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The Butte inter mountain. (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, November 03, 1902, Evening, Image 4

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DAILY INTER MOUNTAIN
isued Evte E iagE, E.oept Sunday.
INTER MOUNTAIN PUBLISHING CO.
Address all mall to Inter Mountain
Publishing Company.
s6 West Granite Street, Butte, Mont.
Dlicial Paper of Silver Bow County and
City of Butte.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Per year, by mail, in advance........ $?.0So
By carrier, per month.............. .75
TELEPHONE NUMBERS:
Editorial Rooms ...........48-(3 rings)
Business Office............428-(r ring)
The Butte Inter Mountain bas branch
effces at Anaconda, Missoula, Bozeman
and Livingston, where subscription and ad
vertising rates will be furnished upon ap
plication.
The Inter Mountain can be found at
the following out-of-town news stands:
Eastern News Company. Seattle, Wash.
Shanks & Smith, hotel Northern,
Seattle, Wash.
Salt Lake -News Stand, Salt Lake, Utah.
Twenty-fourth Street News Stand,
Portlal.j Hotel, Portland, Ore.
PostoHfce News Stand, Chicago, Ill.
REPFBLICAN STATE TICKET.
Sor Associate Justice
W. L IHOLL.O\VAY of Ga:latin
County.
For Member of Congress
JOSEPH M. DIXON oc Missoula
County.
REPUBLICAN COUNTY TICKET.
State Senator
hLALCOLM GILLIS.
Representatives
RICHARD J. OA I ES.
JOHN W. MASTERSON.
GUS J. STROMME.
WILLIAM EDDY.
CARROLL G. DOLMAN.
JOSEPH CORBY.
C. N. DAVIDSON.
M. E. LE BLANC.
CYRUS RETALI.ACK.
HARRY BLUMKIN.
KENNETH J. McRAE.
R. STANAWAY.
bistrict Judge
J. S. S!IROPSHIRE,
Sheriff.-
FRED H. KOHL.
Co'inty Attorney..
JOHN R. GRICE.
County Treasurcr-
J. V. LONG.
County Assessor
I. S1 RASI3URGER.
County Clerk
A. E. W\IIIPPS.
County Auditor
R. G. H USTON.
County Supcrintendcnt of Public Ihltruc
tion
MISS ROSE A. BLAKB
Col :er-JAsiES TACHELI,
Public Administrator-
J. CIIAUVIN.
SILVER BOW TOWNSHIP.
Justices of Peace
C. J. STEVENSON.
J. S. SIIANLANKER.
Constables
JOHN SHEA,
THOMAS M'CRIMMON.
SOUTH BUTTE.
Justices of Peace
GEORGE II. CHAPMA.\,
WALTER CARNS.
Cn nstables
R. T. OGLE.
AR THUR H. GILLETT.
WALKERVILLE.
Jr: "ces of the Peace
E. H. COLDEN,
ARCIIIE LEWis.
Constables
ED. BROCUGIITON.
WIILLIAM MILLETTE.
MEADL...VILLE.
Justices of the Peace
GEORGE DANz.ER
JUDGE MILLER.
Constables
RUBE I.ANYON,
WILLIAM WILLIAMS.
GERMAN IO',VNSHIP.
Iust..e of the Fetrcec
MILO FRENCH.
Constable
AMOS KNAPP.
MOND)AY, NOVEMBER 3, 1902.
DON'T VOTE TO TIE UP THE TOWN.
A vote for the Heinze ticket tomorrow
will be a vote to tie up the town. Busi
ness interests are not enjoying that de
gree of prosperity in Butte that they iave
done in the past, and one of the reasons
Is found in the curtailed registration
which is more than 2,500 less than two
years ago. For the most part this les
sened registration is in the wards where
miners reside. , It is a result growing out
of a war of litigation that has closed
mines and reduced the force in smelters.
This curtailment of labor has of neces
sity been carried into other parts of the
state to a corresponding degree. Work
in the lumber camps and in every allied
industry has necessarily been slackened.
But in Butte and Silver Bow county the
worst results are seen, They are ap
parent in the one thousand empty houses
in this city and in the two hundred and
more in Walkerville and Centerville. This
is the work of Mr. Heinze the self-styled
"savior of labor."
A vote for the Heinze sell-out ticket
tomorrow will be a vote to close more
mines and increase the number of empty
houses in this camp.
IT WILL BE A VOTE TO TIE UP
THE TOWN.
For the Good of Montana.
By the time the next regular edition of the Inter Mountain is from the
press the votes that will determine the result of the campaign will be in the ballot'
boxes. It has been an extraordinary campaign, especially in Silver Bow county.
Mr, Ileinze and his newspapers, particularly his campaign sheet in this city, have
resorted to methods that would shame any state or community. It is almost the
universal verdict that hie has damaged the cause for which he has been striving.
So far as the Inter Mountain is concerned it has presented and discussed
the issues fully and frankly and in a manner which leaves it no regret. No
line has been pencnd that needs either explanation or apology. s
With the issues before the people, there is no reasonable doult that the
electors of the slate will declare for the republican ticket. That ticket stands
for the best interests of all the people. One of the most important matters which
the citizens of this contly have to consider is whether they will indorse by their
votes the contention of Mr. Ilcinze that the legislature shall be turned over to'
his control and the judicial situation in the coutty reccive the approval of the
people. It is inconccivable that this will be done. The judiciary of Silver hlou
(counliy has Ibeen a millstone around tIhe neck of Montana. It has been a notice tq
outside capital that it can comie here only at the risk of confiscation. It has
been showni that the most flagrant "outrages have been perpetrated here ulpon t he
rights of property, with a result that law and justice have been made a mock-y.
It has cost litigants alt enormous sum of money, Mr. Ileinze included. Every
hltsiness interest in lutte and Silver Ilow county have suffered greatly by reason
of this.
There is scarcely a counlty in the state that has not beet a sufferer to a
greater or less degree. No interest has )beenl benefited except that of the lawyers.
The total loss to the people tmight lihe computed at many mnillions of dollars.
I',uler this systemi of strife and hitterness lhitte has gone' backward as a city
ani is likely to c,mtiiine to retrograde iunless the result of the election tomorrow
piromises relief.
It has Ibeen Mr. ltinze's Ipolicy to hght compting companies in the courts
and to protect their ilterests fr ot confiiscation tlhey have beei, forced to meet
him in his war of litigation. It has been an mifortunate and an expensive busi
ness for laboring men. ()net case alone cost the employes of the listoni & Montana
company $3S,,0oo in wages lost. In tiiany othlier cases hundreds of men have been
heartl'csly thlrown\ out of work for months at a time
'lhe Amalgamated companies have not sought to interfere with Mr. I iinze in
any legitimate mining operation where their own interests have not beeti first
assailed and puit in jeopardy. Nor have they any intention to interfere with him
in any way. So far as they are concerned lie cani remain in Ilutte and Montana
and carry on his own miningl operations as long as lie chooses to do so. ()I tlhe
other hand, it has been his lpolice and hiis boast that lie wioul drive the Amial
;gariated companies fronm the state, lie has done everything that lay in his power to
accomntplish this. As has been pointed ouit, this ihas been done with fearful loss to
thl Iecop'e of this comniunity and the state.
* ,.
No one can guess the millions of dollars that this policy onf flly and the oun
scrupulous methods by which it Ihas been carried ion through the coutrts has kept
out "of Montana. To es.timate thihs saiss to tihe mautwealth at $teo,uyo,,oim wouldi
not he to, place the ligures too high. The bulk of this has Ibeen kept out of the
pocket tif labor.
IT IS TIME FOR A CHANGE. THE STIGMA THAT RESTS WITH SUCH
CRUSHING WEIGHT UPON THE STATE MUST BE REMOVED. TOMOR
ROW IS THE DAY TO DO IT.
Under the Banner of Roosevelt.
The ine Weste isi for ou sevelt, irrespeclivte ii f, politcris, ai ,t is plain that
this fart will yi frcibly indirstd at the polls tomotrrow in all of the Wiestern
states in fti( (' lion. Never has a natio,;l ('ec.utiver' si complletely annihilated
party lines as ,.se)v\' lt. i la d in all partis of the colntrt amenl are rallying to his
support, as etidenrd by the rg;:manization of the "loo,.ctlt deto,':atst" antd stlt
l;r parties.
This coniition will r,t.ult in the election of many repuhlic:ua congressmen to
.nort,,w, \whllo will b sent to \\Washington for the purl o.e of assistin:g President
lRuos'velt carry tut his party's wis. pulicecs. It is saf., therefore, to predict that t
soime Ielanlcholy surlpri.es a\wait the democrats of the clntrllll y ; as the re;.tlt ofi to
itiorrow's e'ectioni, s.
In this state thie oppul :,ition is already eumccdling the election of the lioni. J. t
I. lDiixn by the republlicans, anid lmanly democratis have expressed a desire to
see himn successful, for they are heartily in symplathy with tIle work of President
Roscevelt, anld Mr. Dixon will give to the adminiistration his earnest supplort.
It is recognized that the tariff must lie maintained, fotr Montaia's many iin
terCsts demCtaliI its retentiot, and tlhe tlecitoin of any other than Di)ion woIl lie t
ini direct opplosition to our vast wool interests.
()ne republican vote in congress traitn Montana at this time will be greatly
aplpreciated in Washlington, and will be substantially recogiized when the timeI
colies Iiy valu:able t gislation favoring the T'Ireasure state, t
The duty of tIhe pCoile of Moiitamia is Iu'ain. let thie dlcct ])ixon and a
rlepublican legislature inow, andl in two )years ihenlce they \\ill lie sure to send a re- a
pululicani United States senator to \\'ashlington. Then this state will ie utce more
in safe waters, rescued from tlhe breakers of demiocracy, and serenely sailing for
ward t i lpeace iul prosl)crity, wealth and thie well-Ileing of every citiizen.
@heerlnq News For Republicans.
Foriccasts of tomi,rrow's election from our ncighblioring states are gratifying aid
will act as an incentive to Montana rcltublicans to take olf their coats early and F
work for party sutccess as they have nlever worked blcefre. Front Idaho coniies the
wurd that a rel)tblicani congres.slmaln \sill surely be elected, as the people of that
state rccognize tlhe necessity of protecting their interests against tariLf linkiikcriniig,
whliichli has beeni thlrcatcncld.
L'tahl andl Nevada also Ipromise to get in line \with progress andl pro spIerity, for
it is conctdei in every ciinnionwiealth of the \Vest that nowY is the olitiorttnity of
our lpeople to mnake a stand for the ailvancelocnt of thleir country. \We mnust all c
juin hlands if we would secure the future againiist the want anid disaster of which
we have tasted too miuchl in days giole biy whenl the decocr:ats were at the whecel.
Everywhere in thIe \West the reipublicanls have dotlne yeonalln work in the canm
paign just closing, ant d it is sale to forecast a victory so delccisive that it will long lie
reiembercd in the annals of our history. It is now only a question of majoriics,
and let the peoplle roll ulI such a big imajority in favor of pirotcctioni anid adlace- i
man to \Washlingtuon, and MonitaIna, not being )chini the rest, will send the lion. J.
country's prosperity again.
Evcry \Wcstcrn state should, aniid undoubtedly will, se.nd a repntblican congress
nian to \\'ashingtoun and Montana, not being lichlind the rest, wil send the Ilon. J.
MI. D)ixon.
The Amalgamated companies employ
upwards of 15,000 men in their mines,
smelters, lumber and coal camps in Mon
tana. It is the wish and it is to the
Interests of these companies that their
laboring men shall be steadily employed
at the highest possible wages with an
eight-hour day's work. To this policy
they are irrevocably committed. To ald
them in carrying out this policy vote
down the sell-out ticket of Mr. Heinze.
Has any laboring man or business
man of Butte or Silver Bow county a
written contract with Mr. Heinze, wit
nessed before a notary, to share w'th
him in any swag he may get In the event
that his sell-out game shall suooeed?
If he hasn't, where will he be in the
event of a sell-out?
VOTE THE REPUBLICAN TICKET.
LET CAPITAL COME IN.
None will deny that the development of
Montana has been seriopsly delayed by
the attacks which have been made upon
outside capital that has sought investment
here, The state manifestly should open
its doors to the people and capital of
other sections, and by every means insure
new-comers that here they can safely in
vest their money without fear of political
buccaneering leading up to legal confisca
tion.
Such conditions do not exist under the
present democratic regime, and there is no
reasotn to believe that a continuance of
that party in power would ever bring about
a change.
The record of the republican party on
all mailters affecting the public interests
is clear and praiseworthy. The people of
Montanal shoual encourage the development
of minies, the cultivation of fields and the
stocking of the ranges. The only way in
which their sincere intentions can be ex
pressed will be by electing the republican
ticket friom top to bottom in all parts of
the tate.
This sugge ti(on is addressed to the in
telligence of the electors of Montana, be
cause of the fact that the republican party
Ias contilcnce in them as ICmen of reason
IIho will inot be swayed by ilmaudliln en
treaties oa personal lines. It remains for
the discerninag citizens of Montana to
assert their convictions at the polls tomnor
row, and the Inter Mountain firmly bc
licves that they will give their stamp of
approval to the republican ticket.
VOTE THE REPUBLICAN TICKET.
SOME HEINZE SYMPATHIZERS AR=
TRYING TO IMPRESS PEOPLE THAT
IT IS GOOD FOR THE TOWN AND
GOOD FOR LABOR THAT THE FIGHT
AND WAR AGAINST THE AMALGA
MATED COMPANIES SHOULD BE
KEPT UP.
NO MAN SHOULD BE DELUDED BY
ANY SUCH IDEA. LET PEOPLE RE
FLECT UPON ITS FOLLY BEFORE IT
IS TOO LATE. TO KEEP UP TillS
FIGHT AND PARTICULARLY TO HOLD
UP AND STRENGTHEN THE HAND OF
HEINZE IN HIS ASSAULT UPON THZ
LARGEST INTEREST OF THIS TOWN
IS TO KILL THE TOWN.
IT WILL RESULT IN IRREPARABLE
INJURY.
VOTE THE REPUBLICAN TICKET.
THE EIGHT-HOUR LAW.
In nothing has Mr. Heinze so signally
failed as in his attempt to fool the
workingmen of Silver Bow county and
the state into the belief that the eight
hour law was in the slightest danger.
He started his campaign from the court
house stops with this falsehood on his
lips by the talk of an alleged conference
to find a way if possible to declare the
law unconstitutional.
The utter falsity of this statement
was immediately shown. The men at
that conference have made it plain that
the purpose of it was to arrange for put
ting the law into effect instead of in
terfering in any way with iLs operation.
The Amalgamated companies put the
eight-hour act into effect in all their
mines before the law itself became op
erative. That did not look like any in
tention or desire to evade it. Since
then the Amalgamated companies have
been authoritively committed to eight
hours as the maximum day's work in
their mines whatever may become of
the eight-hour law. Mr. Heinze's ghost
story is swept away by a breath. It was
a shallow attempt to fool and mislead
the workingmen of this camp, and it has
fallen as flat as any of the many sense
less things he has done. The eight
hour law is here to stay and the miners
know it.
VOTE THE REPUBLICAN TICKET.
FIGURES TO REMEMBER TOMORROW
The fall figures of the bureau of sta
tititis that have just been received from
\Vaslhington relating to our exports deal
with merchandise that is not, manu
factured, such as grain, cotton, petro
lcutm, cattle, provisions, etc. Comunodities
coming under this classification constitute
about .5 per cent of our total foreign
trade. Although the averages for i902
are somew\vhat less than they were for
the preceding year, the month of Septeni
ber shows that there will be an improve.
ment in this regard, owing to the heavy
exports that are being made in cotton.
Our foreign shipments of cotton this year
are nearly twice what they were in Sep
tenmber of 19oi, being 677,773 bales.
Already the agricultural products show
an increase approximating $8,ooo,ooo for
the month of September, the cotton ex
ports alone amounting to $29,930,815.
The foreign shipments of breadstuffs are
valued at $22,ooo,ooo, showing an increase
of $1,500,ooo over zpot. Offsetting the
leaves the net gain on agricultural com
modities at $8,ooo,0oo as noted above.
The heavy cotton shipments always come
in the fall and they continue for some
time, bringing a great influx of money
from abroad, which happily relieves the
strain on the Eastern money markets
Wvhich are reserves in order to move the
heavy crops.
This shows the importance of agri
cultural pursuits in America. They are
one of the mainstays of our great com
mercial system. Their returns come at a
season of the year when the most good
is accomplished by them. Owing to the
favorable national legislation of the domi
nant party, the farmers of the United
States are fortified against the aggres
sions of foreign producers and for this
reason they have found it to their benefit
to give their support to the republican
party.
The agricultural states to a unit are
republican. It is reasonably to be ex
pected, therefore, that the agricultural
districts of Montana will take their cue
from this condition anl assist in rolling
up a tremendous majority for the repub
lican party at the coming election.
VOTE THE REPUBLICAN TICKET.
Mr. Heinle i: working a sell-out game.
If he sold(put tomorrow, or the next day,
or at any future time, how much of the
swag would go to the men he has been
using and abusing in his interest? He
would throw down his expensive judges
and lawyers so hard that it would make
their teeth rattle. MacGinniss, Burdette
O'Connor and all his helpers and heelers
would get the back of the hand. Mrs.
Brackett would be swept from his pay
roll for he would have no pay roll. Sam
Martin could whistle for that "debt of
honor." Even the Chinese cook would
be left chattering and lamenting.
IT IS NOT GOOD FOR THE TOWN.
Vote a republican ballot tomorrow to
fill up the 1,000 vacant houses in Butte.
A vote for the Heinze bunco ticket will
be a vote to increase the number of
vacant houses in Butte, Centerville and
Walkerville. Continued litigation will,
at the present rate of decreased popula
tion, give Butte 2,000 vacant houes two
years hence. Miners, contractors, car
penters, mascns, painters, workingmen
in all branches of trade, will be the
severest sufferers. Vote the republican
ticket I
VOTE THE REPUBLICAN TICKET.
Mr. Heinze's campaign of the state
was directed against the interests of the
republican party. In every county out
side of Silver Bow he urged the election
of democrats to the legislature. In
Butte he has a mongrel ticket of his own
and he asks the aid of republicans to
elect it. No republican, be he a work
ingman or a business man, can afford to
allow himself to be led into such a trap.
Vote the republican ticket. It is a vote
for open mines, high wages and good
times for this camp.
VOTE THE REPUBLICAN TICKET.
Mr. Heinze is the Mad Mullah of Mon
tana. He flies the black flag. He
stands for disorder, closed mines, empty
houses and no work. No citizen can
afford to stand with him in such a cause,
the meaning and end of which is disas
ter, bankruptcy and ruin.
VOTE THE REPUBLICAN TICKET.
WHAT HAPPENED TWENTY
ONE YEARS AGO TODAY?
Why Just Read These Extracts From the
Files of the Inter Mountain of That
Date and Be Made Wise.
Archbishop McCabe's pastoral on the
"No Rest Manifesto" attracted consider
able attention.
It is said that the conspiracy in the
famous Star Route controversy defrauded
the government out of $9,ooo,ooo.
The effort of the British government to
negotiate a commercial treaty with France
has failed.
A valuable gold strike was made re
cently in the Summnit district in Colorado
and it is said that the owners have refused
$3,000ooo,ooo for the property. Judge Thomas
Bowen of Del Norte, Colo., is the chief
owner.
It is reported that Postmaster General
Jamnes will be succeeded by O. S. Filly of
St. Iouis.
It is reported that Baron James Roths
childs sustained a loss of $8,ooo,ooo on the
Bourse during October.
The Alice shipped four bars of bullion
this morning valued at $6.00ooo. The mine
is once more going at full blast.
Richards and Grix have been appointea
the Butte agents for the American Bible
association.
The Inter lountain announces a New
Year's edition which will be the largest
special edition that has ever been issued
in the Northwest territory.
J. Chauvin has opened a fast freight ser
vice between Butte and Silver Bow junm.
tion.
The first issue of the Montana News
made its appearance under the direction
of John S. and Harry II. Mills.
Alex Tarbell having resigned as super
intendent of the Bell mine, John McCon
nell has been appointed to succeed him.
Messrs. Dickey and Pattison of the
Western Union Telegraph company have
arrived in Butte and report that before
long the greatest mining camp on earth
will be connected by wire with the outside
world.
O, B. O'Bannon, one of the leading re
publicans in the territory residing at Deer
Lodge, has arrived in :'Butte.
VOTE THE REPUBLICAN TICKET.
Wood's
Pile
Suppositories
A Certain Cure for
Blind, Bleeding, Itch.
ing or Protruding
PILES
"I was troubled with itching piles
for ten years," says John M. Atherton,
Chicago, Ill. "After trying a dozen or
more remedies without success I
"nally bought a box of Dr. Wood's Pile
Suppositories and obtained relief at
Once."
For Sale by Newbro Drug Co. Sent
postpaid to any address in U. S.
Liquor Department
The doctors prescribe IRONDE.
QUOIT PORT WINE because it is
the best port wine for the delicate
taste and stomachs of women and in
valids.
Because its quality and purity make
it the best of tonic.
Irondequoit Port Wine, 14 years
old, quart ... .......$..2S
Irondequoit Port Wine, 8 years
old, quart ..... .... Loo
Irondequoit Port Wine, gallon... 4.oo
Newbro Drug Co.
Largest Drug House in the State
109 N. Main St., Butte.
The
Afternoon
Paper
Of the Great Northwes
The Butte Daily
Inter
Mountain
Established Twenty-One
Years. Gives to Adver
tisers
Most
For the Money
Six tIIlion Collars Spent by the
U. P. R. R. Co.
In zmproviig what was originally the
finest track in the West.
RESULT
A comparatively straight and level
roadbed ballasted with dustless Sher.
ruin granite, rendcri,,g possible the
hignest rate of speed, together with
the greatest degree of safety. The
magnitude of the work must be seen
to he appreciated.
WHAT DOES IT MEAN?
Solid comfort, s:curs:ty anu paceas
to our patrons.
ARE YOU GOING EAST?
If so, you cannot afford to go via any
other than this ROYAL HIGHWAY.
Further information on application
personally or by lette: to
H. O. WILSON, O. S. L,
Butte, Montana.
MONTANA
UNDERTAKING
COMPANY
I re sal Directors
bxpert Lmbalmers
1105. LAVELL, Prop.
Iho.,. Sullivan, Mga.
I'i cne 85. t12 E. Park, butt
For Light
The Cheapest,
the Best
For Heat
The chapest, the
most convenient
and best.
For Cooking
Saves labor, saves
money and food.
Gas Office
200 North Main Street
New Books
Capt. Macklin, Donovan Pasha, Ship
*f Dream, Stillman Gott, Temporal
;Power, Castle Craney Crow, Out of the
West, Speckled Birds and many others,
.I'so all kinds of stationery.
EVANS' BOOK STORE
114 N. MAIN ST.

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