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The Butte inter mountain. (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, October 11, 1902, Evening, Image 1

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THE BUTTE INTER MOUNTAIN
VOL, XXII NO. 177 WEATHER FORECAST. BUTTE, MONTANA, SATURDAY EVENING, OCTOBFR ii, 1902. FAIR, WARMER. PRICE FIVE CENTS
NEW ORLEANS TORN
BY STIKE OF
CAR MEN
Mayor Issues Official Procla
mation Declaring City in
a State of Siege.
CITIZENS' COMMITTEES
ORGANIZE INTO TROOPS
No Efforts Made to Run Cars Today and
Status Will Not Change Tomorrow,
as Sunday Crowd Is Feared-But the
Governor Is Personally Directing the
'Movements of the Soldiers and There
Will Be Things Doing Monday.
[nv ASSOCIATED PRFSS.]
New Orleans, Oct. I .--The failure of
all efforts to bring about a settlement of
the differences between the striking street
car men and the New Orleans Railway
company, has, it is feared, brought the
strike situation here to an acute stage
and preparations are being made today
at the various armories in the city to
carry into effect wsith a strong hand, the
proclamation issued today by Governor
Heard, demanding a restoration of order
and the suppression of violence.
All the members of the local militia
are ready to respond to the call to arms
at a moment's notice and the troops from
the country parishes have been ordered
to hold themselves in readiness to'coun.
to this city on short notice.
A citizens' committee has been organ
ized and efforts are being made to or
ganize into independent companies to sup
port the state companies.
No Effort to Run Cars.
No efforts were made to run cars to
day and it is the general impression that
the first attempt under the new condi
tions wi. be postponed until Monday in
order to prevent interference by the mobs
that would certainly gather on Sunday.
All negotiations between the state and
city officials, the railway company and
striking street car employes came to an
end today vheni the car men refused to
accept the proposition made by the com
pany and the railway company refused the
proposition of the car men to submit all
differences to a board of seven arbitra
tors. As soon as these conditions were
made known to the governor he issued
the following proclamation:
"To the People of New Orleans: Dur
ing the past two weeks your city has been
in a condition of unusual and grave ex
citement and of frequently recurring
causes for apprehensions of tumult by
mobs and bloodshed, has ensued. This
condition has depressed trade, arrested
public intercourse and the peaceful pur
suits of population. The greatest for
bearance has been vainly exercised by the
authorities and every effort made to re
move every cause or pretext for conlplaint.
The time has now arrived to bring this
abnormal condition of affairs to a close
and by a firmn and vigorous means to re
establish order and tranquility and the
suptremacy of the law.
"I therefore request all peaceable citl
ze7ns not to congregate in crowds on streets
and thoroughfares and I urge upon them
to discontinue all undue excitement and
acts of violence, and to make known to
officers intrusted with the administration
of the law any breaches of the peace.
ATTORNEY GENERAL
COMES DOWN HARD
SUPREME COURT SITS UPON HIM IN
CONNECTION WITH CASCADE
COUNTY STOCKS.
IISPECIAL TO INTER MOUNTAIN.]
Helena, Oct. II.--The supreme court
has turned down the attorney general In
an attempt to force the Cascade county
authorities to revise their assessment rolls
with regard to bank stock.
The official endeavored to obtain a writ
from the court ordering the assessor and
county attorney to accede to his demand
that banks be assessed for the full valve
of their stock.
Chief Justice Brantly, in announcing
the court's decision today, stated that the
theory of the petition seemed to be that
the law intended that the returns of the
banks of their capital stock to the as
sessor was to Ihe the basis for assessment,
but that such theory was unconstitutional,
in that the return was intended only for
the guidance of the assessor in assessing
the stock to the different stockholders,
they being taxed on their individual-hold
ings.
As to the mandate commanding the
county attorney to consent to the cor
rection of the assessment books, the court
refused it, for the reason that it did not
appear that there had been any abuse of
discretion, in that that officer may have
based his refusal upon the presumption
that the stock had already been assessed
to individual stockholders.
It is likely that the Cascade district
court will be applied to by the attorney
general.
New Freight Terminal.
New York, Oct. II.-The American
Asiatic Steamship company, recently
formed by capitalists interested in the
China Development company, has absorbed
the Philippine Steamship line which is
operated by the Philippines Transportation
& Construction company,
THESE ARE TO SEE
YOU DO NOT CHEAT
THIS BUNCH WILL GLARE AT YOU
ACROSS A TABLE WHEN YOU
GO IN TO BALLOT.
AND ASK HOW OFTEN YOUSE
WANT TO VOTE, ANYWAY, EH?
Amusing Conflict Between Rival Fac
tions sohen the Judges Come to Be
Appointed in the Various Precincts,
Some of Which Are Consolidated Be
cause Voters Are as Hen's Teeth.
There was a lively scene in the county
commissioners' office this morning while
the board was busy with the appointment
of judges of election.
Almighty Voice Pete Gilligan was there
in the interests of the Monte Cristo of
the Butte Mountain.
W. M. Walsh, chairman of the cen
tral committee of the labor party was
there in the interests of the labor party.
Mike Tonrey was there in the interests
of the "faithful forty." There were no
side kickers for the republicans and demo
crats, while Mr. Haggerty of the board saw
that the socialists had some representation,
the party getting eight out of the j3o
judges appointed.
In many of the precincts there were
no recommendations for judges on the
lists submitted by the central committees
of the various parties. There was one
party, the populists, however, that had a
nominee for the office every time. Mike
Tonrey, now deputy in the oflice of the
clerk and recorder, but former chairman
of the populist convention, but who does
not seem to be in particularly good odor
at present with the central committee,
had a list of his own which he wanted
considered before that of the committee.
How Queer That He Should.
He advocated the adoption of his own
list, while the comnmissioners maintained
that that of the committee was the only
reasonable one to accept. During the
discussion, Chairman P. J. Gilroy of the
populist central committee came in and
the fun started. The family skeleton of
the populist party was pulled out of the
closet and paraded before the board alnd
the crowd of spectators.
Tonrey told how there were now popu
lists in certain precincts and how he had
two imported and placed in Mrs. Tulcahy'
boarding house "and now," he said, "you
have not named either of them for judge
of election."
lie became more heated as the discus
sion proceeded and finally told Gilroy that
he was a better populist than Gilroy was.
There was a pie in sight and the populists
were after it. Nothing could be done
with the meeting until the fight was over.
Chairman Clark broke in to say that the
newspapers were misinforming the public
in saying that the populist party was dead.
"They are very much alive just now,"
said he. "Too much alive, In fact."
Finally Mr. Tonrey was turned down
by the board's appointing the judges from
the committee's list.
Then Pete Gilligan had a good deal to
say. lIe had antis and Heinze men whom
he wanted on as judges. Tie knew where
there were good men. So did Walsh, but
the commissioners went on with their, ap
pointments, in the main disregarding the
instructions of the representatives.
It Is Worth Having.
In most of the precincts five judges were
appointed, but in the smaller ones only
three. A few precincts were consolidated
with others, as the voting population did
not justify the appointment of one set in
each.
In some of the large precincts, hige No.
a21, where I,ooo votes are counted, the re
muneration to the judges amounts to con
siderable. The law allows $3 a day and
5 cents for every zoo votes counted. This
means $53 for the judge, but he takes
sometimes the three days to count the
votes, so his share of the winnings is $6o,
County Clerk Weston is preparing ap
pointments for the judges this afternoon
and mailing them as fast as possible, so as
to be in time for the election, which is now
only 24 days away.
Following are the appointees:
Precinct I-Populist, ld Matthews, an
ti-trust, Wilter Pace; labor, J. C. Kelly;
democrat, Frank Shovlin; republican,
James Waters.
Precinct a-Populist, James Gilmore;
zcpublican, John Marsland; anti-trust, John
Regant; labor, B. Arrogoni; democrat,
'1 hos. Collins.
Precinct 3-Populist, Mike Buckley;
anti-trust, Dennis Corbett; labor, Dan Cam
(Continued on Page Four.)
MASKED BURGLARS
DEAL OUT CARNAGE
PROMINENT KENTUCKIAN SHOT TO
DEATH BY DESPERADOES WHO
INVADE HIS HOME.
[BI ASSOCIATED PRE.s,]
Lexington, Ky., Oct. II.-A. B. Chinn,
of the firm of Chinn & Todd, dry-goods
merchants in this city, one of the most
prominent business men and ex-confeder
ate soldiers in Kentucky, was shot to
death by two masked burglars at an early
hour today in his bedroom at his home in
this city. His son, Asa, who heard the
noise, rushed to his father's rescue, and
opened fire on the burglars through a
closed door with a rifle. The burglars
returned the fire and Asa is probably mor
tally wounded.
Citizens and police are searching for the
murderers, but no clew has yet been found.
DO N'T KNOW HIM OUTSIDE OF BUTTE.
R, .. _ "
It
....-- aM,. " -
-4 -
--'- -- - -
"Say, Bill, what in the world hav4 we here?"
"I pass it up. Been all through the cow countries of Montana and I never saw that brand before.'
"Must be a stray from British Columbia. He's a sick steer all right, though."
COLONEL, C. F. LLOYD
NAMED J S.MARSHAL
COL.' C,. LLOYD,
Who Was Today Appointed United States Marshal for Montana bv President
Rooseve It.
News was received in Butte this morn
ing that Col. C. F. Lloyd of this city
was appointed United States marshal for
the district of Montana, vice Joseph F.
Woolman, whose term has expired.
Former Senator T. II. Carter was the
first to hear the news in Montana. A
dispatch from Attorney General Knox
was forwarded to him to St. Louis and re
peated to Helena.
Colonel Lloyd's appointment has been
expected for some time, but all the same
the news was received by his many
friends with great joy and all admit that
he is the man for the place.
It is not known just when Colonel Lloyd
will take charge of the office or whom
he will appoint as deputies, but it is prob
able that he will take charge of the office
as soon as the bonds can be filed anmÂș
the necessary preliminaries arranged. This
may be done in io days.
Mr. Woolman was not a candidate for
reappointment and indorsed the appoint
iment of Colonel Lloyd.
C. F. Lloyd was born in Guttenburg,
Sweden, in the year 1851 and came to
TRUDGIAN SAYS HE
IS THE VERY MAN
Mark Kelly, one of the suspects in the
city jail, charged with having held up and
robbed Alonzo Trudgian last Tuesday
night, at the corner of Colorado and Mer
cury streets, was positively identified as
one of the highwaymen this afternoon bt
Trudgian.
"I would know that man's voice any
where on earth," said Trudgian, after talk
ing a few minutes with the prisoner. "1
shall never forget the way he spoke to me
from behind. That voice made a lastink
impression. I knew the proper man was
behind the bars as soon as I heard him
speak."
Both Kelly and Frank Butler, the other
suspects, were sent to the county jail this
afternoon to await trial for highway rob
bery.
this country when he was only six nlotha
of age, settling first in Wisconsin and
shortly after removing to Iowa.
lie was appointed to the United States
nmilitary academy from Iowa from which
institution he graduated in the year 18;4.
Ilis first military service was as seconr
lieutenant of the Fourteenth U. S. in
fantry.
For some years he was stationed at
Fort Douglass, near Salt Lake, at which
place he was married. lIe was with
(;Cneral Crook in his memorable campaign
against Sitting Bull in 1876 and later on
was stationed at Fort Robinson, Neb. lie
was mustered out of the regular army
June 1o, 1883, and shortly after took
up his residence in this city where he
has been an honored and much respected
citizen ever since.
W\hen the Spanish-American war broke
olit Colonel Lloyd was made lieutenant
colonel of the Third U. S. volunteer cav
alry, one of the rough rider regiments.
lie was appointed to the command on May
14 and was mustered out September to
of the same year.
BAD MEN BEATEN
BY THEIR MATES
F. A. Gilmore, J. F. Green and Frank
Butler, three prisoners at the city jail,
were charged with assault and battery
by Chief of Police Reynolds this after
noon, and when they shall have served
their time they will be held to answer to
the new charge.
Chief Reynolds was attracted by noises
and cries in the city jail and running down
stairs, he found the three men above
named beating Tom McGil and W. S. Wil
martih, the newspaper men who were in
jail to sober up. Before the chief could
interfere the newspapers men had been
terribly beaten about the body and head
and it is said Wilmarth is seriously hurr
JUDGE HARNEY IS
TOO ILL TO COME
COURT ADJOIIRNID ON ACCOUNT
or INDISPOSITION OF THE
JURIST.
CLANCY IS OFF HUNTING
SO NOTHING IS ON TAPIS
Courthouse Is as Busy as a Bee Hive
on Honey-harvest Day, Owing to the
Fact That Nearly Everybody Wants
to Be Eleceted to Something or to
Help Elect Somebody to Something.
Bictween jurors, applicants fr t'oal citi
enshlip paperslwyrs, Iawycrs, court officers and
sprctators, thcre were two goud siz'edl
audiences in the( corridorl of tile (lllty
court today, but theire was Iothitii diIilg,
and the crowd dispersed lisapl)poitld.
Judge larlley is ill and s.ltl word that
he would Ie unabile to ake up tilhe law ;an
motion calendar or anlly of thel ce)it busi
ness today. The following mlitios and
ex-parte nlatters were sat by the ct.rlt for
today, but because of the inlil),,sitinll of
the judge were poltpollned:
W. C. oliomer against the Nolthelrn
Pacific railroad, dllel rr.r; J. R. Ct.' ightoit
against E. N. Ilarwood and others, Idemutr
rer; Mary N. I'ottage agaiist N. ('arroll
and others, slttlelnltl t of .tatlcn(llit ; I.ouis
)Dupuis against Geiorge '. )Doll aIl others,
motion for a new trial; Tiilothy Nolan
against the Montana C('etral Railway com
panFy, motion to vaclate setting; William II.
Hlamilton and orthers against J. J. G(ambet.rs
and others, imotion for a nIew trial; Maximne
Ielande against the City of Itilte, settle
ment of bill of excepiltions; May Clay
bourne against J. S. C(.layhourne, plaintilf's
proofs; II. C. Madsoe against J. A. Gra
ham and others, motion for default.
He Is After a Grizzly.
Judge Clancy is out chasing the elusive
grouse in the mountains, so that all the
nimas of justice have stopped runling with
the exception of that at I)epartment II.
Election is the absorbing topic tunder the
big clock. The county officials, almost all
of whom are calndidatets on sOllme ticket or
another for re-election, are too bIusy with
the glad hand to take too active a part in
county affairs, and at every cornttr of the
(Continued on 'age Three.)
HAYES REFUSED TO
FILE NOMINATION
IT IS CLEAR THAT M'CLERNAN CAN
NOT DEPOSIT PAPERS WITH
THE STATE'S SECRETARY.
Dispatches from Ielena relative to the
filing of the certificate of nominatioin of
Judge McClernan by the secretary of state
made it quite clear that Mr. Ilayes refuses
to file the paper.
As to whether it is necessary for the
nomination to lie filed with the secretary
of state at all is a question that lawyers
differ upon. The only law on the subject
is contained in Section 1312 of the Civil
Code, which provides as follows:
"Certificates of nominaltion of candi
dates for office to le filed by the electors
of the entire state, or of any division
or district greater than a county, must be
filed with the secretary of state. Certifi
cates of nomination for county, township
and precinct officers must be filed with
the clerks of the respective counties
wherein the officers are to be elected."
It has always been the custom to file
the nominations of the district judges
with the secretary of state, whether the
district comprised one or more counties,
but many lawyers maintain that where the
district is in one county it is only neces
sary to file with the county clerk.
PRESIDENT BROUGHT
TPA HALT ON
STRIKE
Roos It Cannot See His
W Clear to'Next Step
i~n Solving It
HOPE OF COMPROMISE BY
ARBITRATION STJLL HELD
Mitchell Refuses to Talk and Seenis to
Think That Intervention by the Chief
Executive Is Now at an End-Miners'
Unions Are to Appeal to the A. F. of
L. for Aid in Continuing Strike-Dyna
miters Are Busy Once More.
r., AS.;I , IA It 1'1t ,
W a s h i n g t o n , ( )M t . n.- I ' r , 'i d t , t R o o s e.
veIt is hrlkilg .idly methlod y which
there tmily hit' feI'.d tral act , in se'ttling
the coal . t. ike. Ili, .'l intt .a bi.,.is have
It ll ' rieql('stt( l to look c.tr f'iilly inti the
litis whicih mi ,y have Ai Il. riig Ill tle
ulhjt and seitt ii thu. , s ;Illy sr.tet ue
inulr whirh hl l l Ian', rl. ,So fr noth
ing has I ',., fount.
T'Illiti is I1 I 'y o, f hluIl" , bill it Is
Itjihtir Iifa llillnt, in v t i ll Illo l , ;litsile ofl
the coal operators. 't his si thai t h inget
Il il t Il ll d IIo ( ll alhitraliion may ell
tit.in . The Illi ilnt ir re willi ng to con l(. i tii(
to ;rbilration tf all ,ttlli,, .. int, oi'er
i is i tin iti ti llill I tnipl ofl ' ;.Ill iltt tiollt
to : uI linlil,'d \Iei th . i l helitig in .ubmlt
illivi oal ca es lof diseim l (i , lt n (ll
ll ,y'rs ;uod rlul hrte to th1 mulut, of
'Hnnii on pleah s in tiI. ,listricl.s ,he.l(, lthe
\\hat th ' ul ult i ll t hi" ;bi . ti ', are
trying ll} a ; r lI . is wilt , 'h r .a n.illel
geI tnl of a bliill;ution m .ay is ct h I. , .r
open. I. i l ls plan, even th nu,;h i t d oI s tot
lout- p'it.',' II hope of ue,'., ",",, is thC
mily til(,' ill sight aI t pr ' , Iout.
Situation It, More Acute.
'lros wrt ho' %% l ht ave r i icussrtl the maller
hhwith ll p, sil.h. t think that l., lh, siltu
ation ,I (uts Hor r; l at 1 i le, otlll parl'lic", ill
th, inteilrn, s.x of lh, , pl l l I, b .l . lii . I t , l y he
i nercrl to n.cept it or suiim thing i of u
similar it ti,''. I ha t the I, stlhdelnt is
veiy much in earrlt,'t o, ,hlm ftlwn the
conf. re..nc s ,in the sutlje, t t..'t cuntinou
lit thill W hite home,.
So ei' t ly \\il]olln oIf tlt- l ago il rlllral
d| ltlinlt it, ( .rr lH I ). \\ ight, (m uaunia
,ion..r of Libor, rnd "1 s k I). Sarrgent,
cou i :,ionl r of i lm igrationlll , were ( ;IImn, g.l
thox.s ,hkio saw lhie presi,!nt thoday, and
it is t ,dhrstood all of lhthem disult:,s'd the
sllik,' sitlaltlo tith him.
N o m i , i tl .,tl l,.a ,'t+.l c',u l be o, lhil.ltl
at the \\ hiht haue as to Ihte prol 'm,a of
Ith ;l onntlrv asl'l n work, althbu h it way
:dnliht ,l lh;,t the'se was "a go'at d ald
Komi; o " I hil h it woul hbe ini lxpl'lie'nt
to umake public It thl prrsent time. No
lltimatio wl i s g eI e as to wh.lth r the
wtmilark tefrrl'td t the co1 l 11 ctl it the
\\ h it " h o u se o r o lhb ; n el'o ,ti. tiois.
Portland Gives Liberally.
Par lm lh l, ( hii., ()(-I. 1 t." -o. f l l unlions|+
of I'otht uld have alh ,ely pled.. l $:*,d 0,
to help the I'unsyla,, li oa l ' n] llinert .
A Imlttlog of the pr, sil, Ilms of the car
ious unionI , hIan 111.4.1 called fur luiolr
saw and it is xplct'' thai t da l$ ,o0* : I
No Further Conference.
New York, Oct. ii.- It was stated to
day at the ollice of I. It. lThomas, chair
man of the board of dircctors of the Er.e
road that the reports to the effect that
tlhere w;y likely to be on Tuesday of
nicxt weeR further conference with Seta
tors .unay, 'latt a.id P'enrose, were intcor
rect. Thle stat.ementt issued by Mr. Th'omasta
at the conclulsion of the collferetnce oiu
Friday morniing deftinitely covered the sit
uation.
It is explained that in the early con
ferences with the civic fleration certainl
Ipropositions had ieeni submitted byv Mr.
'Ihomllas. These propositions are ulnder.
stood to he tlie bIasis of all the negotla
tions oii the part of olperatoirs ever nince
atil to which thei operators adhere. 'These
propositionls were, first, the aanthracite
comlpaies do Inot undertake in the slight
est mtianiner to discriniitnate against memC!n
hers of the IUnited Mine Workers of
(Continued on Page Three.)
SLUSH SLINGERS
FULL OF BOOZE
MIX IT UP IN A SALOON AND LAND
IN JAIL-HEINZE MEN,
OF COURSE,
Toni McG;ill and W. S. Wilnarth, two
of liinize's cartoonists oni the staff of
l;augustus' press, ran amuck last night in
the saloon of A. I.. Green. The menti were
evidently imbibed with the spirit of
licinze's local sheet as well as with a lot
of cheap whisky.
They wandered into Green's saloon and
after ordering several drinks and a box of
cigars, refused to pay for them. A rough
house resulted and the slush-slingers
wound up in the city jail.
P. A. O'Farrel, editor of the sheet for
which McGill and Wilmarth work, went to
the jail to bail out his artists, but find
ing them in a drunken condition he de
cided to leave them behind the bars to
sober up. They spent part of a pleasant
night in jail, and this morning forfeited
bail, failing to appear to answer the charge
against them.

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