearty sympathy with the efforts t&
secure a broader recognition of the claims
of the soldiers Lnd in marked contrast
to the attitude of congress."
The following national officers have been
elected by the Women's Relief corp:.
Mrs. Loudusky J. Taylor of KM *1 asts,
president; Mrs. Geraldine Frishy of Cali
fornia, senior vice-president; Mrs. Maty
M. North of Maryland, junior vice-prga.
dent; Mrs. Sarah C. Philips of New York,
treasurer; Mrs. Jennie Day of Connectleut
chaplain.
IHe was one of the first to advocate the
organization of Butte Stationary En
gineers' union, which has since become so
powerful, and it is mainly owing to his
efforts that the union has been so suc
cessful. Mr. Gillis has been elected to
every office within the gift of that body.
He was sent from the union to the councils
of the Trades and Labor assembly as its
representative and was subsequently
chosen by the engineers as their delegate
to the Western Federation of Miners.
For three successive years Mr. Gillis
was honored as the representative of his
union in the national meetings of the Fed
eration. His active support and' earnaeq
work for the cause 5f labor has made hims
many friends.
Malcolm Gillis has been chosen three
times as chairman of the county central
committee of the republican party. He
has been vice president of the republican
state central committee for four years, and
in many ways has been publicly identified
with the interests of the party in city, state
and county. No stronger man to head the
county ticket could be chosen, and with
Malcolm Gillis at their head the repub
lican candidates may safely consider that
victory is already won.
CAPTAIN E. B. EVERTS
DIES OF PNEUMONIA
CAPT. EDWARD EVERTS,
Member of Butte Polictoe FoPre Who Died This Morning at a Butte Hosptal
of Pneumonia and Complicated Causes.
t ath aome to Police Captatinldward B.
Evert itf St. James hospital this morn
ing at oao o'clock. While thd captain was
know very low e nei.i of his death
will com-tas a shock! to his shaiy friends,
as it was given out yedterday afternoon that
his condition was slightly improved. Pneu
monia is declared to be the cause of his
death by the physicians who attended him.
Captain Everts came to Butte from
Kansas City 15 years ago. He was born in
the little town of Brandon, Vermont, and
was 3o years of age. When still a small
child his parents sent him to Bloston, Mas
sachusetts, to live with an uncle, and Cap
tain Everts' boyhood days were passed in
the city of culture.
Mayor Liked Him.
In the dawn of young manhood Everts
c;ame West, and for several years worked
in a bank in Kansas City. Becoming tired
of the confining work he came to Ilutte and
secured employment on what was then the
street railway. lie was conductor on a
cable car that ran to Walkerville at that
time.
In 1897 Everts was appointed p:ltroh(lllan;
on the police force under Chief Mtilhol
land. So well did he fulfill his duties as an
oficer that he was retained when Chief
James Reynolds assumed( the office of the
head of the local police force. Mayor
I)avey liked the young man so well that lie
appointed him captain of police and Cap
tain Everts filled this office up to the time
of his death.
In the Cold Damp Night.
It was known to the friends of Evert;
that he was ailing during most of the
month of September and that only his re
markable will power kept him in the har
JERRY MURPHY IS
THERE WITH GOODS
SECURES VALUABLE WITNESS
AGAINST FRANK BUTLER, WHO IS
SAID TO BE A BAD MAN.
Detective Jerry Murphy this afternoon
secured a valuable witness against Frank
Butler, who is now in the city jail, charged
witn having held A. T. Trudgeon, up at
the point of a revolver Wednesday night,
at the corner of Mercury and Colorado
streets.
Trudgeon was robbed by two masked
men and Butler was arrested on suspicion
of Leing one of the highwaymen. This
afternoon Edward Eno told Detective Mur
phly that he saw Butler standing at the
corner of Mercury and Colorado streets,
just before the robbery occurred. Eno will
appear against Butler when the case comes
to trial.
Big Fire in New York.
New York, Oct. zo.-Fire early today
damaged the six-story building at 478-480
Pearl street and its contents to the extent
of $75,000, burning out four small con
dfrns.
T'he fire for a time threatened many
lives and compelled firemen to drive ten
ants out and lift children from their beds.
No one was injured.
ness. The chilly nights that camer the lat
ter part of September proved too much for
the nervy young police captain, whose
duties called him out all night, and on
September 26 lie was taken suddenly ill
with a high fever,
He was removed at once to St. Jamen'
hospital, where the physicians pronounced
him a dangerously sick mlan with pnellno
nia. For almost a week Captain Everts
was delirious. Thie fever raged and the
patient never recognized his imost intimate
friends who called to see him.
Ten days ago lie became rational again
and Its the fever had subsided it was an
nounced that the hick uaIo would plrobably
recover. lHadl Evlerts been attacked only
with pneumonia his recovery after the first
shock would have been almost certain, but
other troules set in, malking his case a
coinl plicUted one. It is nlW thought he had
an abscess on the brain, which hastened
the end.
A Stream of Mourners.
'llhe body lies at k lihards' IunIdrtakiing
rooms and all day long friends of the dead
man have called to view the remlai.ns.
Ileavy crepe haings on the door of the
cily ball andI a gloom rests on everyhbody
who klnew the ippular young apta;in.
It is not knowni yet w tll dispsitiion will
bIe made oif the rem;ains, but it is likely they
will be sent back to the forceir home of
the dueceased in Vermont for interm'rit.
Captain [vcrts ar mwaisuii;imried. I Il has
a cousin living in Golhi Creek, Montanma,
and other coitsinms reshiding ih Middllclury,
Vt. Ill sister, Mrs. iFranc s E. Kingsley
of Salisbury, Vt., has be n thelegraplhed
thile news of the death of her blmoth r, but
up to a late hour this altternoon, Chief lIey
nolds had rcciveld ,io reply.
IN THE COURT OF
YOUR UNCLE SAM
CASES SETTLED OR POSTPONED BY
JUDGE KNOWLES IN UNITED
STATES TRIPBUNAL.
On notion of R. C. I urton for an order
to reconsiider h, e., ,f r lhtige ilake,
,anccry, Judge Knowles set the
hearing for S p , ., I s, ;,t which thine
the matter of the Globe National Ilank vs.
the Ilutte & liostoii in.lilg company and
the Ma.ss,;imhtLsets Lonn . aid i rust co,1m
panics will be reopened. 'The motion was
based on the affidavits of Charles II.
i'al':er and John litndsay.
John J. Lavel was dischar:ged from ank
rultcy this morning by Jdulge Knowles. A
memoratldum of authorities was filed by
Attorney Cotter on behalf of the objectors
to L.avel's discharge, in which it was at.
tempted to show that it was a criime to hold
out property fraudulently from the
schelule. Judge Knowles overruled the
objections and the counsel for the plaintiffs
took an exception, which was allowed.
The objectors have to days in which to file
their bill of exceptions.
John Pechuck, who dates his beginning
from the sunny banks of the beautiful blue
Danube, in Austria, forcswore his allegi
ance to Francis Joseph and became a duti.
ful son of the United States.
OPERATORS DEMAND
THir SOLDIERS
CALLED
Call L , President Roose.
velt 1 end Federal Troops
1 ne Coal Fields.
CLAIM MINERS' UNION IS
UNDER CONSPIRACY LAWS
Interstate Commerce, They Say, Is Re
stricted by the Strike and It Is There.
fore Up to Uncle Sam to Step in and
Fix It So rhat the Various States
Can Get Coal Enough to Carry ort
Business, Which Is Now Paralyzed.
0S1 1 - "------1 /
rnv AsLSO'rArtr) I'IIT .IĆ½ 1
Washington, Oct. 10, 3:30 p. m.-
President Roosevelt has received the
communication from David Wilcox of the
Delaware & Hudson Railroad company
referred to in the dispatch from New
York and has referred it together with
the former one of which Mr. Wilcox
speaks to the attorney general.
New York, (ht. in. RI,1vid VWilon,
vice presidett and counsel for tlt. Ila.
ware & Hiudson Railroad tomiiiany, and
one of those presetnlltt t the rt'ect .onter.
ence called by IPresident I.oosi clt at
WVashington, lha; sent to I'residlCent he.
velt a letter, dlieinanllting that the federal
governitent i prceedl againstll tie iintltrs'
organization in tlhe couirts on the g,,outnd
that it is a conspiraiy to pttevett inter
state colItmierce.
Mr. Wilcox, it Is said oit antll ltity,
representst all the coal operators iii this
actionl, anld was eclected ias their i.hlloks.
Iattll.
Letter Made Public.
The letter was nmate pillic in this
city together with ii Irttcr written several
montlhs ago to the pIresidtl it along tihe
sanne lines. 'IThe letter, which in dated
New York, is as follows:
"To the i'resident of the lUniteld St,tteq,
Washingtonl, 1), C.- Sir: Iipontii Jtiie 6
last I had tile honor to address ai letter
to yourself, callitng attelition to tohe char
tcter of the Unitedl Mine Workers of
America. The illegality ,of that organlza.
tion Is fully established by the aiithori,
ties to which I then referred, and its
lethlodls have since been iagain con
demniieid bIy the circuit court of the n'tilted
States (United States vs. Wetber, '4t1h
Fed. Rep g 9; luniiteid Stales vs. I lag
gerty, at6 Itied. Rep. 51,).
"IlI the Wlber case, too, the court says
'It in hardly open to seriois liuestlon
the ultimaiite pullrlpone of the utnilol is iot
legal.'
Has He the Right? I
"Soinic qllstilli hns, however, been
milade whetlher thlie in;tionll governmenttiit
has power toi take aclio g;lilttt it on
Iholt laccounllt, willt thlerifitre I desir e to
respect(ally sulliit soine considerat;lions
which samin to estalblish that it has such
Ipower. The ltatllte of July ., 189ti, getn.
ralrly known as the Sherman act, provides
th;at 'every contraict, combilned form of a
trust or othierwise, or tiilthtpiracy ini re.
straintil iof trade or cinspiracy lin restraitil
1of trade or cnllllllreie aililtlm the severial
tat,'s or with foreign nations, is hereby,
decilaired tii lie illegal.'
"('oillinirce alniotg the stales hiegins
whlen the stibjects there beginl to iuiove to
their place of destinationi uald eniils when
they are aslld. llThe quelstionl tlhereflore is
whetherl.li the mliilne workers' combinaliltion
col.atitltsa a restrainit ulponl such corn
"'i'he view that it does not is basted
tuponI the conitention that this comeniination
lfeclta only proiduction of coial within the
s;tate anud nIilt shilplllmlts oif toal fromu otne
state to another. It is submlitted that this
disticlltianl is without fouLindation in the
law or facts.
"Thl coal of the coutlllry is the mioal
itlillh rttnit tiIbjijeCt of it iliteirstate com
ilu:rc.. 'Thle Unitied Mine Workers con
silts of a rictbinatlitn of rsoillt eiillioyed
in the lirodluction of coal ili nIlany talitel
oif lhe utiion. Its alject alnd effect are to
control ithe teriin upon whiichl this siiliject
oif iiterslat;le rmolllrtierce Ilaty lie ptrodtlcedi
at ;all, either for state or intcrstalte Nhilp.
"Its dlirtct and til Ilrecsanry reffect is that
no coal slhall be shippedl aniywhere within
the ctunttiry, llaless it so permIits. T'hi
(Continued on 'age 'i'hlree.)
DILLON POLITICS
ARE VERY OUIET
G. A. WILLIS SAYS BEAVERHEAQ
SAYS DIXON IS TO BE WARMLY,
WELCOMED THERE.
G. A. Willis, a prominent attorney of
Dillon, was in Butte today on business for
the Short Line. Mr. Willis says that the
campaign is unusually quiet in Beaver.
head this year. When John Evans, the
democratic candidate for congress, ap
peared there during the first part of the
week, he failed to make much of an int\
pression, because his ability as a first rate
speaker sf not very strong.
Mr. Willis said that great preparations
have been made to receive the Hon.
Joseph M. Dixon, who makes his initial
appearance at Dillon tonight. This will be
the opening of the republican campaign in'
B, averhead, and Mr. Willis is of the
opinion that the chances of the grand old
party for victory in that county were
never brighter than this year.

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