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The Butte inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, October 20, 1902, Evening, Image 5

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HOPE ENTERTAINED
FOR HIS RECOVERY
USE OF ROENTGEN RAYS ON DOC
TOR CAYLEY HAS A BENEFICIAL
EFFECT AND HE MAY LIVE.
IS NOW ABLE TO TAKE
HIS FOOD WITHOUT HARM
%r. Hanson Decides That an Operation
Wilt Not Be Necessary, Unless a
Change Comes for the Worst-Noth
ing Has Been Learned of the Where
abouts of the Woman in the Case.
After struggling between life and death
for a week, Dr. H. A. Cayley gives ex
cellent indications of recovering. Dr.
Hanson, his physician, who has been with
out hope ever since he was called upon
to attend the wounded man, expressed him
self today as believing that Cayley had
a fair chance to get well.
The change of condition is directly due
to the X-Ray examination made yesterday
by Dr. Hanson in an effort to locate the
bullet. It has been found that this use
of electricity has materially relieved the
paralysis from which Dr. Cayley was suf
fering. Should it be determined that this
change of condition is due to the use
of the X-Rays it will be of great value
to the medical profession. Electricity Is
being used to wonderful advantages and
it is not impossible that it may prove
effective in treating cases of this char
acter.
Is Able to Take Food.
Since the use of the Roentgen rays, Dr.
Cayley has been able to take food with
beneficial results.
Dr. Hanson has changed his plans for
treating the wounded man in the light of
these developments and he will not oi,,:r
ate on him at present unless Cayley de
sires the knife to be used. Dr. Hanon will
continue to use the X-Ray treatment in an
experimental way and it is possible that
be will be able to make some very valu
able scientific discoveries. This case, hav
ing already attracted a great deal of at
tention, bids fair to become famous be
cause of its medical significance should
Cayley recover.
Nothing further has been heard from
the West concerning the whereabouts of
Madam La lBonte. Detectives are scour
ing the large cities for her. It is ru
mored that she has gone to San Fran
cisco.
BIG POWER HOUSE
IS BURhEO DOWN
HELENA LIGHT AND TRACTION COM
oANY PLANT TOTAL LOSS
FROM FIRE TODAY.
BUSINESS INTERESTS ARE
TIED UP FROM CALAMITY
Impossible to Get Light and Power Until
the Plant Has Been Rebuilt, or Trans
formers Secured-The Loss Is Esti
mated at $45,000, With Insurance at
$30,000-Caught in the Roof.
[SI'.'IAI. TO INTER MOUNTAIN.]
Helena, Oct. so.-Business establish
snents using light and power, and the en
tire street railway system of Helena are
tied up as the result of the burning of
the city power station of the Helena Light
and Traction company, near the Montana
Central depot, at I o'clock this morning.
A short-circuited wire caused the build
ing to blaze.
The flames started in the roof, and be
fore sufficient water could be thrown upon
them the entire building was gutted.
Actual destruction by fire did not cause
such great damage, but heat and flames
caused the delicate electrical machinery to
warp. This makes it useless and a total
loss.
The power-house used power front the
Canyon Ferry dam. In reality it was a
big transforming statiin.
All the power for the street railway,
the electric light system, elevators, news
papers and lights in business houses and
homes came from the plant.
Power still comes from the dam, but
it is of a high pressure and alternating,
and therefore a difficult proposition.
Orders have been sent to Butte for
transformers, which would make possible
use of the current direct.
Until they come, it will be impossible
to obtain power and lights. Every street
car in the city is standing where it was
caught when the power was shut off. To
night, lack of lights will be felt in all
parts of the city.
The loss is $45,ooo; insurance, $3o,ooo.
lVE sell
Rocky Fork, -
i Sheridan, '',,,
Rock Springs,
Pennsylvania Anthracite.
Colorado Anthracite.
BUTTE SEWER PIPE & TILE CO.,
Buy the best and keep your horse
fat. Whitmore keepts it,
401 S. Main St.
Telephone, 328a
They All Say So Who Know
There's Nothing in the. State to Equal the Stock Shown in
Hennessy's--the Biggest, Best and Busiest Store in Butte
,----------- ------ -----------------~--- ----- ~----~~-~--------
/Here's Bargain Black Silk
Sale
Special for Today This Week
This Wceek
185 Coats and loaks ~ A lot of black slks here that cannot be
A duplicated at the prive. We bought sev
eral hundred yards of each kind from the
Worth Up to $25.00 a Garment maker. Ile made a low price to us. We
make low prices to y,,u. If you're want.
ing a black taffeta silk for any purpose,
sec tia. se wondrous vain.,s.
ehoice $9.85 Each nll UnderPriced
i9-inch black taffeta silk. Regular 69c
These garments are made of kersey, velour and montagnac cloth, short and medium lengths. Broken 75c values for..................
sizes and odd lots in a variety of colorings. But they have to go regardless of cost or consequences. 24-inch black Swiss taffeta
Regular $1.oo values for. .........
Sizes 32 to 42 Inches. Values Up to $25.00 24iInh French tffetao .........85
M arked to $9.85 ach 27 inchi lblack French tiffcta. 75c
Regular $1.25 values for.........
S........... . 27-inch black taff, ta silk. Every yard
guaranteedl . Regular $1.5o $100
Autum n's Latest Novelties ............ tff silk. d
guaranteed. RegIular $175 -$1.25
The Very Swellest Styles of the Season 7';inlc for.e s.......
2 7-inch black taffeta silk. (;uaranteed
Novelty coats and long garments. No two alike. Exclu.ivc styles, show,vn nowhere else in the state. and absolutely water p .oof. $1.50
Handsomely made of the finest of Kerseys, Zibelines, Velours and heavy 'eaun de Soic. Blouse, box and Regular $2.00 values for.......
Monte Carlo styles, together with the 52 and 6u-inch long coats. Prices from $22.50 to $82.50 each. lg5inch $l.75 alues ftr. i. $1.50
IKersey eloth Goats Kersey Monte Catlos Women's Long Cloaks " "
Only $6.75 Each Only $18.75 Each Only $12.75 Each P & L." KIds
Women's kersey cloth coats, 27 inches Women's kersey cloth Monto Carlo Women's kersey cloth cloaks, 48 inches Fine French Quality
long, double-breasted box front, half coats, 30 inches long, with bell sleeves, long, with half tight fitting back, lined
tight back, lined through with Italian large cuffs, lining of good serviceable throughout with Italian serge cloth, h!gh
tight back, lined through with Italian satin, cape over shoulders vrith stitched
serge cloth, storm collar. The best coat strapping; colors tan, navy and black; storm collar, warm and serviceable gar- 900 Palrs on Sale This Week
ever shown at rhe price; black only; sizes stylish and rich; sizes 34 to 40 inches. nent; colors castor and black; sizes 34 to "P. & L." Prench Kid Gloves In Two.elasp
34 to 44 inches. Price only $6.75 .each. Prfce only $18.75 each. 40 inches. Our price only $12.75 each. Lengths, Slz's 5 3-. to 7 1.2
These French gloves have one row of stitching
Kersey Cloth Coats Kersey Monte Carlos Women's Long Cloaks on back, and are shown in all the latest fall color
Only $8.50 Each Only $27.50 Each Only $23.50 Each ings and evening shades.
Our $1.25 Gloves for 49c
Women's kersey cloth coats. 27 inches Women's kersey cloth Monte Carlos, 52-inch Kersey cloth cloaks; double
long, coat collar, half tight fitting back 30 inches long, lined through with Skin- breasted ┬║box front, half tight fitting See Glove Advertisement on page 12
ner's satin, bell sleeves with cuffs, silk back, lined through with good satin,
and lined through with satin; colors navy, velvet collars; color tan and castor; effec- cuffs on sleeves, storm collar; colors castor Mall Butte
tan and black; sizes 34 to 44 inches; tive and well made; sizes -4 to 38 inches. and tan; sizes 34 to 40 inches; excellent Orders HennHessy Butte
magnificent values. Onliy $8.50 each. Price $27.50 each. values. Only $23.50 each. To /Sont
AFFIDAVIT IN iHE
DAVIS WILL CASE
NEW YORK LAWYER MAKES DEPOSI
TION RELATIVE TO INGERSOLL
ESTATE-CLAIM FOR FEE.
The deposition of Simon H. Stern, a
lawyer of New York, was today filed in
.he case of the estate of Robert G. Inges
soll against Henry A. Roote and othets
to collect $95,oo0 alleged to be due said
estate as attorney fee for services ren
acred by Mr. Ingersoll in the Davis will
c ntest
The only thing of any Interest to the
tvcncral public in this deposition is the
tcstimcny of Mr. Stern as to the kind
.,ess of manner of Mr. Ingersoll. The
dcposition relates to a conversation where
in Mr. Roote was consoling Colonel Inger
sc.ll on account of his inability to pay
tie colonel as much as was first agreed
.,pon, on account of the loss of the hank.
Mr. Stern says: "I remember Roote
a.id, perhaps half a dozen times, how sor
,y he was; how awful it was that they
were disappointed and Colonel Ingersoll
said over and over again: 'You did the
rest you could and I am satisfied, Henry.'
I remember that perfectly well, because
I thought it was very lovely of Colonel
Ingersoll to be as philosophical and kindly
as he was about it; it seemed more as if
he was comforting Mr. Roote instead of
Mr. Roote comforting him by reason o'
the loss. It impressed itself very deeply
on my mind, his kindness of manner."
BEFORE THE WOMEN'S CLUB
Madame Charlotte Davenport to Lecture
Wednesday Afternoon.
Madame Charlotte de Gollere Daven
port, the distinguished specialist in physi
cal culture, will lecture before the
Woman's club in Ellis hall Wednesday
evening next.
Madame Davenport has achieved great
distinction in her line, and the ladies ot
Butte are certain to extend to her a fine
reception on this occasion.
REGISTER TODAY.
ALIENS BECOMING
CITIZENS TO VOTE
FOUR HUNDRED HAVE ALREADY
SWORE ALLEGIANCE TO UNCLE
SAM SINCE SEPTEMBER 1.
Some of the applications for citizenship
:iay not be heard in time for registra
tion, as there is a large numnber yet to
be heard and new applications are be
ing made every day. The judges devote
all the time they can spare to this work,
'ut there are other important mlatters
which require attention. 'This should
irath those .contemlplatinig citizenship to
nlt wait until the last minute before mak
ing application, for their final papers. The
bes: tile to attend to this matter is be
tweeni elections, when the court has
i lclty of time.
Since the first day of September about
oo0 persons have been admitted to citi
zenship and about 7,0 applications have
been filed. This leaves about 300 applih
cations yet to be heard, and with the
new ones coaming in each day the courts
will have more than they can do to admit
them all.
M'GILLIC AND HENDERSON
BREAK UP LITTLE FEAST
Drop in on Mercury Street Banqueters
and Arrest the Entire Party on
Charge of Stealing Sheep.
A feast of mutton was unceremoniously
Interrupted yesterday afternoon in a cabin
in the rear of No. 335 East Mercury street
by Officers McGillic and Henderson, who
arrested all who sat about the crude ban
quet board, for the stealing of a sheep
from the shop of a butcher on East Park
street.
The epicureans who were taken to the
station are Bill Shea, Paddy Harris, Pat
rick Morrison, Louis Roleau, John Ryan,
James B. Jordan, W. B. Jennings and
Charles Anderson.
Many of those arrested are old offenders
who have been told by Judge Boyle to leave
the city.
IS GOOD NEWS FOR
WESTERN MONTANA
NORTHERN PACIFIC TO PUT ON AN
OTHER TRAIN BETWEEN BUTTE
AND HAMILTON ON THE FIRST.
A letter reccived in Butte yesterday
f:,in Mr. C. S. Mellen, president of the
N0sthutn Pacific railway contains the an
olrittccent that a local train between
:,citc and HIamilton will be put on, corn
, t.ceng with November a. This will be
ion Inews to many people in western
M ontana and to the communities along
ihe lines of the Northern Pacific between
;laniltonl andl Butte.
\\ hea three through trains were put
' , last spring it was believed by the man
a, nlnt of the Northern Pacific that
t::cse trains would be sufficient to take
care of local traffic. In this they were
n.i .ppoit ted.
ihe matter of providing satisfactory
ac omunodations for the local passenger
,:.,lc in this region has engaged the at
i(l.tlon of President Mellen, General Man
rnor Cooper, as well as the local super
Iti.ndents. The putting on of ant addi
tl,,nal ocal train is the result.
The management is entitled to credit for
is disposition to meet the needs of the
;,ihe.
EXPRESS DRIVERS AND
HELPERS TO ORGANIZE
Two Thousand Men In New York Ready
to Protect Themselves-No
Strike.
New York, Oct. so.-More than 2,ooo
drivers and helpers employed by the lead
ing express companies, have, at a meet
Ing in Jersey City, formed the Express
men's Protective association. The or
ganization will be affiliated with the
American Federation of Labor, and the
express companies will be asked to rec.
ognize the union.
Demands will be made for an eight
hour day, an increased wage scale and pay
for over-time. Officers of the new organi.
zation declared there will be no strike.
JUDGE KNOWLES IS
SEVERE ON ALIENS
PUTS THEM ALL THROUGH RIGID
EXAMINATION AS QUALIFICA
TION TO BECOME CITIZENS.
Judge Knowles was greeted by the usual
bunch of applicants for citizenship this
morning. lie is getting rather out of
patience with those who put off declaring
their intentions until just before election.
During the course of the morning the
judge took occasion to lecture a number of
mcn on this point, and then asked why they
did not prcsentt their applications before,
they invented all sorts of lame excuses.
Of the large number that appeared this
morning but six were able to pass muster
of Judge Knowles' rigid examination.
Peter F. lHosch of Helena was. dis
charged from bankruptcy this morning in
the federal court.
The petition for final discharge from
banmkruptcy of C. M. Bates was filed and
Judge Knowles set the hearing of it for
November Ir at Helena.
J. A. G;ordon's petition for voluntary
bankruptcy was adjudicated and referred
to Referee Ballict in Helena, and will be
heard on November 4. Gordon is a resident
of HIavre. His assets are given at $.-69 and
liabilities.
Owing to the proximity of the end of
the present term of the federal court in
Butte, a large number of cases are being
transferred to Helena where the November
term openls tlhe first Monday of next
month with Judge Knowles on the bench.
Fred Lawler and George Brown, both
charged with selling liquor to the Indians
will have their trial at Helena. Harry
Wiper and Jolt Lynch, who were Indicted
for cutting timber on government lands,
were transferred to Helena where they will
be tried during the November term.
Will you buy a home valued at $z,ooo
for $6.9o per month. No first payment. No
rent or Interest. Call or enclose ce post
age for full Information to Office at, Ows
ley block, Butte, Mont.
REGISTER TODAY.
( Hotel Arrivals)
At the Thornton.
J. P. Woolnan, Ifelena; J. S. Rosenfiell,
(Chicago; ). F. Haber, iatden, Germany;
William ()'Sullivan and wife, Ilhelena; S.
J. Monarch, Kentucky; Cyrun Robinson,
New York; ('. W. Whitley, Salt I.ake; W.
I;. IEhbs, New York; Chester Deering, San
Irancisco; A. E. Salvien, Charles I.audin,
(;rangslrry, Sweden; A. Ilansan, Kop
sing, Sweden ; l:. Roth, Stockholm,
Sweden; C. W. ILynde, Chicago; W. A.
Goodwin, San Francisco; E. A. lHough,
Minneapolis; Willard S. Morse, Mexico;
A. I.. Walker, New York; Dr. A. Borguis,
(;arnet; W. S. Ferris, Salt ILake; J. Parker
Veasey, Great Falls; C. I. Whaley, Spo
kane; J. II. Durston, Anaconda; Charles
F. Jackels and wife, M. Stark, New Yrk I
M. Matsdorf, Seattle; J. R. T'heise, New
York; I). W. Camlin, Culumbus, 0.; IH.
A. Cate, Baltimore, Md.; W. II. Wright,
William Castecle, Spokane; E. 1. Duna,
New York; C. C. Willis, Plains.
At the Finler.
J. Povente, Algiers; George Wilson,
IIaverly's Minstrels; Fred 1,. Kline, liel
grade; M. II. Parker, loulder; S. IL. Mon
arch, Kentucky; Edwin Lloyd, Divide; II.
V. Warnacke, Ana:conda; M. A. Warren,
Lincoln; S. J. Seal, Helena; W. A. Sel
vidge, St. Paul; George Drain, Omaha; A.
C. Mason, Tacoma; O. G. Clay, St. Paul;
M. J. Fahey, Pony; Carl Rasch, Helena;
J. F. Walker, Minneapolis; Dr. E. F.
D)odds and wife, Deer Lodge; W. A. Fran
cis, Omaha; O. Crutchfield, Missoula;
Charles Crawford, Fort Benton.
At ti.e Butte.
W. W. Berrilnan, New York; S. S.
Deatherage, Chicago; Geoffrey Lauzier,
Missoula; John I)olan, Dillon; W. A.
Jones, Milwaukee; J. If, Turner, W. A.
State, Chicago; B. K. Loeb, Helena; A. J.
Morrison, Whitehall; P. H. Wickman, H. L.
Sherlock, John Flaherty, Boulder; W. A.
Thompson, city; Fred Fisher, John Fisher,
Basin; D. Curtin, St. Paul; N. W. McCon
nell, Helena; Sol Silverman, Butte; Chas.
A. Parker, San Francisco; C. S. Lorrin,
Miss Beaupre, St. Paul; Harry Ganz, Kan
sas City; J. S. Hopkins, Forsyth.
All kinds of coal and wood.
@ITIZI4NI' QOAbL O.
No. 4 East Broadway.

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