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The Butte inter mountain. (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, December 19, 1902, Evening, Image 1

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VOL. XXII. No. 236. BUTTE, MONTANA, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1902. PRICE FIVE CENTS
PARTIAL RESPONSES
TO MESSAGES TO
THE POWERS
Hay Knows What They Intend
to Do as Much as They
Know Themselves.
GREAT BRITAIN WILLING
TO EMPLOY ARBITRATION
Germany Is Also Willing to Submit the
Matter to Us, With* Reservations
Italy Does Not Count and France is
Docile-Ecuadoreans Make Demon
stration to Show Sympathies for Cas
tro and Peruvians Offer to Fight.
BY ASSOCIATED I'PRF8.
Washington, Dec. 19.-Secretary llay
has received partial responses from the
governments of Great Britain, Germany
and Italy respecting the proposal to arbi
trate the Venezuelan difliculties.
Great Britain is favorable to arbitratmoi
with proper safeguards; Germany accepts
arbitration in principle, but finds a multi
tude of small adjustments to he made be
fore entering into the agreement; Italy, as
the junior partner of the allies, declares
that she is favorable to arbitration but will
be bound probably by the action of the
senior parties.
To secure these results the American
embassies at London, Berlin and Rome
have been working energetically to carry
out the instructions of Secretary Hay to
ascertain how the proposal would be re
ceived.
As far as England is concerned, the safe
guards referred to are believed to relate to
the question of guarantee, which is full ol
difficulty. In this connection, as indicated
in these dispatches yesterday, some con
sideration is again being given to the
feasibility of the assumption of responsi
bility for any award assessed against
Venezuela by responsible private agencies,
but the United States government is de
termined not to allow itself to be drawn
into the position of a guarantor in this
case for the precedent, once established,.
might require the United States to become
the financial backer of all South and Cen
tral America.
NOT WORTH WHAT IS
TO BE DONE ABOUT IT
-lowever, if private concerns can be in
duced to enter the field, the United States
government will do what it can to reduce
their risks. Secretary Hay, Sir Michael
Herbert, the British ambassador, and ben
ator Depew were in conference today and
it is suspected that this phase of the case
was touched upon, although no confirma
tion can be had at this time.
The German position presents the great
est differences, for not only does it in
volve a demand for apologies which are
extremely repugnant to Venezuela, but
also presents so many points requiring ad
justment that it is evident that many :lays
or perhaps weeks must elapse before the
adjustment can be effected and the case
prepared for arbitration.
And the danger of the delay in the frce
of a blockade which seriously cripple)l
neutral conmmerce and invites hostile col
lisions with the Venezuelans cannot be
over-estimated. The efforts of the United
States therefore, must be directed toward
hastening Germany's action on the arbitra
tion proposal.
The Italian position is of course of less
concern than that of the other allies. The
Italian ambassador here has been ex
tremely moderate and considerate, giving
Secretary Hay the impression that he is
well disposed to second any effort of the
United States to terminate the present
dangerous situation.
WHAT THE MONSIEURS
WILL ASK TO BE DONE
The French government has served
notice that without abating her claims, the
payment for which have been arranged, she
also claims the right to have the claims
of French citizens, which have arisen
since the adjustment above spoken of,
considered by the joint tribunal, which will
adjust the Venezuelan debts on a basis of
equality with those of the other nations.
This contention is strongly resisted by
(Continued on Page Three.)
LEST HE BE BURIED ALIVE
Pennsylvania Man Builds a Vault That Opens From Within
So That in Case He Comes to Life Again, He May
Find His Way Out and Reappear.
BY ABSOCIATED P.RESS
Williamsport, Pa., Dec. g9.-In the vault
which he invented and built as a safe
guard against premature burial the body of
John M. Pursel was laid to rest yester
day.
Never was a more unique burial wit
nessed in this part of the country. While
the sorrowing widow and mourners stood
about the quaint wall of stone masonry the
pallbearers slowly placed the coffin in an
iron compartment just large enough to re
ceive it. The coffin lid was not screwed
down, and immediately craftsmen com
mnenced to place a covering of steel over
the opening. This head was bolted and
cemented fast in such a manner that it
could not be removed from the outside
only by means of violent force. Should
the inmate revive, however, be can un
fasten the door of the "narrow house" by
working a combination lock on the inner
side and gain his freedom.
Died of Apoplexy.
Mr. Pursel died of apoplexy Tuesday
morning at the age of 73 years. Neither
his physician nor the nembers of his fam
ily entertained a doubt that life was ex
tinct, and yet every precaution that the
deceased had stipulated in life was ob
served to prevent burial alive. The cus
tomary teats were applied and the body
was carefully watched day and night for
60o hours, but no sign of returning anima
tion was noticed. Finally, when the coffin
VANDALS STEAL ST. JOSEPH'S SACRED VESSELS
Articles Comparatively Insignifioant in Value But Preoious for Their Assooliations Taken By Burglars, to Whose Identity There
Is no Clew--Open Outer Door With Skeleton Keys and Force the Closet Where the Vessels Are Deposited With a
Jimmy--Father Quesnal Is Greatly Grieved at the Loss--Church Is Poor and Just Started.
Burglars broke into St. Joseph's church
last night and robbed the altar of three
sacred vessels valued at $6o. In their
haste the thieves overlooked a gold chalice
and a gold ostensorium worth double were
Luna.
money. It is thought that they were
frightened away before they could com
plete their fell purpose.
Father Quesnal, pastor of St. Joseph's
parish, left the church at midnight last
night after carefully locking everything up
securely. He lives next door to the church
at lai, East Second street.
When the sexton, George Guiette, arrived
at 5 o'clock in the morning to make a fire
he found the hack door open and the
Theca.
traces of a burglar's jimmy on the closet
where the sacred vessels are kept. He at
once informed Father Quesnal of the loss.
The vandals had left no clew to their
identity. The back door had been opened
with skeleton keys, and the closet where
the altar vessels were .tored had benc
forced with a sharp instrument.
TIE VOTE WILL BE
VOTED OVER AGAIN
SPECIAL ELECTION IS TO BE HELD
IN YELLOWSTONE COUNTY TO
MORROW-CANDIDATES.
t"'IcA' L TO Ti I NI I I1N -'IOUN1 I.\1N.
Billings. Dec. 2o.-L'i,der the procla
mation of Governor Tole a special clcc.
tion will be htel in Y\llowstoic cunty,
htlorrow for the ofl;ee of mlcmber of the
legislature. In the I' ovclcr election C.
C. Beaver, relhblican, and Sidney F.
Morse, democrat, c:Ich rccived 735 votes.
To vote off the tic the special election is
to be held. (;reat interest is Ibingl taken
in the fight, and it is expected the vote
tomllorrow will he quite as heavy as in the
clection in November.
Polling lplaces will be opent at the 'usual
hours in all the prccncts of the counity,
each fully provided with clerks and juedges.
The expense will Ie considerable, but
under the law there is no other means
of deciding the election and issuingG a cer
tificate.
SHOT TO SAVE HIS OWN LIFE
talian Who Killed Three Men During the
Strike Is Acquitted.
Reading, l'a., e)cc. t9.-Ant(loni 'Ia
daoi, an Italian aged 17, who on July .4
last, shot John 'J'rayer Edward Ilarman
and Samuel Sitzel, a younttg Itmani who had
assaulted him after having tried to pick a
fight with him, while he was playing a
street piano, and all three of whoml sublse
quently died, was acqutitted in court here
today.
Tadaoi claimed that he killed the three
men to save his own life.
was placed in the vault the utmost pains
were taken to make sure that the mechan
ism of the patent head was in working
order.
Mr. Pursel always dreaded being buried
alive and left to the most horrible of fates.
He made a large collection of newspaper
clipping on the subject, and devoted years
of his life to personal investigation.
Visited Crematories.
Two years ago he visited several crema
tories, with the view of arranging for the
burning of his body after death, but to this
his wife and family objected. Then lie
conceived the notion of building the
vault.
With the aid of his son Thomas, he
built a tomb in Granview cemetery, this
city. The body of it is of solid masonry,
and it fits into the side of a hill. Five
compartments of iron were inserted fiori.
zontally, one for each member of Mr.
Pursel's family. Each chamber is shaped
similar to a coffin, and is open at the
outer end. A small stack carries all odors
out, and a perfect system of sewerage
provides for the carrying away of moisture,
All the steel heads which cover the com
partments are fitted with combinationl
locks of Mr. Pursel's invention. Should
he or the occupant of any of the other
chambers return to life the working of
the combination from within woul'loosen
the head, and an opening would Lvmade,
Mr. Pursel's body is the first to test
the merits of this novel mausoleum.
REV. FATHER QUESNAL.
The articles taken were a handsome
gold cilorium, the gift of the Right Rev.
John B1. Brondel, bishop of Helena, to the
parish; a luna and theca. Father Quesnal
feels deeply the loss.
"I feel deeply grieved over the bur.
glary," said Father Quesnal this morn
ing. "Although God, in Ils providence,
has been good to us and we have no reason
CZAR HAS PARDONED
HIS UNRULY STUDENTS
lY AS.SOI.a' I:nI Ip'RkS.
St. Petersburg, DIec. io.-The czar has
granted amnesty to the students who were
banished for rioting on his "name day."
lie telegraphed to the minister of the in
terior as follows: "let the studltis tiho
were banished for creating lisltrbances re
turn from Siberia, although they should
not for the present he allowed to live it
tows where there are high schtols. Care
must nieverthele, hbe taken that the young
imen onl their returnll Ie enttrustedl to tlhe
keeping of their faiilies, as such suirrnit I
ings will faiiiliarize themi with onrdler."
TheI telegraim. which is equivaleit to aln
impetrial decree. tard.ons the. 5' stl.udlents
exiled to Siberia in addlition to the 6,a
ttudents previously lparduoned.
ANIHRACITE MINES
KILL MANY MORE
IT IS TWICE AS DANGEROUS .T.
WORK IN THEM AS IN THE BI
TUMINOUS COAL FIELDS.;"
Iav 'as,,, IATEDI P11(% SS .
I'Philadielphia, I)c. Ig.--Nw that the
grievances of the coal Inliters inll Pnnkl )
vania are receiving so much public attl.
tion, it is inlteresting to read some of .the
statistics bearing on the subject. Accord.
ing to the United States GCeological Survey,
the following are the figures foraccidents,
fatal and non-fatal, in 18 states Acid ter
ritorics during 19or.
The total number of lives lIst in these If
states and territories was .1,467, and. th
number of accidents was 3,643. The total
number of tons of coal mined for ieach'liie
lost varied from 425,094 in. Maryland' to
49.424 in Indian territory. The average
number of tons mined for each of the 1,167
lives lost was J88,668.
In Pennsylvania the mining of anthracite
coal was twice as fatal as the miing of
bituminious coal. In the anthracite mines
131,524 tons of coal cost one life. The
total number of men killed in these mines
during the year 1go1 was 513. In the same
period 1,2'43 mreln were injured, 227 wives
were made widows, and 624 children were
left fatherless. The anthracite fiords.01.
Pennsylvania furnished a larger nutnlie
of killings than any other fields in the
United States. The next highest reco'd
was that of West Virginia, where 734 men
were killed. Coal mining is from its very
nature a dangerous occupation. How it
compares with other dangerous employ
ments we do not know. It is to be hoped
that the investigations of the present com.
mission, appointed by President Roosevelt,
will throw some, light on the general
hygienic features of the miner's life and
surroundings.
The mining of anthracite coal seems to
be more dangerous than the mining of the
bituminous variety. T'his may be due
partly to the depths of the mines and other
peculiarities of the work. The state lawus
regulating mining are supposed to be well
conceived and well executed.
Shall We Ever Get It?
BY ABBSOCIATED PRESS,.
Washington, Dec. 19.-Confirmation of
the Panama canal treaty with Colombig
has again been moved into the futut1,
and it is now said that no treaty can be
expected before Christmsas, and probably
not until the beginning of next year.
to complain, yet 'we re poor andl just hc
ginning."
St. Joseph's church was built this ycar.
the first mass being held July ij. 'Il'n
parish is sirmall as yet. Jlust what tiic
thieves expectedl to Ido with the sac;red
vessels taken fromn thr churrlch rcannt bIe
imaginld. It will Ie exce ldingly dillitult
for them to realize money ont the articles,
CZAR OF RUSSIA.
AFTER LAIRONES IN
PROVINCE OF RIZAL
ASIATIC FLEET IS ASSEMBLING FOR
THE MANEUVERb SHOR rLY TO
BE HLLD OVER I HLIL.
15, ,. . o, IA llI0 1" 1i,
M a:nifa, I)Jh.. Iu. In lw r ,1 tilt et I :*
droInes ill Rizal ItreVi nlc' Is Plr( ', p ro(1. ,. A
large force .if 'cow tabll lary I as it Ihth IitII
ad lthel Manila Pill. ;ar cto opa ;ntig
tith.it. 'they have c t(da lned tIl north
thmou nd 'y of tlle city to prevwue tlit Ialt
i ts aioni entei ring.
lic LUnited Sitales Astialit i fetl is as
s~i blinlg for lthe evalutio s wi li. w II ;lrl. toi
tnnell nlll ' e tomorror w ;aild nlltinllllll r l a
'lrtnighi t. 'rhey will cini',tt largiely iI
Iatlini t;actics amid the seitue.l , hIrtifyini
alt stijd yin . oi f a nIaval base ril the \%estl
cqitaLt of Luzon, near Saublg.
The balttllcthip lKetuciky is hire anil tiih
OregllOn is expected daily.
BLINDING SNOW IMPEDES
ALL RAILROAD TP,.FFIC
Union Pacific Has to Throw Out Its
Plows Down in Wyoming--Falling
Ceaselessly for Hours Now.
IlV ANsi)iiIAI Vii ll' ISS,
Cheyennie, \Vyo.. Dec. It,. -All last fnight
and today at heavy snllow has lIbeen fallinlg,
accompanied by a wiind which llnakes the
storm a veritable blizzard, naid it is ex
pected that sheep anld cattle will Iate
rially suffer.
Up to io o'clock today aight inclihes
more of sniow had fallen, which, tpiled up
on that which was already onl the groutnd,
completely shut off all grazinig.
The storm extends over a largeI extent
of territory and will undoubtedly dio tmuch
dam age.
The IUnion Pacific early this mlornling
threw all of its snowplows oit the road
to "buck" the big drifts, but the damlp
snow is packing hard.
A prolonged blockade is nrot improbable,
in Cheyenne it is impossible to see 300
feet through the white mass of snow
flakes.
To Reduce Duties.
BY ASSOCIAaTED PRIEGSS
Washington, Dec. ag.-Minister Hart
at Bogota has cabled the state department
that a recent government decree provides
for a progressive reduction of ao per cent
monthly in the export duties of Colombia,
beginning January I, 9goj,
for suspicion would iat once be rorused if
they were olTered for sale.
The gold ust.rloritm1 wihic'h they left
behind was purchaIed I)by the ladie of
the parish, with money raised by their own
efforts - east urnetlhing over $too. The
goltd "- e was also of more v\alue thn;ll
some E he artlilre talkrn. ntl tlhe only
Clbo ium.
reason they wm cr' Iiot i n Clld'. l in th I t
of tri e r hers is that the vI.w;i lt %y
frightened away.
RAILWAY MEN ARE
READY TO COME IN
SAID MEMBERSHIP OF THE AMERI
CAN LABOR UNION WILL SOON
BE GRFATLY AUGMENTED.
In tll I, i.I. , illy th, t ,in b 11,r hipl, ,
lh, i A sv, i ll labr lit ,it w ill 2 ,, i it
. itt l i' hiv Ii: i' Ih( ;i 1111,111 tI 1. , i ll lilt
CtPaus111es WIbca y h11 e o bl an s 111 111"a H l li
I ahu h 1 . ,l ,, I',tla:r y o ,ll,l,,'..y , 11111. l
h lity . by i I, itl I nllw ' I '! ,11i1 lll, I .'
be ingt it 11111,, 1,.1. \1 h11 " i t ,1111 11 ,11: 111 ow /
inlg (f 1 )11" l( thh111. h ,11 it 11 . . 1 L.,, 11[. 1,I It
,11a .( i llh" t 1 1 i, ll ; iii fil, . ''. 1 I )i l
'Rl6po ll' so 1. l I ,,1 ,,1 . II \I1111 I l
l.:;bor 1 l l1H ll I, h, 11 ':,i 1, ,,,*i?, i nlilh .ut.
11111 the ll Vl. " I v1' uaI11. g .111111h 111ll .lrl ,1'
In goý1 ;siI thai;t Iill y Ilit,' i,,uill., 111 thl
w lhrJI,' ,hilb 11 lh, Ih I,,thi t'h,,rl M ill I,1, :i
(iul. lll ; l lll) , ,.I III 11 "1 pl1. :ll Il.'i'l i '11 mi'l
-anllli/;li nll , It is ;1l1h1 m eetl llvli I\ l telr h ,
1 11li a.1 1Ih l I t1.' \ :; 11I l l ,i11 "'l l1 1111".11 Ih IIIe pr l,
huvin, l elm rri, I f ..l ,h l of, I ll at
IIlia t' · wihll Jil' le .\II , ri s I 11 I5 ' IU , I ti,11
I.( i I w ill l il h k ,r hi 1 11
DEFECT IN THE INDICTMENT
Causes Relcase of an Indian Held IUpon
a Charge of Larc.liy.
-l" m sl , l ri iII . 1 5i ' 1 1 1,i 1 ; i `.i'1'..
I1.h(.lnia, IrLct". ,t". 11 11(.I l1i-. ,1 1't;lalll':nl;
hin li;n, r .li l ly im11li li ,iIon Ih1 , h ar1,. ,f
iil a.lly, l"t il;y v.;i, ,li l.h1ta . 1 o.l l IlIIn, 11,n -
Iw a ly h 1y lh, I'ilihn . I lill.. i,,lii 11(.i: iil· l.
STABBED TO DEATH
BY A MAN OUT
OF WORK
John W. Barriger, Promil
nent Railway Man, Falls by
Hand of an Engineer.
MURDERER TOOK POISON
SOON AFTER HIS ARREST
Refuses to Say Anything About the Affair
-Victims Lived but Thirty Mirnutes
and Was Unable to Speak-Barriger
Was Son of a Prominent Army Officer
and Has a Brother Now in tie Army,
Serving in the Philippines.
It\ ,..i4, 1 1A11 Iii I tVq
St. I.ouir , Ihe.. o ,u \\. Iln r, i. iger,
Ir., reiidint iig relrt r io thII, Sr. I dlcii ,
Mcmphi ari d t Sn thilIt e.ih ii I 1.lil%.iy at
t'liarivillh, Mlo., w ,as ,,I.i cc,dI to 111,1 th by
'Titro t.pscbl. M tintc n .cc 1 untimiiluo.YeI c vil
i'ngiliir r.
Miolrlotl, ,hlic tly Qft'r hi, ioi,.it, "i.a
fe told to he . Mltler ig frTll hicIhlciii,. cof
Iimerciury po()irrcllillg. ;n1l eaI ll tlkeIIn I. hlI
city dispensary for trr.nitie ,
Ilis recovery is do, htful. htl,,cin has,
refusedl tIo ml;ln anl y Imitivir Ioi 111 kill.
ing. T'lhe victim. h1141 liv.r l I11t ;l, 11tn
ites ifter the ,iathingi , . .c.s cui lih, to
speak, except inllherently.
Iltlrriger, whoIe agi ;.i . ,. .i1 oi
in a prominenlr t ar iii)y i I. Ic, rc iti tlhe
c:i t, and olllil f is b Iroilheri ,o is .tln
ollirer in the I'lhlippin e,.
MICHIGAN MAY BE
BARRED TO BOXERS
GOVLRNOR DLCLARES YOUNG c;OR
UL.TT AND M'GOVI RN MAY NO I
FIGHT IN bTATE LIMIT '.
IY A:, 4II t1lIti I'i'
l.atising, Mich, I), . Icl c ic c lc r
Illis, will not Ip.ln il tlhe ,.lc i,,t\ i 1 or
Irclt fight, whi h r t;as to he hric l lc Ic)e
tra it n ex t lrim lh . I1 l m ote ll t1, . ell r
n "n to) S.herill li ilc<, ln f %,I 111cn c inlty',
calIlinig his aitnli c i i tIe law uini theiil
cbcljcvt, and telling him thud hle cils lte
him to s iee t'tl the fight . I , not her1 ict
1)el,,iI. In the letter th.e overnor calls
CHAMPION "YOUNG GORBLTT."
:1 1111 ;irrg iii it St" witliia 1,fli ti l, ;IIv.I lIelll
him M at if be. n, 1",I', at;I1itI1 II: I 111 Ill ctllit
thely 1);1 1 it will lic {;iv llil1 T cl'II him. lY
IsIl is , gist i11. Miat, 1111;1 i, I \ i 111;y
ii 't ' aur tli( thIi; Iv 11ii. w i)ll il' t i iv asc
wiV 'll ;I gum i I h1' Lightil IIII.(.L ;u miryp
ENGLISH HAVE SENT REPLY
Expected That Some Arrangements Will Be Made to Submit Ven
ezuelan Matter to Arbitration--Germany's Answer Is Ready and
Will Be Sent to Us in a Few Days.
|IY A,5-.' IA l ! i I'I ,+,
London, 1)ec. I(..-- (Great r t rht;i has
.et a reply to the I'nited S.tate, in regard
to thie uiggetliion that the \V'icIi zuelan
Ilnestion should he subllitted tI arbitra.
tion. The tenor of Ithe reply, it is ex
piectedl here, will tenil to biring about so.le
arrangements for a satisfactory ,solution
while thoroughly safeguardingt h i e tlltelr
ests of the Ipowers conicerned.
The note to Reuter's telegram, aitlltioutic
ing that Great Britain had sent a reply to
the United States, says: "'The :,lttcuatiLs
issuing from Caracas to the ell'cct that
President Castro has empowered Minfs
ter Bowen to act as the represenltative of
Venezuela are regardled in Lon(don as
oplen to question. Any such action on the
part of President Castro would bie consid
ered wholly bIeside the mark. 'lThe powers
concerned will deal solely with the lUnited
States in the matter or arbitration. The
government of Venezuela will not be con.
suited in any form, not even as to the
terms on which arbitration might be ac
ceptable to the powers."
'Have Not Heard of It.
Berlin, Dec. t9,-Germnany's answer to
Venezuela's proposition for arbitration is
ready and will be sent to the United States
government in a day or two. The ollicials
here maintain silence regarding the char
acter of the answer. The foreign officers
have no information to the effect that
President Castro has bestowed on Minis
ter Bowen full power to represent Vene
ztjela in the settlem nctt of the exitting
dilIfit Lt;s, ibut such a slip toward a o0
llltion would be received with pIh asre.
Will We Object?
I. lod in, D)cc. 19.-- In ;t reply aide pub
lic today to a lquestion ill arliamelnt of
(;ilbsonll Bowles, (conservativeI , Irl.niCer
Bialfour says no intiml;tonl has been re
ccivedl from the goverinentei, oJ the I( tied
States that it will object to American ship
ping being interfered with in thee vent of
a blockade of the Venezuelanl coast. I he
objections to the hblckade which it is pro
posed to establish have Ibeen carefully con
sidered. They cannot, hiowever, be alto
g.ther removed as Soimle of thela ;re in
hercnt to that particular class of naval
operations. Mr. liowles asked "whcthecr,
in view of the destruction by the (;ermans
of two gunboats and the consequetnt imn
possibility of holding them as pledges, the
government proposes to continue joint
action with Germany?"
The premier replied in the affirmative,
Hay Is Willing.
Rome, Dec. i9.-Ambassador Meyer vis
ited Foreign Minister I'rinetti at the for
eign office today and communicated to him
a cable message from Secretary Hay say
ing the latter was disposed to consent to
the investment of Minister lIowen with
full powers to settle the Venezuelan con
troversy if agreeable to Gcrmtany, Great
Britain and Italy.

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