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The Butte inter mountain. (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, February 12, 1903, Image 11

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LIPTON WILL FOLLOW LINES OF
THE GREAT AMERICAN WINNER
ST ASSOCIATED PRESs.
London, Feb. sa.-Thomas Lipton, the
btulti-millionaire end yacht builder, was
" visitor in the city today. He called on
the yacht building firm of Stevens & rlur
court, and it is understood came to some
understanding with that firm resarding the
building of a new yacht. It is said on
good authority that the new yacht will
.e modeled along the lines of the Co.
(umbia, the winner of the international
yacht race of t9ot.
Lipton always had a weakness for the
Columbia of that year. and was once
beard to declare that he could carry the
eup back to England if he could own a
yacht modeled after the Columbia.
The great yacht builder and lover of
sports was interviewed this morning by a
representative of the Pall Mall Gazette.
but he refused positively to give out any
thing that would throw light on the na
- e
""U
THE COL UMBIA, WHOSE LINES LIPTON WILL FOLLOWN.
GUY WANTS TO OUST DAVIS
Democratic Candidate for Sheriff of Rosebud County Has
Served a Quo Warranto Notice Upon the
Republican Incumbent.
Forsyth, Feb. 12.-Sheriff Charles Davis,
who has occupied his ottice since the cre
ation of Rosebud county. was today served
with notice by Robert J. tGuy, democratic
candidate for county sheril. at the recent
election, with qlun warranto proceedings
requiring him to show cause by what vir
tue he holds otfice.
At the last election SMr. Guy and J. Z.
Worthaway, the latter thie republican can
didate, were each found by the democratic
board of canvassers to hiave received 300
votes The board then proceeded to ap
point Guy to fill the supposed vacancy. The
attorney general held that in case of a
tie vote the old ofticials held over, and
Sheriff D)avis has been discharging tte
duties of his oftice since that time.
The board thenl met and again ap
pointed Guy. lie has tnot attempted to
gain possession of the otfice since the sec
ond appointment and has now started the
quo warranto proceedings .
GENERAL STAFF BILL IS
ADOPTED IN T'HE HOUSE
Senate Fixes Rank of Certain Officers in
the Army-In the National Con
gross This Day.
Il, 4.Sut t t.rtfal PRI'ES .
i'ashington, Feb. sa.-In the house to
day the conference report on the hill to
create a general tafft in the army was
adopted.
After some further routine business of a
minor character the house went into coin
mittee of the whole and resumned the fur
ther consideration of the sundry civil ap
propriation bill.
'1 he senate went into executive session
today soon after mecting, but some routine
business was transacted.
A bill was passed fixing the rank of cer
tain officers in the anrmy. It provides that
any second lieutenant in the United States
marine corps who may have been appoint
ed a second lieutenant of artillery since
February 2, o191, shall receive credit for
prior service as a lieutenant of volunteers.
Mr. McComnas gave notice that be would
call up the eight-hour bill at the earliest
opportunity, which brought front Mr. Quay
the statement that "until the senator front
Ilarylsnd and those ol~tructionists behind
himn,' consent to the fixing of a day when
a vote can be taken on the statehood bill,
he would oppose any action on the eight
bour bill.
At sa:as o'clock, on motion of Mr. Cul
tonm, the senate went into executive ses
sion.
Immediately after the senate went Into
executive session today Senator Pettus
moved to reconsider the vote by which the
senate yesterday ratified the Alaskan boun
dary treaty. 'Senator Lodge moved to lay
the motion on the table and the latter mo
tion prevailed, 36 to as. There was very
little debate on the motion.
For Swedish Famine Fund.
The Swedes of Butte will hold a meeting
at the council chambers, city hall, Monday
evening at 8 o'clock to take steps for rais
ing s fund for the famine sutterers in bwce
den.
Irish Nationalists Released.
BY ASSOCIATED P'REss.
Dublin, Feb. 3a.--William Dufly, na
tionalist member of parliament for South
Galway, and three others who were im
prisoned under the coercion act were re
leased today.
C. D. Peacok Captured.
aY ASSOCIATED PRiSS.
('hicago, Feb. a.--C. D. Peacock, head
of the jewelry firm of that name, died to
d;)y of pneumonia. Mr. Peacock had re
sil" I in Chicago continuousily for 6a years
snd comes of a long line of jewelers.
Liti
+ f:
ti'
Joseph Z. Nortlaway. the republican
nominee, will at once interplead.
Guy bases his claims on a recount and
states that if the votes of Kirby precinct,
where 5 Butte and Anaconda imports reg
istered. is recounted. he will have a major
ity. The public believes that a recount of
Kirby precinct, where colonization flour
ished, will show almhnost anything necessary
to gan offices for the democratic contest
ants. In this precinct the election board
sent by mail two straight democratic tick
ets which it claimed had not been counted
by the democratic election board. These
two baa.ots were sent inl a separate en
velope front the official count.
Ilow Guy expects these two ballots which
the registry book and poll books show had
been counted will seat him, is a mystery.
If these two ballots are counted it will
show that Kirby cast two more votes than
had been registered in the precinct.
HOTEL ARRIVALS
At the Thornton.
J. M. Hogan, Chicago; B. Kaufman,
New York; Mr. and Mrs. Charles H.
Hanford, F. I.. Walker, Washington, I).
('.; Gcorge Haviland, Missoula; I.. I).
McCall. Chicago: D. R. l.ewellen, Spo
kane; Theodore Nelson, J. E. Mor..c. l)il
lon: E. M. Hand. J. F Itrice, New York;
F. I.. Henley, Chicago: A. R. Katz, New
\ ork ; J. II. Johnston, Missoula ; G.
ilHchstadtcr. Chicago ; F. T. Firth, Den
ver: I.. N. Bowers. Chicago: (. Mc
Carthy, California; W. C. (;reenl. Denver;
Jan. C. Cunningham, Spokane; W. A.
Clark, Virginia City.
At the Finlen.
If. Pulverman, L.ouisville, Ky.: A. I..
Dahler, Helena ; D. Boyle. L.ivingston;
A. McKenzie, Denver; F. (;. Richardson,
II. A. Mass, Great Falls: S. C. Booth,
St. Joe; R. G. Pooper, Helena: C. M.
Brooks, Cedar Rapids: George P. I)ien,
Bozeman ; F. F. Montgomery, Chicago;
T. F. lowery, Great Falls; Albert Jothn
ston, city ; Jamne Mutch, Portland: James
Haggerty, 'an Buren, Ark,; S. W. Mc
Pherson, Great Falls; C. H. Hunter, city;
John Buckley, Benton; W. L. Foley, St.
Paul; Henry Meinner, Jule Semet. city;
John Bodham., New York; W. It. Suthcr
land, Great Falls.
New Paint for British Warships.
[London Chronicle.]
Few more, probably, of the "owners" of
the fleet are aware that the cost of paint
ing each ship amounts to no less than a
thousand pounds. Before the Channel
squadron goes to sea again all the ships
are to be painted French gray, the new
regulation color which has, after much
experiment, been recently adopted for the
Royal navy. The ships of the Mediter
ranean squadron are also to be painted
the new color by April r next. IHitherto
our warships have had black hulls, white
upper-works, and yellow funnels, wfth oc
casionally a red band on the water line.
The new color is obtained by a mixture
of six pounds of white paint with as
ounces of block. A naval writer recently
remarked that there is no such thing as
a naval khaki, save it be like Josenh's
coat of many colors. The militaq author.
ities have lately been painting our guns
in alternate stripes of red, yellow and
blue, and the result is that they are less
distinguishable than if they are patlted
all over with one color. Perhaps we shall
have to paint our battleships with the
same three colors, though, from an artis
tic point of view, such a proceeding
would be deplorable.
London, Feb. .---A;. H. Elmer, the
self-confessed embezsler of $73,ooo from
his employers, Brown, Shipley & Co., the
American bankers. wan today sent teed
to eight montths' i£nsri.osssn~nnt at hard
labor.
ture of his visit to the firm of Stevens &
Hlurcourt. It leaked out later in the day,
however, that Lipton has given orders for
a small model to be built at once, along
the lines of America's winner of the agot
yacht race.
Should Sir Thomas adopt this plan it
will be a radical departure from the plans
he formed after returning to England fro:m
New York last year. It was then supposed
that he would leave the building of his
ney yacht in the hands of the men who had
built yachts for him before. The sport
ing world on this side of the Atlantic is
all agog over Sir Thomas l.ipton's new
plans. It is expected he will give out
something definite for publication within
the next few days.
Bozeman., Feb. .-'l'he wcathcr has
grown cold within the past 48 hours sad it
is now s degrees below zero
PETER MAHER AND
HIS GREAT CAREER
(Continued from Page Fight.)
hut this fellow l'm fighting isn't any man
at all. He's the divil himself in dis
guise."
Fitz Knocked Him Out.
And for a long time Peter claimed that
he had been beaten by a supernatural
agency. It was four years later that he
consented to meet Fitz again and, beitng
that time decently knocked out in a round,
came to the conclusion that Fitz was hu
man, after all.
Butt Peter has fought other grueling bat
tles without a sign of being willing to
quit. The so-round draw that he fought
with (Gu Ruhlin only three years ago was
one of the bloodiest and hardest in ring
history.
Maher's strong point as a boxer lies in
the fact that he is "dangerous" at any
ati ge of the game. lie ihas won several
fights when he seemed on the verge of go
ing out himself. His knocking out of
('hoynski a few years ago is a good ex
ample of this quality. The fight was in
the sixth round. Ikerything was coming
Clhoynski's way. Maher was staggering
arr.'mnd the ring with barely enough
strength left to put up his hands. Choynski,
absolutely untouched, cool, deliberate, was
followiitg him lightly, jabbing hinm down
with sclentific accuracy.
Cut Careers Short.
Then for the hundredth time, perhaps,
Maher wildly let go the right hand "wal
lop" that made him famous. It landed on
Choynaki's chin. Down and out he went
and lay there without a quiver until the
to had becn counted and his seconds came
to carry him to his dressing room.
Of late Peter has been used as a sort of
trier-out of new material. Many a promis
ing career has been cut shorter than it
really might have been by his well-know:l
"wallop."
It is not so long ago that big Joe Ken
nedy fought (;us Ruhlin ao rounds out in
San Francisco and gained the decision. In
a day Kennedy regarded himself as the
coming champon., lie packed his little
idrip and started for the East, where his
histic talents should be recognized, asn l
where the premier heavyweights shouldl go
down before his blows like a line ,f
wooden ten-pins before the ball thrown by
the bowler.
Kennedy Met the Punch.
As a good easy mark for a clever boxer
to start in with, Kennedy picked out Peter
Maher. The arrangements, were made
and in New York the men met in the
ring. For one round Kennedy made
Mailer look like a novice. He jabbed and
hooked him an around the ring. The
friends of Peter looked glum. The Cali
fornia contingent smiled broadly. The bell
clanged again. Kennedy, who had been
lolling in his chair, came to the center
with a swagger. Peter met him. There
was a sudden thud that could be heard out
in the street. Another followed. The
Maher "wallop" had landed again. Kennedy
had struck the floor. The battle was
over.
Maher has always been a popular
fighter. Even now, when a blow on the
jaw that he never would have noticed a
few years ago will put him down and out,
Peter's friends in his home place, German
town, will not believe that anything but an
accident could make himn lose. lie is con
sidered a match for Jeffries himself.
And on his baggage, in big black let.
ters that are a warning to baggage smash
ers, he still carries the lines:
PETER MAILER,
CHAMPION OF IRELAND.
St. Louis Wool.
DY ASSOCIATEDo Pias.
St. Louis, Feb. rt.-Wool, lower; terri
tory and western mediumn, 176911 c; fine,
IJ 01700 c; coarse, sims~%c.
Anzgar College Burns.
Hutchinson, Feb. I.-? VApzgar college
was destroyed by fire, with the library
and all the furniture. Two hundred stu
de,'ts lost all their belongings. The btuild
.i was insured for $Jo,uoo.
LIVESTOCK QUOTATIONS
MY ASIOCIATEOD lLRe,
Chicago, Feb. sa.-Cattle-Recelpti,
8,ooo head; market strong; good to prime
steers. $4.4o005.0; poor to medium, $3.o0
$4.25; stockers and feeders, [email protected];
cows and heifers, [email protected]; canners,
a."1o,4.so; bulls. ,1.4o02.5o; calves,
r2 .t(s4.~ a : Texas steers, [email protected];
bull. $.1,ott4.as.
lngs--tfeceipts ttoday, J.500o head; to
morrow (esttiated). .,ooo head; left
over i i,ooo head; m.arkrt opetned 5(l Loc
lower; mixed and butchers, $6.6ut17.ou;
good to choice heavy. $6.8ot0t 7.13; rough
heavv. $6.tot6b.No; light, $6.Jo'6.53 ;
bulk of sales, $6.50o 6.75.
Sherp-Receipts, tio,nn.o head: mlarket
steadly to strong; good to choice wether.,
$4,.±1.So.50 fair to choice lixed. $.t.so
4.: 3; yearlings, $4.7(iS 5.50; Western
sheeji, $4.5otp6.5o; Western luambs, $475
Kansas City Livestock.
flY A..Otl.ilEtU IRIIS,
Ka.nsas City, Feb. IJ.--t'attle-Receipts,
4,0,0 head itclutling 400 Texans. Market,
steady. Native steers. $J.75t'Sr.a; lr xas
snd Indian steers. $J.75T 4.lo; lexas
cows. $S.4ou'a.ono: native cows and heifers.
$1.5u'4,oo; stickers alid heeders, $2.7541'
MILLIONS OF TONS OF CEREALS.
Development of American Agriculture
Without Parallel.
Thet story of .Americati agricutltuttre, says
Josi.ah Strong in Success, has been the
story of our growth il I,,ppulattil audtl of
the erxtesttiott of our national idomaitn a
reeorl without a parallel itt the history of
the world. A Ch('itcan mant once said that
he JA.ul lied a great l;lany timeslt' aboutl the
graowth of his citvy. but I'ovidenice haIl at
ways quickly come to Its relief. It woitl
take a gifted liar to ,overt..t thle thgrowth
of iilr agrtutlttilte or exaggerate tlilt' Itar
vel 0,f its present tproporthons. The dil,
cultl , to prod imigr.ltihil to any aprt
cialinit of thle simple fact,.
I Stile Sait alrealy oietupis. the first
rank .t.imlo g the faiitert ii tihe woril ill
the I.:i.iittu e anl value of his c'l1ps. Al.
thou,.h his aiGmnily lutist llites only ono
twt ritt ~lt f the human r;tC., lie prodlitr~ s
nlehv ilne tlhird of the worhtl's food tuip
ply. while Itilssia., whillch omttes nlt, s a
foil pr.liur., h;iIas~ t .( liltlh f the
*orhl ' p1pulhtion 811l tnpplie, less than
ar tIht of its fonld. ompare our whelt
crop ,r inn with that of the other lead
ing hliat toutlltrits of tile worldt
t ,entry. t,,he 'l..
U i I ate ...........l. . . 5."... t. ,ton
H.l·u. ill iltlira e........... ...... 2.lll,ot
ral ........ ....... ... .. ). ttn ti.o0
Iritlish India ................. 1!2,5d.gns .o,
(G ernfilny .......................... t. I ,Iot o
lu ua..ry .................... 0....1...l.1,it ti
Ita111' .....................1.. I ii,7iuuuiu
ý sI;tIt ...... ................ InS, o, t., lon
A rt'. llt Ill" . .................. I o ,tlltitoo
(ire-; t lirilain ................ 5s .t.t.t, li
'lht, export inol official) estunatn of our
whetat crotp for the Iast year is 7-l.l5o.,uo
bushelis, andl tll ' saime authority places tour
ctorll crop lit 2.5 ,il.ti5 .,on ushelrl, which
equalsl; the outpIlt of I wheat for the etitit,'
world in u)ot.
\\e are todl by goverrtntnenlt authority
that our crop of cereals for a single )year
s ooo90.000.000 tolls. Let us try to get hoth
of these figures so that they will mean
something to us. Hlow long a train of
cars would he requircd to ship this crop,
allowiing 40 feet ,ltside tneaosrelmenlt to
each car and to tons of grain to each?
If we had a double track belting the
globe at the equator, these cars loaded with
our grain crop for a single year would fill
both tracks solid, and then enough would
be sidetracked to reach fromt New York to
Satin Francisco six tillaes.
rthe Rev. J. J. Adams of Hochester, N.
Y., has issued an appeal that dellominai
tions unite in btuiling at church as a
tribute to tile famou;llll anlti slavery agita
tor, Frederick Douglas.
I r. T. G. Simpson of West Fairlee, Vt.,
ownll the mutlsket from which was, firedi
the first shot at the battle of hunker Iill.
It belonged to his grand- father, Major
Jolihn Sitpspn.
On a London 'Bus.
I .onllon ( hronicle.I
()n Saturd lay anl omniuls .was plunging
through l.ondon froum Putnley to Liver
pool street. Just behind the driver sat a
couple. The young womanll knew nothing
of I.ondon; the young malI knew little.
And the young woman wanted to know
everything. She ascertainedl that the
Brompton, oratory was St. laul's rnathe
dral, that St. George's hIospiltal was Iluck
inghatm palace, and collected a lot of
curious misinformuation abot the Ilotel
Cecil, which had changed places with the
Law courts. The driver fidgeted, and
nearly lost his way. As they cam;e up
l.udulate hill, the young woman catught
sight of the statue of Qutlet Allne. "Now,
who is that?" she demanlded. The young
mait hesitated. Hut the driver could coi'
tain himself no longer. "l)ou't lose 'cart,
guv'y nr." l he said over his shr)ntll',r,
"don't lose 'cart." Say it's Macie ILlo."
SOMETHING FOR NOTHING.
Ruses Employed by People t o Be
Thought What They Are Not.
I From the Mexican Herald.]
Thle lesire is a;lmo.st universal. Whole
crowds of people of all class'es are trying,
the world over, to get something for n1ot1h
ing, iand they carry the art of deadl beating
to an almost a1(mniruable, ieven if sinister,
perfection. 'lake te t , people in this city
who go constiantly to church (anld part with
very few centavos in the whole roulnd year
for the support of the reveretnd clergy.
Salvation as a free-lunch counter suits
these people perfectly. No wonder half
the clergy are poorly fed anl poorly
lodged. People who think otherwise would
do well to investigate.
There are people who arc striving to
get public approbation for their limnguistic
talents, who stammer a few phrases of a
foreign tongue and are, when cornered,
sure to say, "But I am so out of practice,
you know I" There is also the literary
Sgetnius" who never wrote anything anyone
q'wou.t read, and who never dips into a
book of any solid merit. A volume of
familiar quotations is his stock in trade.
In New York the big hotels suffer from
the stationery thieves who boldly walk into
their writing rooms and "wait their chance
to stuff their pockets with the gilt stamnped
letter paper and envelopes of the hotel."
This paper they take to their cheap lodg
ings, and so we, down here in Mexico, are
amazed to find that De Smythkins is stay
ing at the Waldorf-Astoria, while he has
never been able to pay us the tenter he
owes us, since heaven knows when. )e
Smythkins is trying to get the reputation
of a swell when he travels, sans paying
hotel -bills.
The opening of a new year is a good
tiue to watch out sharp for these gentry I
ST*rn them down, and turn then down
hardi What tales our tailors might unfold
of the butterflies of Plateros and San
Francisco who wear fine raiment, but for
bear to pay! They are trying to get the
'something' of fashionable reputation for
nothing.
HUNTER'S DEAREST TROPHY.
[Icangor Commercial.]
A big black bear is the trophy that all
sl)ortsllie who have been in the woods
are after. Shooting deer is all right, and
a moose, of eourse, is a spert'ent.'a anut
4.25; buns, $J.4o0a 3.5e; calves, $..40o1
6.00; Western steers, $S.756jS.oo; West
ern cows, $m.llo{a.9o.
Hogs-R-eceipts 7,ooo beau. Market,
weak to se lower. Bulk of sales, $6.74
6.85: teavy, [email protected]: packers, $6.65(ai
6.77;a ; medium, $6.7o0g6.nt'J ; igmt. $St.4o
4(6.75; Yorkes, $6.65(j6.75; pigs, $5.57'5
(1c6.10.
Slheep --teceipts . noo head. Market,
hirher. Ml.tons. $.1 .ottS.o n: lamhis, $.t .o
116.15; range wettllerr. $t.ootg'4..5; ewes,
$.t.ooti'4.91.
Omaha Livestock.
I1Y At.t I ( Ol lD PRI ISA
Scoulth O()maha, Ft'h. 1 .-t'atlle-H-"e
cript., ...5oo head. Ma1rket active and
strolnger. 'Native steers, $.t.Sc4,5.;': rcow
ndl heifers. $.;.vt1.;s5: canners, $1.7;515
2.640; stockers andl feeders, $.;.( c 4.1 :
calves, $,t.JS( c.. 15 ; hulls, stags., tc. , $Sa..
llog Receiputa. i n... l( head. Market
6.75: light, $(.SuCal6.7 : pigs. $5.75.4.50;
b,".. of sales Al $6.700c'i.75.
Sheep--Receipt.s.e.40c head. Market
steauy. FeIl Icuttnlts, $=.1.5i1 5.5: weth
ers. $ : 9nlrS :; cwtws. coa1r t ; enns
m11n11 and stoc'kers, $1.75gc I1.5; lIunml , .1.75i
hitimie until hlie gets min': then Ihe 1ut
Iive.' Iahear. It sunilldil s. c II111. Ii d1ege.l.
on kinow, to say thi.tL you hIav. kille.l a
ear. llrars are snpposrcl e, tie "i'ry lianI
ttrrul,* i ntilI otlly shot afler h.ae to, h ,rIl
delllat. . la;rge nutmber of hears halve
conse down tmrul the woods i o far thes
ftll. id ii ei'icii'. I'. i i t.eeeec w Iee lherr
fall, and it seri-iis . if M1,1.1 le Ihalll were.
either very plentiful of t,. Ir.h.llv r1ice,'s...
lanltels furom l t tihe statl,. e,,r' .ntilt.
like Ito get a hear. wev 'ttorie' , It ihow
the p ut,' ar ite' h t ,'i novel I.4 p..v.'edI
'out l t the' w. y, a- ;C f i'aellllh with ylleig
dore lint Will w.0ti eln l .e it II i cu' hglit to cmv
or it ,cii' think., the vth .ieung one,' . e' i
dlange r. Ihin1 sitlckll Jgl 1i n ,i ..c , 1(,4- a)
imn11.1, lio th1.ILt i .Li ter'. lih:er h nle l.ing. hIlcs
V.ir', is 0o1ct ol c ll II'petcrIi c .4 1 ' I lIL,' 'mie rt.
Iel tcII e1In Lu ke.e il t I I i1.,. I e. kill'ing
niiiiItI 0 ,.l Is fit Ii ' 1 el'1y I lnn inn"1 , 1, . a.
slle in the I wood, : h1, . hiullc.t hii111i l tu.e
he cauln .1.1 slawatl I ltnt ,.10"". are il0 ntI
,11c'd in 1 nltinli h ;ii.., \\ H ' l, ihe Jul.,
ly their hlll.ukl Iee: 1hel s e lcd ' h 1c u .e ke.e p111k i
the bigK. wI' 1r'te cl c'II ile ' 1 n1111 hlc l . i i' , .
to ta.ke' a ge. n I a I11 e. dn'e'c n...li
nei kc' eoeunt. I e') .e- ,'.c,,e.letcn ', 1 ,c hI,l
I c' 11 i ugly whei'n lhis 1 ic .nher. bii t d-0 nI ,
.. I,Ie ln i ch ichance' ;:.ll'.t 1ic.1c ol ellret'
l'larltie'lc y eII ll '. e ' . w Ihie are 'hl t Ie
cpc t.o'dee'i 1ne' lcrccuc'let ceect 401 thic. Cici Is
tni , ilher n el t l el, i vw houlri ll n. into
rc ,. Ie .'.I , ,flc e c . i h. i p;. iIiale 1c 11 '
4 i cci. c41 cc '.cie'r le cllt' cit l
law in hai. . .ic.1l ccv l,- ,l..h t, ill.qcc l I icc
kill l 41 ;llyc ,oth.r w.,% ,l, .hat ev. I lh, mv t0av
ce' 1-c1n11. h\\ ihen vcI .1 lc. 0 l enCec,. dcwi0
fIroit ip 1c r the inl, ll, .r , iii ;,alttcc h
61OOi. at thb" \\W '. ternl0 ,hpl I'-l',hr ol,, he
eha a lher or no.se.' ;lcng lhat lhie' his. t)
ideh'ntify, After ,rcng u l e will ale c.i.
ask if it i, n.eei' ..ary for him Ic p.,i e
propel.rty in ret.rd to the hea'r, inIil hie
scncil ,. lrcnlly cc. the crowil. w:il. h , e
always gahe.re,'d r'iou111cd the' woardcen. If
the blear is all lthe g:ae he haI , w'h. hl'
will make ia big noisre aeboiuet inoit hbei:; ,Ile.
to hind the warden so al to. identity he.
hear, for, of leclirse, hil Wallit to hie '.1i
tichat thie lov. ar isn'lt .cer' cd. Ih, w cilc.hl. i
have that hlappen folr an ything. tilh. ilc.
Neor wocll lie have the crowdcl rrincain ie
niorint of the fact that le has got a l.ir.
The Supply of Timber.
Thre scientijfic ic.In are a:lwa0.'s ci.,tiibuln
ting Io our anxieties'.. This win'cter'' c
peticence has given peoplle a suap |erit.,4ste
of 4the cefldilionl, to he when the c:el l'p
ply is exlhau,.ted, ailnd the 'expert have
deuee s.eonee figuring oni the late w.henl
ehlnaustion will come. In thbe pr'.e',nl lack
of ceoal thoeust4iil, havee r.esct.edl the m, .I
wood. mrnfesic.r lernow of ('oreell uni
versity now te'll,. cs that the timber csepply
of the tland will ble usrl ulp lcng Itwfore the
coal can be. Indeed. hle allowe but tI
years kslcrer for the 'coutcry to have ai
supply that will ,ree' tihe de'ian: cl. l'nssi
bly, hlie says, lhe suietitutioin of other mate
rial for wcul inc many cases maay give the
forests a little lunger life'. ibut not for IlnanitlY
years. Wha-t is to Ile done ? lie r.ecorn
mends that no tcime fie I.st in taking cle'.,
to replace Ihe .forest,' and i the I.';m'anellne
tbe would have the dcities on every kitd of
timber removeed in order to draw as enuech
as possible fronm other countries while our
own isU growing. Ilirein is a suggetagtioun
to the plidentl farnmer. I)o not esacr'itwee
the wood lot, but cheris.h it anid start new
l -t atlioen .•
WE ISSUE
Special
Advices
Daily
200 Page
Quotation Record
FREE UPON
APPLICATION
Both Are Indispensable to Active
TradrrL
Clarke, Wallace & Co.
BANKERS AND BROKERS
60 State Street, BOSTON. MASS.
47 lreadway. - NEW YONK
"It Interested In Prolits, write us."
POGSON, PELOUBET & CO.
PublicAccountants
New York - n roead street
Chicago * Mrquotte .lidhlg
St. Louis C- hemlonl SlMin
Butte flennessy Suliding
YELLEK DOCTORS
n .re All hrolic DOleases of
M soa d iWeAme
N. E Corner Breadway and
Ment-a.A ede,
The Daly Bank and Trust
Company of Anaconda
Anaoonda, MoMtana.
General banillng . all hbanches.
Sell exchanges on New1 Yorkg Cbl
Caoe, St. Paul, Omaha, San 1rAll'
isco, etc.., and draw direct on the
principal cities of England, France,
Ireland, (Germany and the Orient.
l)rposits oa $1.oo and upwarl4 ro
ceived.
Corresponents
National City bat t, New York;
First Nati'onal ban', Chicago; First
National bank, St. Paul; Omaba
National bank, Omuaha; Lun!i of
California, San Francisco.
John R. Tonle, President; NM. B.
Greenwood, Vice President; Louis
V. Beanett, (',,shter; F. C. Nor.
I.eck, Assistant Cashier.
DALY
BANK AND TRUST
COMPANY
Olr BVTTE
EstablishseJ sr58. Incorporated igot.
Capielal...$100.000.O0
Genoral
Banking Business
JO( N .. R.AN ......... President
)l IN It. I'u T)I .. Vice Pseautlett
t. (. SH INI(IINF. ........ ('ashier
H. A. KUNL..:.. .. Assistar.nt iLtalier
STATE SAVINGS BANK
Inhn A. Creightn t......... Prevident
(;. W . S'.illrtn ......Vice lresil.nt
T . I1n i.. us ........... d. l .1 r
I· O. I ild.en ......1 .sistatnt Cash,,r
It. lr. ull, ..Alk ,.r. .,i.lnt.t l ta.lwr
I'nder state *lperr.isiIon nnl join
dictin,. litter, st p i.l dllEposit.
Sills i ihtiig avt..i lie l gig till iii'
p ilncipal c tas u i,,t Unitel St it"i
and I" u ope. (ull-i ioun prain th at
ele t .rir ,. ir;lis.l t .a g. c.I e lii , .
in. ha niteos
I )i t fiii s: I A A. i'tightiln, Omfl ha;
(; W . St.a.lrt,.t, A II. It*rrrt, I. 1).
lievitt, S. V i.Kemper, ', M. I. lldg
e.s. J. 0. Iasli 'lyens.
Curitr Main and PaIsk Streets, Iltutte.
Butte. Mornt.
Capital ......... $so, oooo,.
Untlder slate snperviinn. Five per
cent int'rcst,. Ilpjalle quJrterlr, paid
on deposits.
Money to Loan on
Real Estate
F. AtIG. IIFINZI. .......... President
A. N. tlcments ...............Cashier
N. A. Clark. J. Ross C:ark.
W. A. CLARK & BRO.
BANKERS
Transacts General Banking Business.
luy soldl dust, gold bars, ailh er bul.
lion and local securities.
Doses for rent in safe deposit vault.
Sell eacLange available in all of the
principal cities to the Uni.ed States
and Europe.
Special attention given to collec.
tions.
ALLX J. JOINSTON,
Cashier.
The First National Bank
Of Butte
(Established a187.)
Capital * * $200,000.00
(iENERAL BANKING
Drafts drawn on aM principal cities
of the world and letters of credit is.
sued.
ANDREW J. DAVIS......President
JAMES A TALWOTT--Vice Pres.
& B. WRIRICK.............Cashler
J. S. DUTTON....Aassstant Cashler
C. R. Leonard, Pres. T. R. Hinds, V. P ,re
Fayette Harrinlton, Cashier.
Silver Bew National Bank
CAPITAL. 1100,000.0
This bank solicits accounts, ofers
prompt and careful attention to business of
customers. Collections promptly attended
to and remitted for on day of collections.
Sell frosiga and domestle exchange, trams
act a general banking business, pay late.
eot on time deposits.
Directors-Charles R. Leonard, F. Aug.
Heinse, S. Marchesaeau, A. Balmfrth, M.
A. Louis, C. W. Newton, T. R. Hinde
John MaeGinnisl slyette Harringtoe.
Al Lide ed Coat sad Wood.
t CItu'.
No t.;sleesr.o'.

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